Pool Etiquette

by admin on May 23, 2013

Earlier today, I went to the swimming pool. This pool is part of a rather stuffy country club but I’ve never had any problems with their rules throughout my membership.

When I got to the pool, it had been divided into 3 sections: two single lanes side by side and one big area where an exercise class was taking place. One of the single lanes was occupied by a woman swimming up and down, as one does; the other lane was empty. I got into the empty lane and began swimming.

After a few slow warm-up lengths, I wanted to do some sprints. My favourite stroke is back crawl as I used to swim it for my school’s team. When one gets to the end of a length in this stroke, there are two options if you want to continue swimming. You can stop and turn yourself around, which many people do, but this process is slow.

In races, the tumble turn is preferred. For this, a back crawler gets very close to the wall and switches for one stroke onto their front. Then they roll forwards so that their feet touch the wall and then they push off and begin the back crawl again. This is the method I prefer and when performed correctly, there is minimal or no splashing.

Only one end of the pool was deep enough to do this turn so I would only sprint two lengths at a time. The lifeguard had no problem with me doing these turns and nobody in the exercise class seemed bothered either, but the woman in the lane next to me was not happy.

While I was resting in the shallow end, she pulled up next to me and told me to “stop mucking about and swim properly.” (I don’t know if mucking about is a phrase that has made it across the pond, but just in case, it means playing/messing around. Almost exclusively used when talking to children). I was quite confused and I replied, “But I am swimming properly.”

“No, you’re playing in the deep end and that is not why we come here.”

“Oh, are you talking about the roll I do at the end of a length? Oh, see, that’s just a way of turning that racers use.”

“Well, you go too fast and nobody’s racing here!”

“Too fast? I wasn’t aware there was a speed limit. And I just like to turn around like that.”

“Well you shouldn’t! You’re flashing your fanny in the air and it’s disgraceful!”

(NB: This move does involve turning upside down so one’s backside does indeed come out of the water briefly – and fanny refers to a lady’s privates in the UK. Obviously, I was wearing a swimming costume, so there was no inappropriate flashing involved.)

“Well, you’re the only one who seems bothered by it, and it’s a perfectly legitimate swimming technique.”

“You’re splashing me when you do it!”

“That’s not possible. The move doesn’t make any splash because it’s mostly underwater.”

“I don’t understand why you’re being so difficult, young lady. You should respect your elders and when they tell you to stop doing something, you stop!”

I am at least 40 years younger than this woman, but I didn’t see why that should make any difference. “Well, I’m sorry you feel that way, but I’m not going to change how I swim just because you don’t like it.”

The woman stalked out of the pool with an extremely sour look on her face. I stayed in the pool 15 minutes longer than I had planned because I didn’t want to run into her in the changing room.

The lifeguard never said anything about my turning being inappropriate and nobody else in the pool was paying any attention to it because all of them were all part of the exercise class.

I really don’t understand why this woman got so annoyed over the way I swam. Was I being difficult, like she said? Should I have modified my swimming?    0517-13

While some of Old Lady’s complaints appear to be manufactured, the key phrase she used was, “You’re splashing me when you do it!”   You yourself admit that the roll over does not create any splash *if performed correctly*.    It is very plausible that your technique wasn’t as good as you thought it was and you actually were splashing her more than you realized.   Old Lady did not articulate her gripes concisely and effectively and you were not amenable to listening to catch any valid point she may have had.

{ 85 comments… read them below or add one }

Kay L May 23, 2013 at 2:53 am

So, she may have been getting splashed. She’s in a swimming pool. And I don’t think its even possible for her to be right near the OP every tme the OP does this move.

When you go swimming , you get wet. It’s jsut a fact of life. She sounds a little entitled to tell other people who are behaving reasonably what they can and cannot do.

If someone was deliberately splashing her, the lifeguard would have put a stop to it. But, getting some water in your face because you are near other people swimming is just part or swimming.

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Nestholder May 23, 2013 at 3:21 am

I think I have to disagree here – the complaint about “you’re splashing me” came at the end of a list of silly complaints, not at the beginning. The older woman did not approach the OP and ask her to stop the splashing, she started out with ‘mucking about’, ‘playing’, ‘going too fast’, and ‘flashing your fanny’ before she could manage to dredge up ‘you’re splashing me’. A weak complaint, because unless the older woman was exactly keeping pace with the younger, the splashing can only have been on the rare times when their lengths coincided.

That was not the key phrase. The older woman did not have a valid complaint at all, because the OP did nothing wrong.

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Marozia May 23, 2013 at 4:14 am

Old lady was being plain crass and vulgar. What she allegedly said was too ‘in-your-face’. Way too aggressive! If the OP was crossing lanes, obstructing anyone in any way possible or being a generalised nuisance, OK people can complain.
In response to ‘You’re splashing me when you do it’, OP should’ve said ‘I’m terribly sorry about that, I’ll be more careful on my turns’, left it at that and then continued swimming or gotten out and spoken to lifeguard. By answering Old Lady, it was just made worse.

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Kitty May 23, 2013 at 4:57 am

It’s a pool. If you don’t want to get wet, stay out of the water. I’m sorry, but the OP’s right to swim properly, and the turn she’s doing IS swimming properly, far outweighs the other lady’s right to not get wet.

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Green123 May 23, 2013 at 5:05 am

<>

It’s A. SWIMMING. POOL. You do not go to a swimming pool if you want to remain dry. Old Lady needs to get over herself.

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Via May 23, 2013 at 5:25 am

My own opinion is that if you are swimming in a swimming pool, there is a certain expectation that you may get a little splashed by accident due to others’ swimming techniques. Even if the woman in question WAS being splashed, I don’t think that’s reason for complaint as long as the letter-writer was not doing on purpose. After all, many other swim strokes (the butterfly, for instance) cause splashing naturally.

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Vicky May 23, 2013 at 5:41 am

I belong to a club with a similar set up – two designated lap lanes. I don’t think you are being difficult. This is a pool and among its purposes is swimming. As long as you are not purposely splashing water in her face, the other woman should just be going about her business and swim in her lane. And the age of the parties involved is irrelevant.

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Kate May 23, 2013 at 6:03 am

OP, how dare you get someone wet in a swimming pool!!

I know what you’re referring to (former competitive swimmer myself) and you would have to be standing right next to the swimmer every time they do a tumble turn in order to get splashed. It’s not like doing a belly flop.

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Lynne May 23, 2013 at 6:04 am

Disagree. I believe that by the time splashing was mentioned, the woman was grasping at straws to give a reason for why the OP should stop, especially given her opening line of complaints, and that her closing argument was, “Well I’m older; listen to me just because.” I’ve met people like this, and they will continue to manufacture wildly disparate reasons for each one that is rebutted.

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PM May 23, 2013 at 6:18 am

Methinks she didn’t like the fact that you were swimming so much faster than she was. Maybe she was previously queen of the lanes before you showed up? :)

I think you were perfectly fine. And you were very polite in how you responded to a ridiculous barrage of “but.. but.. but…this is why I’m right!” tactics from the woman.

My husband stopped swimming laps at our local gym because of the interference from other patrons. If it wasn’t someone swimming in the lane he’d called ahead to reserve* and refusing to get out because “they were there first!”, it was someone hopping into his pre-reserved lane MID-SWIM and wanting to “share” the lane with him (nearly impossible in a narrow lane where two swimmers would collide). At one point, he was in the middle of his swim and bumped into somebody at the end of the lane. He surfaced and found that a group of senior citizens had decided that there wasn’t enough room to stand in the shallow end and talk, so they’d unhooked the lane marker and were standing in a big group at the end of his lane. When he asked them politely to move as he was swimming laps, he was called rude, told that he should respect his elders, and his form wasn’t any good anyway.

The gym staff tried, but failed to enforce the rules. The rude members would just wait til the staff left the pool area and returned to what they were doing. DH had enough and switched to running.

*DH was always careful to call ahead and reserve a lane so he would be sure to have a workout over his lunch break. But the reserved lanes weren’t physically blocked off or anything, so technically people could jump in a reserved lane swim at any time. The polite thing to do, however, when someone says, “Excuse me, I’ve reserved this lane for this time slot,” would be to jump out and swim elsewhere in the pool, not refuse to get out.

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Lo May 23, 2013 at 6:47 am

You didn’t do anything wrong at all and in fact handled this situation perfectly gracefully.

Knowing what fanny means in the UK, I would have been pretty flabberghasted at hearing an older woman accuse me of “flashing” mine while swimming.

I’m respectful of elders to the fault of mindless obsequience sometimes (I was raised fairly strictly compared to many of my peers) so I certainly don’t talk back. But I have to admit that my reaction to all of her statements would have been along the lines are “Are you kidding me? ARE YOU KIDDING ME? Seriously? Seriously? Seriously!?”

You handled this way better than I would have.

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o_gal May 23, 2013 at 6:51 am

Not to rise to any defense of this entitled Special Snowflake, but splashing is an unexpected occurrence and can sometimes startle you. If she’s doing a stroke like crawl/freestyle where you are mostly under water and then come up and turn your head to the side to breathe, then having someone splash you just as you open your mouth is quite jarring. However, in order to get splashed like that, she’d have to be coming up for air right at the end of the lane, and if she’s doing that, she’s likely to get very well aquainted with Mr. Wall.

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Jays May 23, 2013 at 7:28 am

I completely disagree. I used to swim competitively and I know exactly what the OP was talking about. It’s perfectly legitimate turn and doesn’t splash any more than just general swimming (even if you splash a little!)

If you’ve not supposed to swim in a pool … what are you supposed to do?

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Alex May 23, 2013 at 7:35 am

I agree with other commenters. I highly doubt that you were even splashing her, not only because she mentioned it at the end but also because you would have to both be on the same lap at the same time and since you were going too fast I doubt that was the case. I am sorry she was rude to you!

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Anonymous May 23, 2013 at 8:14 am

>>Methinks she didn’t like the fact that you were swimming so much faster than she was. Maybe she was previously queen of the lanes before you showed up? :)<<

That's the impression I got, too. People fight over the stupidest things at fitness-type places. Anyway, OP, you were fine. By the way, on a side note, the rudest thing I ever saw at the swimming pool was when I was swimming lengths, and a group of special needs kids and their caregivers came in, and one boy started mouthing the water in the pool gutter, and then spitting it back out. I asked one of the caregivers to tell him to stop, because "he could get sick from the germy water" (it was cold and flu season), but she just said, "he's autistic, and he likes the water." Jaw, meet floor.

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The Elf May 23, 2013 at 8:14 am

The only valid complaint is the splashing – and even then unless you’re doing cannonballs it just goes along with the nature of being in the pool. I have a feeling Lap Swimmer is just one of those people who likes to gripe.

I don’t see anything you did wrong; I’d just forget it. In the future, it wouldn’t hurt to do a quick check to make sure you’re not immediately next to someone when you do your turn, but other than that you’re good.

I did some lap swimming when I was practicing for my scuba certification. I quickly found that unless I got there right at 5am to grab a lane, it just wasn’t worth the trouble. As soon as I got the cert, I quit going.

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Redneck Gravy May 23, 2013 at 8:19 am

Recently I have been hearing several elderly persons claim the “respect your elders” line…THEY are not always right and quite frankly I am tired of hearing it. I treat EVERYONE with respect and I am from the South, where we are trained to have the utmost respect for our elders. I feel like some of them are acting “entitled” just because they are elderly even when they are wrong and they know it.

This is one of those don’t engage the crazy occasions. At the point OP realized the woman was just being argumentative she probably could have just waved and moved away with the same end result.

Disagree with the response.

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Rap May 23, 2013 at 8:30 am

Sorry, but two people in a swimming lane, there’s going to be some splashing. It is a perfectly legitimite swimming technique, and the only way the other patron would be splashed is if she was at the end of the lane at the exact time the OP was executing the turn… and unless the OP is really horrible at it, its no more splashy than than someone (someone like me for example) slowly and painfully crawlstroking with poor technique.

Its a pool. You’re going to get a little splashing. And sorry but I find “I’m older than you so you shut up and do whatever I want and if you don’t, I’m gonna call you disrespectful” to be one of the rudest things older people say and do at times. Being older does not make you wiser and in this case it was clearly being thrown down as a trump card for somone to get their way.

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L.J. May 23, 2013 at 8:31 am

“Respect your elders” is only said by or about elders who can’t earn respect on their own merits.

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Margo May 23, 2013 at 8:32 am

I agree with PPs. This lady was very ride, and you were fine. The fact that the comment about splashing came so late in her litany of complaints makes me think it wasn’t really this issue.

Even if OP was causing some splashing, she wasn’t rude unless she was deliberately splashing this lady, or using an inappropriate area of the pool (for instance, swimming laps in an areas set aside for an exercise , or small children, or whatever).

And the Old Lady had thee option of adapting her own swimming to ensure she wasn’t right at the end of the pool when Op turned, if the splash bothered her so much

I would be inclined to mention her behavior to a member of staff, so that they are aware of her behavior.

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Lynne May 23, 2013 at 8:36 am

I agree that this complaint was ridiculous and manufactured. If the OP was really behaving inappropriately, the lifeguard definitely would have stepped in.

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AMC May 23, 2013 at 8:47 am

I’m going to call BS on the older lady’s splashing claim because she seems to be making up complaints as she goes. And every time OP shoots down one, she comes back with another. First it’s that she doesn’t like OP “mucking about”, except she isn’t; she’s using a common swimming technique. Then it’s that OP is going too fast, except as OP points out, there’s no speed limit. Then it’s that she’s flashing her fanny, which is covered and not a crime. THEN she complains that OP is splashing her. How can OP take this complaint as legitimate when the three that came before it clearly are not. Maybe the lady doesn’t like sharing the limited space in the pool and made up excuses to justify her anger at OP.

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acr May 23, 2013 at 8:48 am

I have to disagree with the Dame here. If you are swimming, you will occassionally get splashed. The OP wasn’t deliberately driving sheets of water towards the complainer. She was using the pool in the approved manner – to swim.

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Ergala May 23, 2013 at 8:54 am

PM the staff should have asked them to leave instead of “failing”….they are in charge therefore they have the power to make it stop. Easily. Our local pool absolutely did enforce the rules and you were removed if you kept ignoring them.

OP: You were 100% right. I know the turn and all my years of swimming I’ve never been able to do it without the fear of bashing my head. So kudos to you! The older woman was absolutely out of line. If anything she would be getting splashed more with your doing the crawl or back crawl, that can create a HUGE amount of splashing. But it’s a legitimate stroke and she needed to get over herself.

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Barb May 23, 2013 at 8:58 am

my pool experience is in an un-laned pool, where a group of seniors does water exercise a few hours a day. Many come with hair coiffed, jewelry and eyeglasses on, with makeup and perfume!! And they do NOT expect to get splashed. They aren’t able to reserve the pool for their exclusive use although they try to make it seem that way.

I don’t even try to swim laps when they are there.

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Jay May 23, 2013 at 9:03 am

Disagree with admin here.

Even if there was a little splashing, who cares? It’s a pool. The chance that this woman (also swimming laps, at a different speed), was right next to the poster over and over again to somehow get splashed from 5 feet away is basically 0. The other woman was rude to say, well, pretty much any of that, and you were fine.

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momofeveryone May 23, 2013 at 9:06 am

i have been a swimmer and life guard for years, i also coached and taught swimmers. in the US we call that move a ‘flip-turn’ and it can get splashy if your doing it very, very, wrong. a swimmer who does one while doing the backstroke, has to be very good at this move or it wastes time and energy. i doubt op is a bad swimmer.

this was an old a crochety women. she should be ignored. next time you swim op, see if the guards will add a lane so you can be a little further away. most probably know this women and will be happy to help.

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Jewel May 23, 2013 at 9:11 am

Loved how you pushed firmly back against her entitled attitude. In my own life, I’ve observed enough of these people to know that her next move is probably to see if there are any philanthropic committees you are on in which she could use her influence to get you removed or if you/husband are in a business that she could negatively affect in some way through her/her husband’s connections. And, don’t be surprised if the club manager pulls you aside during your next visit to “discuss complaints received” about your swimming style.

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Cat May 23, 2013 at 9:19 am

It sounds as if the older person just wanted to be unpleasant to you and, as we say in the States, “Any old stick to beat the dog”, which means, not that one should beat ones dog, but that anything will do at the time.
The notion that, I am older than you so you must agree that I am right in order to show respect to me, has always seemed silly to me. We should always be respectful to everyone. The elderly, the handicapped, and the very young should be offered assistance if it is needed, but agreeing with a falsehood as respect is ridiculous.

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Katie May 23, 2013 at 9:20 am

I think the older lady was jealous of the OP’s swimming technique! I think you’ve inadvertently stolen her thunder, OP ;) You did nothing wrong and she was exceptionally rude.

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Allie May 23, 2013 at 9:26 am

I’m afraid I can’t agree with you today, Admin. I don’t see that the OP did anything wrong. Of course, it’s unfair to characterize all older women as crotchety old gasbags. That’s age discrimination and it’s not right. However, it sounds to me the OP did listen to this woman’s grievance and politely told her “no dice”. I suppose she could have taken the further step of consulting the lifeguard as to whether there was any merit to the complaint. On the flip side, the complainer could have gone to the lifeguard if there was any merit to her complaint. Since she didn’t, that supports my suspicion that in this case, this particular complainer is, in fact, a crotchety old gasbag. Even if she were getting splashed (and hello?! you’re in a pool; if you don’t like getting splashed, that’s not the place to be) she did not approach the problem civilly. I wonder how the OP would have reacted had she said “excuse me, you may not realize this, but when you do your turn in the deep end, you’re creating quite a splash and disturbance. Is there some way you can reduce that?” I suspect that kind of an approach would have garnered quite a different reaction from our poster.

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Betty Edit May 23, 2013 at 9:29 am

I think the older woman was just jealous, pure and simple.

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Allie May 23, 2013 at 9:32 am

Just read through the other comments and I wanted to say, PM, that the gym staff should have asked the offending patrons to leave each and every time they interfered with your husband’s swim. In my area, lane swimmers take precedence over other pool users at designated times, and you DO NOT interfere with a lane swimmer as it is considered not only rude but dangerous to wander into their lane when they’re going full tilt. Anyone doing so is asked to leave and risks being banned from the pool if they continue to offend the rules.

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spartiechic May 23, 2013 at 9:35 am

I disagree with the admin on this one. The older lady sounds like someone who is very entitled and expects to get her way. If you’re swimming in a side-by-side lane, you’re going to get splashed by others because many strokes cause splashing. Most likely, she felt that she should be the only one swimming laps because it’s “her” club. When she’s swimming, no one else better swim next to her, by gosh. I do believe the OP could have handled it better by simply ignoring her from the beginning. “Stop mucking about,” deserves a friendly smile and nod and then continue on with your lap. She’d leave in a huff and you wouldn’t be bothered anymore.

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Daisy May 23, 2013 at 9:35 am

I usually agree with Admin but today I’ll have to differ. As others have already pointed out, the older woman’s complaint about being splashed came at the end of her litany, as she was grasping at straws to justify herself. My grandson swims competitively so I’ve spent many afternoons watching people swim. Getting splashed is pretty much a given if you’re in a swimming pool; getting splashed by the tumble turn is only possible if you are in the next lane at the same time. Even if OP’s tumble turn needed work, where else is she supposed to practice? It’s not the sort of thing you can do in a bath tub. I thought she was quite polite and has nothing to worry about.

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Kim May 23, 2013 at 9:46 am

OP, you did nothing wrong. You see those tumble turns in competitive swimming and there is, indeed, very little splashing. You were swimming for a workout. This woman was a complainer. I’m glad you didn’t give in.

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inNM May 23, 2013 at 9:58 am

(the engineer in me jumped out here) The OP would have had to be swimming at least 3x as fast (and have both of them start in the shallow end) as the older lady to be at the same point in the lane to cause the OP’s splashes to disturb the lady.
I, too, am of the belief that the splashing wasn’t the main complaint. It sounded like the lady has a belief that there is a proper way to swim and the OP wasn’t doing it properly like her. Thus, she was playing the role of the pool police uninvited. Furthermore, the lifeguards are there to prevent horseplay as well as. At the public pool I frequented last year, the lifeguards were very hands on. If you got too rough or too wild in the water, they would haul you out and ban you for the season. If the lady in the next lane had a valid complaint, she should have taken it to the lifeguard.

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Yvaine May 23, 2013 at 10:09 am

Agree with the others–she just grasped at splashing after her other gripes didn’t pan out. OP was probably doing it exactly right.

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Elizabeth May 23, 2013 at 10:25 am

She’s in a pool; getting wet it to be expected. Throwing the age card when not getting her way was just bratty. Ignore her.

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Stepmomster May 23, 2013 at 10:33 am

we had this experience while on vacation. there was a pool FULL of young children, since it was a family resort. The kids were being kids, and splashing each other, shrieking, some cried when they got the water for the first time, every baby wore swim diapers (thank goodness) and there were water noodles, inner tubes, floaties, goggles, balls and 100 children climbing in and out to whine at their parents for snacks and to force their siblings to share.

In short, happy chaos.

I watched this one older lady gingerly lower herself in the pool, and then slide along the wall and stand right at the side, in the thick of a Marco polo game. She then complained loudly when the seekers splashed her or accidentally swam into her looking for their friends, because she refused to move aside, even when she saw them coming.

Some people just like drama.

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Harley Granny May 23, 2013 at 10:47 am

The old woman lost me with “you should respect your elders”.

After a certain age, the elders have to earn my respect and this isn’t the way to do it.

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Pen^3 May 23, 2013 at 10:54 am

The lady mentioned splashing after a long list of other made-up or ridiculous complaints: it was not her main concern. And if it was, it’s a swimming pool. Plus, as a swimmer myself, the splashing caused by even an average backstroke tumble turn is less than that caused by someone swimming along doing the standard front crawl. Is this lady not going to allow people to swim a standard stroke like front crawl either because a few drops of water land on her?

It is an internationally-recognised correct way to swim. As a result, it is neither mucking about, nor can it be termed inappropriate (if it’s okay for people of all ages to watch on television at all times, it’s not inappropriate to anyone of reason). And if seeing one’s backside clad in swimwear is somehow rude and ‘flashing’, then I don’t know how people are supposed to ever get out of the pool! This woman had no valid points to make. Splashing is minimal, and less than other ways of swimming cause even if the tumble is performed poorly. And splashing in a pool, next to a water exercise class of all things, is expected.

I see nothing whatsoever reasonable in the woman’s complaint. Further, the way she complained was rude and patronising. I would think nothing more of the batty old woman. If it occurs again, speak to the lifeguard about harassment.

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Seiryuu May 23, 2013 at 11:00 am

Disagree with Admin. OP was not purposely splashing water on Complaint Woman in a swimming pool, where splashing is to be expected. People’s techniques may vary and from what it sounds like, the OP’s wasn’t bad.

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Kovitlac May 23, 2013 at 11:06 am

I, too, disagree with the Admin. As others have said, her “you’re splashing me!” excuse came at the end of a long list of sad excuses. Also, the OP seems to be capable of performing the maneuver correctly, so I highly doubt there was any huge amount of splashing.

The woman was just in a sour mood that day, it seems. Who knows why. Good on you for not backing down, OP.

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Ashley May 23, 2013 at 11:18 am

If the splashing was excessive and deliberate (like if you were somehow deliberately sweeping big armfuls of water directly at her face), I could understand her being mad. But honestly it sounds like it was minimal as her comments about splashing were at the end of a very long list of other useless complaints. You were in a lap lane, swimming laps. I’ve seen other people just STARTING to learn how to do that turn, and even they produce minimal splash.

Don’t even get me started on the “respect your elders” thing, I’ve had more bad experiences with people trying to pull that card than good….

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Calli Arcale May 23, 2013 at 11:32 am

When I was swimming competitively, we called that a flip turn. Totally normal, and actually *less* disruptive than other turns. Which is actually the whole point; a turn that creates splashing is inefficient. You don’t want to lose any more kinetic energy than necessary. The woman was doing a variation on the Gish Gallop, which is where in a debate a person without a good argument trots out too many references and claims for anybody to possibly verify and refute in the time allotted. It’s usually a good sign that the person’s argument is bankrupt. I disagree that the old lady had any sort of valid complaint. OP had already given her plenty of time to issue a valid complaint, and the woman did not. She simply kept manufacturing new ones because she didn’t like being talked back to.

To PM:
It’s a pity the gym didn’t reserve the lanes properly. That said, it is entirely possible to share lanes without colliding. The main catch is that you need to be going a similar speed, or find a way of overtaking gracefully. When I was a racer, we routinely shared lanes during practices, since otherwise nobody’d get any kind of a workout at all — after all, without lane sharing, a pool cannot accommodate more than six people. And at meets, the two warm-up periods (before the meet, and after the break for the divers) would be open to all swimmers of both teams, which meant lane-sharing aplenty. Imagine seeing fifteen racers all sharing one lane. ;-) It works, if everyone is courteous. That’s the big “if”, though, and it sounds like that probably wouldn’t happen at your hubby’s gym.

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Alex May 23, 2013 at 11:35 am

I have to disagree admin! They were in A POOL! A POOL full of WATER. Where an exercise class is also going on. I have to assume that there is a certain amount of splashing that occurs in a POOL, especially when people are exercising.

The old bat had no right to gripe at the OP. They were all there for the purpose of swimming and exercising. The OP has every right to swim in any way she sees fit to do in her lane. Especially if the lifeguard is not objecting to her swimming technique. The old bat was flailing around for something to gripe about, which is why her complaints were so far ranging. She flailed about verbally until she landed upon something to get the OP to engage in her tirade.

I think the OP gets an ‘atta girl’ for sticking up for herself!

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Barbarian May 23, 2013 at 11:40 am

I am with the OP and PM all the way here. I swim regularly. Designated swim lanes are supposed to accommodate swimmers of all levels-from beginners to the top professionals. As long as you stay in your lane, you should be able to swim laps. I have had people doing walking exercises in lanes beside me complain about splashing and I simply tell them the lane is for swimming. When kids congregate at one end in my lane when I’m using it, I remind them that the gym rules don’t allow them in the swimming lanes and that if they don’t move I will call the lifeguard. They always move. One parent complained to me that her child was just playing there and I pointed to the sign “Children under 12 not allowed in lap pool”. She put on a sour face but had her child get out of the water. After all, there was an ample-sized leisure pool for kids. I think non-swimmers need to stay out of swimming lanes period. If they want to chat, they can do it in the general pool instead of tying up lap lanes people are waiting in line to use.

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SJ May 23, 2013 at 11:47 am

If you swim in lanes, I don’t see how you expect not to get a little splashed.

Also, the “splashing,” sounds like a tagged-on complaint to make her rant seem more legitimate, as opposed to a real problem. The rest of her complaints are just nonsense.

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SJ May 23, 2013 at 11:51 am

AND, when the OP points out that she couldn’t have been splashed, the woman doesn’t explain that yes, she was. She just uses her age to demand she be obeyed.

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