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Wedding Wednesday – A Wedding Haka

This is awesome. Family of groom (and the groom eventually joins in) perform a dramatic Haka at New Zealand Maori wedding, moving the bride to tears before she eventually joined in the performance.

One commenter translated the Haka:
Leader: (What is right is always right!) Everyone: (In – deed! ) Leader: (What is right is always right!) Everyone: (Ah… yes! ) (Be true to yourself, my son!) (My concerns have been raised about you, so pay attention!….) (What is this problem you are carrying?) (How long have you been carrying it for?) (Have you got that? Right, let’s go on.) (So son, although it may be difficult for you ) (and son, although it seems to be unyielding ) (no matter how long you reflect on it ) (the answer to the problem ) (is here inside you.) (Indeed! Indeed! Indeed! Yes, indeed!)?

{ 17 comments }
{ 17 comments… add one }
  • bap October 17, 2018, 8:09 am

    Even though I don’t understand it at all, I don’t have to. It seems to be a traditional blessing of some sort and that alone makes it beautiful. I pray many years of blessings for the couple.

  • Lenore October 17, 2018, 8:22 am

    What a *beautiful* way of bonding the families! The heart and emotion moved me to tears.

  • Lolkay October 17, 2018, 9:52 am

    Honestly this is really beautiful, once you understand the meaning it has to everyone present.

    I almost cried.

  • Michelle October 17, 2018, 10:05 am

    Beautiful.

  • AMC October 17, 2018, 11:36 am

    Brought me to tears too. <3

  • LEMon October 17, 2018, 12:53 pm

    I needed that this morning.

  • rindlrad October 17, 2018, 4:18 pm

    Thank you! What a beautiful video.

  • K October 17, 2018, 7:49 pm

    I’ve seen this a few times before, and I always get teary-eyed when the bride starts tearing up, and at the end, when the groom exchanges “nose bumps” (not sure the proper name- when two people allow the bridges of their noses to touch, in greeting).

    • Disconnected October 19, 2018, 12:54 am

      What you’re referring to is called a hongi.

      • K October 20, 2018, 10:19 am

        Thank you!

  • Wonderer October 17, 2018, 10:25 pm

    This is what weddings are SUPPOSED to be about ! <3

  • Ange October 17, 2018, 11:23 pm

    Just amazing, especially the brief moments flashing on the bridesmaid (I’m assuming) and the bride right there passionately among it. So special.

  • at work October 18, 2018, 6:00 am

    I cannot watch a haka and not overflow with emotion. I always cry — their movements and voices wring it right out of me.

  • shoegal October 19, 2018, 10:53 am

    I’m completely unfamiliar with a Haka. As I understand it to be a nice sentiment and everyone seemed to be overwhelmed with emotion – I don’t understand the intense facial expressions, sticking out their tongues, angry sounding words, hitting of their chests and the guy doing stuff with the stick – it didn’t present itself as a nice thing to me. I thought the bride was crying because they were ruining her wedding, it was only near the end that I understood it to have been a nice thing.

    • Kea October 19, 2018, 11:26 am

      The haka is a traditional Maori posture dance considered to be the dance that celebrates life. Haka are performed to welcome distinguished guests, or to acknowledge great achievements, occasions or funerals. It is frequently mislabeled as a war dance. I love watching The All Blacks do the haka before a rugby game especially when facing a team like Samoa who have their own haka.

      • Ange October 21, 2018, 8:29 pm

        That’s my favourite too! The all stars games here in Aus are amazing for that, indigenous war cries vs the haka is a highlight. Back in the early days of the game even with a tiny crowd the energy was electric: https://youtu.be/Nk2Cwl_flZc

      • Lanes October 23, 2018, 2:28 pm

        Thanks Kea – I’m a kiwi and thought it was a war cry, a call to arms of sorts. Glad to have learnt something about our indigenous culture today 🙂

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