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  • January 16, 2018, 12:03:50 PM

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Author Topic: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update  (Read 18925 times)

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Twik

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #75 on: December 26, 2017, 09:19:20 AM »
This is getting a bit off topic, but I have a story too. My previous boss was allergic to chocolate. After she gave birth to her first baby, she's no longer allergic. I'm not sure how she found out though.

Man, did she make up for lost time!

Well who wouldn't?  ;D
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Happy2BCF

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #76 on: December 26, 2017, 09:37:28 AM »
Another raw tomato allergy here. Cooked (tomato sauce, paste) are no problem but if I eat raw I end up with a rash from head to toe & my eyes swell shut. Don't really miss them too much except for BLT's - haven't had one in 30 years & every once in a while I think about having one & just dealing with the aftermath. And then I talk myself out of it.
Not a food allergy but my worst allergy is to Aleve. I've had a bad reaction twice (thought the first time was from something else). Doctor told me to never take it again - the reactions get worse every time & the next time could put me in the ER.
Make grilled cheese and bacon.  My daughter hates tomatoes. Not allergic, just doesn't like them. The theory is just keep giving them the food and eventually they'll eat it.  I gave her a thin slice of tomato, she was two.  She opened her mouth, peeled it off her tongue and handed it to me.  Last time I tried that.  She loves tomato sauce, salsa etc.  but grilled cheese and bacon is the best.

I'll have to try that. Is there anything that isn't made better by the addition of bacon?
That's funny about your daughter. I can picture that scene in my mind! I couldn't stand tomatoes when I was younger but when I moved to the Southwest & was introduced to Mexican food I started liking them.
When the allergy kicked in I thought maybe my younger self was giving me a clue that I should avoid them. Don't know why it took ten years for the allergy to start up though.

Dazi

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #77 on: December 26, 2017, 12:59:36 PM »
This is getting a bit off topic, but I have a story too. My previous boss was allergic to chocolate. After she gave birth to her first baby, she's no longer allergic. I'm not sure how she found out though.

Man, did she make up for lost time!

Well who wouldn't?  ;D

Not me. I was allergic to chocolate as a child, and it is one of few allergies I outgrew. I still don't care for it at all. I'll occasionally eat a Reese's peanut butter cup or a single snickers mini, but that's really about it.
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





Lynda_34

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #78 on: January 01, 2018, 11:29:30 PM »
Another raw tomato allergy here. Cooked (tomato sauce, paste) are no problem but if I eat raw I end up with a rash from head to toe & my eyes swell shut. Don't really miss them too much except for BLT's - haven't had one in 30 years & every once in a while I think about having one & just dealing with the aftermath. And then I talk myself out of it.
Not a food allergy but my worst allergy is to Aleve. I've had a bad reaction twice (thought the first time was from something else). Doctor told me to never take it again - the reactions get worse every time & the next time could put me in the ER.

Make grilled cheese and bacon.  My daughter hates tomatoes. Not allergic, just doesn't like them. The theory is just keep giving them the food and eventually they'll eat it.  I gave her a thin slice of tomato, she was two.  She opened her mouth, peeled it off her tongue and handed it to me.  Last time I tried that.  She loves tomato sauce, salsa etc.  but grilled cheese and bacon is the best.
We were together for a holiday dinner this year.  Someone had brought take out.  All pasta with veal she doesn't eat that for ethical reasons, ok more for me.  She doesn't like seafood, ok more for everyone else.  She will and does eat chicken.  I passed on the chicken, we were careful to make sure everyone who liked seafood got an equal amount.  I noticed at the end of the meal she had moved her tomato to the edge of the plate.  This woman is 36 years old no allergy just set in her ways. 

I'll have to try that. Is there anything that isn't made better by the addition of bacon?
That's funny about your daughter. I can picture that scene in my mind! I couldn't stand tomatoes when I was younger but when I moved to the Southwest & was introduced to Mexican food I started liking them.
When the allergy kicked in I thought maybe my younger self was giving me a clue that I should avoid them. Don't know why it took ten years for the allergy to start up though.

DanaJ

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #79 on: January 03, 2018, 12:33:51 PM »
I actually have one that still baffles me.   I was told when I was a teen that I was allergic to Wheat & barley (and dust/pollen).  Naturally, that makes beer my drink of choice.  I took allergy shots even into college for my allergies.  Decades later, I can drink some beers and have no real issues.  And then I'll try one of the specialty beers and after a couple of sips I'll start wheezing.   Pretty much if it has Wheat in the name, I have a decent chance of a reaction. 

DP gets an upset tummy from a lot of kegged beers, but not all of them (and it was not an issue of improperly cleaned keg lines). Eventually we discovered that it was an issue of pasteurization. Some exported beers, like Guiness, are pasteurized and DP can drink a keg pour no problem. It's unpasteurized keg beer that gives him an upset tummy and turns him into quite the *ahem* gas-bag (occasionally he gets the runs). 

There are many microbreweries around here and some of their bottled peers are also unpasteurized, so DP has to be careful and ask questions with beers from smaller breweries to avoid a belly ache.

We have never been told what the differences is or what the pasteurization process does to make it okay for DP to drink. The "test yourself with pasteurized vs. non-pasteurized" thing was recommended by a brewmaster we met on a distillery tour.

Dazi

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #80 on: January 03, 2018, 01:38:23 PM »
I actually have one that still baffles me.   I was told when I was a teen that I was allergic to Wheat & barley (and dust/pollen).  Naturally, that makes beer my drink of choice.  I took allergy shots even into college for my allergies.  Decades later, I can drink some beers and have no real issues.  And then I'll try one of the specialty beers and after a couple of sips I'll start wheezing.   Pretty much if it has Wheat in the name, I have a decent chance of a reaction. 

DP gets an upset tummy from a lot of kegged beers, but not all of them (and it was not an issue of improperly cleaned keg lines). Eventually we discovered that it was an issue of pasteurization. Some exported beers, like Guiness, are pasteurized and DP can drink a keg pour no problem. It's unpasteurized keg beer that gives him an upset tummy and turns him into quite the *ahem* gas-bag (occasionally he gets the runs). 

There are many microbreweries around here and some of their bottled peers are also unpasteurized, so DP has to be careful and ask questions with beers from smaller breweries to avoid a belly ache.

We have never been told what the differences is or what the pasteurization process does to make it okay for DP to drink. The "test yourself with pasteurized vs. non-pasteurized" thing was recommended by a brewmaster we met on a distillery tour.

I have celiac disease and, as it turns out, a sensitivity or allergy to yeast. I've never been able to drink beer without getting extremely ill. I also have a friend that is anaphylactic allergic to hops. It tooks them ages to figure out what the issue was with that one. The first time he ever went drinking, he got so sick they thought he had malaria.
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





Twik

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #81 on: January 03, 2018, 02:10:41 PM »
We have never been told what the differences is or what the pasteurization process does to make it okay for DP to drink. The "test yourself with pasteurized vs. non-pasteurized" thing was recommended by a brewmaster we met on a distillery tour.

Sounds like he reacts badly to the yeast itself or other microbes if pasteurization cures the problem.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

DanaJ

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #82 on: January 05, 2018, 03:56:24 PM »
We have never been told what the differences is or what the pasteurization process does to make it okay for DP to drink. The "test yourself with pasteurized vs. non-pasteurized" thing was recommended by a brewmaster we met on a distillery tour.

Sounds like he reacts badly to the yeast itself or other microbes if pasteurization cures the problem.

Is it possible to have issues with a "strain" of yeast? Does that even exist? DP seems generally fine generally with brewers yeast as far as I know. Creepy to think that there are some grumpy microbes that kick his intestines around.

Dazi

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #83 on: January 05, 2018, 03:59:54 PM »
We have never been told what the differences is or what the pasteurization process does to make it okay for DP to drink. The "test yourself with pasteurized vs. non-pasteurized" thing was recommended by a brewmaster we met on a distillery tour.

Sounds like he reacts badly to the yeast itself or other microbes if pasteurization cures the problem.

Is it possible to have issues with a "strain" of yeast? Does that even exist? DP seems generally fine generally with brewers yeast as far as I know. Creepy to think that there are some grumpy microbes that kick his intestines around.

Well, I don't see why not. There are many different species of yeast. In beer making, they typically use either top brewing or bottom brewing yeast (they are different species), and one produces lagers and one produces ales iirc.
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





Sebastienne

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #84 on: January 05, 2018, 04:23:39 PM »
We have never been told what the differences is or what the pasteurization process does to make it okay for DP to drink. The "test yourself with pasteurized vs. non-pasteurized" thing was recommended by a brewmaster we met on a distillery tour.

Sounds like he reacts badly to the yeast itself or other microbes if pasteurization cures the problem.

Is it possible to have issues with a "strain" of yeast? Does that even exist? DP seems generally fine generally with brewers yeast as far as I know. Creepy to think that there are some grumpy microbes that kick his intestines around.

Well, I don't see why not. There are many different species of yeast. In beer making, they typically use either top brewing or bottom brewing yeast (they are different species), and one produces lagers and one produces ales iirc.

All beer yeast is some variation of saccharomyces, but there are thousands upon thousands of different strains that do different things. Hefeweizen yeast, for example, lends the beer its banana/clovey notes; saison yeast will produce peppery, spicy esters. A lot of brewers now are also using mixed cultures of multiple yeasts, not just pure lab cultures of sacch, and they may also include some types of friendly bacteria (lactobacillus, for example) and non-sacch yeast like brettanomyces. I've never heard of anyone having an allergy to, say, just hefeweizen yeast or any specific sacch strain, but I can imagine something in a mixed culture not working for someone.

DanaJ

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Re: Bowing out of holiday dinners-Update
« Reply #85 on: January 09, 2018, 02:44:50 PM »
All beer yeast is some variation of saccharomyces, but there are thousands upon thousands of different strains that do different things. Hefeweizen yeast, for example, lends the beer its banana/clovey notes; saison yeast will produce peppery, spicy esters. A lot of brewers now are also using mixed cultures of multiple yeasts, not just pure lab cultures of sacch, and they may also include some types of friendly bacteria (lactobacillus, for example) and non-sacch yeast like brettanomyces. I've never heard of anyone having an allergy to, say, just hefeweizen yeast or any specific sacch strain, but I can imagine something in a mixed culture not working for someone.

Very interesting, thank you!

DP just sometimes gets the runs from kegged beer, but it's just combative intestines, not an actual allergy. Until the pasteurized vs non-pasteurized suggestion came up, his own reserach turned up nothing, so he was really excited when he found that pasteurized beers rarely cause a problem.

Unfortunately, he also found that you can't really count on ordinary bar staff to know which beers are or are not pasteurized.  ::)   

The folks at the "tasting rooms" of microbreweries really know their stuff though.