Etiquette Hell

Etiquette School is in session! => The Ehell Guide to Never Behaving Badly => Topic started by: Miriam on September 14, 2011, 09:51:23 AM

Title: University Etiquette
Post by: Miriam on September 14, 2011, 09:51:23 AM
I don't know how many are students or still in school, but I'm growing concerned over the growing trend of etiquette faux pas or basic lack of manners. This is also my first post (after being a longtime reader and fan) so hopefully many can understand where this is coming from.

1. Most of our lecture classes are full to the brim, I'm talking a good 100+ students in their seats. Each class is separated to end 10 minutes before the next lecture is to start in that class, so you would think we will be able to exit the class safely and have time to spare to walk to our next class. I have noticed lately that when my classmates and I are trying to leave our class, the next wave of students pummel through to get their favorite seats (which are still occupied, I mean the lecture just ended). Is it rude to tell these students to please wait for us to fully exit the one door that we have so we are not trapped while they try to run in? They have a good ten minutes before their class begins, and we cannot go anywhere while they squeeze through the door and try to find empty seats that are still occupied. I have seen several frustrated people yell "Move!" or "Let us through, THEN come in!" and nothing works.

2. In the computer labs I have noticed, as well, that when I am occupied on a desktop working on homework or doing a test I am asked to move because someone has an important e-mail, FB post, or whatever to check. I usually stare and wait for them to figure it out. Computer labs on campus are for academic purposes, wait for after hours to check FB or bring your own laptop. (I am typing this from my own laptop)

3. I also receive e-mails from students requesting someone to make a scanned copy of a homework page in the textbook and send it to them. I totally understand if you're hurting for cash and can't afford the book, but that's why the teachers reserve one in the library that cannot be checked out so it's always there. I send them this information and they are upset I'm not taking my time to copy and send the page to them. Rude?

4. You need headphones for that blasting ipod. Why is it even on? You're in class.

5. Anyone experience a parking lot "vulture"? A person who just parks their car and waits for someone to get out of class and take their space. I wouldn't have a problem with this except our parking lots are one way. I cannot go around you and now someone has pulled up behind me, great, I'm trapped. Thanks vulture.

I may have more. I can't think of any at the present time but I usually discover random incidents during the day or week that make me wonder: bad manners, etiquette faux pas, or just me?
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Black Delphinium on September 14, 2011, 10:00:35 AM
6)Classrooms are like offices or any other enclosed space. Please: A) shower/bathe regularly, B) do your laundry more often then Fall Break and Christmas, and C) don't think that can of Axe/bottle of Curious will cover up the fact that you haven't been keeping up with either A or B.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: violinp on September 14, 2011, 10:02:32 AM
7. When in the dining hall, try to move the line along as quickly as possible. There are a lot of people who have to eat in a very short amount of time, so please don't dawdle (This was true at the college I attended, because everyone had to go to chapel, and there were a lot of people who had class, like 15 minutes after chapel).

8. If the prof says "Don't eat," do you really think s/he means "Bring your whole lunch into class! It doesn't matter!"?

9. Don't talk if the prof is playing a movie. We don't usually get that kind of privilege after high school, so take advantage of the fact that you have no work in that class for two days, and BE QUIET. Sheesh.

10. Treat your fellow scholars with respect when they speak, and they will return the favor. No one will listen to you if you snerk and giggle the whole time someone else is talking.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Miriam on September 14, 2011, 10:12:25 AM
6)Classrooms are like offices or any other enclosed space. Please: A) shower/bathe regularly, B) do your laundry more often then Fall Break and Christmas, and C) don't think that can of Axe/bottle of Curious will cover up the fact that you haven't been keeping up with either A or B.

Or turn your shirt inside out! It's not fresher  ;D
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Yvaine on September 14, 2011, 10:14:52 AM
2. In the computer labs I have noticed, as well, that when I am occupied on a desktop working on homework or doing a test I am asked to move because someone has an important e-mail, FB post, or whatever to check. I usually stare and wait for them to figure it out. Computer labs on campus are for academic purposes, wait for after hours to check FB or bring your own laptop. (I am typing this from my own laptop)

Policies on this vary; at the school I went to, there was a hierarchy posted on the walls of the computer labs stating that academic work came first and that recreational users were to cede priority to academic users. But the recreational users could use the school machines if they weren't being used for schoolwork at that moment.

(On the other hand, this was before it was so ubiquitous for students to have their own computer in their dorm or a laptop. The students who had those were considered lucky by the rest of us! Mid-nineties.)

Anyway, I think the rule should at least be that users should follow posted policy, and absent a posted policy, give priority to academic users.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: MrTango on September 14, 2011, 10:15:03 AM
11) Please don't be offended when the person you've asked to proofread your paper has the audacity to correct your spelling and punctuation.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Yvaine on September 14, 2011, 10:15:25 AM
11) Please don't be offended when the person you've asked to proofread your paper has the audacity to correct your spelling and punctuation.

I'll second that! Been there and done that! ;D
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on September 14, 2011, 01:31:06 PM
This relates to residential life as well as general university ettiquette.

12) Don't slam doors at 2 a.m. The people on your hall have class in the morning and want to go to bed.
13) If your school doesn't let you have certain things in the dorm, please don't bring them. Or if you do, don't throw a fit when you're caught with them.
14) If it's illegal, don't keep it in the dorm room. The roommate(s)/suitemate(s) could get in trouble even if they never knew about it.
15) For discussion-based classes, be prepared to actually speak with the rest of the class. It's frustrating to be the only person besides the professor talking for the whole time.
16) Don't say things in class which are disproportionate to what's going on. Not talking in class ≠ putting one's classmates in slavery (actual thing said). That one's just plain offensive, actually, but y'all get the gist.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: lollylegs on September 15, 2011, 11:51:34 PM
16) Don't say things in class which are disproportionate to what's going on. Not talking in class ≠ putting one's classmates in slavery (actual thing said). That one's just plain offensive, actually, but y'all get the gist.

This. If the lecture's only one hour, your five minute question/story is taking up a good chunk of it. Now I realise that there are classes where real life anecdotes are germane, but generally, even if your story is related to the lecture, save it for a more appropriate forum (e.g. a tutorial, discussion based class, study group, etc.)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Spoder on September 16, 2011, 12:07:41 AM
17) The Silent Study Zone of the library is exactly that: SILENT. That notice on the door which says 'Please use other areas of the library unless you plan to be completely silent'? That means *you*. Whispering is not silent. Talking on your cell phone is not silent. Playing your iPod at top volume is not silent: it 'bleeds' out and annoys the person next to you. You have the other 90% of the library to be non-silent in; show some respect for other students who can't concentrate through audible distractions.

18) If you're late to the lecture late, enter via the back door, if there is one. Do not amble (or even run) across in front of the lecturer, distracting everyone else.

19) The lecturer is a person, not a robot. Show them some respect. If you've just sat through a 1- or 2-hour lecture, you can sit through another 30 seconds at the end while they give instructions for the next class, without noisily packing up your stuff or chatting to the student next to you.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: kitty-cat on September 16, 2011, 09:11:28 AM
20) Don't just all get up and leave EXACTLY when class ends. I'm in a freshman level lecture hall (last gen ed!) and at exactly 5:45 they all start getting up and leaving. I'm in an upper level business lecture hall and everyone waits until the professor dismisses us.

21) Even if you don't like the Greek system, do not disparage it every moment you are on campus- and especially not in front of someone in letters... We don't mind if you don't like us, we do mind when names are called, stereotypes are brought up, and when put down just for being Greek.

22) If you bike on campus, don't run over those that are walking.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on September 16, 2011, 07:22:09 PM
21) Even if you don't like the Greek system, do not disparage it every moment you are on campus- and especially not in front of someone in letters... We don't mind if you don't like us, we do mind when names are called, stereotypes are brought up, and when put down just for being Greek.

22) If you bike on campus, don't run over those that are walking.

Thank you! I hate both of these things too!
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: HorseFreak on September 16, 2011, 08:02:48 PM
This relates to residential life as well as general university ettiquette.

12) Don't slam doors at 2 a.m. The people on your hall have class in the morning and want to go to bed.

Or what happened in my dorm junior year: Don't run through the hallway at 3 am calling your female roommates "wh0res" at the top of your lungs for 15 minutes at a time. It's not cute or funny.

For RAs: Do your darn job. That means not PARTICIPATING in the vandalism/disruptions/underage drunken stupidity. Some of us are actually enrolled in intense programs and need to study and sleep effectively. And if someone comes to you with an emergency, for example falling out of their 5' lofted bed on their elbow and dislocating it, your job extends a little beyond handing them a cold can of soda and telling them to walk to health services late at night alone if it's "that bad." Many of my RAs were fantastic, but the bad ones were really terrible people. My awesome, enthusiastic friend couldn't get into the program and yet somehow the laziest jerks got positions.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: TeamBhakta on September 16, 2011, 09:34:14 PM
I don't know how many are students or still in school, but I'm growing concerned over the growing trend of etiquette faux pas or basic lack of manners. This is also my first post (after being a longtime reader and fan) so hopefully many can understand where this is coming from.

1. Most of our lecture classes are full to the brim, I'm talking a good 100+ students in their seats. Each class is separated to end 10 minutes before the next lecture is to start in that class, so you would think we will be able to exit the class safely and have time to spare to walk to our next class. I have noticed lately that when my classmates and I are trying to leave our class, the next wave of students pummel through to get their favorite seats (which are still occupied, I mean the lecture just ended). Is it rude to tell these students to please wait for us to fully exit the one door that we have so we are not trapped while they try to run in? They have a good ten minutes before their class begins, and we cannot go anywhere while they squeeze through the door and try to find empty seats that are still occupied. I have seen several frustrated people yell "Move!" or "Let us through, THEN come in!" and nothing works.

2. In the computer labs I have noticed, as well, that when I am occupied on a desktop working on homework or doing a test I am asked to move because someone has an important e-mail, FB post, or whatever to check. I usually stare and wait for them to figure it out. Computer labs on campus are for academic purposes, wait for after hours to check FB or bring your own laptop. (I am typing this from my own laptop)

3. I also receive e-mails from students requesting someone to make a scanned copy of a homework page in the textbook and send it to them. I totally understand if you're hurting for cash and can't afford the book, but that's why the teachers reserve one in the library that cannot be checked out so it's always there. I send them this information and they are upset I'm not taking my time to copy and send the page to them. Rude?

4. You need headphones for that blasting ipod. Why is it even on? You're in class.

5. Anyone experience a parking lot "vulture"? A person who just parks their car and waits for someone to get out of class and take their space. I wouldn't have a problem with this except our parking lots are one way. I cannot go around you and now someone has pulled up behind me, great, I'm trapped. Thanks vulture.

I may have more. I can't think of any at the present time but I usually discover random incidents during the day or week that make me wonder: bad manners, etiquette faux pas, or just me?

The running gag at my university computer lab was "*marches into room* Okay, anyone who is on Facebook or looking at po_n, get off, I need to do my homework  :D" 
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Lady Snowdon on September 19, 2011, 04:22:42 PM
2. In the computer labs I have noticed, as well, that when I am occupied on a desktop working on homework or doing a test I am asked to move because someone has an important e-mail, FB post, or whatever to check. I usually stare and wait for them to figure it out. Computer labs on campus are for academic purposes, wait for after hours to check FB or bring your own laptop. (I am typing this from my own laptop)

Policies on this vary; at the school I went to, there was a hierarchy posted on the walls of the computer labs stating that academic work came first and that recreational users were to cede priority to academic users. But the recreational users could use the school machines if they weren't being used for schoolwork at that moment.

(On the other hand, this was before it was so ubiquitous for students to have their own computer in their dorm or a laptop. The students who had those were considered lucky by the rest of us! Mid-nineties.)

Anyway, I think the rule should at least be that users should follow posted policy, and absent a posted policy, give priority to academic users.

My college's policy was that the computer labs were first-come, first-served.  Someone could, and often did, take up a computer for the entire night playing games, chatting, etc, especially in the dorm labs (I did it myself, especially when my computer refused to cooperate with the network on campus and wouldn't connect to the Internet, or the printer, or anything).  The labs in the buildings were a bit different, in that academic work was given priority but you couldn't boot someone off a computer to do your work.  So I don't think this is a universal rule of etiquette.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: bookworm317 on September 19, 2011, 08:15:48 PM
When you have a class that meets 2X a week for an hour and 15 minutes, DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT come waltzing in to class when there's only 20 minutes left!

On test day(as well as EVERY other class period), COME PREPARED!!!! Do not go around asking OTHER people for a writing implement.

I observed this behavior from the moron I call 'Jo-Jo the oblivious idiot' several years ago. He still makes me slightly stabby.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: kitty-cat on September 19, 2011, 08:16:58 PM
I'm paying to hear the professor speak, not your stupid comments. (there's this kid in my social psych class who does this every.single.class.)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Solanna Dryden on September 19, 2011, 09:29:14 PM
It's great that you're a mom/wife. It really is. But don't take up valuable class time telling the class and professor ten minute long stories about your husband or kids. Particularly if it's only tangentially related to the discussion at hand.

Double double agreeing with don't talk in class. Especially if it's a tiny class!

This is more for small classes, but don't speak out of turn! There's this girl in my Greek class who can't stop doing this. We're supposed to go around the room and one by one say a letter of the Greek alphabet and it's sound, and without fail this girl would YELL it out from the front seat. And she would laugh REALLY REALLY loud at the prof's mildly funny jokes. (To be fair to this girl, I suspect she may have Aspergers or something similar, but still, she shouldn't be doing it!)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: TeamBhakta on September 20, 2011, 01:39:58 PM
It's great that you're a mom/wife. It really is. But don't take up valuable class time telling the class and professor ten minute long stories about your husband or kids. Particularly if it's only tangentially elated to the discussion at hand.


And don't introduce yourself or ask for help with "I'm a mom. I went to school back in the ice age, so excuse my dumb mom forgetfulness. I'm a little slow lol." The most annoying one was, and I quote her on this, "Hi, I'm Patty. Been out of school for a bit. I'm just a bit of a dummy mom. Please be patient with me." I don't know why people do that. I find it very grating to hear. I've heard some variant at every college I've been to. Really, just stick with "Hi, I'm Shelby, majoring in (whatever subject)" or "Could you help me with this assignment ? It's unclear to me."  ::)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: audrey1962 on September 20, 2011, 01:46:37 PM
If all of the students in class must give a final-term presentation, don't skip all of the presentations before yours.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Moray on September 20, 2011, 03:53:10 PM
It's great that you're a mom/wife. It really is. But don't take up valuable class time telling the class and professor ten minute long stories about your husband or kids. Particularly if it's only tangentially elated to the discussion at hand.


And don't introduce yourself or for help with "I'm a mom. I went to school back in the ice age, so excuse my dumb mom forgetfulness. I'm a little slow lol." The most annoying one was, and I quote her on this, "Hi, I'm Patty. Been out of school for a bit. I'm just a bit of a dummy mom. Please be patient with me." I don't know why people do that. I find it very grating to hear. I've heard some variant at every college I've been to. Really, just stick with "Hi, I'm Shelby, majoring in (whatever subject)" or "Could you help me with this assignment ? It's unclear to me."  ::)

Slightly related, I'm currently taking an online course where our first assignment was to engage in a "snowball discussion", where we were to introduce ourselves, state our majors and a little bit about ourselves. I guess the teacher figured it would build a better sense of community, which is important in this class because much of the work is group-related. Anyhow, cue 12 out of 15 people starting off with something like: "Hi, I'm Casey and I've been married for two years. My hubby is the best ever. He's the leader of our Community Watch and he works at a bank." or "I'm Jen and I'm a proud mamma to two beautiful little girls. Their names are Kayla and Brianna and their favorite color is pink. I'm taking this class online because they are my world and I can't leave them for a second. They're so excited to help mommy with her homework!:) :)"

Seriously, "Casey", that's nice and all, but who are you? What are you majoring in? How about you, "Jen"? I'm sure your girls are delightful, but I'm not going to be partnering with them for the midterm report.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: camlan on September 20, 2011, 05:04:25 PM
If you are an undergrad and taking a huge lecture course that has several teaching assistants--it might be useful to find out which teaching assistant you are assigned to. Skipping all the discussion sections held by that TA could prove embarrassing the day of the mid-term when the professor announces, "Here's the exam. When you are done, hand it in to your TA," and leaves the room.

Then the TAs get to sit on the edge of the stage at the front of the lecture hall, betting on who will have the most students come up and ask, "Are you my TA?"
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Miriam on September 21, 2011, 10:35:42 AM
It's great that you're a mom/wife. It really is. But don't take up valuable class time telling the class and professor ten minute long stories about your husband or kids. Particularly if it's only tangentially elated to the discussion at hand.


And don't introduce yourself or for help with "I'm a mom. I went to school back in the ice age, so excuse my dumb mom forgetfulness. I'm a little slow lol." The most annoying one was, and I quote her on this, "Hi, I'm Patty. Been out of school for a bit. I'm just a bit of a dummy mom. Please be patient with me." I don't know why people do that. I find it very grating to hear. I've heard some variant at every college I've been to. Really, just stick with "Hi, I'm Shelby, majoring in (whatever subject)" or "Could you help me with this assignment ? It's unclear to me."  ::)

Slightly related, I'm currently taking an online course where our first assignment was to engage in a "snowball discussion", where we were to introduce ourselves, state our majors and a little bit about ourselves. I guess the teacher figured it would build a better sense of community, which is important in this class because much of the work is group-related. Anyhow, cue 12 out of 15 people starting off with something like: "Hi, I'm Casey and I've been married for two years. My hubby is the best ever. He's the leader of our Community Watch and he works at a bank." or "I'm Jen and I'm a proud mamma to two beautiful little girls. Their names are Kayla and Brianna and their favorite color is pink. I'm taking this class online because they are my world and I can't leave them for a second. They're so excited to help mommy with her homework!:) :)"

Seriously, "Casey", that's nice and all, but who are you? What are you majoring in? How about you, "Jen"? I'm sure your girls are delightful, but I'm not going to be partnering with them for the midterm report.

Right! I feel bad because I'm 21 and all these students have children, who sound wonderful, but when it's my turn it's "Hi. I'm Miriam and Jimmy Buffet is my hero." Oh gosh I just sound like a crazy partier while everyone is at home nurturing their precious children.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Miriam on September 21, 2011, 01:44:27 PM
Also, I just left the computer lab. I had to wait 30 minutes to print out 3 pages because the one printer was busy printing out a freakin' textbook or something for one person. The limit of printed pages is 20, so I don't know how she got away printing off two inches of stacked paper. Everyone in the lab was upset and late to their next class but she offered no apologies other than "I didn't know it would take so long!" Really? Printing off 500 pages didn't shock you or help you understand it would be inconsiderate to print it all at once?
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: BeagleMommy on September 22, 2011, 02:08:54 PM
I work at a university so here are some of my peeves.

You are now considered an adult.  If you are told a class is full and no more "pink slips" are allowed don't have Mommy or Daddy call the big mean secretary to try to get you into the elective you had six months to consider.

If you have an outstanding balance you are not allowed into any other classes.  This isn't my rule, it's the rule of the university.

If you have a problem with a class, your first point of contact is your advisor.  You will not be able to talk to the chair of the department unless you go through your advisor first.

Just because college students have mercurial hours doesn't mean the office staff is at your beck and call.  If you call me at 6:40 pm on a Friday, sorry I went home at 4:30.  The hours are clearly stated on the answering machine.  Don't get nasty when I return your call the next business day.

Internships cannot be done online (I actually had a student ask this)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: snowdragon on September 22, 2011, 04:18:21 PM
It's great that you're a mom/wife. It really is. But don't take up valuable class time telling the class and professor ten minute long stories about your husband or kids. Particularly if it's only tangentially elated to the discussion at hand.


And don't introduce yourself or for help with "I'm a mom. I went to school back in the ice age, so excuse my dumb mom forgetfulness. I'm a little slow lol." The most annoying one was, and I quote her on this, "Hi, I'm Patty. Been out of school for a bit. I'm just a bit of a dummy mom. Please be patient with me." I don't know why people do that. I find it very grating to hear. I've heard some variant at every college I've been to. Really, just stick with "Hi, I'm Shelby, majoring in (whatever subject)" or "Could you help me with this assignment ? It's unclear to me."  ::)

Slightly related, I'm currently taking an online course where our first assignment was to engage in a "snowball discussion", where we were to introduce ourselves, state our majors and a little bit about ourselves. I guess the teacher figured it would build a better sense of community, which is important in this class because much of the work is group-related. Anyhow, cue 12 out of 15 people starting off with something like: "Hi, I'm Casey and I've been married for two years. My hubby is the best ever. He's the leader of our Community Watch and he works at a bank." or "I'm Jen and I'm a proud mamma to two beautiful little girls. Their names are Kayla and Brianna and their favorite color is pink. I'm taking this class online because they are my world and I can't leave them for a second. They're so excited to help mommy with her homework!:) :)"

Seriously, "Casey", that's nice and all, but who are you? What are you majoring in? How about you, "Jen"? I'm sure your girls are delightful, but I'm not going to be partnering with them for the midterm report.


 This, so this. Especially in terms of on campus classes, you class mates are not there  to provide ANYTHING for your kid, so if babysitting falls through stay home, don't take a seat away from an actual student in an overcrowded classroom, don't ask them to "share" resources" or ask that they participate in a class they could not possibly have been admitted to - no, it does not matter if he has something to say, relevant or not. We paid for the class, you child didn't - he does not have any place participating or insinuating himself into the class. 
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on September 22, 2011, 06:32:43 PM
Internships cannot be done online (I actually had a student ask this)

Ow. Really, that had to take a brain stretch to think that that was okay. Out of curiosity, what would've been the internship material?
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Mopsy428 on September 22, 2011, 08:00:00 PM
20) Don't just all get up and leave EXACTLY when class ends. I'm in a freshman level lecture hall (last gen ed!) and at exactly 5:45 they all start getting up and leaving. I'm in an upper level business lecture hall and everyone waits until the professor dismisses us.


When I was in college, I often had classes that were 10 minutes apart. Sometimes, these classes were in different buildings, which required at least a 5 minute walk (and that's when I was hustling.) So, if Professor Jones is going over the class time with no end in sight, then yes, I would have gotten up and left if I had another class. The class ends at a certain time for a reason. When you have to go to another class, you have to go.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Mopsy428 on September 22, 2011, 08:05:28 PM
-Even if you live off of campus, you still have to abide by the noise ordinances and laws. You are not entitled to be loud and obnoxious at all hours of the night just because you are in university and are "living it up".

(Two people next to me got evicted because they were loud and refused to be quiet. When I would file complaints at the office, the manager would tell me not to confront these people (not that I would) because they could be aggressive, and they thought they were entitled to blast music all the time because they were university students. Then I saw a letter in our university paper saying that the "old fogies" need to chill out and accept that if they live near the university, students are going to be loud, drunk, and obnoxious all throughout the night.  ::) )
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Onyx_TKD on September 22, 2011, 08:33:13 PM
-Even if you live off of campus, you still have to abide by the noise ordinances and laws. You are not entitled to be loud and obnoxious at all hours of the night just because you are in university and are "living it up".

(Two people next to me got evicted because they were loud and refused to be quiet. When I would file complaints at the office, the manager would tell me not to confront these people (not that I would) because they could be aggressive, and they thought they were entitled to blast music all the time because they were university students. Then I saw a letter in our university paper saying that the "old fogies" need to chill out and accept that if they live near the university, students are going to be loud, drunk, and obnoxious all throughout the night.  ::) )

Um...I'm still a university student, and I wouldn't tolerate that without complaint. And I wouldn't have been any happier about it when I was an undergrad.

20) Don't just all get up and leave EXACTLY when class ends. I'm in a freshman level lecture hall (last gen ed!) and at exactly 5:45 they all start getting up and leaving. I'm in an upper level business lecture hall and everyone waits until the professor dismisses us.


When I was in college, I often had classes that were 10 minutes apart. Sometimes, these classes were in different buildings, which required at least a 5 minute walk (and that's when I was hustling.) So, if Professor Jones is going over the class time with no end in sight, then yes, I would have gotten up and left if I had another class. The class ends at a certain time for a reason. When you have to go to another class, you have to go.

I agree; there's nothing rude about leaving quietly when classtime is over, even if the professor hasn't ended class yet. There are plenty of valid reasons why someone might need to leave promptly (whether that's getting to another class/appointment, or that you desperately need to use the restroom and have no idea how long the prof. is going to keep going). Also, even if you don't have a pressing need to leave on time, if a professor routinely refuses to respect the class ending time (showing a blatant disregard for the value of his students' time), I don't see anything wrong with deciding that you're going to leave at the end of the scheduled class period, as long as you don't disrupt the other students more than necessary as you leave.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: kitty-cat on September 22, 2011, 08:51:19 PM
20) Don't just all get up and leave EXACTLY when class ends. I'm in a freshman level lecture hall (last gen ed!) and at exactly 5:45 they all start getting up and leaving. I'm in an upper level business lecture hall and everyone waits until the professor dismisses us.


When I was in college, I often had classes that were 10 minutes apart. Sometimes, these classes were in different buildings, which required at least a 5 minute walk (and that's when I was hustling.) So, if Professor Jones is going over the class time with no end in sight, then yes, I would have gotten up and left if I had another class. The class ends at a certain time for a reason. When you have to go to another class, you have to go.

They aren't quiet though. At *exactly* 5:45, sometimes even before that they all stand up and leave talking and chatting. My professor has never gone over time either- she teaches up to time, but she has never been more than 30 seconds late.

I have had classes close together in the past, but I've never left class early to go to another one. I might not get the exact seat I want, but I don't disrespect one teacher to please another. (and I want that last little bit of information too! I can't hear it over the masses leaving the hall)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Eisa on September 23, 2011, 06:29:00 AM
I just graduated in May, but I can think of a few things. :)

With our computer labs, it differed. The one in the Rendezvous was big and open, and it was definitely first-come, first-served. You could do whatever you wanted on the computer, basically. The one in the library and the ones in some of the classroom buildings however were supposed to be focused on schoolwork. I'm not sure what anyone could do if you didn't, however. ??? Also, a lot of the labs in the classroom buildings were reserved for classes. Rendezvous lab was never reserved.

For classes--I always hated when people really whipped out their cell phones or played solitaire on their computer in class. It's one thing to play a quick game when you're in the back row, but when you're in the front row of class, everyone behind you can see. And it's one to answer a quick text under the table/desk. Quite another to carry on a whole conversation, with the cell phone blatantly in front of you, like you aren't paying attention at all.


As for residential life, I noticed a lot of freshmen didn't seem to understand this. Just because you're in college doesn't mean the rules of common courtesy and politeness fly out the window. Of course you can "go crazy" and stay up all hours of the night. But you better be darn quiet after about midnight, or your roommates and your neighbors down the hall are going to hate you. :P Particularly when you invite your friends over for noisy video games in the living room during finals week.
Title: university etiquette
Post by: Shores on September 23, 2011, 06:50:37 AM
20) Don't just all get up and leave EXACTLY when class ends. I'm in a freshman level lecture hall (last gen ed!) and at exactly 5:45 they all start getting up and leaving. I'm in an upper level business lecture hall and everyone waits until the professor dismisses us.


When I was in college, I often had classes that were 10 minutes apart. Sometimes, these classes were in different buildings, which required at least a 5 minute walk (and that's when I was hustling.) So, if Professor Jones is going over the class time with no end in sight, then yes, I would have gotten up and left if I had another class. The class ends at a certain time for a reason. When you have to go to another class, you have to go.

They aren't quiet though. At *exactly* 5:45, sometimes even before that they all stand up and leave talking and chatting. My professor has never gone over time either- she teaches up to time, but she has never been more than 30 seconds late.

I have had classes close together in the past, but I've never left class early to go to another one. I might not get the exact seat I want, but I don't disrespect one teacher to please another. (and I want that last little bit of information too! I can't hear it over the masses leaving the hall)
Poor time management on the professor's part. Nothing important should be said in the last minute, if possible, anyway. I don't even do that with high schoolers. Sure I keep talking but not about anything vital because I know their little one-track brains are going "60!....59!....58!....57!..." and the minute that bell rings, they're gone. They don't have time to let me ramble on past that bell and neither do most uni students. Prof needs to change up her style a bit.


ITA on the poster who discusses blabbermouths. There always has to be that ONE girl who has a comment for freaking everything in every class. She talks over everyone, including the teacher, and pretty much thinks she's an expert on par with the prof herself. I have one in EVERY class and I do not get on with those people. In a class last night, she and I almost had to "have a talk" because she kept interrupting a presentation I was doing! I finally had to pause the show and say "I'd really appreciate if I could get all the way through the show and then I'll be happy to lead a discussion"
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: BeagleMommy on September 23, 2011, 01:14:07 PM
Internships cannot be done online (I actually had a student ask this)

Ow. Really, that had to take a brain stretch to think that that was okay. Out of curiosity, what would've been the internship material?

It was for social work.  Our master level students MUST put in 260 hours (unpaid) per semester at an approved social service agency to receive their degree. This student thought she could do it online because "everything can be done online now".
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: 567Kate on September 23, 2011, 01:22:21 PM
20) Don't just all get up and leave EXACTLY when class ends. I'm in a freshman level lecture hall (last gen ed!) and at exactly 5:45 they all start getting up and leaving. I'm in an upper level business lecture hall and everyone waits until the professor dismisses us.


When I was in college, I often had classes that were 10 minutes apart. Sometimes, these classes were in different buildings, which required at least a 5 minute walk (and that's when I was hustling.) So, if Professor Jones is going over the class time with no end in sight, then yes, I would have gotten up and left if I had another class. The class ends at a certain time for a reason. When you have to go to another class, you have to go.

They aren't quiet though. At *exactly* 5:45, sometimes even before that they all stand up and leave talking and chatting. My professor has never gone over time either- she teaches up to time, but she has never been more than 30 seconds late.

I have had classes close together in the past, but I've never left class early to go to another one. I might not get the exact seat I want, but I don't disrespect one teacher to please another. (and I want that last little bit of information too! I can't hear it over the masses leaving the hall)

I had one professor who was always ten minutes late and really disorganized. The class would then go ten minutes late, and of course, our passing periods were ten minutes. This would also make the professor for the next class in that room get a late start. I didn't have a class right afterward, but the students who did would just leave at the time class was supposed to end.

I think students should wait a minute or two to be respectful, but professors who consistently have classes that go late are being disrespectful themselves.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on September 24, 2011, 12:16:13 AM
Internships cannot be done online (I actually had a student ask this)

Ow. Really, that had to take a brain stretch to think that that was okay. Out of curiosity, what would've been the internship material?

It was for social work.  Our master level students MUST put in 260 hours (unpaid) per semester at an approved social service agency to receive their degree. This student thought she could do it online because "everything can be done online now".

ROFL! Wow. I'm sure my advisor would totally be okay if I went up to her and asked to do my church music internship online. Yeah, that would go over great, even though the internet is no substitute for real-life experience.  ::)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: snowdragon on October 19, 2011, 08:46:59 AM
11) Please don't be offended when the person you've asked to proofread your paper has the audacity to correct your spelling and punctuation.

I'll second that! Been there and done that! ;D
you, especially if you did not

Don't expect the person proof reading your paper to rewrite it for you - especially if you did not even bother to write on the topic assigned!


ETA:  If you *MUST* bring your kid to class, do not allow him/her to disrupt the class, expect that they can participate in class activities/discussions or ask the other students for supplies to keep your kid busy...and it's rude to have the kid eating and rustling bags during class, yes we can hear that, yes it's distracting. So is chatting with the kid during lecture time and having the kid play games with the sound on, ect. Those students paid for the class, and while you paid tuition your child did not and allowing them to distract the students from their studies is entitled and rude. The kid does not have the "right to be"there.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: snowdragon on October 19, 2011, 09:03:31 AM
some  for the Professors:


Your students are there to learn, not to be ridiculed, you may know more than them about your topic, but sure as shooting - there's things they  know more than you about - especially if they are older students.

If another professional takes your class on a tour of their facility thank  you notes are  not "stupid, out dated conventions" they will make those professionals feel appreciate and more willing to help you out the next time.

Support staff are not your servants - and treating them as such can seriously harm your career.

Title: Re: university etiquette
Post by: TeamBhakta on October 28, 2011, 02:15:09 PM
20) Don't just all get up and leave EXACTLY when class ends. I'm in a freshman level lecture hall (last gen ed!) and at exactly 5:45 they all start getting up and leaving. I'm in an upper level business lecture hall and everyone waits until the professor dismisses us.


When I was in college, I often had classes that were 10 minutes apart. Sometimes, these classes were in different buildings, which required at least a 5 minute walk (and that's when I was hustling.) So, if Professor Jones is going over the class time with no end in sight, then yes, I would have gotten up and left if I had another class. The class ends at a certain time for a reason. When you have to go to another class, you have to go.

They aren't quiet though. At *exactly* 5:45, sometimes even before that they all stand up and leave talking and chatting. My professor has never gone over time either- she teaches up to time, but she has never been more than 30 seconds late.

I have had classes close together in the past, but I've never left class early to go to another one. I might not get the exact seat I want, but I don't disrespect one teacher to please another. (and I want that last little bit of information too! I can't hear it over the masses leaving the hall)
Poor time management on the professor's part. Nothing important should be said in the last minute, if possible, anyway. I don't even do that with high schoolers. Sure I keep talking but not about anything vital because I know their little one-track brains are going "60!....59!....58!....57!..." and the minute that bell rings, they're gone. They don't have time to let me ramble on past that bell and neither do most uni students. Prof needs to change up her style a bit.


ITA on the poster who discusses blabbermouths. There always has to be that ONE girl who has a comment for freaking everything in every class. She talks over everyone, including the teacher, and pretty much thinks she's an expert on par with the prof herself. I have one in EVERY class and I do not get on with those people. In a class last night, she and I almost had to "have a talk" because she kept interrupting a presentation I was doing! I finally had to pause the show and say "I'd really appreciate if I could get all the way through the show and then I'll be happy to lead a discussion"

I had two male chatterboxes in my college, named D. and G. Each of them was known for doing this to professors and guest speakers: "What do you think is the impact of xyz situation in the market place ? Because I used to work in such and such position and it seemed to me the impact was....*five minutes later* So what do you think ?" Oddly enough, G used make snotty comments about D being a chatterbox and holding up class. Straight over his head, I swear  ::)

20) Don't just all get up and leave EXACTLY when class ends. I'm in a freshman level lecture hall (last gen ed!) and at exactly 5:45 they all start getting up and leaving. I'm in an upper level business lecture hall and everyone waits until the professor dismisses us.


When I was in college, I often had classes that were 10 minutes apart. Sometimes, these classes were in different buildings, which required at least a 5 minute walk (and that's when I was hustling.) So, if Professor Jones is going over the class time with no end in sight, then yes, I would have gotten up and left if I had another class. The class ends at a certain time for a reason. When you have to go to another class, you have to go.

They aren't quiet though. At *exactly* 5:45, sometimes even before that they all stand up and leave talking and chatting. My professor has never gone over time either- she teaches up to time, but she has never been more than 30 seconds late.

I have had classes close together in the past, but I've never left class early to go to another one. I might not get the exact seat I want, but I don't disrespect one teacher to please another. (and I want that last little bit of information too! I can't hear it over the masses leaving the hall)

I had one professor who was always ten minutes late and really disorganized. The class would then go ten minutes late, and of course, our passing periods were ten minutes. This would also make the professor for the next class in that room get a late start. I didn't have a class right afterward, but the students who did would just leave at the time class was supposed to end.

I think students should wait a minute or two to be respectful, but professors who consistently have classes that go late are being disrespectful themselves.

I had one professor at community college who was always late and disorganized. Professor Boring would show up at least 15 minutes late every day (she was a licensed dietician, I think ?) Then she would stand in front of the class giving what sounded like a hastily thrown together presentation written an hour earlier ("The most important nutrient in that case is *shuffles cards, squints* vitamin A...Sources of it include..."). It got to the point that people would get up halfway through class and leave en masse, because she was just so useless. Even adding pop quizzes to the end of class did not convince people to stick around. My parents later had her for a diabetes class at the local hospital. They said everyone wanted to leave her diabetes class because she behaved the same way.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Miriam on November 02, 2011, 10:53:33 AM
I have a new one. Our computer labs are electronically locked, so you need an i.d. to access. Everyone knows this, it's in all the pamphlets, mail-outs, posters, registration papers, etc. It bugs me to no end when people grab the handle and start banging the door because they don't have their i.d. to access the labs.

They are super loud bangings too. It's distracting, and people eventually get up to let them in. If we ignore them we get yelled at through the window.

So, is is rude to come to school without your i.d. if you know you need to use the lab? I make sure mine is always in my bag, I can understand an honest mistake, but not if you are doing what you can to knock the door off its hinges.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: violinp on November 02, 2011, 11:31:13 AM
I have a new one. Our computer labs are electronically locked, so you need an i.d. to access. Everyone knows this, it's in all the pamphlets, mail-outs, posters, registration papers, etc. It bugs me to no end when people grab the handle and start banging the door because they don't have their i.d. to access the labs.

They are super loud bangings too. It's distracting, and people eventually get up to let them in. If we ignore them we get yelled at through the window.

So, is is rude to come to school without your i.d. if you know you need to use the lab? I make sure mine is always in my bag, I can understand an honest mistake, but not if you are doing what you can to knock the door off its hinges.

Yes, it's very rude to come in, expecting others to let you in. A failure to plan on their part does not constitute an emergency on your end. Double rude points for actually banging the door.  >:(
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: camlan on November 02, 2011, 02:44:22 PM
I have a new one. Our computer labs are electronically locked, so you need an i.d. to access. Everyone knows this, it's in all the pamphlets, mail-outs, posters, registration papers, etc. It bugs me to no end when people grab the handle and start banging the door because they don't have their i.d. to access the labs.

They are super loud bangings too. It's distracting, and people eventually get up to let them in. If we ignore them we get yelled at through the window.

So, is is rude to come to school without your i.d. if you know you need to use the lab? I make sure mine is always in my bag, I can understand an honest mistake, but not if you are doing what you can to knock the door off its hinges.

Most universities I know of have a rule that you need to have your ID on you whenever you are on campus. You usually also need them for things like checking out library books and getting into your dorm and at some places, using the dining halls. So why not just put it in your wallet or bag and have it on you all the time? Seems simpler than having to think every day, "Am I going to need my ID today?" When I was an undergrad, we all carried our IDs on our key rings, just to make sure we'd take them with us every day.

But to answer your question, yes, I think it's rude to plan to use the computer lab and to know that you will need your ID to do so and not bring it along. As you say, mistakes happen, but it's pretty easy to carry an ID with you.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Gabrielle on November 02, 2011, 07:01:06 PM
I have a new one. Our computer labs are electronically locked, so you need an i.d. to access. Everyone knows this, it's in all the pamphlets, mail-outs, posters, registration papers, etc. It bugs me to no end when people grab the handle and start banging the door because they don't have their i.d. to access the labs.

They are super loud bangings too. It's distracting, and people eventually get up to let them in. If we ignore them we get yelled at through the window.

So, is is rude to come to school without your i.d. if you know you need to use the lab? I make sure mine is always in my bag, I can understand an honest mistake, but not if you are doing what you can to knock the door off its hinges.

Most universities I know of have a rule that you need to have your ID on you whenever you are on campus. You usually also need them for things like checking out library books and getting into your dorm and at some places, using the dining halls. So why not just put it in your wallet or bag and have it on you all the time? Seems simpler than having to think every day, "Am I going to need my ID today?" When I was an undergrad, we all carried our IDs on our key rings, just to make sure we'd take them with us every day.

But to answer your question, yes, I think it's rude to plan to use the computer lab and to know that you will need your ID to do so and not bring it along. As you say, mistakes happen, but it's pretty easy to carry an ID with you.

I have done this before - the banging on the door thing. Here's why. I had a laboratory report that was very time constrained - we started the lab experiment at 2pm and the report was due by 10pm that night. My small department has a computer lab to themselves, and it had been announced that those of us doing the lab would have priority on the dept computers. For this reason, everyone left their bags by a computer to "mark their territory" (this was suggested by HOD as computer real estate was prime). So we went off to do our lab at 2pm and finished at 6pm (the lab ran later than expected). At 5pm the university autolocks so you can't get into computer labs without an ID card. The ID card that was sitting in the locked computer lab. So yes, I banged on the door and a friend let me in.
Sure it was my mistake, but nobody in the computer lab considered it rude - we're all friends and it wasn't at all a big deal.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on November 02, 2011, 11:13:51 PM
That's really interesting that you have locked computer labs. We have one in each dorm, computers all over the library and the student union, as well as kiosks so people can check email and such without having to leave a building they have a class in.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Eisa on November 03, 2011, 12:30:20 AM
I think only the library at my university had a 'locked' computer lab. All the computer labs required a computer account, but that's it.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Gabrielle on November 03, 2011, 02:00:26 AM
That's really interesting that you have locked computer labs. We have one in each dorm, computers all over the library and the student union, as well as kiosks so people can check email and such without having to leave a building they have a class in.

The dorms and libraries all have lots of computers too (although I live off campus). But the entire university locks after 5pm - you have to push buttons on every door to get out and swipe your ID on all the main doors to get in. In my case I was in the same building - I was on the floor below. But access is restricted especially in the engineering departments, because each engineering discipline has their own specialised computer lab and using another discipline's lab is frowned upon.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Miriam on November 03, 2011, 11:38:21 AM
Our labs are locked because we live right next to residential areas, and many people just walk into our school and apparantly walk out with more (school property). I think there's a TSA system in our library now  ;D
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: hollandoates on November 03, 2011, 09:25:16 PM
how about "please do not put your feet up on the chair in front of you in a lecture hall. especially if your feet are bare."

a girl in one of my classes did this to a seat that was two seats down from me. it was unbearably gross, even at that distance.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Thyisa on November 06, 2011, 03:20:20 AM
I am no longer in university, but here is one that bugged me: If you MUST come to class under the influence of some substance, please do not reek, and please make certain you will not disrupt the other students or the professor. Someone in a class spent five minutes asking if there was a connection between A and B...Which was the subject of the past two lectures, the titles of which were on the syllabus.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: TeamBhakta on November 06, 2011, 07:17:57 AM
Don't skip your part of a group project and repeatedly whine "It's too hard...I can't do this tiny, simpler task...I'm just too busy, do it for me", then randomly rewrite the whole project the night before it's due "because it was just terrible." Your "helpful" new version won't be used, thanks ::)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Daffodil on November 06, 2011, 08:26:51 AM
The library is a quiet place - respect that.

The library at my university was expected to be fully quiet, but there was a designated quiet area. The lower level was where people could work on group projects and talk at a respectful volume to each other but upstairs was understood to be dead quiet - not a peep.

Of course, you would have these SS ones who thought it was okay to just whip out their cell phone and have this nice long and loud discussion. There was also a guy who played a film on his laptop - through the speakers ! And don't get me started on the texters who can't be bothered to turn their phone to silent .. Really - were these people raised in a barn ?
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: camlan on November 06, 2011, 08:55:33 AM
If you get a low grade on a paper, the way to improve your grade is not to do the following:

Go to your TA's office hours, arriving 5 minutes before they end. Close the door (must be kept open to avoid sexual harassment issues), move the guest chair at the TA's desk to a position of your choosing which makes it extremely difficult for the TA it make eye contact with you or go over your paper with you, move the fan so that it blows only on you as you sit in the guest chair, turn on the radio on another TA's desk and fiddle with the stations, take a pencil off the TA's desk and put it in your backpack, move various items on the TA's desk to positions of your choosing, lean on the desk with both elbows, smile up at the TA and say, "So, what extra credit can I do to get me an A?"

Trust me.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Daffodil on November 07, 2011, 07:26:02 AM
There's contributing to the conversation, and then there's trying to dominate it.

I'm not sure if this guy was socially awkward and wasn't aware he was doing this, or if it was on purpose but the entire class and the prof. were incredibly annoyed. Every time the prof. would ask a question or even just pause for air, this guy would always speak up. When someone else was answering a question, he would try and cut them off and he *always* had to throw in his own viewpoints whether someone else was speaking or not. It doesn't sound bad written out - but it was excessive.

It was at the point that when ever the prof. would see him open his mouth, he'd hold up his hand in a "one minute" gesture, at him *every time* he'd go to speak, because it was just that bad. 

*edited to fix typo
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Miriam on November 07, 2011, 08:07:40 AM
There's contributing to the conversation, and then there's trying to dominate it.

I'm not sure if this guy was socially awkward and wasn't aware he was doing this, or if it was on purpose but the entire class and the prof. were incredibly annoyed. Every time the prof. would ask a question or even just pause for air, this guy would always speak up. When someone else was answering a question, he would try and cut them off and he *always* had to throw in his own viewpoints whether someone else was speaking or not. It doesn't sound band written out - but it was excessive.

It was at the point that when ever the prof. would see him open his mouth, he'd hold up his hand in a "one minute" gesture, at him *every time* he'd go to speak, because it was just that bad.

This. You can't have a class without the residential interrupter/debater/speaker.

Everytime I walk by this one class in the mornings some girl in the back row is yelling over the class. I highly doubt she's a TA or anything, just "the talker". I'll walk around for a bit, go to the bathroom, have a snack, then walk by this class again and still she's obnoxiously loud over everyone. Glad I'm not in there, but they should shut the door.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: hollandoates on November 07, 2011, 12:29:40 PM
I wish, sometimes, that the "Wrap It Up" sign from Chapelle's Show existed for classrooms.

It drives me a little batty when I'm in this one tutorial for one of my classes. The same two people like to play professor and dominate the conversation with long-winded, quasi-sensical diatribes. Discussions work so much better when people make concise points.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Army Mom on November 09, 2011, 11:32:03 AM
I'm staff at a large Midwestern US university and some of the faculty are so rude that we hate to deal with them.  One in particular was apparently offended that I actually do receive a lunch break.  I was not at my desk when he arrived, without an appointment mind you!, so he abused my office mates, left me a cryptic note and some obscure paperwork and stormed out.

I promptly took the tale, the note and the paperwork to my boss (VP).  Who called the professor and explained exactly why I was not going to take care of it for him!  >:D

I realize that many of our faculty are recognized experts in their fields but that doesn't mean that I'm required to curtsey!
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on November 11, 2011, 12:48:19 PM
how about "please do not put your feet up on the chair in front of you in a lecture hall. especially if your feet are bare."

a girl in one of my classes did this to a seat that was two seats down from me. it was unbearably gross, even at that distance.

Or putting your feet in the seat someone is sitting in. The person behind me in a class put her feet where my tush was. I don't even know.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Nikko-chan on November 12, 2011, 06:05:44 AM
I second (third? fourth?) the whole no children in class rule. I might have mentioned this, but a classmate of mine in my math class brought her kid to class with her, TWICE. The second time she did so, Baby was shrieking and carrying on and I couldn't concentrate, so I up and left when I realized the Professor was not going to do anything.

Second story:

I too have had the class with a disorganized Professor. He would come to class late often, one time he didn't show up at all (apparently he sent out an email or something that some of us didn't get). I made a friend out of that class actually. *snicker* We bonded over how bad the class was.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Gabrielle on November 12, 2011, 04:14:53 PM
I second (third? fourth?) the whole no children in class rule. I might have mentioned this, but a classmate of mine in my math class brought her kid to class with her, TWICE. The second time she did so, Baby was shrieking and carrying on and I couldn't concentrate, so I up and left when I realized the Professor was not going to do anything.

Second story:

I too have had the class with a disorganized Professor. He would come to class late often, one time he didn't show up at all (apparently he sent out an email or something that some of us didn't get). I made a friend out of that class actually. *snicker* We bonded over how bad the class was.


I once had a class at 12. The lecturer emailed us about the change in location for that class.... at 12.45pm. Then he wondered why nobody showed up *facepalm*
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Miriam on November 13, 2011, 12:43:25 PM
If you are taking an online class, please know what groups you are assigned to (if any) and be aware of who's post you are writing under or quoting.

Found this gem today under a group project from my group (there are four of us, and we are grouped together because the professor did it alphabetically).
"Good Evening, Ladies!   
I am just now getting back to the discussion board to learn that you all have decided to submit OUR story, without including MY story too.  Unless there is a communication that I missed (which may be possible since I have had the flu for a week), it was my understanding that the due date for this project was Sunday, November 13th.  While I realize it is close, I don't recall the group agreeing to a set deadline for submission, nor do I recall any communication about automatic exclusion from the group at any time.  I know we all have different schedules, interests, ways of learning and studying, I know we bring different life experiences, belief systems, baggage, wit, drama, nonsense, values, morals, thoughts and opinions.  That said, the common thread that should have held OUR story  together is that we are women striving to complete a goal and had to depend on one another to see it come to fruition. I am disheartened to say the least.  I wouldn't want anyone's grade to suffer from anything that I did or did not do, but I don't want mine to suffer because you all did not want to wait. I guess no hard feelings, just disappointed.  Sometimes part of  being in a "group project" environment is learning how to jump out and take a lead when required, learning how to meet a specific deadline and sometimes learning how to wait on those that may not have the same studying styles and habits that are the same as those that you possess.    MY story is attached."


I'm sorry it's so long. I read this under our posting which we turned in early and was absolutely shocked. This person is not in our group. We are all in the beginning of the alphabet when she nearly touches Z and our professor has the lists in a special folder. I e-mailed her and cc'd the professor asking her to to delete the post because she is mistaken and it is rude and to please contact the group she belongs to.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: snowdragon on November 14, 2011, 02:12:27 PM
Also for online classes: do not copy from the other class participants. particularly do not cheat off your classmates and then get angry when those you cheated off of call you on it.

background: in my art ed class the teacher has the 'post first' option as default - meaning you can't see other's work til you post yours...well, several my classmates have taken to copy and pasting the questions and copying their answers from others. yesterday I did my work, and posted and then found out that half the people in the class had done the copy and paste thing, with none of their own work there.  I've stated asking if they have tech issues that this happened. One girl called me witch spelled with a b and told me to mind my own business. This same girl lifted whole sections of my work last week, which is how I caught on.  Sorry toots, if you cheat off me it *IS* my business.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Miriam on November 14, 2011, 03:15:37 PM
Also for online classes: do not copy from the other class participants. particularly do not cheat off your classmates and then get angry when those you cheated off of call you on it.

background: in my art ed class the teacher has the 'post first' option as default - meaning you can't see other's work til you post yours...well, several my classmates have taken to copy and pasting the questions and copying their answers from others. yesterday I did my work, and posted and then found out that half the people in the class had done the copy and paste thing, with none of their own work there.  I've stated asking if they have tech issues that this happened. One girl called me witch spelled with a b and told me to mind my own business. This same girl lifted whole sections of my work last week, which is how I caught on.  Sorry toots, if you cheat off me it *IS* my business.

Wow tell your professor. All colleges have MAJOR issues with plagiarism. I would keep a copy of your post time and all those who have copied after you.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: poundcake on April 18, 2012, 12:25:36 PM
Adding some of my class rules.

Remember that the classroom is a community. All the members are important. Don't grandstand, monopolize, or humiliate.

My class is not a place for religious or political discourse.

Do not come to my class stoned or drunk.

Do not eat or drink anything smelly or noisy during my class. A coffee cup is fine. Slurping a Big Gulp through a straw and shaking the ice around repeatedly is not. A candy bar is fine. A meatball sub is not.

Do not come to my class late. If you are late, there is an alternate assignment posted. Once my classroom door is closed, you are late. Do the assignment. Do not come in and argue with me about how you weren't really late.

If your phone rings during my class, I will answer it for you.

Do not bring guests to class. That includes your baby, your little kid, your dog, your SO, your parent, or your friend who is visiting.

Do not record my class or anything in my class without express permission from me.

Do not come to me the week of the final and ask what you have to do to get an A/pass.

Do not ask if you can do extra credit.

Do not ask anything that is not answered clearly in the syllabus. It only shows me that you don't take time to read it.

This is a lecture and discussion class. Do not bring your laptop/iPad/gadgetry unless you need it for a medical purpose or are physically unable to use a pen and paper.

Contact me, as stated in the syllabus, only via university email or in person during my office hours.
 
(I usually hit my students with all the mean teacher stuff up front. Then they are all scared of me, and end up being surprised by how much fun we have and how much they learn during my classes.)

The difference between high school and college classes is huge, and I think it is partially our responsibility to remember that most incoming students (or students returning after years away from a campus) have no clue that what was acceptable in Mr. K's math class is not acceptable in Professor Smith's Topics in Western Civ seminar. I try to lay out even what seems like the most obvious things, because otherwise, students think that they are scoring points by asking if they can do extra credit, record lectures, or want to call me at home/text/be FB friends.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Jaelle on April 19, 2012, 05:12:49 PM
I'm just curious. Why are you not OK with recording lectures? I thought it was a very common thing these days.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: violinp on April 19, 2012, 06:21:44 PM
I'm just curious. Why are you not OK with recording lectures? I thought it was a very common thing these days.

Not poundcake, but I'm assuming that it's a sneaky way to cheat on the final. The brother of a kid I knew recorded the audio of the lectures, then put it on his iPod and listened to that during the final.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: NyaChan on April 19, 2012, 06:25:06 PM
I'm just curious. Why are you not OK with recording lectures? I thought it was a very common thing these days.

At our school, when kids know class is getting recorded, the attendance drops by half since students figure they can just get the recording later.  Profs are required to record makeup classes though since technically students didn't agree to attend class at any time other than what was originally listed.  Another reason one of my profs asks us not to record classes beyond what she does officially is so that if she says something in class that isn't exactly professional (makes a joke, uses a bad word, or criticizes something at the institution) there won't be an audio/video recording of it that might either be turned in or go viral on youtube.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: violinp on April 19, 2012, 06:31:36 PM
I'm just curious. Why are you not OK with recording lectures? I thought it was a very common thing these days.

Not poundcake, but I'm assuming that it's a sneaky way to cheat on the final. The brother of a kid I knew recorded the audio of the lectures, then put it on his iPod and listened to that during the final.

He was allowed to listen to his Ipod during an exam?? We are not even allowed more than a few pens and that is it when we do a final. ( Obviously people who need to write their finals in another way are accommodated at another venue) The majority of our lectures are recorded but we have to agree that we will only use the recordings for our own study. Maybe its a copyright issue and they don't want their original lecture notes handed to other professors or put in academic papers as other students ideas.

Yup. They were allowed to listen to iPods. And the kid I knew was so embarrassed that her brother would even think to cheat that way.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: kherbert05 on April 19, 2012, 07:49:19 PM
This relates to residential life as well as general university ettiquette.

12) Don't slam doors at 2 a.m. The people on your hall have class in the morning and want to go to bed.
13) If your school doesn't let you have certain things in the dorm, please don't bring them. Or if you do, don't throw a fit when you're caught with them.
14) If it's illegal, don't keep it in the dorm room. The roommate(s)/suitemate(s) could get in trouble even if they never knew about it.
15) For discussion-based classes, be prepared to actually speak with the rest of the class. It's frustrating to be the only person besides the professor talking for the whole time.
16) Don't say things in class which are disproportionate to what's going on. Not talking in class ≠ putting one's classmates in slavery (actual thing said). That one's just plain offensive, actually, but y'all get the gist.


If you (admin/RA's) tell students that they will be held criminally libel if campus cops find illegal drugs/acholol in the room, do not say there is nothing you can do when an honest/non illegal substance using student reports her high as a kite can't walk down the stairs because she is floating roommate. Suggesting she has undiagnosed diabetes is not a good excuse for not doing something. Also your it is a free world we can't question students like this doesn't hold water after I was question for an extensive period of time after someone broke into my room to steal my epi kit to try and harm herself. Thank goodness she bent the needle and couldn't inject herself (this is before epipens)


While on that subject of epi, RA's should be told that the proper response to help me I can't breath because I've been exposed to Peanuts is not Leave me alone I have a party to get to. (Thankfully other people heard and got me to the ER) (To give them some credit she was not an RA the next year)


Sensitive subject in white


















Do not let the RA's and their supervisor hold Inquisitions dragging the roommates, suitemates, and  friends of a girl that attempted suicide in front of panels to be question about why they didn't stop her. Once I realized what was going on (I thought it was some type of mandatory counciling.), I got up told them I would not be answering their questions and my lawyer was X at  X firm in Houston - and dragged the other victims out of the room. Put them in a car and went to my cousin's house to call my parents and our lawyer. Then I had to talk my cousin and her DH out of stringing the whole lot of them up by their toenails.  You can bet there was an about face in attitude after that - most of the RA's and SA's gave me a wide berth after that. (Side note - our lawyer is also my "uncle". He and Dad went to K - University together.)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on April 22, 2012, 08:24:40 AM
This relates to residential life as well as general university ettiquette.

12) Don't slam doors at 2 a.m. The people on your hall have class in the morning and want to go to bed.
13) If your school doesn't let you have certain things in the dorm, please don't bring them. Or if you do, don't throw a fit when you're caught with them.
14) If it's illegal, don't keep it in the dorm room. The roommate(s)/suitemate(s) could get in trouble even if they never knew about it.
15) For discussion-based classes, be prepared to actually speak with the rest of the class. It's frustrating to be the only person besides the professor talking for the whole time.
16) Don't say things in class which are disproportionate to what's going on. Not talking in class ≠ putting one's classmates in slavery (actual thing said). That one's just plain offensive, actually, but y'all get the gist.


If you (admin/RA's) tell students that they will be held criminally libel if campus cops find illegal drugs/acholol in the room, do not say there is nothing you can do when an honest/non illegal substance using student reports her high as a kite can't walk down the stairs because she is floating roommate. Suggesting she has undiagnosed diabetes is not a good excuse for not doing something. Also your it is a free world we can't question students like this doesn't hold water after I was question for an extensive period of time after someone broke into my room to steal my epi kit to try and harm herself. Thank goodness she bent the needle and couldn't inject herself (this is before epipens)


While on that subject of epi, RA's should be told that the proper response to help me I can't breath because I've been exposed to Peanuts is not Leave me alone I have a party to get to. (Thankfully other people heard and got me to the ER) (To give them some credit she was not an RA the next year)


That is terrible that an RA would act like that. Our RA's do funny stuff sometimes, like have lightsaber fights with people or tease them a little (they do also write people up when necessary), but I'm sure that a lot of punishment would come down swiftly if they treated residents that way.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Mopsy428 on April 22, 2012, 08:50:24 AM
Professors: if you are going to use a guest lecturer who is giving the same lecture for different classes , please tell your students, especially if most of them are taking both classes.

I took two classes on the same day, and the first class we had a guest lecturer That was fine. I took notes. The class ended. 3 hours later, in a different class with the same professor, we had a "surprise" guest lecturer. It was the same guest lecturer, and yes, she was giving the exact same talk that she did 3 hours before.  Many of us were not amused and left.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: poundcake on April 24, 2012, 11:02:46 PM
I'm just curious. Why are you not OK with recording lectures? I thought it was a very common thing these days.

Cheating potential aside, it personally makes me very self-conscious, and hampers class discussion. No, I don't want to end up on YouTube!  :o It's also becoming more common for some classes to be recorded for online streaming by the university, and can actually create a conflict of "who owns the material?" the student or the school, so yes to the copyright issue as well.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: jeni on April 25, 2012, 03:14:23 AM
I'm glad I found this thread! I can really relate to some of the issues mentioned.  I work full time and study part time at uni, sometimes on campus and sometimes online.   When I actually get to campus, I really hate it when:

- students carry on conversations during lectures, that's just so rude, why do they even bother going, clearly they are not listening.
- students sitting behind you in lecture theatre put their feet in between the seat you are sitting in and the one next to you - just gross.
- when they kick or jiggle the back of your seat

When they do these things I just move when I can or turn and ask them to stop.

I hate giving presentations and one time it was an important one, and two students were giggling and chatting and it was so distracting. I really should have said something but I didn't, I was too nervous, and their behaviour put me off completely.

I would like some advice on something. Currently I'm in a class that varies between 10-15 people and in tutorial sessions we are supposed to actively engage in discussion on whatever the weekly tutorial tasks have been.  The problem is only about 3-4 people have ever actually done the questions before the tute class (the lecturer asks) and only about 3 people will ever speak.  You guessed it, I'm one of them.  After the first few weeks when this pattern became evident, I now sit back as long as I can and wait, wait and wait for someone else to speak before I say anything.

Sometimes I just say nothing at all and the lecturer launches into an explanation (sometimes I feel like an idiot because I do know what she is talking about), but I don't want to be the only one to speak.  Occasionally the lecturer has pointed to individuals and asked questions and they have just ignored her! I feel it's disrespectful not to answer, even if you're not sure surely a simple 'I'm not sure' is better than ignoring the lecturer?

My question is, how long to wait before offering an answer or asking a question myself?
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: kitty-cat on April 25, 2012, 08:18:23 AM
It's finals week at my uni and here's what I've seen:

Ya know that big sign with a cell phone in a circle with a line through it. With the caption that says "3rd and 4th floors are designated quiet areas". That means don't talk on the 3rd or 4th floor in anything above a slight whisper. This is why the good lord invented paper and pencil for notes and texting with your phone on silent...
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Wulfie on April 25, 2012, 09:39:10 AM
I'm glad I found this thread! I can really relate to some of the issues mentioned.  I work full time and study part time at uni, sometimes on campus and sometimes online.   When I actually get to campus, I really hate it when:

- students carry on conversations during lectures, that's just so rude, why do they even bother going, clearly they are not listening.
- students sitting behind you in lecture theatre put their feet in between the seat you are sitting in and the one next to you - just gross.
- when they kick or jiggle the back of your seat

I only wish this ended when people graduate!!  In order to keep my license, I have to attend at least 8 hours of continuing ed each year. My company requires MUCH more than that however.  I recently went to 2 classes the same week and at both of them, I saw exactly these kinds of things.

 The first one was about mental health for social service providers. We had two people doing a part of the class called "In their own words". These were two people who have been battling serious mental illness and were there telling us what it was like from their point of view.  I had a bunch of people start talking about this party they were going to after class. These were people in their 40s! They were the same people that slammed around getting coffee and bagels during the morning part of the class disrupting everyone's concentration.  Fortunately the instructor heard them and at the break called them aside and laid into them.  They sat their for the rest of the afternoon kicking seats, shoving tables when they went past them and in general, acting like 2 year olds.

At another class 2 days later on immigration law for the non-lawyer. I was late so grabbed the first seat I saw which was up in the front corner The people behind me were city council members for one of the smaller suburb cities. I learned all about what was going on in their city. Some of it was stuff I am pretty sure should not be discussed in public like it was! One of the ladies kept kicking my seat.  I mean CONSTANTLY kicking my seat. She was swinging her foot in a huge arc and kicking the back of my seat every single time. I finally turned around and asked her to stop as it was getting very painful. She told me where I could go and what I could do when I got there! I got up and moved to another area of the room during the first break. One of the presenters came to me during the break and asked what was going on, they had seen me say something to the woman behind me during her talk, I explained and apologized for disrupting her. She told me that this city council group is well known in the area for their poor behavior and they were probably only there to make a show of supporting immigration reform since it is an election year for most of them.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: kherbert05 on April 30, 2012, 08:42:20 PM
Wulfie,
     If doctors make the worst patients - then teachers make the worst students, and presenters about best practices make the absolute worst teachers.


   I have to get 8 hours each year also. I watch the listings for the summer classes and sign up for the week long classes designed by people on our staff. Those tend to have the best presenters, things you can actually use in class, and people who want to be there.


The worst is the 6 hour update we need for G&T. Those workshops tend to be the worst. Lots of theory very little you can actually use in class. 
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Mopsy428 on April 30, 2012, 09:47:41 PM
I've seen lawyers do that (talk non-stop) for CLE courses. Look, I'm definitely on the side of getting rid of CLEs. I hate going to them, and I think they are the biggest wastes of money on the planet. However, suck it up; pretend to listen, and just.stop.talking! One presenter walked over to two lawyers who were talking, stood in front of them, and finished his presentation while standing up against their desks. I hope they learned their lesson! They were so disruptive.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Garden Goblin on May 01, 2012, 10:03:21 AM
If we have a team meeting over the phone on Wednesday and decide Person A is doing part 1, Person B is doing part 2, and Person C is doing part 3, and all parts are due on Sunday at 5pm:

1pm on Sunday is not the time for Person C to decide she'd rather team up with Person B on part 2 and leave Person A to do parts 1 and 3.  The correct response to Person A's objection isn't 'well you should check the team forum more often to see if there are changes' and completely denying what was said in the verbal meeting.  Person A is not being mean if she then states that all future communication is to take place in a manner the provides a written record and that all changes must be agreed upon by Friday by all people the change affects.

It is especially absurd to tell Person A that 'well in the business/classroom it works like...' when Persons B and C are first time students who have never actually worked in a 'business setting' and Person A has a decade of experience and just finished up another degree at the same institution.  It makes Person A cranky. 
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: snowdragon on May 11, 2012, 10:38:27 PM
Do not walk into a test of any type and start talking to the professor about your paper, due in a half hour. It's not the fault of the 30 other students who are taking the test right NOW. When the prof tells you to leave don't further disturb the class with your protests about how you need to get this done. Really - not the student's problem.

Do not think that because you had a class in a room that it's yours during exam week unless you are taking an exam at that time. Exams are not always given in the same room as the class and you don't come first over students who are scheduled to be there...no I don't care that you're studying and their oral exam is disturbing you. They are where they are supposed to be.
e
Do not come to hand in your paper with out it formatted the way the prof stated,,,if she wants it in a manilla envelope, in MLA format don't do it in APA and in a folder with kittens on it.

For the Profs:

 Don't steal your student's work and donate it to an archive in your name. It's not your work.

 Don't try to start a race war, the results won't be pretty.  Discussing race issues may be germane to the class but calling your white students, "slave owners",, telling them that they are all guilty of being racist because they are white and that they all live in X area and believe Y is not something you could know and will make them very angry. When the black students tell you that you are way out of line, ask you if you even "like white people" and tell you that you are causing race issues on campus - dial it back several notches.

Don't share your favorite positions ( yes THAT , type) with your entire class, statements like "It doesn't matter how I get it, as long as I get it" , calling women the W word for women who are employed at night,,, ain't cool and screaming at some one to shut the F-word up when they protest is unprofessional, rude and sick. Really, you lost yourself a lot of respect doing that.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Black Delphinium on May 12, 2012, 06:52:03 AM
Just a lot of respect? Not his or her job?
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on May 12, 2012, 09:49:14 AM
*majorfacepalm* at the offensive prof in snowdragon's post. That guy should be fired.

If the girls next to me don't stop slamming their door loud enough to shake the adjoining wall and give me a major tension headache, I'm going to the RA. It's 24-hour quiet hours, which means no talking or unnecessary noise in the dorm room or lounges unless it's 7-9 p.m. It was 11 at night last night when they were doing this, and I have an Abnormal Psychology exam today.
At least their fine will be going to charity (I think the local food bank).
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: snowdragon on May 12, 2012, 11:10:50 AM
Just a lot of respect? Not his or her job?

Tenure is a "wonderful" thing. He's been reported to everyone who would listen, but beyond that I don't know what the consequences were.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: AnnaJ on May 12, 2012, 04:19:09 PM
Just a lot of respect? Not his or her job?

Tenure is a "wonderful" thing. He's been reported to everyone who would listen, but beyond that I don't know what the consequences were.

Tenure is not at fault here, it's the administration.  Tenured faculty can, and have been, fired at every university I know. 

From what you have said about this person, my suspicion is that this professor is a member of a minority group; if so, very likely the school's administration is reluctant to fire him/her for fear of bad publicity. If this person refers to white students in class as "slave owners" they will certainly be vocal about it if their job is in jeopardy.

Tenure is something faculty earn in college/university (I'm not too familiar with the process in K-12), and it can be dingdangity hard to earn.  I have seen cases where administration has granted tenure over the objections of the faculty, but that puts the blame squarely back where it belongs, on administration.     
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: violinp on May 12, 2012, 04:28:11 PM
Just a lot of respect? Not his or her job?

Tenure is a "wonderful" thing. He's been reported to everyone who would listen, but beyond that I don't know what the consequences were.

Tenure is not at fault here, it's the administration.  Tenured faculty can, and have been, fired at every university I know. 

From what you have said about this person, my suspicion is that this professor is a member of a minority group; if so, very likely the school's administration is reluctant to fire him/her for fear of bad publicity. If this person refers to white students in class as "slave owners" they will certainly be vocal about it if their job is in jeopardy.

Tenure is something faculty earn in college/university (I'm not too familiar with the process in K-12), and it can be dingdangity hard to earn.  I have seen cases where administration has granted tenure over the objections of the faculty, but that puts the blame squarely back where it belongs, on administration.   

Exactly. The administration at my old school allows a teacher to talk in graphic description about her sex life to her students to embarrass them, to tell other students' grades, and several other rather atrocious things, and then just throw up their hands and say, "She refuses to leave when we tell her to leave." Then call the cops to take her away, numbskulls! (http://www.smileyvault.com/albums/userpics/11655/banghead.gif) (http://www.smileyvault.com/) Frankly, she should've been quietly let go after a student who happened to live near her went over for a cup of sugar and the prof answered the door in nothing but bubblewrap, because that could have been potentially VERY embarrassing and detrimental to the numbers of students coming to the college - who wants to be taught by a person like that?
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: AnnaJ on August 23, 2013, 06:54:15 PM
As fall classes are about to begin...read the syllabus.  If you want to know whether or not the professor takes attendance, read the syllabus.  If you want to know her/his policy about extra credit, read the syllabus.  If you want to know if the final is cumulative, read the syllabus.  If the answer isn't in the syllabus, then ask the professor.

Asking questions that are answered in the syllabus is rude - we don't write them for our own amusement, we write them so that you, the student, have access to information that is important to your success in the class.  We do want you to do well, but our confidence in your abilities is shaken when we realize you haven't bothered to do the most basic task. 
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 23, 2013, 07:42:02 PM
Also, I just left the computer lab. I had to wait 30 minutes to print out 3 pages because the one printer was busy printing out a freakin' textbook or something for one person. The limit of printed pages is 20, so I don't know how she got away printing off two inches of stacked paper. Everyone in the lab was upset and late to their next class but she offered no apologies other than "I didn't know it would take so long!" Really? Printing off 500 pages didn't shock you or help you understand it would be inconsiderate to print it all at once?

I learned how to use the cancel job function on the printer because of people like that.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: snowdragon on August 25, 2013, 10:05:34 PM
Your fellow students do not owe you their notes. I don't care what the circumstances are behind your demand. Having what ever office takes care of needs like this ask ONCE is ok. But if no one responds - getting your classmates emails and sending 6 demands for notes stating "It's my right to have this done" will not endear you or make anyone more willing to help you.

  the school may have to provide you with a means to get notes,that does not mean your classmates are obligated to turn of theirs on demand. It may mean that your professor hands you notes - or a note taker who is not a student may be hired.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: snowdragon on August 26, 2013, 04:49:21 PM
If the location of the course is changed --tell the students via email or other official channels but letting students sit in the posted room and wonder where you are - is rude.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: MrTango on August 27, 2013, 09:05:48 AM
Instructors: Do not expect students to have already completed some bit of reading when they show up for the first class.  There are two problems with this:

1) We don't have the sylabus yet, so how are we supposed to know what to read?
2) The bookstore doesn't accurately indicate which materials are required vs. optional.

My personal rule was that until I had a syllabus in hand, I would not purchase any books for the course.  There were far too many times where a book was listed by the bookstore as "required" for a given course but then the actual syllabus wouldn't even mention that book.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Library Dragon on August 27, 2013, 05:38:51 PM
Instructors: Do not expect students to have already completed some bit of reading when they show up for the first class.  There are two problems with this:

1) We don't have the sylabus yet, so how are we supposed to know what to read?
2) The bookstore doesn't accurately indicate which materials are required vs. optional.

My personal rule was that until I had a syllabus in hand, I would not purchase any books for the course.  There were far too many times where a book was listed by the bookstore as "required" for a given course but then the actual syllabus wouldn't even mention that book.

POD

Sometimes the students haven't been able to even purchase the textbooks.  This happened to me, it's also happening to one of our library aides.  The college bookstore doesn't have any more of textbook A and the off campus bookstore doesn't have it.  She had to order a copy online and is hoping it arrives soon.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: cwm on August 28, 2013, 09:21:50 AM
Another note to instructors: If you're going to require reading from a book that's out of print, the class is grateful when you bring in printouts of what we're supposed to read. But if you forget to bring the printouts and you know that neither the school library nor the local library actually have any copies of the book, please make a small note to remind yourself that it was literally not possible for the class to do the reading. Especially when you, as the instructor, have no open office hours between the class period you forget the handouts and the class period we're expected to have read them.

Yes, this happened. Luckily I'd found a copy of the book on eBay and a few of my classmates lived in the dorms with me and could read it, but she tried to take participation points away from most of the class. We all had to remind her quite vocally that we didn't actually get the readings, we couldn't have read them. She finally remembered, after arguing with us for nearly twenty minutes, that her printer HAD been broken last Tuesday and they hadn't fixed it until early Thursday and oh yeah, she didn't give us the readings because she didn't have time to stop by the library to get everything printed.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Cherry91 on August 28, 2013, 09:55:18 AM
If you accidentally lock yourself out on the secondary fire escape of the student halls, the one that's not supposed to be used unless there's an, oh yes, FIRE, because a group of you decided to go on an "adventure", and then proceed to hammer on the door and shout for me since my room is directly across from it, I will not be impressed.

When you do this at 3am, I will make serious consideration of leaving you there until morning.

(I didn't, if anyone's worried, but I let them sweat for a few minutes, since they had a habit of being really loud and stupid, always at 3am, and I had a lot of classes first thing)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: StuffedGrapeLeaves on September 03, 2013, 04:34:08 PM
The library is a quiet place - respect that.

The library at my university was expected to be fully quiet, but there was a designated quiet area. The lower level was where people could work on group projects and talk at a respectful volume to each other but upstairs was understood to be dead quiet - not a peep.

Of course, you would have these SS ones who thought it was okay to just whip out their cell phone and have this nice long and loud discussion. There was also a guy who played a film on his laptop - through the speakers ! And don't get me started on the texters who can't be bothered to turn their phone to silent .. Really - were these people raised in a barn ?

Alternatively, if you need a quiet place to study, don't go into the student union and glare and curse at other students who are talking at normal volume. 
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Miss Understood on September 03, 2013, 10:36:19 PM
This is a lecture and discussion class. Do not bring your laptop/iPad/gadgetry unless you need it for a medical purpose or are physically unable to use a pen and paper.


I am curious about this particular issue.  I type 85+ WPM but my handwriting is absolutely illegible, even to me.  Why would you not allow your students to type their notes rather than write them longhand?  (I'm not even part of the younger generation that has never needed to write longhand for any length of time - I did, but I lost it over time.)
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: NyaChan on September 03, 2013, 11:19:43 PM
This is a lecture and discussion class. Do not bring your laptop/iPad/gadgetry unless you need it for a medical purpose or are physically unable to use a pen and paper.


I am curious about this particular issue.  I type 85+ WPM but my handwriting is absolutely illegible, even to me.  Why would you not allow your students to type their notes rather than write them longhand?  (I'm not even part of the younger generation that has never needed to write longhand for any length of time - I did, but I lost it over time.)

Personally prefer a computer to take notes, but some profs hate it because students aren't paying attention or taking notes - they are on FB, instant messaging, watching whatever game is on, playing tetris, web surfing, etc.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Nibsey on September 04, 2013, 08:55:11 AM
This is a lecture and discussion class. Do not bring your laptop/iPad/gadgetry unless you need it for a medical purpose or are physically unable to use a pen and paper.


I am curious about this particular issue.  I type 85+ WPM but my handwriting is absolutely illegible, even to me.  Why would you not allow your students to type their notes rather than write them longhand?  (I'm not even part of the younger generation that has never needed to write longhand for any length of time - I did, but I lost it over time.)

Personally prefer a computer to take notes, but some profs hate it because students aren't paying attention or taking notes - they are on FB, instant messaging, watching whatever game is on, playing tetris, web surfing, etc.

As a TA I allowed computers in class but only with the understanding that they had to be put away if I asked. This was for a few reasons. Firstly seminars are meant to be class discussions (in the perfect seminar I shouldn't have to open my mouth after telling the students the assignment) so you shouldn't be taking more than a few short notes yet the people with laptops tended to take vast amount of notes while letting other students do the work.

I also found having laptops screens infront of people's faces hindered discussions ie people hiding behind their screen.  I also found it a bit of a distraction in the smaller classrooms when trying to recall some more complicated material to hear a clickety click every time I stopped to think. They could also cause a distraction when people started squabbling over plug sockets.

It also helped matters that as a history class looking at primary documents that old fashioned pen and paper actually worked better for taking notes on copies of primary documents (ie circling/underling the relevant info) than computers anyway.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: cwm on September 04, 2013, 09:00:11 AM
This is a lecture and discussion class. Do not bring your laptop/iPad/gadgetry unless you need it for a medical purpose or are physically unable to use a pen and paper.


I am curious about this particular issue.  I type 85+ WPM but my handwriting is absolutely illegible, even to me.  Why would you not allow your students to type their notes rather than write them longhand?  (I'm not even part of the younger generation that has never needed to write longhand for any length of time - I did, but I lost it over time.)

Personally prefer a computer to take notes, but some profs hate it because students aren't paying attention or taking notes - they are on FB, instant messaging, watching whatever game is on, playing tetris, web surfing, etc.

As a TA I allowed computers in class but only with the understanding that they had to be put away if I asked. This was for a few reasons. Firstly seminars are meant to be class discussions (in the perfect seminar I shouldn't have to open my mouth after telling the students the assignment) so you shouldn't be taking more than a few short notes yet the people with laptops tended to take vast amount of notes while letting other students do the work.

I also found having laptops screens infront of people's faces hindered discussions ie people hiding behind their screen.  I also found it a bit of a distraction in the smaller classrooms when trying to recall some more complicated material to hear a clickety click every time I stopped to think. They could also cause a distraction when people started squabbling over plug sockets.

It also helped matters that as a history class looking at primary documents that old fashioned pen and paper actually worked better for taking notes on copies of primary documents (ie circling/underling the relevant info) than computers anyway.

For discussion/seminar classes I agree. But if a professor had tried to tell me I couldn't use my laptop to take notes during my biology lecture class, or any other class where there was a large amount of information given and no discussion from the class itself, I would be understandably upset.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: ladyknight1 on September 04, 2013, 02:08:24 PM
Oh, I have so much to add! I work full time and study full time at my university.

I have a class that is mixed mode, as in it meets one hour a week and then everything else is online. The professor has been gracious enough to upload her lecture powerpoint with voice over on the course page in my university's website. Two weeks in a row, students have posted online minutes after the class meeting that they could not attend and wanted notes. Even though the lecture and powerpoint are available!  ??? Also, in this class we have a constant talker who sits right in front of the lecturer and responds to everything she says.

For my other face to face class, which is 4000 level, people continually arrive late. We have a quiz next week and the professor moved the quiz time to the last portion of class so the latecomers can still take the quiz. I think that is very generous, but people are complaining that it is not fair. Thus far, after 5 class meetings, no one has left early, so I don't see an issue with having quizzes at the end. Oh, and students are complaining that we haven't had enough classroom time to review the material covered in the quiz next Tuesday, so I offered to meet with other students for a study group. No response.

Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: snowdragon on September 04, 2013, 11:30:25 PM
A student's ADA accommodations override your prohibitions of anything - recording, "guests" or what have you.  If you can't deal with the fact that a student might be LD enough to need to record rather the write notes, or need a sign language interpreter or notes in braille and a seeing eye dog - get over it or don't teach but you can't deny a student documented accommodations for any reason.

Your student's research is not yours to steal and donate.

Your students don't care about your religious beliefs, ethical concerns, or scrabble proclivities - nor do you professors.

coming drunk to class is not a good thing.

and for the love of all that is holy....if your professor is required to meet during exam week and decides  to show a movie than give an exam - don't have a foot stomping, desk pounding temper tantrum because you don't want to stay.  Really - it does not look good.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Twik on September 17, 2013, 11:11:59 AM
If you accidentally lock yourself out on the secondary fire escape of the student halls, the one that's not supposed to be used unless there's an, oh yes, FIRE, because a group of you decided to go on an "adventure", ...

This gave me the immediate mental image of Bilbo Baggins and the dwarves on your fire escape.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: ladyknight1 on September 17, 2013, 11:16:19 AM
It is bad form to do your yoga exercises while blocking the hallway outside a classroom door. Find a dead end hallway to do it in, or better yet, the rec and wellness center yoga room!
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: SplishFish on September 26, 2013, 12:40:56 PM
Been a while since I graduated, but a couple stand out:

- Partying is fine, but it must be done in moderation. If your drinking is interfering with things like taking tests, you need to seek help.
A roomate of mine spent at least 1/2 a semester drunk or hung over. She missed a final because of a hangover but managed to talk the prof into rescheduling it. What did she do? She got good and drunk the night before the rescheduled test and missed it AGAIN. Not surprisingly, she was put on academic probation and later flunked out.

- Do your share of group work or get dropped from the final grade.
We had a group member blow off all the work. The ONLY thing responsibility we gave her was to deliver the completed project to the prof (because the other group members couldn't because of work or early morning classes on the other side of campus). She couldn't even do that. We told the prof exactly what happened and she received zero points for the final projectó50% of the grade. (Thankfully, the prof was understanding and gave us deserving group members full credit. The slacker's excuse? "Oh, I forgot.")
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: purplerainbow on October 06, 2013, 05:15:14 PM
In an on-campus computer lab/the university library, you do not get to "save" seats for friends who are "using this computer". (As in, the friend hasn't arrived and there is nobody actually sitting there using the computer.)
Especially if there is a queue to use said computers.
Especially during high-traffic times when there are no other computers free.
My presence trumps your friend "coming". If they're not here and not logged on, they're not using the computer.


Please don't talk/make noise/do anything else distracting during, or throughout, a lecture.
You've finished compulsory education, and are now (hopefully), an adult attending university by choice. As in, you don't actually have to be here. It's rude to the lecturer, and to everyone else. Very few of the subjects I've done have taken attendance in lectures (arts subjects), so you could have just gone to the pub to continue your conversation if you didn't actually want to learn.

[Basically, please don't do anything that will affect anyone's learning or grades than your own.
You may be happy to scrape through with minimum effort, but it's not fair to drag other people down. So pull your weight in group projects. Don't troll/bait people when they're trying to get something done. Don't treat the library as a common room to brag about last night's party when there's a pub/social gathering area 30 seconds down the path.

Disabled students do not have it "easy".
Support is put in place to put disabled students on a level playing field. They (we) are NOT "lazy/thick/entitled/making stuff up/scamming the system" to get "free laptops", extra time in exams, note-takers, etc. You want the "benefit"?  >:( Take the disability with it. Trust me, we'd really rather not be disabled.

Your classmates do not "owe" you notes.
I've given my notes to classmates before. Some of them have helped me out the same way. But it was occasional, not habitual, and something we did as friends if the other person had missed the lecture due to illness or something. The notes were not handed out to strangers by hardworking students because Jimmy went to this awesome party last night and decided to sleep in. That's rude. If you can't be bothered to make the class, then expect someone to give you the notes they struggled in for 9am to take, you are insulting them. You are basically saying, "I had better stuff to do than be in class, but you didn't, schmuck."


Don't be the drunken idiot who everyone has to carry home. Or if you are, at least be grateful.
I only had one incident of extreme drunkenness where some friends had to take me back to my room. Fortunately, it was on campus, in the building next to my dorm (the central building housed the student bar). I tried cider for the first time and liked it, but then forgot that I shouldn't mix. (I'm not a heavyweight drinker.) It was only the second (and last!) time in my life that I'd ever been drunk enough to need taking home, and I thanked my friends profusely.
My "friend" J, on the other hand, was the opposite. (He and I are no longer friends.) J likes to drink. He drinks to the point that he blacks out, pretty much every weekend. At one point he got kicked out of the same club 2 weekends in a row for being drunk and disorderly, and starting a fight. You constantly have to watch him and stop him punching some innocent bystander for some perceived slight. Anyway, most nights out, he has to be carried home. One night, the "friend" J was clubbing with, dumped a drunken, almost-passed-out J on a mutual friend of ours, C (who had only recently arrived, and had one drink) who got him in a taxi and took him home. By the time he got in the front door, J couldn't even remember having been in the taxi 30 seconds ago. J's housemate of the time (another friend of ours) literally had to watch him all night to make sure he didn't choke on his own vomit. When it was suggested that J should be grateful to C for getting him home, and apologise for spoiling C's night, J complained indignantly, "Why? He didn't have to, did he? He could have just left me there!"  ::)   >:(  Um, no. We all know that C, like most normal people, has a conscience. C wasn't going to just leave J lying in the gutter, alone, at night, unable to even remember his own name, for goodness knows what to happen to him.
So, yeah. If you're drinking, that's fine. Being carried home occasionally by friends is acceptable dependent on friendship groups etc, but it really gets to be a pain if you're doing it EVERY time you go out. We want to have a good time too. Also, please note that if you need looking after EVERY time we go out for a drink, invitations will soon disappear.

People with cars are not your personal taxi service/chauffeur.
If your friend/housemate has a car, and OFFERS you a lift, or suggests you grocery shop together and put the shopping in the car, it's OK to accept. But it's not a constitutional right (or polite) to demand they drive you somewhere whenever you please. If you want a car, pay for one yourself.

Taking a degree in something does not make you a leading expert.
I used to know a guy who bragged all the time about how he was a "BMusEd" student. (His degree was Musical Education, and he wanted to become a high school music teacher.) But he has such a superiority complex about it. He thinks his degree makes him the authority on schools, and on music. ANY piece of music you hear, be it on the radio, TV, in a club, whatever, he'll immediately start telling you what key it's in, and start criticising something about it - it's flat/off key/the artist has a lousy voice.  ::) And unless you did his course, even if you play several instruments to a high standard AND know all the theory, AND teach music, you can't possibly know as much as him.
He also thought he was a leading authority on schools, because he did a few weeks' placement in order to get the class credits. He'd always make a HUGE deal out of something small, then when I commented saying he was making a mountain out of a molehill and the topic was basic common sense rather than actual law, he tried patronising me. Um, I've worked in schools longer than he has, plus my mother has been a high school teacher for 20+ years. Trust me, I know things.
So, yeah... don't feel you have to know everything. Just because you're studying, say, English Lit, doesn't mean you're expected to know the complete works of Shakespeare off by heart.

Don't out people. Or mock them.
For a fair number of the LGBTQ community, university is the first time they've been able to find people who "get" their issues, or who are openly gay or whatever. Sometimes it's the first time they've had the opportunity to date like the rest of their peers. For some, such as transgendered people, it's the first opportunity some of them have to be in control of their own gender identity.
However, just because they're out to YOU, doesn't mean they're out to everyone. Sometimes their family doesn't know, or doesn't approve. Sometimes they just don't want their sexuality/gender identity/confusion etc to be a big deal, or the subject of hot gossip across campus. Whatever the reason, it's not your place to "out" someone.
Also, don't mock. If you don't understand something, or don't know how to support someone going through issues, just ask the LGBTQ society. Most likely there will be someone willing to explain things you're not sure of. And no, you don't have to be gay to go to a meeting!  :P

You are an adult, and the university aren't mind-readers.
If there's a problem, the uni will generally bend over backwards to try and help you. But if you want an appointment with the counsellor, for example, you have to book it - they don't know you'll want to see them. This isn't like high school, where you have a homeroom teacher or whoever to set you up with a meeting there. Nor is it your mum's job to call the faculty.
When I had problems in my personal life that were affecting my studies, the university were amazingly helpful - when I told them I was having problems. Until I told them, all they knew was that I wasn't turning up to tutorials or handing in much work. When I emailed my adviser to actually ask for help, she was amazing.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Cherry91 on October 07, 2013, 03:40:24 AM
In an on-campus computer lab/the university library, you do not get to "save" seats for friends who are "using this computer". (As in, the friend hasn't arrived and there is nobody actually sitting there using the computer.)
Especially if there is a queue to use said computers.
Especially during high-traffic times when there are no other computers free.
My presence trumps your friend "coming". If they're not here and not logged on, they're not using the computer.

Related to this:

Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: Lillie82 on October 10, 2013, 09:51:32 PM
A student's ADA accommodations override your prohibitions of anything - recording, "guests" or what have you.  If you can't deal with the fact that a student might be LD enough to need to record rather the write notes, or need a sign language interpreter or notes in braille and a seeing eye dog - get over it or don't teach but you can't deny a student documented accommodations for any reason.

I asked to be allowed to record as an ADA accommodation, along with some other accommodation requests. My academic advisor (I was also taking the class she taught) took me into her office after the first class of the year and said that in the 'real world' of the field we were in, I would have to learn to do without those, so I wouldn't be allowed them in class (meaning any of my classes.)

She was incredibly intimidating to argue with, just because of her persuasive skills, which actually made her brilliant in teaching the subject she taught, and I ended up loving her classes.

When I shared with other students the story of being denied permission to record, they brought up some of the ulterior motives we've discussed here, primarily, "She doesn't want you selling her lectures on the black market."
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: alkira6 on October 10, 2013, 11:21:32 PM
A student's ADA accommodations override your prohibitions of anything - recording, "guests" or what have you.  If you can't deal with the fact that a student might be LD enough to need to record rather the write notes, or need a sign language interpreter or notes in braille and a seeing eye dog - get over it or don't teach but you can't deny a student documented accommodations for any reason.

I asked to be allowed to record as an ADA accommodation, along with some other accommodation requests. My academic advisor (I was also taking the class she taught) took me into her office after the first class of the year and said that in the 'real world' of the field we were in, I would have to learn to do without those, so I wouldn't be allowed them in class (meaning any of my classes.)
She was incredibly intimidating to argue with, just because of her persuasive skills, which actually made her brilliant in teaching the subject she taught, and I ended up loving her classes.

When I shared with other students the story of being denied permission to record, they brought up some of the ulterior motives we've discussed here, primarily, "She doesn't want you selling her lectures on the black market."

After I was diagnosed and had my accommodations registered I had one teacher try this with me.  I insisted that he put it in writing that he was denying me accommodations for a registered disability without offering any alternate accomodations.  Amazingly I got to bring in my laptop and record lectures.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: purplerainbow on October 12, 2013, 08:55:09 AM
Thought of a few more!

Argue/debate minutiae with the lecturer in your own time, not during the lecture.
I'm not a lecturer/teaching professional myself, but I'm pretty sure they (and everyone else!) would appreciate it if you went to see them during their office hours to discuss minute details, rather than waste our lecture times. The professor or guest speaker or whoever only has one hour in the lecture. The rest of us want to learn. If you want to debate/discuss/elaborate on the finer points of ____, or put forward hypothetical situations to dis/prove a theory, do it on your time, not ours.

Sometime after 11am is  not an unreasonable hour to have a conversation, even in halls.
Yes, I know the walls in halls of residence are paper thin and you can practically hear the person next door's thoughts. But if I'm standing in the doorway of my friend's room and our conversation (at normal volume) goes on a bit longer than anticipated, at practically midday on a Saturday, we are not being unreasonable.  ::) This happened in first year. It was going on midday, and party girl who doesn't care about disturbing people at all hours of the night because she's drunk, thought it was highly unreasonable that some of us would actually have a conversation in the daytime. Cue her shouting, "It's 11 in the morning!" as if we were committing some heinous crime. Um, no. Just because you went partying all night, does not mean we should tiptoe around you in the daytime.  ::)

Don't complain bitterly about the university not supporting/helping you at all, if you haven't even told them you're having problems.
Universities aren't psychic. And while they DO care, the reality is there are thousands of students here. They can't keep tabs on every single one. They might note whether you turned up for tutorials etc (if a register is taken), if you're handing in work, or failing classes; whether you've paid the rent on your room in halls of residence, etc. The flip side of all the freedom you get? It's taking responsibility for yourself. So if, say, your grandmother died and the grief is affecting your work, it's up to you to speak to your tutor/lecturer/adviser, get yourself an appointment with the counselling service, etc. The help is there - you just have to ask for it, rather than expect it to fall in your lap.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: scotcat60 on October 14, 2013, 06:10:17 AM
Sometimes the students haven't been able to even purchase the textbooks.

And this can be because the book is out of print, but the lecturer giving out the reading list has not bothered to check that. When I was working, we would get calls from other colleges asking ot borrow a certain book, because the author was one of our staff. However, it had been out of print for several years, our only copy had been "liberated" by some selfish person, and even the author himself was unable to help enquirers. I finally told one person who said "But it's on my reading list" to take the said reading list to the lecturer and point this out. That was the last time anyone ever rang asking for that particular book, though I did hear that it was going to be reprinted.

Don't moan that the library is closed, when in fact you do have access to it. The office is closed, because there is only one member of staff on duty, who has been/will be on duty all day, and needs a lunch break.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: purplerainbow on October 15, 2013, 02:31:33 PM
If you're a party animal, that's cool. I really don't mind people going clubbing or whatever every night of the week if they so choose. I drink myself on a night out. What I do mind, however, is when said party animal repeatedly tries to turn even the most casual get-together (eg going to someone's house, or a BBQ) into a total drink-fest with the music turned right up. If you want a wild night, arrange one - but I get became tired of people turning every meet-up into a liver-pounding party. (I am no longer friends with the culprits.) Sometimes I just want a casual, relaxed catch-up with friends with good conversation, you know?

Please, please could people quit with the "if you're friends with them, you can't be friends with me" tripe?  ::) It's so juvenile; people actually did this to me when I was about 10. You don't get to decide who I'm friends with just because you don't mesh well with the other person. If you keep up the "them or me" campaign, you can bet I'll drop you.

Living up to the student stereotype (whatever that is) does NOT give you licence to be a pain in the backside (to put it in Ehell-approved terms), whether you live in student digs or not. "Living life to the full", believe it or not, isn't a euphemism for "treat everyone like rubbish when they complain about behaviour you wouldn't want to be subjected to, because they're obviously just boring/square/trying to spoil your fun". Have some consideration for the people around you. Just because your parents aren't around to tell you off, doesn't mean something is automatically acceptable.



Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: camlan on November 03, 2013, 08:00:19 AM
Sometimes the students haven't been able to even purchase the textbooks.

And this can be because the book is out of print, but the lecturer giving out the reading list has not bothered to check that. When I was working, we would get calls from other colleges asking ot borrow a certain book, because the author was one of our staff. However, it had been out of print for several years, our only copy had been "liberated" by some selfish person, and even the author himself was unable to help enquirers. I finally told one person who said "But it's on my reading list" to take the said reading list to the lecturer and point this out. That was the last time anyone ever rang asking for that particular book, though I did hear that it was going to be reprinted.

When I was a teaching assistant for Freshman English, I didn't really "assist" anyone. I taught my own class and got to pick the books for it. Just before the start of every semester, I'd go into the bookstore and check to see if all the books I'd ordered were in yet.

One semester, I had ordered "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," which is a Middle English poem. I'd carefully chosen the edition that was translated into Modern English, as I didn't expect incoming freshmen to be fluent in Middle English.

So I was very surprised to find the Middle English edition on the shelf for my class. I stormed over to the book ordering office to find out what was going on. They had to spend a couple of days researching the issue.

One publisher, the one that published the book I needed, had been bought out by another publisher. The second publisher now had three editions of "Sir Gawain" on its list, which was thought by someone to be one too many editions. So, without checking to see what the differences between the editions were, they deleted the only translation from their list, and kept the two editions that were in Middle English.

The book store was able to scrounge up enough copies of the edition I needed, and the following semester, I was happy to see that logic had prevailed at the publishing house, and they were once again offering the translated version.
Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: AccountingIsFun on October 01, 2015, 03:32:49 PM
Please remember that the professor often does not have the power to change what publishers have done.
Please do not berate us for problems with a computer system that we are required to use.
Read the syllabus, shower, do not surf facebook during class.
I know the game is important, but having a long discussion about it during class is never appropriate.
If I have told you that I am allergic to perfume, please do not wear perfume to my classroom. I will be sick for days later.
I am not psychic but I am not stupid either - so don't make up weird excuses why you are missing class or not doing the homework, but don't just ghost.
Learning comes from hard work, so please be prepared that class isn't going to be easy. If college was easy, everyone would do it - remember Terry Pratchett said "If you trust in yourself...and believe in your dreams....and follow your star.... you'll still get beaten by people who spent their time working hard and learning things and weren't so lazy".

Title: Re: University Etiquette
Post by: EllenS on October 01, 2015, 03:59:29 PM
Please remember that the professor often does not have the power to change what publishers have done.
Please do not berate us for problems with a computer system that we are required to use.
Read the syllabus, shower, do not surf facebook during class.
I know the game is important, but having a long discussion about it during class is never appropriate.
If I have told you that I am allergic to perfume, please do not wear perfume to my classroom. I will be sick for days later.
I am not psychic but I am not stupid either - so don't make up weird excuses why you are missing class or not doing the homework, but don't just ghost.
Learning comes from hard work, so please be prepared that class isn't going to be easy. If college was easy, everyone would do it - remember Terry Pratchett said "If you trust in yourself...and believe in your dreams....and follow your star.... you'll still get beaten by people who spent their time working hard and learning things and weren't so lazy".

I absolutely love that quote.