Etiquette Hell

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Title: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: DuBois on October 03, 2011, 02:00:34 PM


I just had breakfast for dinner tonight (mmmmm, breakfast for dinner) and I wondered about the differences between British and American breakfast. I am British, and here a standard breakfast is eggs either fried or scrambled, sausages, black pudding (which is made of pig's blood potato scones (which are a kind of flat bread made with potato flour) and often tomatoes or mushrooms, and the all important bacon. Some people add baked beans (Heinz) but I abhor them so I don't.

What is an American breakfast? I know about waffles with bacon and maple syrup (and I love it!) and I've heard of hash browns but I don't think I've ever had them. One big difference between the UK and US I think is the type of sausage available.  Most non-Brits don't like British sausages because we have a percentage of bread or 'rusk' in our sausages. I was brought up with British sausages and can't eat any other kind: when I lived in the States the one thing I couldn't stomach were the sausages, they were too meaty for me.  Are there any other differences?
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Hushabye on October 03, 2011, 02:22:43 PM
Well, first, I highly doubt you'll find black pudding making the table in pretty much any American breakfast scenario, unless the cook is British.  :)

Second, an "American breakfast" really varies based on where you are.  In the South, a good breakfast will most likely include biscuits (the American kind) and gravy (usually sausage gravy), grits (ground corn kernels boiled with water or milk and generally served with butter, salt, and pepper), eggs, bacon/ham/sausage, and maybe a hashbrown casserole (hashed potatoes, cheese, general yumminess).  Home fries are also an option (potatoes cut in small chunks and fried with bell peppers and onions, usually).

As far as sausage, I've never had British sausage, so I can't speak to the differences between British and American sausage.  I prefer links to patties myself.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: faithlessone on October 03, 2011, 02:23:15 PM
I've heard of hash browns but I don't think I've ever had them.

Really? I'm in the UK, and they're an option at most breakfast restaurants I've been to. I also make them myself at home - they're really easy, if a little messy.

ETA:
Home fries are also an option (potatoes cut in small chunks and fried with bell peppers and onions, usually).

Is that what that is? I had it for dinner today! Here I was thinking it was just a mess of stuff in a pan, and it's an actual dish. ;D
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Perfect Circle on October 03, 2011, 02:26:07 PM
I've heard of hash browns but I don't think I've ever had them.

Really? I'm in the UK, and they're an option at most breakfast restaurants I've been to. I also make them myself at home - they're really easy, if a little messy.

My husband loves his hash browns too.

Also, the sausage/meat thing really depends on what you buy. My favourite sausages are 97% meat because I really like a good quality, meaty sausage.

Sorry, not trying to be picky, I just really love my good quality British sausages which are the best in the world.

I also agree that breakfast for dinner is sometimes the best thing in the world.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Nibsey on October 03, 2011, 02:26:35 PM
And I'm posting this to make everyone hungry

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/37/Full_Ulster_fry.jpg/200px-Full_Ulster_fry.jpg)

A Ulster fry  >:D
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Hushabye on October 03, 2011, 02:28:50 PM
ETA:
Home fries are also an option (potatoes cut in small chunks and fried with bell peppers and onions, usually).

Is that what that is? I had it for dinner today! Here I was thinking it was just a mess of stuff in a pan, and it's an actual dish. ;D

Yep!  Growing up, my mom just called them fried potatoes, although that might have been because she sliced them thinly rather than into cubes or chunks, but in restaurants, if that's what you want, you're going to be looking for home fries.  I tend to eat them with gravy or ketchup.  :D
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: LB on October 03, 2011, 02:31:27 PM
Scrambled or fried (or poached, or hard boiled or soft boiled) eggs, toast (wheat, white, sourdough), buttermilk bisquits (sometimes with sausage gravy on top) sausage, ham, bacon, french toast, hash browns, cereal, fried potatoes, pancakes, waffles, coffee, milk, orange juice.

Those are all  some of the components of some typical American breakfasts. From what I see, people generally put together different combos of three or four of the above foods. Or more if they feel like it.

Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: LB on October 03, 2011, 02:32:10 PM
Oh, I forgot - steak and eggs is a pretty popular breakfast too, if you're really hungry in the morning. :-)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Maujer on October 03, 2011, 02:36:10 PM
I'm American, but my family always has baked beans and corned beef hash for cooked breakfast. But according to my friends and husband, most Americans don't eat baked beans with breakfast. Maybe it's an Irish-American thing?
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: blue2000 on October 03, 2011, 02:38:14 PM
Canadian here. A typical restaurant breakfast (here and in parts of the US) would be eggs, bacon/sausage/ham, hash browns or home fries, and toast and jam. With ketchup, of course. Some places offer pancakes with bacon, toast, and jam. I was brought up on pure meat sausage - the breakfast sausages here are not meaty enough for me! Other than that, the British version sounds tasty. :)

Note - I don't remember ever having hash browns, so I can't tell you how they taste. I get home fries, although I've never had them with bell peppers or onions, just fried potatoes. Very tasty, but usually a massive plateful - either I stuff myself silly or I end up taking them home!

And now I vote we take a field trip to Nibsey's house. You know, just for research purposes.  ;D
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: LB on October 03, 2011, 02:41:56 PM
I'm American, but my family always has baked beans and corned beef hash for cooked breakfast. But according to my friends and husband, most Americans don't eat baked beans with breakfast. Maybe it's an Irish-American thing?

I don't really know about other areas (I'm in Utah), but I've never seen baked beans for breakfast. Corned beef hash is also rare around here, but I have seen it offered at a few restaurants.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Rohanna on October 03, 2011, 02:46:01 PM
If I was getting an "all day breakfast" diner style breakfast most places in Canada, I would expect bacon (usually with the option of "breakfast sausages" or thick sliced ham), fried eggs, toast and jam. Most places coffee comes with the meal though you can generally get tea instead. Frequently a token piece of fruit makes an appearance, usually a few orange slices or cantaloupe.

edited to add: I forgot homefries frequently come with an all-day breakfast (I see homefries more than hashbrowns, locally).

The second most common local breakfast is Finn pancakes and breakfast sausage, with generous amounts of maple syrup over both.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: P-p-p-penguin on October 03, 2011, 02:53:18 PM
I had breakfast for dinner yesterday. It was delicious!

Brit here:
- Eggs. Preferrably fried, but scrambled will do.
- Sausages.
- Bacon.
- Toast.
- Mushrooms.
- Fried tomatoes.
- Hash browns.
- Black pudding.
- Baked beans.

I don't eat all of that (I eat most :D) but those are the main ingredients in my neck of the woods. You might have other things, like potato farls, but they're not that common.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: audrey1962 on October 03, 2011, 03:01:10 PM
When I have breakfast*, it's almost always an omelette. I usually have mine with toast, no potatoes. Maybe some fruit, too.

*I'm not talking about my usual morning meal during the workweek - that's something quick like oatmeal or maybe a baked egg. But on weekends I have time to make breakfast.

ETA: I'm in Detroit, Mich., USA
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: aventurine on October 03, 2011, 03:02:47 PM
It ain't breakfast unless there are grits involved.  Growing up, breakfast consisted of a fried egg, runny yellow, served with grits (salt & pepper), bacon (sometimes sausage patties) and a biscuit. 

My mother swears to this day she can't make biscuits.  I say she's the only person who should be allowed to make them.   :-*

Lapis sugars his grits.  I have no idea where he came from. 
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Brentwood on October 03, 2011, 03:25:43 PM
Wait...so no one's mentioned a Snickers bar and a Mountain Dew as the breakfast of champions? ;)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: frogonmytoe on October 03, 2011, 03:45:01 PM
American here, spent a semester in England.

The big differences:
- in the US, the options for breakfast are HUGE! Bagels, cereal, fruit, yogurt, pastries, egg sandwiches, omelets, pancakes, waffles, on and on and on. plus your meats & egg combos with hash browns or home fries, or skillet dishes.
- breakfast available out and at any hour. 24 hour diners are a specialty of my homestate, and yay for that :P

Love love love england. But I LOOOVE american breakfasts! I usually cook up a bigger one at least once on the weekend, eggs, toast or biscuits, bacon or sausage. during the week i don't really eat one.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: violinp on October 03, 2011, 03:49:22 PM
Wait...so no one's mentioned a Snickers bar and a Mountain Dew as the breakfast of champions? ;)

Hehe. I have a FiberOne bar and Simply Orange orange juice (that stuff tastes so much better than Tropicana).
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: DuBois on October 03, 2011, 04:00:50 PM


I'll have to try grits. They sound absolutely delicious! As for hash browns, I haven't had them because I'm not over fond of fried potatoes (weirdly, I like chips/french fries) so I prefer having the potato farls. The US certainly seems to have a wider variety of breakfast foods that we do!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: aventurine on October 03, 2011, 09:58:36 PM
Wait...so no one's mentioned a Snickers bar and a Mountain Dew as the breakfast of champions? ;)

Or cracklins and boudin, as I put on my FB page during a trip recently   ;D
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: hyzenthlay on October 03, 2011, 10:06:24 PM
Here is the southwest the breakfast of choice is frequently a breakfast burrito  ;D

Eggs, potatoes, cheese and chili in a tortilla.

Potatoes might be hash browns or pan fried. Chili is either red or green (hot sauce made from chili plants, NOT from bell peppers.) We usually substitute a hot salsa for the chili at home. And they usually contain either bacon, sausage or chorizo (a hot spicy sausage.) 

Blake's Lotaburger makes the best breakfast burritos.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Brentwood on October 03, 2011, 10:19:19 PM
My many recent visits to Texas have introduced me to the breakfast pleasure that is migas (eggs cooked with strips of fried tortillas, jalapenos, onions, tomatoes, cheese, and, for me, chorizo ).
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: kitty-cat on October 03, 2011, 11:27:01 PM
Wait...so no one's mentioned a Snickers bar and a Mountain Dew as the breakfast of champions? ;)

A bottle of Coke and a pack of Twizzlers. Especially if you use the Twizzlers as a straw at the start of the bottle of soda.

Breakfast of the college student. (i can call anything breakfast though. i even had sushi for breakfast once- not one of my better ideas though)

On topic: When we actually make breakfast it is: pancakes, scrambled eggs, sausage (links and patties), bacon, fruit, juice, and coffee. There would be hashbrowns, but I don't know how to make em.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: LTrew on October 04, 2011, 04:39:14 AM
I'm an American who has lived in the UK for a decade, and one thing I pine for is American breakfast sausage.  I've even tried making it  myself but just couldn't get the fat content right so it was all dry and wrong.

There is way more variety for breakfast in America, most places in the UK offer a variety of fry ups and maybe some pastries, porridge/oatmeal, fruit or cereal, but it is mostly fry ups.  What exactly is in the fry up is regional, a local farmshop/restaurant  here offers 2 sausages, 3 rashers bacon, 2 eggs, tomato, mushrooms, hogs pudding and sautéed potatoes - plus toast of course,  with all the meat coming from their own animals.  It is apparently wonderful but waaay too much food for me, and my husband is never able to get through it all.   

I miss being able to get pancakes, waffles, breakfast sandwiches, omelettes, breakfast tacos and burritos, ham and eggs (which you can get here, but not at breakfast) french toast, biscuits and gravy, bagels...
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Bethalize on October 04, 2011, 04:41:57 AM
I was thinking about having brunch today and now I am going to. Scrambled egg, two rashers of dry-cured back bacon, Branston baked beans and a slice of fried bread. I even have dripping to fry the bread in! No potatoes to fry, or black pudding though.

ETA And jolly good it was too with a glass of orange juice. I didn't miss the spuds. I would have liked a tomato though.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: LTrew on October 04, 2011, 04:46:06 AM
Also, I can eat baked beans for breakfast now, but it took some getting used to!  UK baked beans are more like pork and beans without the pork, but not at all like what I would consider baked beans to be.

Being given a plate with sausage, bacon, runny fried eggs, mushrooms, half a tomato and a big mess of baked beans in the middle was a shock to the system when I first moved here!

At the same time English people I've talked to have been horrified to be given a plate with American bacon (which I agree is not very nice) eggs, etc. and pancakes with syrup on the same plate.  They don't really do the salty/sweet combo here.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: iridaceae on October 04, 2011, 04:46:33 AM
Wait...so no one's mentioned a Snickers bar and a Mountain Dew as the breakfast of champions? ;)

A bottle of Coke and a pack of Twizzlers. Especially if you use the Twizzlers as a straw at the start of the bottle of soda.

Breakfast of the college student. (i can call anything breakfast though. i even had sushi for breakfast once- not one of my better ideas though)

Nah; you're not hard-core enough. My breakfast as a university student was Mountain Dew and a package of Suzie-Qs.

******

If I'm going to have a formal breakfast- like when I'm on vacation- it's usually eggs over medium, toast, hash browns, and milk.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: mechtilde on October 04, 2011, 05:13:49 AM
American here, spent a semester in England.

The big differences:
- in the US, the options for breakfast are HUGE!

That used to be the case in Britain too- in the Edwardian period, if you had breakfast at a well-off household there would be a variety of chafing dishes on the sideboard - not just bacon and eggs but kidneys, kippers, and a variety of other things- including eggs done several ways. Plus porridge. And Prunes.

It sort of died out after WW1 when people didn't have so many servants. There wasn't really much variety in places serving food either- it tended to be variations on the same "Full English" theme.

Although very few people eat cooked breakfasts every day, and eat cereal or toast, people do still love it as a treat. My Granny always cooked bacon for my Grandad though, and he often had porridge too.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on October 04, 2011, 06:27:55 AM
For me, a good solid breakfast is the following:
- Eggs, either an omelet or sunny side up.  If having multiple items on this list, the eggs *have* to be sunny side up
- Bacon.  I prefer limp to crisp, if only because I find crisp bacon gets too acidic.
- Sausage.  Links or patties, but links are the standard.
- Hash browns or home fries.  I prefer home fries, but I can make frozen hash browns.   :P
- Toast, biscuits, or English muffins.  I vastly prefer biscuits, and I prefer what I call "biscuit bread", which is simply biscuits in a bread pan.  Mom started making them that way when she stopped feeling like making them drop style.
- Orange juice.  This is the ONLY non-negotiable item.  If there's no orange juice, it's not breakfast, it early lunch.

Other options, depending on mood, are cold cereal (I prefer bran flakes with dehydrated fruit), oatmeal (usually instant, usually apples/cinnamon or maple/brown sugar), or pancakes/waffles (if I'm in a sugar mood).  Some people eat French toast (that's bread dipped in egg batter and fried), but we don't talk about those people.

Oh, and despite Mom being from West Virginia, I've never gotten a taste for white gravy.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: wheeitsme on October 04, 2011, 09:22:21 AM

At the same time English people I've talked to have been horrified to be given a plate with American bacon (which I agree is not very nice)


Heresy!!!!

I adore American bacon!

Imagine my suprise when I ordered a British breakfast that contained bacon and there was none there.  Just a weird piece of ham.  I have since learned to like a British breakfast, but that first one was an unhappy one.   ;)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: LTrew on October 04, 2011, 09:50:23 AM
If you want American style bacon you have to ask for "streaky bacon"

My biggest problem with American bacon is that it is too fatty, and it is too difficult and fiddly to remove the fat.  English bacon (back bacon) is totally easy to strip of extra fat and my husband is always willing to gobble up the leftovers.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: demarco on October 04, 2011, 10:26:15 AM
When I was growing up in New England, my older relatives ate baked beans and brown bread for breakfast as well as some kind of fish on occasion. I ate the beans and the bread but recoiled from the fish.  Pie  (usually apple) showed up on the breakfast menu as well. The only part of this tradition I have carried on is the pie. 

I was stunned to see sliced  tomatoes on the breakfast table when I visited England but Americans eat omelettes with tomatoes in them so it's not really as different as it seemed. 

I suspect many Americans have two categories of breakfast:  1) the thing you clutch in your fist as you run out the door; 2) the massive, megacalorie spree you have when you have breakfast out on weekends, holidays, or vacations or you decide to cook big at home.   My favorite in the second category is pancakes and bacon.  DH's is an "everything omelette," hash, eggs and toast. 


Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: SamiHami on October 04, 2011, 10:54:58 AM
Southeastern US here:

Shrimp & Grits
Omelets with shrimp, scallops, crawfish or crab
Biscuits & Gravy (the gravy being a thick white gravy with meat in it)
Crabcakes Benedict (Heaven on a plate....yummy!!!)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: DavidH on October 04, 2011, 11:04:31 AM
American vs. British bacon.  I'm partial to the American kind, but I agree it can be quite fatty.  The easiest way to solve that is to cook it until it is CRISP and the fat remains behind in the pan.  If you don't care about calories or cholesterol, in parts of the US, you then cook the eggs in the bacon fat.

While many places in the US use imitation maple syrup under a variety of brands, there is nothing like real maple syrup.  Since I'm from the US I'll say Vermont maple syrup, but there are some Canadians who might disagree with that  >:D .
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: aventurine on October 04, 2011, 12:17:25 PM
American vs. British bacon.  I'm partial to the American kind, but I agree it can be quite fatty.  The easiest way to solve that is to cook it until it is CRISP and the fat remains behind in the pan.

Oh yeah.  Flabby bacon is nasty - gotta cook it till it's crispy. 
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on October 04, 2011, 12:22:43 PM
American vs. British bacon.  I'm partial to the American kind, but I agree it can be quite fatty.  The easiest way to solve that is to cook it until it is CRISP and the fat remains behind in the pan.

Oh yeah.  Flabby bacon is nasty - gotta cook it till it's crispy.

See, to me, crispy bacon is just this side of salted charcoal.  I prefer it flexible.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Wonderflonium on October 04, 2011, 12:34:56 PM
I had a gigantic lunch and am stuffed to the gills, and yet you people have me craving pancakes with lots of syrup and crispy bacon. For shame!  ;D

My mom's mom's family is southern, and we always have sliced tomatoes with breakfast (and if they are in season, with lunch and dinner too). I didn't realize that was a British thing!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: #borecore on October 04, 2011, 12:52:20 PM
I don't really go in for giant breakfasts. Growing up, Sunday was the one day of the week when we had anything other than bagel, toast, cereal or oatmeal (aka quick stuff) and a banana, always a banana. We either had waffles, pancakes, french toast, or omelets. Meat was very rare for breakfast unless it was ham in the omelet.

These days I eat cereal or fried egg and toast almost every day, with eggs and toast or waffles on Sundays. Usually with coffee. Once in a while I'll go out -- this weekend I had a pear pancake and two eggs over easy; a month or so ago I had tofu scramble (like scrambled eggs but for vegans), toast, vegan "sausage" and fruit. That was good!

Grits ... maybe they're better if you grew up with them; I don't usually bother, as they're often quite bland and gritty ;D . Definitely a regional dish.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Betelnut on October 04, 2011, 01:07:11 PM
Bagels and cream cheese are good too!  When I lived in NYC, the mecca for bagels, I would rush out, buy a NY Times and my breakfast--an onion or garlic bagel with a smear of scallion cream cheese and a chocolate chip muffin.  I would take that home and read and eat for a long time.  Heaven!!!!!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: aventurine on October 04, 2011, 01:29:00 PM
MMMMmmmmmm bagels
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: cicero on October 04, 2011, 02:07:56 PM
Bagels and cream cheese are good too!  When I lived in NYC, the mecca for bagels, I would rush out, buy a NY Times and my breakfast--an onion or garlic bagel with a smear of scallion cream cheese and a chocolate chip muffin.  I would take that home and read and eat for a long time.  Heaven!!!!!
NY bagels! yum!
whole wheat with cream cheese, smoked salmon, tomatoes, red onion.

or

cinnamon -raisin bagel with cream cheese.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Dindrane on October 04, 2011, 10:27:36 PM
This American, when confronted with bacon in an Irish breakfast for the first time, felt enormously shortchanged.  That's ham, not bacon!  I do like it, but not when I'm craving bacon.

In the end, though, I really can't eat a "real" breakfast at breakfast time.  Most of the time, I have a bagel or a bowl of cereal or similar and call it good.  When I do eat eggs and hash browns and so forth, it can mess up my eating schedule for the rest of the day.  Because of that, I usually have it for brunch (and then have an early dinner) or just eat it at lunch time after having something like toast when I first wake up. :)

My personal favorites are good biscuits and sausage gravy (which can be sort of a hit-or-miss dish even in the south, but definitely outside of it), hash browns, pancakes, Belgian waffles (none of those other kind without the deep pockets), eggs (fried or poached in a restaurant, scrambled if I'm at home), and bacon or sausage.  I never eat all of that in one meal, though. :)

I have never cared for grits, like even a little bit.  I'm a born and bred southerner, but give me hash browns any day.  I really don't much like home fries, either.  I did discover the best hash browns in the whole world at my favorite breakfast place, though -- stuffed hash browns.  Basically, it's two layers of hash browns sandwiched around sour cream, cheese, and chopped bacon.  It's like a baked potato made of hash browns.  It is AWESOME.  My husband and I will sometimes split a steak-and-eggs breakfast that has 3 eggs and the stuffed hash browns (and pancakes) from this place.  I can't imagine one person eating all of that, since we both always leave full, and it's the cheapest breakfast going.

I don't really drink juice, so my breakfast drink of choice is often diet soda. :)  I like coffee, but I don't always like drinking the coffee available in restaurants, because I don't think it tastes very good.  Plus, I can't always get just plain milk to put in it -- some places (particularly breakfast diner type places) really only have the little mini-moo type things, and I really dislike those.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: kareng57 on October 04, 2011, 10:55:17 PM
IME, B&B breakfasts in the UK were usually quite good, but also quite predictable.

Two eggs, sunny-side up, bacon possibly with sausage as well, toast, hash-browns along with fried tomatoes.  Overall, very hearty portions, and it's pretty difficult for even an indifferent B&B hostess in the UK to ruin breakfast.

In the US (I'm Canadian) I tried grits once, out of curiosity.  Blech....try unsweetened Cream of Wheat... :P
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Brentwood on October 04, 2011, 11:43:38 PM
I had breakfast for dinner tonight: two eggs over medium, two strips of bacon, crispy hashbrowns, and pancakes. And coffee. Two cups of reasonably good coffee.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Wonderflonium on October 05, 2011, 08:01:13 AM
I did discover the best hash browns in the whole world at my favorite breakfast place, though -- stuffed hash browns.  Basically, it's two layers of hash browns sandwiched around sour cream, cheese, and chopped bacon.  It's like a baked potato made of hash browns.

Oh. Oh my. I neeeeeeeeeeeed those!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Maujer on October 05, 2011, 11:32:06 AM
I'm from the Northeast but me and grits might get married. I used to get them as a side at a diner in Prospect Heights Brooklyn and mix it with their homemade horse radish sauce - incredible.

We went out on to a diner last night and a friend who's also from Massachusetts ordered a dish that included Jonny Cakes. My husband didn't know what it was. I guess maybe it's more of a Massachusetts/Rhode Island thing? He's from CT, but parts of the state are more NY metro area-orientated than New England.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Wonderflonium on October 05, 2011, 11:49:13 AM
I demand pancakes, hashbrowns, and bacon!!!  ;D
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: PrincessInPink on October 06, 2011, 12:33:58 AM
Southeastern US here:

Shrimp & Grits
Omelets with shrimp, scallops, crawfish or crab
Biscuits & Gravy (the gravy being a thick white gravy with meat in it)
Crabcakes Benedict (Heaven on a plate....yummy!!!)

All of that sounds wonderful. Especially Crabcakes Benedict. I had no idea it existed, but I love the idea!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Wonderflonium on October 06, 2011, 07:09:46 AM
Last night for dinner I had hashbrowns with cheese, sour cream, and green onions and a side of sliced tomatoes. I blame this thread.  :)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Thipu1 on October 06, 2011, 09:57:53 AM
Wait...so no one's mentioned a Snickers bar and a Mountain Dew as the breakfast of champions? ;)

Hehe. I have a FiberOne bar and Simply Orange orange juice (that stuff tastes so much better than Tropicana).

BIL's idea of a Wisconsin breakfast is a can of cola and a slice or two of left-over pizza straight out of the fridge. 
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Dindrane on October 07, 2011, 09:19:49 AM
Last night for dinner I had hashbrowns with cheese, sour cream, and green onions and a side of sliced tomatoes. I blame this thread.  :)

You're welcome. :)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Wonderflonium on October 07, 2011, 09:20:25 AM
Last night for dinner I had hashbrowns with cheese, sour cream, and green onions and a side of sliced tomatoes. I blame this thread.  :)

You're welcome. :)

It was so good, I had it for dinner again last night.  :)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Thipu1 on October 07, 2011, 09:24:43 AM
Last night for dinner I had hashbrowns with cheese, sour cream, and green onions and a side of sliced tomatoes. I blame this thread.  :)

You're welcome. :)

It was so good, I had it for dinner again last night.  :)

Hmmm.  We've been wondering what to serve with our left-over meat loaf.  The hash brown concoction with a broiled tomato seems the perfect solution for a Friday night supper.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Wonderflonium on October 07, 2011, 09:39:54 AM
Last night for dinner I had hashbrowns with cheese, sour cream, and green onions and a side of sliced tomatoes. I blame this thread.  :)

You're welcome. :)

It was so good, I had it for dinner again last night.  :)

Hmmm.  We've been wondering what to serve with our left-over meat loaf.  The hash brown concoction with a broiled tomato seems the perfect solution for a Friday night supper.

So what time should I be there?  ;)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: KenveeB on October 07, 2011, 10:04:33 AM
Oh my, this thread has me hungry!

My idea of a good breakfast -- again, the weekend/vacation kind, not the quick kind before work -- would be scrambled eggs, sausage or bacon, and pancakes, waffles, or biscuits & gravy.  Plus orange juice, and hashbrown casserole would be a nice addition.  When I was in college, every weekend they'd have brunch with these awesome make-your-own waffles and a toppings bar.  I topped mined with chocolate chips and cherries. :)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Morticia on October 17, 2011, 12:47:33 PM
I'm from Canada, but Southern breakfasts are awesome. Although, I put hot sauce on my grits, instead of butter, salt and pepper. Is that okay? Can I still have biscuits and gravy? (With hot sauce?  >:D )
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: aventurine on October 18, 2011, 12:31:03 AM
I'm from Canada, but Southern breakfasts are awesome. Although, I put hot sauce on my grits, instead of butter, salt and pepper. Is that okay? Can I still have biscuits and gravy? (With hot sauce?  >:D )

Hot sauce is appropriate with just about anything, my dear.  I'm a Crystal girl, myself
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: sempronialou on October 22, 2011, 09:29:11 AM
We went out on to a diner last night and a friend who's also from Massachusetts ordered a dish that included Jonny Cakes. My husband didn't know what it was. I guess maybe it's more of a Massachusetts/Rhode Island thing? He's from CT, but parts of the state are more NY metro area-orientated than New England.

I live in the Great Lakes Region, and we used to make Jonny Cake quite often when I was growing up.  Now I have a craving for Jonny Cake.  Maybe it was just our family.  Who knows.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Sharnita on October 22, 2011, 09:41:28 AM
We went out on to a diner last night and a friend who's also from Massachusetts ordered a dish that included Jonny Cakes. My husband didn't know what it was. I guess maybe it's more of a Massachusetts/Rhode Island thing? He's from CT, but parts of the state are more NY metro area-orientated than New England.

I live in the Great Lakes Region, and we used to make Jonny Cake quite often when I was growing up.  Now I have a craving for Jonny Cake.  Maybe it was just our family.  Who knows.
No, my did is a Michigan born and raised guy who calls it Jonny Cake
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: General Jinjur on October 22, 2011, 10:40:34 AM
I love blood sausage. When we get a wild hair and go out for an English breakfast, I get double because DH thinks it sounds disgusting. I don't understand this - what exactly does he think is in sausage? And haggis, that's another one. No one will ever convince me that it's any grosser than a hot dog.

When going out for breakfast, I have a hard time deciding between sweet and savory. There are places around here that do wonderful dessert-like pancakes and French toast, but you can inhale 1000+ calories that way and still be hungry. But eggs, sausage, and toast doesn't scratch the itch. So my favorites are the ones that let you order a la carte to get a little of this and that. Failing that, I like a diner that offers the choice of pancakes or toast  :)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Thipu1 on October 22, 2011, 04:26:50 PM
Several years ago, when we were on the QE2, a passenger from Devon got a horrible surprise when he ordered grits for breakfast.  The grits were listed on the breakfast menu under the same heading as oatmeal.  So, the poor unsuspecting gentleman had them with sugar and cream.  :-X

Grits should be considered in the same way as hash browns or cottage fries.  They are not to be eaten with cream and sugar. butter and salt is the approved seasoning.  BTW, for those who haven't eaten grits, polenta is a more solid version of the same thing. 



Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Nornster on October 22, 2011, 04:34:09 PM
I have grits with butter and sugar (but not cream) quite often, but my favorite is cheese grits with lots of Tabasco sauce!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Sharnita on October 22, 2011, 04:59:32 PM
I actually like grits with milk and sugar.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: jenny_islander on October 27, 2011, 06:06:16 PM
Alaskan here.  In general, a big breakfast is something bready, something meaty, something potato-y, and eggs, with a fruit or vegetable or both.  Drinks may be fruit juice, milk, and/or the stimulant drink of choice.  There should be something salty/smoky/spicy and something sweet available.

French toast with strawberries and optional fillip of whipped cream, American bacon (lovely crisp crackly bacon), hash browns with ketchup, orange juice, coffee.

Skillet is a pan of home fries with something extra on top.  Maybe melted cheese, maybe eggs broken on top and cooked sunny-side-up, maybe chopped sausage.  Add a stack of toast with choice of jams and jellies and a drink.

Eggs "any style," stack of white or whole-wheat toast with butter, honey, and choice of fruit spreads, link or patty sausage, hash browns, sliced oranges.

Denver omelet (like a big frittata with onions, peppers, diced ham, and I forget what else), hash browns, blueberry cornmeal muffin.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Delia DeLyons on October 29, 2011, 12:40:43 PM
We here is rural northeastern Pennsylvania also have the option of scrapple as a breakfast "meat"... Kind of a flat slice of fried hot doggishness.... So good!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on October 29, 2011, 12:52:23 PM
We here is rural northeastern Pennsylvania also have the option of scrapple as a breakfast "meat"... Kind of a flat slice of fried hot doggishness.... So good!

Not quite hod dog style... it's spiced, so it's more of an untubed bratwurst.

Ah, the PA Dutch... much like their German roots, anything that can be shoved into a tube, WILL be shoved into a tube.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Thipu1 on October 30, 2011, 02:18:17 PM
We here is rural northeastern Pennsylvania also have the option of scrapple as a breakfast "meat"... Kind of a flat slice of fried hot doggishness.... So good!

I love scrapple. It's almost the US version of haggis.  Scrapple  and eggs is almost the most wonderful breakfast in the world.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Sophia on October 30, 2011, 03:29:17 PM
To me, an American Breakfast must have


What I love is that some breakfast restaurants allow you to substitute a side of pancakes for the toast. 

Big difference I noticed was that there were these extra things on the plate in London, but the choice was less.  Good still.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Wonderflonium on October 30, 2011, 06:18:55 PM
When I was a kid, I LOVED scrapple. I liked it sliced thin and cooked extra crispy. Now that I know what's in it, I just can't handle it.  :P
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Doll Fiend on October 30, 2011, 06:36:23 PM
Um. .  what is Scrapple?
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Wonderflonium on October 30, 2011, 06:59:19 PM
Scrapple is a fine example of Pennsylvania Dutch ingenuity. My people didn't waste anything.  ;D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on October 30, 2011, 07:05:14 PM
Short and sweet definition:

Take a pig.  Take everything they use for hot dogs, set it aside.  The rest is scrapple.

And it is GOOD.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Doll Fiend on October 30, 2011, 07:19:05 PM
*drool* That sounds so good!  Of course, I enjoy Braunschweiger on a regular basis.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Nuku on November 18, 2011, 03:27:36 PM
When I was a kid, every once in a while, my grandfather would make fried mush, which sounds awful, but is really delicious. (Think of polenta put in a loaf pan in the fridge overnight, then sliced and fried in butter.) We ate it with breakfast meat on the side and more butter and maple syrup on top. He was from Southern Illinois.

French toast was one of my fave breakfasts as a kid. My mom put plain sugar on hers instead of syrup. It makes a crunchy coating as it crystallizes.  :) I also always liked places that served crepes. It's like a pancake, but sophistimicated.  ;D

In some places in the upper Midwest, you can get fried lake fish with your eggs. (Popular in more old-style tavern-type restaurants.)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Dys on January 23, 2012, 03:01:46 PM
In our house ( yorkshire, england ) the preferred hot breakfast of choice is ' A butty ' ( sandwich ) containing bacon  / sausage /egg , or any combination thereof.
If feeling sophisticated, then the bread for the butty will be eggy bread. There is a minor risk of burned fingers which is offset by the deliciousness.
There is also an in house debate of ketchup vs brown sauce. Going without is not an option.

Dys
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: seeley on January 23, 2012, 03:10:37 PM
Cold pizza, anyone? It's the breakfast of champions! I'm American by the by.

I usually have cereal for breakfast during the week, but on weekends we bake. My husband baked blueberry muffins on Saturday, and I made cinnamon rolls on Sunday.  :)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: AmethystAnne on January 23, 2012, 11:35:54 PM
Sunday morning breakfast is my favorite meal of the week - creamed chipped beef over toast(for DH) or soft bread (for me).
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: lady_disdain on January 24, 2012, 11:12:33 AM
As a Brazilian, these breakfast foods make me slightly queasy. Breakfast, for us, tends to lighter, uncooked food. Perhaps some scrambled eggs or, in country hotels, porridge but that is pretty much the line. Potatoes? No way.

Our breakfast would be something along the lines of:
- Fresh fruit (pear, cantaloupe, papaya, kiwi, etc or a fruit salad)
- Fresh french bread with butter, cream cheese (ours is particularly runny and delicious), sliced deli ham or turkey, some cheese
- Cottage cheese
- Light, fluffy corn bread
- Cheese bread
- Fruit jam
- A simple cake (chocolate, carrot, orange, lime or vanilla) without frosting or anything like that (I think this is what Americans would call a coffee cake)

To drink, coffee with plenty of milk in it and juice (generally orange, but watermelon, passion fruit, guava, etc are also common). Tea is becoming more common as well.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: DuBois on January 24, 2012, 11:38:38 AM
As a Brazilian, these breakfast foods make me slightly queasy. Breakfast, for us, tends to lighter, uncooked food. Perhaps some scrambled eggs or, in country hotels, porridge but that is pretty much the line. Potatoes? No way.

Our breakfast would be something along the lines of:
- Fresh fruit (pear, cantaloupe, papaya, kiwi, etc or a fruit salad)
- Fresh french bread with butter, cream cheese (ours is particularly runny and delicious), sliced deli ham or turkey, some cheese
- Cottage cheese
- Light, fluffy corn bread
- Cheese bread
- Fruit jam
- A simple cake (chocolate, carrot, orange, lime or vanilla) without frosting or anything like that (I think this is what Americans would call a coffee cake)

To drink, coffee with plenty of milk in it and juice (generally orange, but watermelon, passion fruit, guava, etc are also common). Tea is becoming more common as well.

I have to say that that breakfast sounds rather delicious. I think that you have to have been brought up around cooked breakfasts to 'get' them. I certainly couldn't eat a cooked breakfast every morning (except something light like scrambled eggs and mushrooms, on toast)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Dindrane on January 24, 2012, 10:18:23 PM
As a Brazilian, these breakfast foods make me slightly queasy. Breakfast, for us, tends to lighter, uncooked food. Perhaps some scrambled eggs or, in country hotels, porridge but that is pretty much the line. Potatoes? No way.

Our breakfast would be something along the lines of:
- Fresh fruit (pear, cantaloupe, papaya, kiwi, etc or a fruit salad)
- Fresh french bread with butter, cream cheese (ours is particularly runny and delicious), sliced deli ham or turkey, some cheese
- Cottage cheese
- Light, fluffy corn bread
- Cheese bread
- Fruit jam
- A simple cake (chocolate, carrot, orange, lime or vanilla) without frosting or anything like that (I think this is what Americans would call a coffee cake)

To drink, coffee with plenty of milk in it and juice (generally orange, but watermelon, passion fruit, guava, etc are also common). Tea is becoming more common as well.

I have to say that that breakfast sounds rather delicious. I think that you have to have been brought up around cooked breakfasts to 'get' them. I certainly couldn't eat a cooked breakfast every morning (except something light like scrambled eggs and mushrooms, on toast)

I think weather could play into it as well.  Being cold can sometimes make you hungry (it takes more calories to keep warm), so the idea of a large hot breakfast sounds pretty good when it's cold out.  But whenever I spend time in warmer places (even just visiting my family in Houston during the summer), all I want is some iced coffee and maybe a bagel, and I'm good to go.  Lighter, uncooked foods are a lot more appetizing when it's hot and/or humid than anything that feels heavy.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Shea on February 03, 2012, 09:40:08 AM
American here. I'm not a big breakfast person most of the time, my normal breakfast is oatmeal/porridge and tea. However, on the rare occasions when I go out for breakfast, I favor waffles or pancakes and bacon. I must defend American style or "streaky" bacon, cooked right it's soooooo good. You need to get the fat to the right amount of crispiness, but not actually burned. If it flops over when you pick it up, it's not cooked enough, if it crunches it's too well-done. Living in Canada, I've found that breakfasts are pretty much the same, although around here you're very likely to get real maple syrup rather than the fake "pancake syrup" that's common in most of the US. Good thing too, because I can't stand the fake stuff.

I've never had grits in my life, but I'm very fond of buttermilk biscuits. Though not gravy, I prefer my biscuits with butter and honey or jam.

I lived in France for awhile, and I love the breakfast there. Coffee, fresh baguette with butter or Nutella, and maybe a piece of fruit. Perfect. I also loved the breakfasts served at most of the various inns I stayed at while visiting Morocco, which was very strong coffee and a kind of bread that the hosts invariably insisted was a crepe, but was far thicker, oilier and chewier than any crepe I'd ever encountered before, served with honey. I'm drooling just thinking about it.

Right, that's it, I'm having waffles and bacon for dinner tonight!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Thipu1 on February 03, 2012, 10:47:46 AM
Cold pizza, anyone? It's the breakfast of champions! I'm American by the by.

I usually have cereal for breakfast during the week, but on weekends we bake. My husband baked blueberry muffins on Saturday, and I made cinnamon rolls on Sunday.  :)

Ah, yes.  The cold pizza. 

In college, my roommate would put the left-over pizza from Friday night under her bed and enjoy breakfast in bed on Saturday morning.

Some years ago, SIL and her husband stayed at our place while attending a Wedding.  SIL's DH is a pizza addict and we have quite a few pieces of art around the place. 

While SIL was sleeping in, her DH looked like an aesthete In a gallery.  He walked around in a contemplative manner, enjoying the exhibition.  The only jarring note was that he was holding a slice of pizza in one hand and a can of coke in the other. 

Oh, yes.  He was also wearing a pair of boxer shorts and a tee-shirt. 

We had no problem with this.  When people visit us, they have the run of the fridge.  When we got up he had his coffee and juice but the Pizza was the important part of his morning.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: MERUNCC13 on February 12, 2012, 09:52:22 PM
Chiming in from the Southeast US - in this area, biscuits with gravy (usually pork sausage) or filled with meat (I have to have a sausage, egg and cheese biscuit on occasion), grits (which can be seasoned with anything except sugar!) eggs, liver mush (fried) are a must for breakfast.  I usually don't and can't eat grits so I have oatmeal or cream of wheat. 
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: bestimw on February 15, 2012, 06:59:06 PM
US here.

Regarding British scrambled eggs.  I saw a Gordon Ramsey special where he was making Christmas foods.  And one of the things he made was "scrambled eggs" but I did not recognize them.  He seemed to take a saucepan of milk, heat that up, and then stir an apparently equal volume of eggs into it. 

The resulting eggs looked very loose to me. 

I'm used to scrambled eggs that are mostly eggs, sometimes a tablespoon or so of milk added while mixing them up. I personally don't add anything, just whip them up and cook them in butter.  (Which I'll have to modify, having just started Weight Watchers.  Grrr!)

Anyway, was Gordon's recipe typical of British Scrambled Eggs?
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Sophia on February 15, 2012, 10:02:04 PM
I wouldn't start a thread on this, but since it is here...
As a kid, my husband was served Spaghetti-O's on Toast for breakfast.  His mother told him it was "an English breakfast".  Not THE traditional English breakfast, but a side version.  I expressed disbelief that anything involving Spaghetti-O's would be English.  He was told it was a post-war rationing thing where spaghetti-O's were available when other stuff wasn't. 
So, anyone old enough to remember the rationing?  Is my MIL off her knocker?

p.s. He claims it is great.  I have noticed all foods remembered from childhood are either loved or hated.  So, that is my theory on why he likes it. 
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: faithlessone on February 16, 2012, 04:43:01 AM
US here.

Regarding British scrambled eggs.  I saw a Gordon Ramsey special where he was making Christmas foods.  And one of the things he made was "scrambled eggs" but I did not recognize them.  He seemed to take a saucepan of milk, heat that up, and then stir an apparently equal volume of eggs into it. 

The resulting eggs looked very loose to me. 

I'm used to scrambled eggs that are mostly eggs, sometimes a tablespoon or so of milk added while mixing them up. I personally don't add anything, just whip them up and cook them in butter.  (Which I'll have to modify, having just started Weight Watchers.  Grrr!)

Anyway, was Gordon's recipe typical of British Scrambled Eggs?

I'm a Brit, and I've always been taught 2 eggs and a dash of milk. TV chefs always seem to go overboard on something though.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: veryfluffy on February 16, 2012, 06:14:33 AM
I don't get scrambled eggs in the UK. This is Delia's recipe:
http://www.deliaonline.com/how-to-cook/eggs/how-to-scramble-eggs.html

which seems pretty typical -- in my view this results in what I call "congealed eggs" -- just sort of an egg splodge. I can't even look at it.

I grew up in Canada, and scrambled eggs involves eggs with a bit of salt and pepper (and maybe a spoonful of water -- when this heats up and steams it makes the eggs fluffier), butter or oil in a frying pan and cooking them on high heat until they are firm and golden. My Austrian family made them the same way (Eierspeise), and we had a special enamel frying pan that was never used for anything else.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: blue2000 on February 16, 2012, 08:05:08 AM
I wouldn't start a thread on this, but since it is here...
As a kid, my husband was served Spaghetti-O's on Toast for breakfast.  His mother told him it was "an English breakfast".  Not THE traditional English breakfast, but a side version.  I expressed disbelief that anything involving Spaghetti-O's would be English.  He was told it was a post-war rationing thing where spaghetti-O's were available when other stuff wasn't. 
So, anyone old enough to remember the rationing?  Is my MIL off her knocker?

p.s. He claims it is great.  I have noticed all foods remembered from childhood are either loved or hated.  So, that is my theory on why he likes it. 

My opinion? MIL is pulling his leg.

According to Wikipedia, Spaghetti-Os were introduced in the US in 1965. They are not sold in the UK, but similar things are. So it is possible that people had some unusual meal choices during and after the war, but not this one.

Maybe she saw people eating canned beans on toast and thought Spaghetti-Os were close enough?
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Anniissa on February 16, 2012, 08:16:19 AM
I wouldn't start a thread on this, but since it is here...
As a kid, my husband was served Spaghetti-O's on Toast for breakfast.  His mother told him it was "an English breakfast".  Not THE traditional English breakfast, but a side version.  I expressed disbelief that anything involving Spaghetti-O's would be English.  He was told it was a post-war rationing thing where spaghetti-O's were available when other stuff wasn't. 
So, anyone old enough to remember the rationing?  Is my MIL off her knocker?

p.s. He claims it is great.  I have noticed all foods remembered from childhood are either loved or hated.  So, that is my theory on why he likes it.

In the sixties and seventies in particular this was quite popular either as a breakfast or supper meal for children. They're not spaghetti-O's - over here they are called spaghetti hoops which are basically very similar to spaghetti-O's. Spaghetti hoops on toast were an alternative to the other perenially popular beans on toast. Spaghetti hoops have been sold in tins over here since before the war I think.

I don't get scrambled eggs in the UK. This is Delia's recipe:
http://www.deliaonline.com/how-to-cook/eggs/how-to-scramble-eggs.html

which seems pretty typical -- in my view this results in what I call "congealed eggs" -- just sort of an egg splodge. I can't even look at it.

I grew up in Canada, and scrambled eggs involves eggs with a bit of salt and pepper (and maybe a spoonful of water -- when this heats up and steams it makes the eggs fluffier), butter or oil in a frying pan and cooking them on high heat until they are firm and golden. My Austrian family made them the same way (Eierspeise), and we had a special enamel frying pan that was never used for anything else.

I guess it depends on your definition of firm on the egg front but Delia's recipe does say they should be cooked until there is no liquid runny egg. It's difficult to tell without a picture of what the finished dish should look like. I do think, typically, that in the UK it is more common to get a slightly less set scrambled egg than you get in the US. Although it does vary and I've seen everything from so loose as to make me concerned that the egg was cooked enough to so set and rock hard I think the kitchen sponge would have yielded a nicer texture  :) I like mine somewhere in between - eggs, splash of milk, a little butter melted in the pan then scrambled over heat until the liquid has all but gone then removed from the heat (as they will continue to cook anyway) so that the texture is reletively firm but still moist. I think it's one of those things where everyone has a personal preference kinda like how cooked a steak should be.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Sophia on February 16, 2012, 10:30:30 AM
I was browsing the cookbook area at my library.  There was a Julia Child cookbook, I think it was about eggs.  One recipe was how she likes scrambled eggs.  The next was how her husband likes scrambled eggs.  My mind boggled at someone having easy access to Julia's cooking and preferring it some other way

I think this is the definative example that proves there is room for personal preference in scrambled eggs. 

Note, my way was very close to Julia's way except I was cooking too hot. 
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: veryfluffy on February 16, 2012, 12:54:27 PM

I guess it depends on your definition of firm on the egg front but Delia's recipe does say they should be cooked until there is no liquid runny egg. It's difficult to tell without a picture of what the finished dish should look like. I do think, typically, that in the UK it is more common to get a slightly less set scrambled egg than you get in the US. Although it does vary and I've seen everything from so loose as to make me concerned that the egg was cooked enough to so set and rock hard I think the kitchen sponge would have yielded a nicer texture  :) I like mine somewhere in between - eggs, splash of milk, a little butter melted in the pan then scrambled over heat until the liquid has all but gone then removed from the heat (as they will continue to cook anyway) so that the texture is reletively firm but still moist. I think it's one of those things where everyone has a personal preference kinda like how cooked a steak should be.

I think the difference is that my version of scrambled eggs is fried quickly in hot fat, as opposed to stirred in a saucepan on a lower heat until they set.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Ferrets on February 16, 2012, 01:13:03 PM
In the sixties and seventies in particular this was quite popular either as a breakfast or supper meal for children. They're not spaghetti-O's - over here they are called spaghetti hoops which are basically very similar to spaghetti-O's.

Don't forget the 1957 Spaghetti Harvest (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaghetti_tree_hoax) (video here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7yJ8C5TbeY))...

Naughty BBC. ;)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Anniissa on February 17, 2012, 06:19:45 AM

I guess it depends on your definition of firm on the egg front but Delia's recipe does say they should be cooked until there is no liquid runny egg. It's difficult to tell without a picture of what the finished dish should look like. I do think, typically, that in the UK it is more common to get a slightly less set scrambled egg than you get in the US. Although it does vary and I've seen everything from so loose as to make me concerned that the egg was cooked enough to so set and rock hard I think the kitchen sponge would have yielded a nicer texture  :) I like mine somewhere in between - eggs, splash of milk, a little butter melted in the pan then scrambled over heat until the liquid has all but gone then removed from the heat (as they will continue to cook anyway) so that the texture is reletively firm but still moist. I think it's one of those things where everyone has a personal preference kinda like how cooked a steak should be.

I think the difference is that my version of scrambled eggs is fried quickly in hot fat, as opposed to stirred in a saucepan on a lower heat until they set.


I think I've only scrambled them once over a high heat - they came out much chunkier and less moist so more like chunks of omelette. Of course, I may just have overcooked them! They still tasted ok but as I only really eat scrambled egg occasionally on toast with smoked salmon I prefer a slightly moister texture to contrast with the toast and the salmon.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: kckgirl on February 17, 2012, 07:04:57 AM
My standard breakfast: Sausage links, an orange, and coffee. On the weekends I might add hot cereal or toast.

I start the links in the toaster oven, start the coffee, then go take my shower while the machines do their thing. I used to try to cook the sausages on the stove, but it took too much tending to be a weekday thing. When I got the toaster oven, it made my life much simpler.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 17, 2012, 08:28:36 AM
American, born Texan and now living in Florida.

What I actually eat for breakfast during the work week, but because of a medical condition I have, I always eat something.
Usually, one of these:
Frozen toaster waffles spread with peanut butter and drizzled with syrup
Cold cereal with milk
Old-fashioned oatmeal with golden and regular raisins
Flat bread with peanut butter, sliced banana, granola, and honey
Thin bagel, toasted, with peanut butter
Breakfast bagel or wrap
Homemade muffins
Fruit
Trail mix (homemade)
Smoothie, on occasion

Now, weekends or days off, our family makes breakfast an event. We go in rotation, but here are our favorites.

Eggs: Scrambled, fried, or omelets (DH makes the eggs most the time)
Biscuits (most of the time home made) or toast
Waffles (we put pecans, banana, chocolate chips, blueberries inside the batter) or Pancakes (with the same additions, plus granola) or French toast, occasionally Stuffed French toast (two very thin slices of bread, stuffed with a sweetened whipped cream cheese and often with berries, then dipped in a batter and grilled)
Chocolate gravy (like a hot chocolate pudding) served with biscuits
Bacon, ham, or sausage (we usually do patties, but we like links and chicken breakfast sausage too)
Sausage gravy (Very rarely)
Hashbrowns, on occasion
Latkes, on occasion (potato and onion pancakes, served with apple sauce and sour cream)
Fruit

Very rarely, especially around the holidays, I will make a breakfast casserole that has eggs, sausage, cheese and grits. I also make a stuffed French toast breakfast casserole.

We only use real maple syrup, butter, and real honey. We are rather adventurous with food, but we have to have our syrup!

ETA: DH is a native Southerner and loves grits. His old high school friends ask if he still eats a butter bowl full of grits every day. The answer: no, too many carbs. He eats fried egg sandwiches most days.
We have steak or pork chops and eggs at least once a month. I drink iced tea or water with breakfast, since juice has too much sugar for me. I like my coffee from the Dunkin, with some mocha syrup and cream, hot or iced. DH and DS love bagels, so we usually have some in the house.
I love cream of wheat and making cinnamon toast, so that is what I do when DS or I don't feel well. That was my comfort breakfast growing up.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: jenny_islander on February 18, 2012, 06:30:49 PM
As a busy mom, I generally end up heating leftovers from yesterday.  If there aren't suitable leftovers, I will have oatmeal (porridge), toast with jam and peanut butter, or a can of soup, all with a piece of fruit.  If I have time to cook a "proper" breakfast, it's sauteed eggs with toast, whole-wheat pancakes with assorted toppings, or skillet.  (Skillet is chopped cooked potatoes and chopped onions sauteed together, with optional extra vegetables such as celery or peppers, plus a protein such as chopped summer sausage stirred in or eggs broken on top and left to set on low heat under a lid, plus seasonings.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: emwithme on February 19, 2012, 09:24:34 AM
Can someone knowledgeable explain what (US) biscuits are?  And white gravy?  ???

Further up the thread, someone mentioned that grits are kinda like polenta.  Do they come in slices or is it more grainy?
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Shea on February 19, 2012, 12:12:26 PM
Can someone knowledgeable explain what (US) biscuits are?  And white gravy?  ???

Further up the thread, someone mentioned that grits are kinda like polenta.  Do they come in slices or is it more grainy?

These are biscuits:
(http://i226.photobucket.com/albums/dd161/DanaanMI/buttermilk-biscuits-recipe.jpg)

They're made with butter, flour, salt, baking powder or soda and often buttermilk, and aren't sweet. They usually split easily in the middle, and can be eaten with butter and/or jam or honey, filled with scrambled egg, sausage patties, or ham, or topped with sausage gravy or something like creamed chicken.

I believe white gravy is basically sausage gravy without the sausage, made with milk, dripping and flour. We don't eat it much in my part of the country, so I'm not positive. Likewise grits, I'm not sure what the deal is with those.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: faithlessone on February 19, 2012, 01:39:01 PM
Shea - do you guys have scones? Because that's what your picture looks like to me.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Dindrane on February 19, 2012, 02:46:11 PM
We do have scones in the US, although I don't know that many people make them themselves.  Places like Starbucks sell them, though.  They tend to be flavored in some way, possibly with icing, rather that eating them with jam and clotted cream (or any other topping).

Scones and biscuits do have very similar textures -- they're both very flaky bread.  The biggest difference here, at least, is that biscuits themselves are pretty much always savory, though you can eat them with butter and jam.  Scones in the US, if they are not plain, are usually sweet.  I think good biscuits are also a little lighter here -- scones tend to be a little denser and a little heavier, in my experience.

But, all in all, they're not that different.

The gravy that people eat on biscuits is sausage gravy or white gravy.  Biscuits and gravy is a very southern dish, and southern gravy tends not to be the brown gravy you get from meat juices.  The simple reason for that is that lots of people who lived in the south for a great deal of its history either couldn't afford that type of meat, or didn't cook things like roasts because it was too hot.  It's why lots of southern food is fried -- it doesn't heat up the house the way roasting or baking does.

So sausage gravy or white gravy is made from bacon or sausage drippings (or butter, if you don't have those), cooked with flour to make a roux, combined with milk to make a gravy, and seasoned with pepper.  And as far as I'm concerned, good sausage gravy with light and fluffy biscuits is just this side of heaven.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Weez on February 19, 2012, 04:30:38 PM
Shea, those biscuits definitely look like what I would call a plain scone.  The recipe that I would use for a plain scone is self-raising flour, pinch of salt, margarine or butter and milk.  If you were to replace the self-raising flour with plain flour and baking powder, you'd have your biscuit recipe, so I think they're pretty much the same thing. 

You do also get recipes for 'rich scones', with sugar, egg and dried fruit, and savoury scones, often with cheese, but I've seen lots of variations of both sweet and savoury scones.   Here in Scotland, we also have potato scones (http://www.be-ro.com/recipe/showrec7.html) which would be served with sausage, bacon and egg as part of a cooked breakfast.  They are basically flour and butter mixed with mashed potato, shaped then fried.

Dindrane, thank you for that explanation of white gravy - seems somewhat obvious now that you've explained it, but I just couldn't work out what people were referring to!
 ::) <-- at me!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Shea on February 19, 2012, 05:11:09 PM
Shea - do you guys have scones? Because that's what your picture looks like to me.

In my experience, scones are sweeter. Even the plain ones I had in the UK that were served with jam and clotted cream were sweeter than biscuits. Maybe I had unusual ones?
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Dindrane on February 19, 2012, 05:21:46 PM
Shea, those biscuits definitely look like what I would call a plain scone.  The recipe that I would use for a plain scone is self-raising flour, pinch of salt, margarine or butter and milk.  If you were to replace the self-raising flour with plain flour and baking powder, you'd have your biscuit recipe, so I think they're pretty much the same thing. 

You do also get recipes for 'rich scones', with sugar, egg and dried fruit, and savoury scones, often with cheese, but I've seen lots of variations of both sweet and savoury scones.   Here in Scotland, we also have potato scones (http://www.be-ro.com/recipe/showrec7.html) which would be served with sausage, bacon and egg as part of a cooked breakfast.  They are basically flour and butter mixed with mashed potato, shaped then fried.

Dindrane, thank you for that explanation of white gravy - seems somewhat obvious now that you've explained it, but I just couldn't work out what people were referring to!
 ::) <-- at me!

If it makes you feel better, I might know what white gravy is, but I've never successfully made it. :)  I'm still working on being able to make a roux that actually thickens anything.

The other thing about biscuits (and probably scones as well) is that the ingredients aren't the only, or even most, important thing about them.  The technique is pretty important as well.  You have to be really careful not to overwork biscuit dough, because like pastry doughs, it gets kind of rubbery and icky if you work it too much.  So it's one of those "mix until just combined" kind of deals, and you don't really knead it so much as just fold it over a few times.

That's why I often like making drop biscuits best.  With those, you make a dough that's more moist (so that it's almost a batter), and just "drop" it on to your baking sheet.  There's no kneading in any capacity involved, you don't have to cut the biscuits out, and they end up with a very uneven surface that gets all nice and browned in the oven.  It's a great contrast to have small little crispy bits on top and a flaky, soft inside.

One other note about biscuits is that the most common ones are probably made with buttermilk, rather than milk.  It gives them a very distinct flavor, and may be why Shea thinks even plain scones are sweeter than biscuits. :)
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: faithlessone on February 19, 2012, 05:30:14 PM
Shea - do you guys have scones? Because that's what your picture looks like to me.

In my experience, scones are sweeter. Even the plain ones I had in the UK that were served with jam and clotted cream were sweeter than biscuits. Maybe I had unusual ones?

I don't know. The ones my Grandma taught me to make are just as nice with onion relish and cheese as they are with jam and cream. There isn't any sugar in my recipe, although I have seen recipes with sweetener of some sort. Maybe you had the sweetened kind.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Weez on February 19, 2012, 06:12:59 PM
If it makes you feel better, I might know what white gravy is, but I've never successfully made it. :) 
Thank you!  It probably doesn't help that I see you speaking (typing?!) about biscuits and my mind automatically goes to the UK biscuit which is more like your cookies - I get stuck on the weirdness of eating them with a savoury sauce of any kind!  A plain or savoury scone (UK version) would go very nicely with a savoury sauce.  Hmm, I can sense some baking coming on this week!

The other thing about biscuits (and probably scones as well) is that the ingredients aren't the only, or even most, important thing about them.  The technique is pretty important as well.  You have to be really careful not to overwork biscuit dough, because like pastry doughs, it gets kind of rubbery and icky if you work it too much.  So it's one of those "mix until just combined" kind of deals, and you don't really knead it so much as just fold it over a few times.
Yep, that's the same with scones too.  I think you might be right with the buttermilk making your biscuits less sweet than our scones too.  I've maybe just missed it, but I don't think buttermilk is as common over here.  I'm fairly convinced we're speaking about variations on the same thing.  I wonder if anyone's posted a biscuits recipe here on E-hell?  I feel I should experiment!

Thank you both, Shea & Dindrane - this has been very educational for me!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Shea on February 19, 2012, 06:29:09 PM
If it makes you feel better, I might know what white gravy is, but I've never successfully made it. :) 
Thank you!  It probably doesn't help that I see you speaking (typing?!) about biscuits and my mind automatically goes to the UK biscuit which is more like your cookies - I get stuck on the weirdness of eating them with a savoury sauce of any kind!  A plain or savoury scone (UK version) would go very nicely with a savoury sauce.  Hmm, I can sense some baking coming on this week!

The other thing about biscuits (and probably scones as well) is that the ingredients aren't the only, or even most, important thing about them.  The technique is pretty important as well.  You have to be really careful not to overwork biscuit dough, because like pastry doughs, it gets kind of rubbery and icky if you work it too much.  So it's one of those "mix until just combined" kind of deals, and you don't really knead it so much as just fold it over a few times.
Yep, that's the same with scones too.  I think you might be right with the buttermilk making your biscuits less sweet than our scones too.  I've maybe just missed it, but I don't think buttermilk is as common over here.  I'm fairly convinced we're speaking about variations on the same thing.  I wonder if anyone's posted a biscuits recipe here on E-hell?  I feel I should experiment!

Thank you both, Shea & Dindrane - this has been very educational for me!

For your edification and enjoyment: my favorite biscuit recipe.

Buttermilk Biscuits

Ingredients:
2 cups/16 oz flour
1 tbsp baking powder
2 tsp sugar
1/2 tsp cream of tartar
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup/4 oz butter
2/3 cup/158 ml buttermilk

1. In a bowl, combine flour, baking powder, sugar, cream of tartar, salt and baking soda. Using a pastry cutter, cut in butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Make a well in the center of the dry mixture, and add the buttermilk all at once. Using a fork, stir until just combined.

2. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Knead dough 5 or 6 strokes until dough is nearly smooth. Gently roll to a thickness of about 3 cm. Cut dough into rounds with a cookie cutter or the top of a glass.

3. Place biscuits onto an ungreased baking sheet, leaving some room between them. Bake at 450F/230C for 10 to 12 minutes or until the tops start to turn golden. Remove from baking sheet and serve warm.

Enjoy!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: kherbert05 on February 19, 2012, 07:19:31 PM

I like breakfast tacos. Scrambled eggs, cheese, bacon wrapped in a tortilla and hot sauce. If I'm at home I'll make scrambled eggs with cheese, bacon, and grits. 
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Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: PastryGoddess on February 19, 2012, 07:37:33 PM
MMMM Grits!  I love grits and eat them with butter, salt, pepper, and cheese.  I'll use Sharp Chedder, Parmesan, Gouda, etc.  I also add in scrambled eggs, shrimp, chicken, sausage, bacon, etc


The Grits need to be cooked for a while to make them nice and creamy.  I can't stand the Quick 5 min Grits...they just have the wrong texture to me


Grits are also called hominy and differ from Cream of Wheat / Farina in that the cornmeal is not as refined.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Doll Fiend on February 19, 2012, 09:35:56 PM
Reading about the grits, gravy, and of course biscuits, is making me think of different Good Eats episodes.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: emwithme on February 20, 2012, 07:08:47 AM
Thanks for the explanation - the recipe for (US) biscuits is very similar to my granny's savoury scones, so now I've got a picture in my head.

We'd have them with melted cheese and tomato ketchup...yummy!
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 20, 2012, 07:33:56 AM

I like breakfast tacos. Scrambled eggs, cheese, bacon wrapped in a tortilla and hot sauce. If I'm at home I'll make scrambled eggs with cheese, bacon, and grits. 
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We make breakfast burritos often as well. Cook some hot breakfast sausage in advance and crumble. You only have to add some to the pan before adding the scrambled egg, then top with shredded cheese and salsa. Wrap in a tortilla and you are good to go.
Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: #borecore on February 20, 2012, 10:11:29 AM
In my experience, the main difference between biscuits and scones is density. Biscuits tend to be considerably more moist and lighter. And usually they're cut smaller.

I had a scone for breakfast yesterday that crumbled up as soon as I touched it. A biscuit would be more likely to stay intact.

Title: Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
Post by: Dindrane on February 20, 2012, 01:27:47 PM
In my experience, the main difference between biscuits and scones is density. Biscuits tend to be considerably more moist and lighter. And usually they're cut smaller.

I had a scone for breakfast yesterday that crumbled up as soon as I touched it. A biscuit would be more likely to stay intact.

I think some of that could be chalked up to the relative quality/freshness of scones vs. biscuits in the US.  Most of the biscuits I've eaten in the US are made fresh (either by me, or by a restaurant).  Non-fresh biscuits that were made in advance and just heated up tend to be drier, more crumbly, and less fluffy than the fresh ones.

I think the same is true of scones.  The ones you can usually buy at stores or coffee shops are generally not freshly-made.  I've made scones at home (from a King Arthur Flour box mix :)) that were a lot more similar to the biscuits I typically eat in texture.

Ultimately, both biscuits and scones are un-yeasted, pastry-like breads, so that does tend to make them behave similarly.  Both types of bread are, I think, quickly susceptible to degrading (in texture if not in taste) when they sit around for too long.