Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange => Topic started by: Slartibartfast on March 03, 2012, 09:26:44 AM

Title: City "titles"
Post by: Slartibartfast on March 03, 2012, 09:26:44 AM
Was thinking about this today - does your hometown lay claim to any particular title?  I grew up in "The River City," which is a laugh because it was a small town and certainly not the only place with a river, but we were 45 minutes from "The Toilet Paper Capitol of the World" which I suspect is a distinction much less frequently claimed :P

I now live in "Rocket City, USA" - logical, because we have a big NASA presence here.  All the schools are also named after various space missions (Discover, Challenger, Endeavor, etc).
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: BabylonSister on March 03, 2012, 09:34:01 AM
I used to live in "the petunia capital of the world".
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: #borecore on March 03, 2012, 09:38:36 AM
I live in "The Live Music Capital of the World."

There are other nicknames but that's the most common one. And an overly boastful one, at that -- except in about two weeks!

I'm from Motown/The Motor City and The Bayou City/H-Town.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Thipu1 on March 03, 2012, 09:51:59 AM
Not a city but a state.  New York is nicknamed the 'Empire State'.  This has led to a lot of confusion.  My FIL once said the NY could no longer use that nickname because other states had a larger population.  Bill Bryson wondered if NYS had overseas territories. 

Neither of these are true.  NY is the Empire State because of the Erie Canal.  In the early days of the USA, the region west of the eastern mountains was called the Inland Empire.  Before the Erie Canal, getting there was long and dangerous.  The canal made settlement much easier.  That is why NYS is called the Empire State. 
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: camlan on March 03, 2012, 10:04:16 AM
Boston has a lot of nicknames, perhaps because it's an older city.

Beantown
Athens of America
The Hub (of the Solar System) (there used to be a large bronze medallion in the street at an intersection in downtown Boston, just off the Common, proclaiming this)
The City on a Hill
The Cradle of Liberty
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Nibsey on March 03, 2012, 10:32:16 AM
Well less so city titles than county titles;

So Dublin is: The big Schmoke, The Pale
Galway: City of the tribes
Limerick: Stab city, Treaty city
Cork: The rebel county
Kilkenny: The marble city
Waterford: The crystal county
Louth: The wee county
Kerry: The kingdom
My favourite is probably Mayo: 'Mayo, God help us'

Dublin doesn't have that many nicknames considering it's the capital. I suspose Dublinners prefer to nickname their infrastructure and statues rather than the city itself.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: drebay on March 03, 2012, 11:45:20 AM
I live in the "Rose City" and we even have a Rose Parade.  Also two Rose Gardens, one that is filled with Roses, and one that we fill with fans of basketball, hockey, music and monster trucks.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: T'Mar of Vulcan on March 03, 2012, 12:01:29 PM
Johannesburg is known as "the City of Gold" because its location is solely due to the gold mining industry. The Zulu nickname, Egoli (which means city of gold) was used as the title of a soap opera set here. The province it's in, Gauteng, means "place of gold" in Sotho.

Most English-speaking people call it Joburg (previously Jo'Burg but officially the shortened version now has no apostrophe). Most black people call it Jozi.

I call it home.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Twik on March 03, 2012, 01:57:03 PM
Toronto is often called "Big Smoke". Not that it has that much pollution - one pundit said it meant it had "a big reputation, not much to show for it - all smoke and no fire".

Mississauga, where I actually live, has no real nickname, except when people call it "Misterandmississauga".

On the far side of Toronto, there's Scarberia, I mean, Scarborough.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: GreenEyedHawk on March 03, 2012, 02:02:32 PM
I live in Edmonton, the City of Champions, which may have been true back in the 80s when some of hockey history's legendary great players were part of our team and the Oilers were an intimidating force to be reckoned with, but not so much now.

It's also sometimes called the Festival City, and if you've ever been in Edmonton in the summertime, you'd know why.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Bethczar on March 03, 2012, 02:16:32 PM
My home town, Milwaukee, is "Cream City", not for the dairy industry but for the color of the bricks in the older buildings. The native clay produces cream-colored bricks. It is also know as "The City of Gemutlicheit" for it's German heritage, and the "The City of Festivals" for the ethnic festivals and Summerfest held on the lakefront.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Hollanda on March 03, 2012, 02:20:06 PM
Not sure whether this counts, but Nottingham's tagline on Trent FM (now Capital FM) used to be "The World's Best City".

Jo and Twiggy - possibly the most annoying (but funny) breakfast show presenters EVER. :( I miss them!!
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Danismom on March 03, 2012, 02:53:54 PM
I used to live in Big D and before that I lived in the Metroplex.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: baglady on March 03, 2012, 03:45:34 PM
I live near Saratoga Springs, N.Y., aka the Spa City (for the mineral springs) and the Racing City (for the track).

Also in this area: Collar City (Troy), Rug City (Amsterdam), Glove Cities (Gloversville and Johnstown) and Electric City (Schenectady), all named after what used to be their biggest industries. Troy also is proud of being the home of the real Uncle Sam.

I'm in Schuylerville, which used to be Old Saratoga, and every other business in the village is Old (or Olde) Saratoga Somethingorother. (There was a campaign to change the name back to Old Saratoga a few years ago, but it failed.) It's also known as the Turning Point (as in turning point of the American Revolution, because the Battle of Saratoga was fought here).

Then there are the less flattering names: Smallbany, Skankectady, Troylet, Amsterico (that last is because Amsterdam has a large Hispanic population. Hispanics were the last wave of immigrants to move there to work in the carpet mills before they closed).

The town I grew up in, Nashua, N.H., was the Gate City, because it was right on the Massachusetts border.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: readingchick on March 03, 2012, 05:40:23 PM
My hometown is known as The Orthopaedic Capitol of the World, also known as Lake City (there are three lakes in the city limits).
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Julian on March 04, 2012, 05:59:00 PM
The itty bitty village I live in, and the (slightly) larger town nearby, pop. approx 5,000, have no real nickname, however we are located in the Valley of Love.   ;D

One of the local nicknames for the slightly-larger town however, would trip the filters.  The other is milder - and I've seen it on a spoof T-shirt - "London  New York  Paris  Norfick".  I sooo have to get one of them...

(and anyone who knows Tassie - yup, think I just outed myself!)
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: SamiHami on March 04, 2012, 06:24:46 PM
I live in the Holy City. Sounds pretty special, huh? It's because we have dozens of beautiful old churches in our city. Church steeples dot our skyline (there are no tall buildings here...the tallest one I can think of is 10 stories, so no skyscrapers to obliterate the view). It's very pretty.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Smitty on March 04, 2012, 06:28:47 PM
I live in Guelph, ON, aka the Royal City.

I used to live in Toronto, aka Hogtown.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: oz diva on March 04, 2012, 06:43:20 PM
I grew up in the Beef Capital of Australia, which was strange because the only cattle in the city limits were at our abattoirs.


Is that Rockhampton?

I live in Marvellous Melbourne, The Food Capital of Australia
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: PastryGoddess on March 04, 2012, 08:38:05 PM
I live in Baltimore, MD "Charm City" 
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: BatCity on March 04, 2012, 09:21:12 PM
I live in "The Live Music Capital of the World."

There are other nicknames but that's the most common one. And an overly boastful one, at that -- except in about two weeks!

I'm from Motown/The Motor City and The Bayou City/H-Town.
     
[BatCity waves to jmarvellous]
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on March 04, 2012, 10:01:07 PM
Greetings from the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia!
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: oz diva on March 04, 2012, 10:14:31 PM
I grew up in the Beef Capital of Australia, which was strange because the only cattle in the city limits were at our abattoirs.


Is that Rockhampton?

That it is! Although Casino, NSW is always trying to steal our title.

I also heard that we are the unofficial rum drinking capital of Australia. Apparently we drink more Bundy per capita than anywhere else (and remembering some nights out, I can totally believe it!)

A good friend of mine is living there now. I visited her in 2010. It rained - in September.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Gwywnnydd on March 04, 2012, 10:15:04 PM
I grew up in the Emerald City (Seattle), in the Evergreen State =).

I still insist I live 'in Seattle', even though I'm technically in the next city north =).
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Shopaholic on March 04, 2012, 10:51:59 PM
I live in the Holy City. Sounds pretty special, huh? It's because we have dozens of beautiful old churches in our city. Church steeples dot our skyline (there are no tall buildings here...the tallest one I can think of is 10 stories, so no skyscrapers to obliterate the view). It's very pretty.

For a minute there I thought you lived in Jerusalem  ;).

I recently stumbled upon Tel Aviv being referred to as "The Little Orange". It is also known as "The White City" due to all the Bauhaus architecture (it's a Unesco site!).
People also like to refer to it as "the city that never stops".
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on March 04, 2012, 10:58:25 PM
I'm in "Hub City", named so because we were quite a central place during the Civil War, being in a neutral state between North and South and because it's pretty much train central.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Ereine on March 04, 2012, 11:28:49 PM
Finland sort of looks like a person and so my unfairly unpopular town is called by some "the bottom of Finland," usually with cruder language. 

I grew up in "Athens of Finland" (for culture and education) and lived near "Chicago of Finland" (people assume it was because of crime rates but actually was because of the rate population grew or something). 
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: mechtilde on March 05, 2012, 03:25:37 AM
I live just outside Newcastle- The Toon.

It may have been a city for more than a century, but it is still, and always will be The Toon.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: merryns on March 05, 2012, 03:41:40 AM
I grew up in the Beef Capital of Australia, which was strange because the only cattle in the city limits were at our abattoirs.


Is that Rockhampton?

That it is! Although Casino, NSW is always trying to steal our title.

I also heard that we are the unofficial rum drinking capital of Australia. Apparently we drink more Bundy per capita than anywhere else (and remembering some nights out, I can totally believe it!)

In Brisvegas we just call Rocky Cow Town.

I grew up in a little Tassie town that has since rebadged itself as the Platypus Capital of the World.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: WillyNilly on March 05, 2012, 09:27:49 AM
I live in The Big Apple aka New York City.  I have no idea where the title came from but I do know NYS is well known for its apples.

Not a city but a state.  New York is nicknamed the 'Empire State'.  This has led to a lot of confusion.  My FIL once said the NY could no longer use that nickname because other states had a larger population.  Bill Bryson wondered if NYS had overseas territories. 

Neither of these are true.  NY is the Empire State because of the Erie Canal.  In the early days of the USA, the region west of the eastern mountains was called the Inland Empire.  Before the Erie Canal, getting there was long and dangerous.  The canal made settlement much easier.  That is why NYS is called the Empire State.

I always thought NYS was the Empire State because of the Empire State building LOL - I guess maybe the building took the title from the state and not the state took the title from the building, huh?  Guess I shoulda thought that one through!


Growing up my family often would go through Mylan New Hampshire on our way to Dummer NH.  There was a store in Mylan that sold t-shirts "The folks in Mylan may not be smart, but the next town over is Dummer" - I guess that's not a title, but it is a fun play on a place name!  :D
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Thipu1 on March 05, 2012, 09:48:57 AM
I live in the Holy City. Sounds pretty special, huh? It's because we have dozens of beautiful old churches in our city. Church steeples dot our skyline (there are no tall buildings here...the tallest one I can think of is 10 stories, so no skyscrapers to obliterate the view). It's very pretty.

Come to think of it, In the 19th century, Brooklyn was an independent city and was considered a suburb of Manhattan.  At the time, it was known as the 'City of Churches'.  It still is.  When you take the F train into Park Slope, the steeples really stand out.  Brooklyn has also been called the 'Five Towns' because five settlements originally united to form the city of Brooklyn.

It wasn't until late in the 19th century that Brooklyn became a borough of New York City.  Brooklynites still refer to that union as 'The Mistake of '98'.

Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Thipu1 on March 05, 2012, 10:02:20 AM
Back again because I just remembered Doodletown.

This was a small town that disappeared in the 1960s.  The name was supposed to come from the fact that Colonial troops from that area sang 'Yankee Doodle' as they marched to the Battle of Stony Point. 

The town disappeared because there was a crack-brained scheme to build a theme park on an island just south of Bear Mountain.  A park like that required a large supply of water and Doodletown was considered the proper place for a reservoir.  The  town was evacuated but the deal fell through and the reservoir was never constructed.  The only thing remaining of Doodletown is a small cemetery.  It was decided that anyone who had lived in the town had the right to be buried there.  It's a sad thing. 
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: PastryGoddess on March 05, 2012, 11:02:06 PM
I'm in "Hub City", named so because we were quite a central place during the Civil War, being in a neutral state between North and South and because it's pretty much train central.

There was a neutral state???  :)
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: JonGirl on March 06, 2012, 02:08:31 AM
I grew up in the Beef Capital of Australia, which was strange because the only cattle in the city limits were at our abattoirs.


Is that Rockhampton?

I live in Marvellous Melbourne, The Food Capital of Australia

I'm in Melbourne too, The Sporting Capital.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: iridaceae on March 06, 2012, 05:51:01 AM
Tucson is called The Old Pueblo, though I'm not exactly sure why.

My old hometown (Madison, WI) has been called Mad Town or Mad City.  A former governor of Wisconsin once called it "78 square miles surrounded by reality".  Which is not that inaccurate.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: bigozzy on March 06, 2012, 06:08:49 AM
I grew up in the Beef Capital of Australia, which was strange because the only cattle in the city limits were at our abattoirs.


Is that Rockhampton?

That it is! Although Casino, NSW is always trying to steal our title.












I remember years ago the mayor of Rockie had large statues of bulls erected but someone kept 'removing their equipment'. He threatened to do the same to the vandals if caught.

I also heard that we are the unofficial rum drinking capital of Australia. Apparently we drink more Bundy per capita than anywhere else (and remembering some nights out, I can totally believe it!)
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: bigozzy on March 06, 2012, 06:19:48 AM
I now live in Edinburgh, Scotland or:

Dun Eidean
Dunedin
Auld Reekie
Athens of the North
Empress of the North (Walter Scott)
Embra

Or, from a Glasgow perspective: Town of posh, stuck up folk. Best thing out of Edinburgh is the motorway west to Glasgow.
Ther emay be some rivalry.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Slartibartfast on March 06, 2012, 09:16:05 AM
I'm in "Hub City", named so because we were quite a central place during the Civil War, being in a neutral state between North and South and because it's pretty much train central.

There was a neutral state???  :)

I remember three of 'em, but Wikipedia says five (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Border_states_(American_Civil_War))  :P  Missouri, Kentucky, West Virginia, Maryland, and Delware, for various reasons.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: marcel on March 06, 2012, 09:43:13 AM
Very boring, but I live in the hofstad, which would translate to court town, due to the government and royal palace being in my town.

I personally hate nicknames of towns, or that claim that a town is the so and so capital of the world, since these things are seldom true. That said, checking nicknames for The Hague, I found that it also has the nickname legal capital of the world, due to the international court.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: exitzero on March 06, 2012, 09:53:49 AM
I live in Quincy, MA, "The City of Presidents", named so because two presidents were born there.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Bethczar on March 06, 2012, 10:36:41 AM
My old hometown (Madison, WI) has been called Mad Town or Mad City.  A former governor of Wisconsin once called it "78 square miles surrounded by reality".  Which is not that inaccurate.
As a current resident, I can assure you it is still true.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on March 06, 2012, 12:16:34 PM
Chicago has a few.

The City of Broad Shoulders - I think for all the industry.  It was coined in a poem by Carl Sandburg.
The Windy City - for lots of reasons: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_the_name_%22Windy_City%22
The Second City - kind of a put down in a New Yorker article but it stuck.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: PastryGoddess on March 06, 2012, 03:05:54 PM

I'm in "Hub City", named so because we were quite a central place during the Civil War, being in a neutral state between North and South and because it's pretty much train central.

There was a neutral state???  :)

I remember three of 'em, but Wikipedia says five (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Border_states_(American_Civil_War))  :P  Missouri, Kentucky, West Virginia, Maryland, and Delware, for various reasons.

I'm in MD and it was definitely not neutral at least the populace wasn't, politicians maybe.  I knew Missouri, WV, and Delaware.  Fun Fact WV actually seceded from Virginia mostly because of the Civil War...there were some other economic and cultural reasons too
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on March 06, 2012, 03:42:38 PM

I'm in "Hub City", named so because we were quite a central place during the Civil War, being in a neutral state between North and South and because it's pretty much train central.

There was a neutral state???  :)

I remember three of 'em, but Wikipedia says five (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Border_states_(American_Civil_War))  :P  Missouri, Kentucky, West Virginia, Maryland, and Delware, for various reasons.

I'm in MD and it was definitely not neutral at least the populace wasn't, politicians maybe.  I knew Missouri, WV, and Delaware.  Fun Fact WV actually seceded from Virginia mostly because of the Civil War...there were some other economic and cultural reasons too

I knew that, thanks to Mom.  :)
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Nuku on March 06, 2012, 04:43:21 PM
Chicago has a few.

The Second City - kind of a put down in a New Yorker article but it stuck.

You can't believe everything you read in The New Yorker. It's the Second City because the first one burned down.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Gumbysqueak on March 06, 2012, 04:49:34 PM
Mile high = Denver, Colorado. The city is a mile above the ocean.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: hobish on March 06, 2012, 05:49:52 PM

Apparently Atlantic City, NJ is called “Vegas of the East” and the motto is “Always turned on.” I grew up near AC and never heard either of them before. It’s just AC.

Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: iridaceae on March 07, 2012, 05:02:17 AM
My old hometown (Madison, WI) has been called Mad Town or Mad City.  A former governor of Wisconsin once called it "78 square miles surrounded by reality".  Which is not that inaccurate.
As a current resident, I can assure you it is still true.

Heh. I so believe that.

I read a New Yorker article recently where the writer went to Madison and the state to talk about the Walker recall election. I get the distinct impression that the anti-Walker banner in the Capital Building reading "It's Not Nice" baffled the writer no end, as it was described as being pure Wisconsin or something like that.  I just nodded, laughed, and said "that is so Wisconsin". (Only in Wisconsin and possibly Minnesota would that be seen as a stinging criticism.)
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: cicero on March 07, 2012, 06:17:34 AM
i don't think we have an "official" title - but i live in jerusalem which is the/a holy city, holy city to the three major monotheistic religions, etc.

Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Bethczar on March 07, 2012, 08:36:40 AM
My old hometown (Madison, WI) has been called Mad Town or Mad City.  A former governor of Wisconsin once called it "78 square miles surrounded by reality".  Which is not that inaccurate.
As a current resident, I can assure you it is still true.

Heh. I so believe that.

I read a New Yorker article recently where the writer went to Madison and the state to talk about the Walker recall election. I get the distinct impression that the anti-Walker banner in the Capital Building reading "It's Not Nice" baffled the writer no end, as it was described as being pure Wisconsin or something like that.  I just nodded, laughed, and said "that is so Wisconsin". (Only in Wisconsin and possibly Minnesota would that be seen as a stinging criticism.)
Oh, I don't know. It would be pretty harsh in Iowa, too.  :P
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Thipu1 on March 07, 2012, 09:11:23 AM
My old hometown (Madison, WI) has been called Mad Town or Mad City.  A former governor of Wisconsin once called it "78 square miles surrounded by reality".  Which is not that inaccurate.
As a current resident, I can assure you it is still true.

We have relatives who live in Madison and have visited often.  One of our prized possessions is a mug with the legend, 'Madison.  an alternative to reality'.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Thipu1 on March 07, 2012, 09:44:21 AM
Across the East River in NYC from south to north there are three iconic bridges.  These are the Brooklyn, the Manhattan and the Williamsburg bridges.

Visitors who took a bus tour were told that locals refer to the trio as the BMW.  Mr. Thipu and I have lived in the area all our lives and in NYC for about 40 years.  We have never heard the bridges referred to in this way. 

However, because the first is so elegant and the second is so gawky, the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges have been called, 'Beauty and the Beast'. [/img]
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on March 07, 2012, 11:03:26 AM
Chicago has a few.

The Second City - kind of a put down in a New Yorker article but it stuck.

You can't believe everything you read in The New Yorker. It's the Second City because the first one burned down.

That's what I'd previously thought but the New Yorker thing was in some Wiki article I read later.  That's what I get for trusting Wiki implicitly, LOL
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: WillyNilly on March 07, 2012, 12:57:39 PM
Across the East River in NYC from south to north there are three iconic bridges.  These are the Brooklyn, the Manhattan and the Williamsburg bridges.

Visitors who took a bus tour were told that locals refer to the trio as the BMW.  Mr. Thipu and I have lived in the area all our lives and in NYC for about 40 years.  We have never heard the bridges referred to in this way. 

However, because the first is so elegant and the second is so gawky, the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges have been called, 'Beauty and the Beast'. [/img]

Lifelong NYer and I've never heard of the bridges being called "BMW" either.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: CorrieFan on March 08, 2012, 05:01:06 PM
I'm in Saskatoon, SK in Canada, and there are a few nicknames for my city:

City of Bridges or Bridge City (we have 7 so far, and currently building #8)
Toontown
Saskabush
Paris of the Prairies ( I like this one!)
Hub City ( not used so much anymore)

The one I like the most in the province is the small city of Swift Current, which we call Speedy Creek!
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: marcel on March 08, 2012, 05:15:02 PM
I'm in Saskatoon, SK in Canada, and there are a few nicknames for my city:

City of Bridges or Bridge City (we have 7 so far, and currently building #8)
That doesn't even come close to a lot of bridges.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: MERUNCC13 on March 08, 2012, 05:53:42 PM
Chiming in from the Southeast United States, I live in the "Queen City of the South" (Charlotte) named for the wife of King George III (brown-nosing 18th century style!) which is in the "Tar Heel" state (North Carolina), which has several versions of why we got that nickname.  The best known comes from the Revolution when shipbuilders used pine tar to slow down the British advance in the eastern part of the state - I'm not sure that is all true but it's the one that I give people who ask.
 ;)
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: violinp on March 08, 2012, 09:09:07 PM
I live in "The Model City," called so not on account of how it was planned, but because the government was supposed to be a model to all other cities, who at the time were so corrupt, apparently.  :o That was...interesting to find out.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: CorrieFan on March 08, 2012, 09:44:08 PM
I'm in Saskatoon, SK in Canada, and there are a few nicknames for my city:

City of Bridges or Bridge City (we have 7 so far, and currently building #8)
That doesn't even come close to a lot of bridges.
[/quote

Probably not in comparison to many other cities, but at a quarter of a million people this is the biggest city in the province. The province itself only has a population of just over one million people, and is big enough to fit several European countries in it! Population density is low.

As they say, it's all relative. I'm pretty sure no other city in my province has even half the number of bridges we do, hence the title.
]
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: hobish on March 08, 2012, 11:31:00 PM
Tucson is called The Old Pueblo, though I'm not exactly sure why.

My old hometown (Madison, WI) has been called Mad Town or Mad City.  A former governor of Wisconsin once called it "78 square miles surrounded by reality".  Which is not that inaccurate.

I visited Madison in 1993 or so; i liked it there. The friends i was visiting said their apartment was considered to be in the bad part of town, but their apartment was so nice and their friends i met were interesting in a good way, and friendly.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: iridaceae on March 09, 2012, 07:28:39 AM
My old hometown (Madison, WI) has been called Mad Town or Mad City.  A former governor of Wisconsin once called it "78 square miles surrounded by reality".  Which is not that inaccurate.
As a current resident, I can assure you it is still true.

Heh. I so believe that.

I read a New Yorker article recently where the writer went to Madison and the state to talk about the Walker recall election. I get the distinct impression that the anti-Walker banner in the Capital Building reading "It's Not Nice" baffled the writer no end, as it was described as being pure Wisconsin or something like that.  I just nodded, laughed, and said "that is so Wisconsin". (Only in Wisconsin and possibly Minnesota would that be seen as a stinging criticism.)
Oh, I don't know. It would be pretty harsh in Iowa, too.  :P

True; I forgot about Iowa.

By the way the actual quote is "a purely Wisconsin rebuke".  Heh. It is.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Bethczar on March 09, 2012, 12:10:45 PM
Tucson is called The Old Pueblo, though I'm not exactly sure why.

My old hometown (Madison, WI) has been called Mad Town or Mad City.  A former governor of Wisconsin once called it "78 square miles surrounded by reality".  Which is not that inaccurate.

I visited Madison in 1993 or so; i liked it there. The friends i was visiting said their apartment was considered to be in the bad part of town, but their apartment was so nice and their friends i met were interesting in a good way, and friendly.
I'm moving away from Madison tomorrow, after living there for over 15 years.  :'(  It's really a lovely city.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Thipu1 on March 09, 2012, 06:36:45 PM
Here's something else that sets Madison apart.

In most hotels there is a list of single digit speed dial numbers on the in-room phones.  1 is the front desk. 2 is security, etc.  We've stayed in several hotels in Madison.  In each one there was a speed dial digit for pizza.  We have never seen this in any other city.

Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Julia Mercer on March 14, 2012, 05:08:27 PM
I'm in Windsor Ontario, the City Of Roses http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windsor,_Ontario
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 15, 2012, 05:33:05 AM
Not a place where I've ever lived, or spent much time; but my parents grew up not far away, and knew it well.  Birkenhead, north-west England; just the other side of the River Mersey estuary, from its better-known, more stylish, glamorous, and dashing "twin", Liverpool.  Ever since the cities came into being, Birkenhead has suffered from a massive inferiority complex vis-a-vis Liverpool (for a very long time, the two were even in different counties).  Liverpool folk often took every opportunity to sneer at their smaller, duller, less cultured neighbour just across the water; they gave it the name of "The One-Eyed City".

Thanks to this situation, Birkenhead has long been notorious for harbouring a lot of bitter, touchy inhabitants -- it's not a place with obviously benign "vibes".  In decades gone by, the Empire Music Hall, Birkenhead, was regarded with dread by novice comedians: the audiences were notoriously hard to please, and inclined to make very clear, their displeasure with a comic whom they did not find funny; often, by throwing things.  Birkenhead has its moments; but it's not a big feature of the British tourist circuit.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Jaelle on March 28, 2012, 12:38:21 PM
Resurrecting this thread because I wanted to add my city. :)

Buffalo is The Queen City, either because it's the second biggest city in New York state or because it was one of the most prosperous cities along the Great Lakes, once upon a time.

It's also The City of Good Neighbors and Nickel City. (Buffalo nickel? :D)
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 31, 2012, 09:16:43 AM
Seems I can't stop posting, just now.  May I ask -- am I right in thinking that the name of Buffalo, NY, is nothing to do with bison;  it's a corruption of the French "Beau Fleur"?
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Teenyweeny on April 02, 2012, 01:59:36 PM
I live just outside Newcastle- The Toon.

It may have been a city for more than a century, but it is still, and always will be The Toon.

Areet pet, howzit gannin? Ah havint been yem for a while like, but ah can still tark propa Geordie.  ;D


Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: bopper on May 01, 2012, 12:36:41 PM
I live in the "Biggest Small Town in New Jersey."
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on May 01, 2012, 02:13:09 PM
I live in the "Biggest Small Town in New Jersey."

And since I may be moving to that fine state (the property taxes are no match for the combined bridge tolls and extra gas that M uses to get to the new job), I had to go and look that up.   ;D
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: ladiedeathe on May 01, 2012, 02:22:04 PM
I'm in Cincinnati- Cincy, the 'Nati, the Queen City, or the Tristate.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Ms_Cellany on May 01, 2012, 05:21:48 PM
Dallas: "Big D."

Our motto, apparently is "We can spell."
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: hobish on May 01, 2012, 05:34:18 PM
I live in the "Biggest Small Town in New Jersey."

And since I may be moving to that fine state (the property taxes are no match for the combined bridge tolls and extra gas that M uses to get to the new job), I had to go and look that up.   ;D

I had to, too; i was (incorrectly) guessing Vineland.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: BabylonSister on May 01, 2012, 08:22:45 PM
Seems I can't stop posting, just now.  May I ask -- am I right in thinking that the name of Buffalo, NY, is nothing to do with bison;  it's a corruption of the French "Beau Fleur"?
"Beau fleur" would not be correct in French. It should be "belle fleur" (fleur is a feminine noun and the adjective should be feminine too.)


I looked it up and it appears the city was indeed named after the animal even though there are no buffaloes in the area.


Edit: Oh, Wikipedia mentions "beau fleuve" (beautiful river) as a possible but not very likely explanation. It's grammatically correct, at least.

Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 03, 2012, 10:38:03 AM
Seems I can't stop posting, just now.  May I ask -- am I right in thinking that the name of Buffalo, NY, is nothing to do with bison;  it's a corruption of the French "Beau Fleur"?
"Beau fleur" would not be correct in French. It should be "belle fleur" (fleur is a feminine noun and the adjective should be feminine too.)


I looked it up and it appears the city was indeed named after the animal even though there are no buffaloes in the area.


Edit: Oh, Wikipedia mentions "beau fleuve" (beautiful river) as a possible but not very likely explanation. It's grammatically correct, at least.
Thanks !  A very long time ago, I met (on the continent of Europe) an inhabitant of Buffalo, who gave me the "beau fleur" attempt at an explanation -- unless I misheard or misunderstood.  If not, it seems he had things wrong.  I just thought "Anglophones, with no genders in their language, botching things vis-a-vis languages with genders." (In the English suburb where I live, there's a would-be up-market sandwich shop which calls itself "Le Maison du Baguette".)
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: mrs_deb on May 03, 2012, 12:55:05 PM
The nearest Big City to us is nicknamed "The Queen City", altho the locals tend to call it "Manch-vegas". 
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: AmethystAnne on May 08, 2012, 04:29:04 PM
Hello, from the Bluegrass State and specifically, the hometown of the Kentucky Headhunters and Black Stone Cherry


I live in the "Biggest Small Town in New Jersey."

And since I may be moving to that fine state (the property taxes are no match for the combined bridge tolls and extra gas that M uses to get to the new job), I had to go and look that up.   ;D

I had to, too; i was (incorrectly) guessing Vineland.

I had to look it up too. Some of my cousins used to live near there. I had made a wrong guess too - Flemington.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Charliebug on May 31, 2012, 10:41:13 PM
I have heard Windsor, ON is also referred to as "Detroit of the North"....not sure if that is true or just what some locals have coined it?

Some places I have lived:

Calgary, AB is also known as Cowtown.
Vancouver, BC is also known as Hongcouver (for its high immigrant population from Asian countries.)
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: AustenFan on May 31, 2012, 11:03:33 PM
I have heard Windsor, ON is also referred to as "Detroit of the North"....not sure if that is true or just what some locals have coined it?

Some places I have lived:

Calgary, AB is also known as Cowtown.
Vancouver, BC is also known as Hongcouver (for its high immigrant population from Asian countries.)

Calgary (pronounced Calgree) is also known as Texas North due to our oil dependent economy.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: GreenEyedHawk on June 02, 2012, 11:05:24 AM
AustenFan:  Here in Edmonton, we call it Cowgree.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: jaxsue on June 02, 2012, 02:33:53 PM
AustenFan:  Here in Edmonton, we call it Cowgree.

My dad, who was born in Toronto in 1920, said they called it "cow town" when he was a boy. It sure isn't that now!
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Alboury on July 25, 2012, 06:11:59 AM
Finland sort of looks like a person and so my unfairly unpopular town is called by some "the bottom of Finland," usually with cruder language. 

I grew up in "Athens of Finland" (for culture and education) and lived near "Chicago of Finland" (people assume it was because of crime rates but actually was because of the rate population grew or something).

Well, I live in the traditional rival city, then - the Manchester of Finland, the Brick City, the Red City, Nääsville (1).
I spent good chunks of my childhood in the town that steals the j's (2), or around the World's Navel, the Kalakukko City (3).
The town I grew up in (Hämeenlinna) hasn't a nickname as a whole, but it's centre is called Finland's largest lit cemetery.

(1): the city of Tampere. The centre of Nordic heavy industry in the 18th and 19th centuries, lots of red brick and huge old factories - thus the Manchester of Finland, shortened Manse. In the 1970's and 1980's the Finnish rock and punk scene coiled around the city and the nickname was further justified. The Brick City is simply because of the vast amount of red brick. The Red City has to do with red brick as well, but it also stands for the Red Declaration (for workers' rights) read there in 1905, and the city being the headquarters of the Reds, the defeated side in the Finnish civil war. Nääsville is a play on Nashville, because of the constant occurrence of  the phrase "nääs" ("you see") in local speech which sounds just like a prolonged "Nash" with an ordinary s.

(2): Kajaani, which would be pronounced similar to "Kah-yaa-knee", but the dialect spoken there stresses the "yaa" part, so it's regularly transcripted as "Kajjaani", sometimes with three j's. Thus, no other cities in the northern parts of Finland may be pronounced with an additional "j" (some dialects tend to do Joensuu - Jojensuu), as Kajjaani steals all the j's in the north.

(3): Kuopio, the capital of Upper Savonia region. Locals ironically, and just to frustrate non-Savonians, call it the World's Navel - it's relatively big for a Finnish city, and located in what used to be the middle of nowhere, and still is to some extent. The kalakukko is a traditional Savonian dish (little fish and bacon baked inside a rye pouch), and both of the most remarkable bakeries providing those are located in Kuopio.

It's kinda funny, though, that no more nicknames for Kuopio exist, since it's deep in the Savonian culture to never refer to things with their actual names. Countless euphemisms and nicknames are invented instead - sometimes to the point of losing the original name. For example, there is a monument in the city that has two flattish, narrow metal slabs pointing upwards, connected at their lower ends. The actual name of the monument is a complete mystery, everybody has called it The Frozen Longjohns for decades now.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Redsoil on July 25, 2012, 06:17:47 AM
I grew up in an area of NSW known as "The Start of the Outback".  I now live in another area that is famous for "The Black Soil Plains".
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: CLE_Girl on July 25, 2012, 08:08:39 AM

I grew up in Chicago - aka: Chi-town, the Windy City, second city, the city of big shoulders, The Big Onion

I currently live in Cleveland - aka: The mistake by the Lake, C-town, The Rock 'n' Roll Capital of the World
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: ShanghaiJill on July 25, 2012, 09:37:28 AM
The City Of Homes, although people call it The City of Homies. ;)
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: oz diva on August 19, 2012, 12:23:21 AM
How about World's Most Liveable City? Melbourne is usually in the top three.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Thipu1 on August 19, 2012, 09:48:56 AM
Congratulations to Melbourne!   :D. Where can we find the list?

A few years ago, Madison WI was judged the best place to live in the USA.  We have family there.

Last year,  Park Slope was selected as the best neighborhood in NYC. We live there so we can share bragging rights. 
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: oz diva on August 20, 2012, 08:05:34 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World's_most_livable_cities

http://www.eiu.com/site_info.asp?info_name=The_Global_Liveability_Report

Not sure if you can get the full list without paying for it.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: JonGirl on August 21, 2012, 05:43:43 AM
How about World's Most Liveable City? Melbourne is usually in the top three.

I seriously can't work out why.
I've lived here all my life and all I can see is bad public transport, worse weather and City violence.
Maybe I'm getting old.  :)   :-\
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: TheaterDiva1 on August 21, 2012, 06:33:49 AM
I went to high school right outside Hartford, CT - "The Insurance Capital Of The World."

Connecticut itself is "The Nutmeg State" - don't know why.
Title: Re: City "titles"
Post by: Thipu1 on August 21, 2012, 08:16:38 AM
One theory of how CT became the Nutmeg State is slightly nasty.

In the early days of the USA itinerant traders who sold just about everything were common.  Many were from New England and some were noted for shady dealings and shoddy goods.  Nutmeg was an exotic spice and expensive.  Traders from CT were said to pass off cheaply carved pieces of wood as nutmegs.  Since nutmeg is usually grated and wasn't likely to be used until the trader was far away, this ruse often worked.