Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange => Topic started by: Ceallach on March 28, 2012, 05:36:40 AM

Title: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Ceallach on March 28, 2012, 05:36:40 AM
I've heard a character on a US show say "foy-aye" before and assumed it was meant to be funny (e.g. a joke),  but I just heard it on another show and wondered if this is simply a regional difference in pronunciation that goes beyond accents.

Here, the entryway type area of a home (foyer) is called "foy-er".    Or perhaps "foy-ah".  What I've heard on these shows that sounds completely different is definitely more "foy-aye" or "foy-yay".  Very different.

So how do you pronounce Foyer, AKA the entryway.  Or if you've never heard that word before, tell us!
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 28, 2012, 05:43:16 AM
I wouldn't usually say foyer (I'd be more likely to say 'hall' or 'entrance'), but if I did, I'd say foy-yay. I'm in the UK, if that helps.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Irishkitty on March 28, 2012, 05:55:11 AM
I wouldn't usually say foyer (I'd be more likely to say 'hall' or 'entrance'), but if I did, I'd say foy-yay. I'm in the UK, if that helps.
Same here. (except I'm in Ireland)
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: blue2000 on March 28, 2012, 08:43:57 AM
I would say foy-yay (Canada). Although it is mostly fancy houses and businesses that have foyers here. If you live in a regular house, you just have an entrance/front hall.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Thipu1 on March 28, 2012, 09:48:59 AM
NYC here and we would say foy-er. 

I've noticed that people in the UK tend to use the pronunciation of a term's original language. 

Some years ago we were on a ship.  The theater was named after Vincent Van Gogh.  Here, the name is usually pronounced Van Go.  When making announcements about the day's schedule, the English Social Director always referred to the place as the Van Khok Lounge.  There were people who had a hard time finding the place for a day or two.

But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

Ah, the glories of the English language. 
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: CakeBeret on March 28, 2012, 09:50:52 AM
I just avoid saying it :)

If I were to say it, I would say foy-yay.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 28, 2012, 09:59:12 AM
But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

I think someone's been pulling your leg there. We say 'buff-ay' in the UK too.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: MrsJWine on March 28, 2012, 10:01:09 AM
I'm from the US, born in South Dakota. Until we moved to Wisconsin, I'd only ever heard "foyer." Then again, South Dakotans pronounce the capital (Pierre) as "peer." Now I hear a mix of both "foyer" and "foyay." Both now sound wrong to me, even though they're both in the dictionary; I just avoid using the word altogether.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 28, 2012, 10:07:08 AM
NYC here and we would say foy-er. 

I've noticed that people in the UK tend to use the pronunciation of a term's original language. 

Some years ago we were on a ship.  The theater was named after Vincent Van Gogh.  Here, the name is usually pronounced Van Go.  When making announcements about the day's schedule, the English Social Director always referred to the place as the Van Khok Lounge.  There were people who had a hard time finding the place for a day or two.

But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

Ah, the glories of the English language.

"It's always a problem to know --
  Is the chap called Van Gokh, or Van Go?
  This doubt re the name,
  I confess, to my shame,
  Makes my highbrows go terribly low."

And just to add to the confusion -- I (lifelong Brit) call the self-serve jobbie, a BUFF-ay. (Teenyweeny -- just noticed your post -- but which syllable do you put the accent on?)
 
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 28, 2012, 10:11:46 AM
NYC here and we would say foy-er. 

I've noticed that people in the UK tend to use the pronunciation of a term's original language. 

Some years ago we were on a ship.  The theater was named after Vincent Van Gogh.  Here, the name is usually pronounced Van Go.  When making announcements about the day's schedule, the English Social Director always referred to the place as the Van Khok Lounge.  There were people who had a hard time finding the place for a day or two.

But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

Ah, the glories of the English language.

"It's always a problem to know --
  Is the chap called Van Gokh, or Van Go?
  This doubt re the name,
  I confess, to my shame,
  Makes my highbrows go terribly low."

And just to add to the confusion -- I (lifelong Brit) call the self-serve jobbie, a BUFF-ay. (Teenyweeny -- just noticed your post -- but which syllable do you put the accent on?)

I would probably give both syllables equal stress. I think we can both agree, though, that it isn't a 'buffette'. (Although, I do sometimes say that as a little joke. I also enjoy saying 'ballette'.  ;D )
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Thipu1 on March 28, 2012, 10:18:17 AM
People like to have fun with words. 

Most people would call a platter of raw vegetables served with dip 'Croo-da-TAYS'. A friend, who knows better, enjoys calling them 'CRUDD-ites'.  He also likes to call hors oeuvres 'Horse Doovers'. 
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Gumbysqueak on March 28, 2012, 10:23:19 AM
foy-yay for our house. When you enter there is a large space with foy-yay table with flowers. Foy-er is also common in Colorado/USA. If you enter a traditional post WII house we call it an entry room.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 28, 2012, 10:33:36 AM


But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 


Quote
And just to add to the confusion -- I (lifelong Brit) call the self-serve jobbie, a BUFF-ay. (Teenyweeny -- just noticed your post -- but which syllable do you put the accent on?)

Quote
I would probably give both syllables equal stress. I think we can both agree, though, that it isn't a 'buffette'. (Although, I do sometimes say that as a little joke. I also enjoy saying 'ballette'.  ;D )

A "buffette", whatever else, it sure isn't. Confusion English / French: in our island's own language, we have the word in its own right, "buffet" (accent on first syllable) -- to hit someone, with considerably-less-than-lethal violence.  Then along came the Frogs -- same word, same spelling, totally different meaning.  And please, let us not get into the business with the world's most famous arachnophobe...
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Outdoor Girl on March 28, 2012, 10:49:11 AM
I'm Canadian.  I say foy-eh.   ;D  (So foy-yay)
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: WillyNilly on March 28, 2012, 01:02:43 PM
NYC here.  We say "foy-er" unless we are being goofy, then its a foy-ay (like Tar-zhay for Target, or on-deeve for endive (N-dive)).

People like to have fun with words. 

Most people would call a platter of raw vegetables served with dip 'Croo-da-TAYS'. A friend, who knows better, enjoys calling them 'CRUDD-ites'.  He also likes to call hors oeuvres 'Horse Doovers'.

I call them hoors doovers ala Homer Simpson  ;D
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: #borecore on March 28, 2012, 01:14:50 PM
FOY-er (but I don't use it -- I say entryway or some other term. If I knew I was around people who did, I might try "foy-ay," but I'd probably feel awkward.)
buh-FAY
Or-DERV(S)
I don't say crudite because I don't know how it's said.
Bal-AY (we were talking about how Billy Elliot's dad always something that sounds more like a single syllable "BOLLY" to our American ears just last night!)

To add another to the mix:
ANT (though some other people's parents' sisters just seem more like AUuunts than my dear aunts, and it's AUN-tee, not ANT-ee for "auntie").
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: KenveeB on March 28, 2012, 01:18:28 PM
I've always been taught that "foy-yay" was the correct pronunciation, but I've heard "foy-er" as well.


People like to have fun with words. 

Most people would call a platter of raw vegetables served with dip 'Croo-da-TAYS'. A friend, who knows better, enjoys calling them 'CRUDD-ites'.  He also likes to call hors oeuvres 'Horse Doovers'.

Oops. I call them "croo-dites".
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Outdoor Girl on March 28, 2012, 03:05:29 PM
I call it a veggie tray.   :D
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Layla Miller on March 28, 2012, 03:10:42 PM
I call them "Uh huh, that's nice, where's the cake?"  ;D
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: demarco on March 28, 2012, 07:06:58 PM
I call it the front hall. 

(I grew up in New England and have lived my adult life in the Midwest and the south.)
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Isometric on March 28, 2012, 07:20:41 PM
I call them "Uh huh, that's nice, where's the cake?"  ;D

Haha! Were we seperated at birth??

Foy-ah. (Or Foy-yay if putting on a mock posh voice) I only use it when refering to hotels.

I once knew a woman who pronounced things as she read them - sachet was sat-chet, and foccacia was focka-chia.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: camlan on March 28, 2012, 09:03:58 PM
I call it the front hall. 

(I grew up in New England and have lived my adult life in the Midwest and the south.)

Me, too. I'm from New England. I only hear foy-yay on the TV; never heard a real, live person say it. And I've never heard entry room--that must be a regionalism.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: hyzenthlay on March 28, 2012, 09:12:40 PM
Foy-yay here. I'm a military brat and tend to use 'unaccented' and relatively non regional American English.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: kareng57 on March 28, 2012, 09:17:37 PM
I would say foy-yay (Canada). Although it is mostly fancy houses and businesses that have foyers here. If you live in a regular house, you just have an entrance/front hall.


I say it that way too, also Canada.  However, I consider the term to be fairly interchangeable whether referring to a small house, mansion, office building etc.  But generally for a commercial building I would say "lobby".

As an aside - I do remember "entrance hall" being a common term in the 1960s for fairly newly-built homes.  Quite often, these were basement-entry homes - the entrance-level would include the rec room, perhaps a den, second bathroom and laundry room.  Upstairs was the main living area.  But overall, these entrance-halls were huge and they only really had to accommodate a coat-closet.  Lots of wasted space....
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Dindrane on March 28, 2012, 10:44:25 PM
I say "FOY-er," and it is a word I use on occasion.  I can't recall if I've used it to refer to a house -- the last time I lived in one with any sort of space that could possibly be called a foyer was about 10 years ago.

For a few decades after WWII, it seemed to be pretty common to build houses such that the front door opened onto the living room (or at least it seems that way based on houses of that era that are still around).  More recently, I've seen more newer homes that actually do have an entrance room or area of some sort, but there are probably just as many that are so open-planned that it's not really a discrete space.

And actually, now that I think about it, I'm inclined to use the term "front hall" for a house that has some sort of discrete entryway space.  That could be because that space in the house I grew up in really was more of a hallway than an entrance way.  We rarely used the front door, and instead used the side door that opened into the living room.  Thus, the room that the front door opened onto functioned primarily as a pathway between the living room and the den.

Now, of course, my "front hall" is a 2 foot by 2 foot patch of linoleum in my living room, with nothing else to distinguish it from the rest of the room. :)  I rather miss having a separate entryway, but them's the breaks when you live in an apartment (or so it seems).
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: PrincessInPink on March 28, 2012, 11:11:47 PM
I don't think I've ever said it out loud. I call it an entryway. But when I read it, I pronounce it "foy-yay" in my head.

Also, I do not say crudites. I would call that a veggie tray. So would most other people I know, except for my grandmother, who says relish tray.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: KenveeB on March 28, 2012, 11:41:18 PM
I don't think I've ever said it out loud. I call it an entryway. But when I read it, I pronounce it "foy-yay" in my head.

Also, I do not say crudites. I would call that a veggie tray. So would most other people I know, except for my grandmother, who says relish tray.

I thought a relish tray had pickles and olives on it, not general veggies.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Slartibartfast on March 29, 2012, 12:04:52 AM
I grew up hearing it as "foy-yay" in my house and "foy-er" everywhere else in town.  As a result, I've just learned to call it "the front hall" instead :P  There are actually several words I avoid because of this issue - I point-blank refused to call our chaise lounge/lounge anything at all because "chase lounge" sounded like I didn't know any better but "shez lonjj" sounded like I was trying to be pretentious (and nobody would know what I meant anyway).  Apparently both are correct in the US, but I finally ended up calling it "the chase" because that's what DH and Babybartfast call it.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Tilt Fairy on March 29, 2012, 12:11:53 AM
But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

I think someone's been pulling your leg there. We say 'buff-ay' in the UK too.

Lol yes. Have a stern word with them Thipu!

In the UK we say buff-ay and foy-yay.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: SouthernBelle on March 29, 2012, 03:09:32 PM
Hmm.  How about valet?
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Tilt Fairy on March 29, 2012, 03:16:54 PM
val-ay

does anyone say val-ette? I hope so. That would totally make my day.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Thipu1 on March 29, 2012, 07:42:12 PM
I call them "Uh huh, that's nice, where's the cake?"  ;D

Haha! Were we seperated at birth??

Foy-ah. (Or Foy-yay if putting on a mock posh voice) I only use it when refering to hotels.

I once knew a woman who pronounced things as she read them - sachet was sat-chet, and foccacia was focka-chia.

My MIL does that.  To her, the stone  granite is pronounced as 'GRAY-night'.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Tilt Fairy on March 29, 2012, 07:47:21 PM
This thread is really funny. Maybe my amusement is heightened due to the the glass of wine in my hand but regardless, for some reason, I'm finding this all hilarious.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Slartibartfast on March 29, 2012, 08:06:48 PM
DH's grandmother is from rural Kentucky, home of the PO-leece and CEE-ment.  I giggle every time she says things like that.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Outdoor Girl on March 29, 2012, 08:08:53 PM
And vee-HICK-ul.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: baglady on March 29, 2012, 08:29:07 PM
NYC here.  We say "foy-er" unless we are being goofy, then its a foy-ay (like Tar-zhay for Target, or on-deeve for endive (N-dive)).

People like to have fun with words. 

Most people would call a platter of raw vegetables served with dip 'Croo-da-TAYS'. A friend, who knows better, enjoys calling them 'CRUDD-ites'.  He also likes to call hors oeuvres 'Horse Doovers'.

I call them hoors doovers ala Homer Simpson  ;D

I call them horse ovaries a la Archie Bunker.

I don't use the word "foyer" much -- it's the front hall -- but when I do it's "foy-er," to rhyme with Verne Troyer and Conan the Destroyer. I know a fellow who says "Four-ee-yay."
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Optimoose Prime on March 30, 2012, 07:38:41 PM
I'm from the mid-west US.  I say foy-er, and buffay.  Except my daughter had a speech problem when young and she called it fuffay.  So we go to the fuffay.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: kareng57 on March 30, 2012, 08:03:50 PM
But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

I think someone's been pulling your leg there. We say 'buff-ay' in the UK too.

Lol yes. Have a stern word with them Thipu!

In the UK we say buff-ay and foy-yay.


Maybe not always.  Dh used to have a co-worker from the UK (this was probably around 30 years ago, at least) who also pronounced it as buff-fett.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: ClaireC79 on March 31, 2012, 03:37:04 AM
and as evidenced in this thread there are likely some in the US who get it wrong and pronounce it that - some people do pronounce words wrongly.  The standard UK pronounciation doesn't have a -ette on the end, it has an -ay
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: marcel on March 31, 2012, 03:45:50 AM
NYC here and we would say foy-er. 

I've noticed that people in the UK tend to use the pronunciation of a term's original language. 

Some years ago we were on a ship.  The theater was named after Vincent Van Gogh.  Here, the name is usually pronounced Van Go.  When making announcements about the day's schedule, the English Social Director always referred to the place as the Van Khok Lounge.  There were people who had a hard time finding the place for a day or two.

But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

Ah, the glories of the English language.

"It's always a problem to know --
  Is the chap called Van Gokh, or Van Go?
  This doubt re the name,
  I confess, to my shame,
  Makes my highbrows go terribly low."

And just to add to the confusion -- I (lifelong Brit) call the self-serve jobbie, a BUFF-ay. (Teenyweeny -- just noticed your post -- but which syllable do you put the accent on?)

I would probably give both syllables equal stress. I think we can both agree, though, that it isn't a 'buffette'. (Although, I do sometimes say that as a little joke. I also enjoy saying 'ballette'.  ;D )
On the Van Gogh thing, it is neither, both Brits and Americans simply can not pronounce the name correctly.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Thipu1 on March 31, 2012, 08:22:57 AM
I understand there's a similar problem with the Capitol of Denmark, and I've heard this from Danes.

In English, it's 'COPE-en-haygen' or 'COPE-en-hahgen'.  In Danish, it's more like 'Coabn-hven'. The problem is that, when English speakers attempt the Danish pronunciation, it almost always comes like the German pronunciation and brings back uncomfortable memories of WWII.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Tilt Fairy on March 31, 2012, 08:54:35 AM
What about Warren Buffett?
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 31, 2012, 08:57:29 AM
On the Van Gogh thing, it is neither, both Brits and Americans simply can not pronounce the name correctly.

Please -- what IS the right pronunciation, then?  (Enquiring minds want to know...]
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 31, 2012, 09:05:08 AM
val-ay

does anyone say val-ette? I hope so. That would totally make my day.

I'm British -- same as you, if I'm right -- so I say "val-ette", accent on first syllable (not a word I use much in conversation -- haven't been the employer of a personal body-servant in recent times).

This thing gets complicated for me, by the archaic word "varlet" (serf / churl / plebeian and uncouth person).  Maybe they're related -- presumably an aristocrat's valet would be lower-class and thus a varlet...
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Tilt Fairy on March 31, 2012, 09:16:43 AM
val-ay

does anyone say val-ette? I hope so. That would totally make my day.

I'm British -- same as you, if I'm right -- so I say "val-ette", accent on first syllable (not a word I use much in conversation -- haven't been the employer of a personal body-servant in recent times).

This thing gets complicated for me, by the archaic word "varlet" (serf / churl / plebeian and uncouth person).  Maybe they're related -- presumably an aristocrat's valet would be lower-class and thus a varlet...

That's true. I think valet parking over here isn't anywhere near to how it is in America. I'm 25 and I don't think I've seen a single valet in the UK ever. Though that may be because I'm pretty poor.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Hollanda on March 31, 2012, 09:16:43 AM
Buff-ay is how we say buffet. Foy-yay for foyer, val-ay for valet.

Someone I know who was trying to be posh said "boof-ay" and my friends and I were howling with laughter. "Should we go to the boooooooooooof-ay?!"

Yeah, you had to be there... :-\
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Tilt Fairy on March 31, 2012, 09:34:34 AM
Buff-ay is how we say buffet. Foy-yay for foyer, val-ay for valet.

Someone I know who was trying to be posh said "boof-ay" and my friends and I were howling with laughter. "Should we go to the boooooooooooof-ay?!"

Yeah, you had to be there... :-\

Yes. In the UK its buff-ay, foy-yay, val-ay.

Then we have the more quirky pronunciation differences:

Par-sta-cine or pla-sta-cine?
al-mond or arl-mond or all-mond?
ga-ridge or gar-raaaaaaage?

And out of all the intercontinental differences between the UK and US my favourite is gardens and yards. We have back or front gardens or back and front lawns. We would never say yard. A yard over here is a sort of derelict unkept area at the back of a kebab shop or on a farm where you would comunally store your tools or rake or lawn mower or rubbish bins.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Hollanda on March 31, 2012, 09:51:09 AM
Buff-ay is how we say buffet. Foy-yay for foyer, val-ay for valet.

Someone I know who was trying to be posh said "boof-ay" and my friends and I were howling with laughter. "Should we go to the boooooooooooof-ay?!"

Yeah, you had to be there... :-\

Yes. In the UK its buff-ay, foy-yay, val-ay.

Then we have the more quirky pronunciation differences:

Par-sta-cine or pla-sta-cine?
al-mond or arl-mond or all-mond?
ga-ridge or gar-raaaaaaage?

And out of all the intercontinental differences between the UK and US my favourite is gardens and yards. We have back or front gardens or back and front lawns. We would never say yard. A yard over here is a sort of derelict unkept area at the back of a kebab shop or on a farm where you would comunally store your tools or rake or lawn mower or rubbish bins.

My DF is from Suffolk (quite a posh area lol) and he says "garrige" for garage, but he does say "graaarrrrrrrrrse" and "paaaaaarse" (grass and pass). I find it funny and cute! He says "larf" for laugh, too. He says "But laugh is not spelled L-A-F-F, despite what you see on Facebook. It is spelled with an 'au' which makes a completely different sound." Um I get what he means, but if it was pronounced that way it would be "lorf" if we use the 'au' to make an 'or' sound as in the word "auction" or "audience"...does anyone get what I mean here?

And my Grandma used to have a yard at the back of her house. It was simply a concrete area 6 x 6ft approximately and my bro and I used to chase each other round it riding our little plastic trikes!!!  ;) I also used to help Grandma by sweeping the yard.  She always called our front garden at home a yard, too, despite the fact it had grass lol.

I love this thread!
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Tilt Fairy on March 31, 2012, 10:00:49 AM
Ha Ha! So strange to think of a yard as somewhere that has anything growing/surviving in it let alone grass! Normally it's just somewhere between two shops just full of rusty tools and some sort of wasps nest, where you might go to take your cigarette break!

The main regional differences in the UK will be the north/south divide. Though there's debate on where exactly the divide is. I see anyone from north of London as a northerner but most people put the divide either mid-or north of the midlands. The main differences in pronunciation is how people say their a's. It's a dead giveaway.

I'm from Sussex so I say car-stle (castle) and darnce (dance). My boyfriend is from up north and he says ca-stle (sounds a bit like cattle) and da-nce (sounds like pants).
I also say 'my aunt' whereas he says 'me ant'.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Hollanda on March 31, 2012, 10:06:06 AM
Ha Ha! So strange to think of a yard as somewhere that has anything growing/surviving in it let alone grass! Normally it's just somewhere between two shops just full of rusty tools and some sort of wasps nest, where you might go to take your cigarette break!

The main regional differences in the UK will be the north/south divide. Though there's debate on where exactly the divide is. I see anyone from north of London as a northerner but most people put the divide either mid-or north of the midlands. The main differences in pronunciation is how people say their a's. It's a dead giveaway.

I'm from Sussex so I say car-stle (castle) and darnce (dance). My boyfriend is from up north and he says ca-stle (sounds a bit like cattle) and da-nce (sounds like pants).
I also say 'my aunt' whereas he says 'me ant'.

Lol. Oh yeah. The "is Nottingham in The Midlands or is it up North" debate. Hahaha. To me, Notts is in the Midlands, DF reckons it's "Up North". I am from Lancashire (think Peter Kay!!!) so I talk more like my Dad. After 2 glasses of vino, it gets more pronounced lol.  My BFF, Jo, is from down South (near London), and she reckons Notts is up North too. Her and DF constantly poke (good natured) fun over my Northern attitude - chips and gravy anyone?? It has to be thick, tasty gravy and huge, fat chips dripping in fat.  He thinks the idea is disgusting.

He also says "arsk" for "ask"...lol. :D
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 31, 2012, 10:13:44 AM
Endless fun and mickey-taking in Britain, about the (northern) short / southern (long) a, thing. I'm from the south; at university long ago, I had Northern friends with whom on one occasion, I was doing some  travelling up north.  The journey involved meeting-up in the city of Lancaster, which back then had two separate railway stations.  We were to meet at the main one -- Lancaster (Castle) station. In making the arrangements, my friends said to me re that venue (libellously, as it happened) -- "or as you probably call it, 'Larn-carster Carstle'  ". All good-humoured regional mockery...
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Tilt Fairy on March 31, 2012, 10:17:14 AM
I went to Nottingham uni and I classify it as north (even though its technically the midlands). I think it's because the midlands in general have more in common with the north than the south in regards to pronunciation, cost of living, housing, culture, personality, food quirks etc... which is why so many people see the midlands as northern.

My boyfriends friends offered me a "chip butty" the other day. Errrr what?
Also, he says 'tea' instead of dinner. I can't take him anywhere.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Hollanda on March 31, 2012, 01:21:11 PM
I went to Nottingham uni and I classify it as north (even though its technically the midlands). I think it's because the midlands in general have more in common with the north than the south in regards to pronunciation, cost of living, housing, culture, personality, food quirks etc... which is why so many people see the midlands as northern.

My boyfriends friends offered me a "chip butty" the other day. Errrr what?
Also, he says 'tea' instead of dinner. I can't take him anywhere.

Chip butty - a chip sandwich, usually with the bread really heavily buttered. Yummy yummy yummy lol!

I say "tea" too. DF tells me it's "dinner" and what I call "dinner" is actually "lunch". I feel so uncouth sometimes!! :-[
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: marcel on March 31, 2012, 03:02:04 PM
On the Van Gogh thing, it is neither, both Brits and Americans simply can not pronounce the name correctly.

Please -- what IS the right pronunciation, then?  (Enquiring minds want to know...]
It cannot be explained, since it is virtually impossible to explain the pronounciation of the Dutch G. You just have to hear it.
This video is the best I could find: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEqiVEPVY70 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEqiVEPVY70) (Also note the pronounciation of the word van.)
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Thipu1 on March 31, 2012, 05:07:38 PM
About the yard question. 

In NYC, a yard is a place around a residence that includes grass.  A garden is a place in a yard that includes either vegetables or decorative plants.  One may easily have a very nice yard without having a garden. 

The derelict space between buildings is a 'vacant lot'.

'Yard' can also indicate a large outdoor storage space as in the term 'rail yard'.     
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Gumbysqueak on March 31, 2012, 06:01:42 PM
About the yard question. 

In NYC, a yard is a place around a residence that includes grass.  A garden is a place in a yard that includes either vegetables or decorative plants.  One may easily have a very nice yard without having a garden. 

The derelict space between buildings is a 'vacant lot'.

'Yard' can also indicate a large outdoor storage space as in the term 'rail yard'.   

Same in Colorado.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: baglady on March 31, 2012, 10:59:59 PM
About the yard question. 

In NYC, a yard is a place around a residence that includes grass.  A garden is a place in a yard that includes either vegetables or decorative plants.  One may easily have a very nice yard without having a garden. 

The derelict space between buildings is a 'vacant lot'.

Or alley, if it's a very narrow space. Where I live a vacant lot isn't necessarily a derelict paved space like the one our British posters were describing. It can have grass or dirt. It's just a piece of land with no building on it in an area where most lots that size do have buildings on them.

Quote
'Yard' can also indicate a large outdoor storage space as in the term 'rail yard'.   

Also brickyard and lumberyard.

"Garden" sounds very grand to my American ears, when it's used to mean what we call a yard. ("Let's have tea in the garden."). The way a poster once mentioned "carriage" sounded to her when she first heard it used to mean grocery cart.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on April 01, 2012, 01:53:03 AM
On the Van Gogh thing, it is neither, both Brits and Americans simply can not pronounce the name correctly.

Please -- what IS the right pronunciation, then?  (Enquiring minds want to know...]
It cannot be explained, since it is virtually impossible to explain the pronounciation of the Dutch G. You just have to hear it.
This video is the best I could find: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEqiVEPVY70 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEqiVEPVY70) (Also note the pronounciation of the word van.)

Thanks.  I do gather that it's a "given" that only a Dutch person can pronounce Dutch truly correctly !
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Hollanda on April 01, 2012, 03:02:02 AM
Yes...and in England when someone is talking nonsense, we say they're talking "Double Dutch"!
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on April 01, 2012, 04:27:10 AM
England and Holland having had a mutual love-hate "thing" going many centuries back, including the occasional war between the two nations --  England has a number of expressions tending toward mockery of things Dutch.  A couple to go with "Double Dutch" are "Dutch courage" (getting drunk to nerve oneself to do something which one would normally be afraid to undertake), and "Dutch treat" (everyone pays for themself, so no-one gets treated).
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: camlan on April 01, 2012, 05:35:27 AM
Yes...and in England when someone is talking nonsense, we say they're talking "Double Dutch"!

In the US, "Double Dutch" often refers to a type of jumping rope, where there are two jump ropes, a person at each end to turn them and one person jumping both ropes in the middle.

For a more coherent explanation, see here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_Dutch_%28jump_rope%29 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_Dutch_%28jump_rope%29)
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: veryfluffy on April 01, 2012, 08:15:47 AM

I'm from Sussex so I say car-stle (castle) and darnce (dance). My boyfriend is from up north and he says ca-stle (sounds a bit like cattle) and da-nce (sounds like pants).


The problem with describing the "a" sounds, and saying it is like "ar" is that the "r" is generally less pronounced in the English accent. So it's not the way an American would hear "car" -- it's more like caah, the sort of sound the jackdaws make. There's no rolling at the back of the throat. So while "castle" is said just like "car-stle", it is not "car" the way an American would say it, but  caah and caah-stle.

Just like the "er" sound isn't strongly articulated at the end of words: eg the season after spring is "summah", as opposed to "sum-ur".
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Thipu1 on April 01, 2012, 11:07:11 AM
Pronunciation is always fun and educational to learn about. 

For a few years, most of my friends were Canadian.  On a ship, a stranger and I were looking at and discussing a map that showed the current position of the ship.  Cheerfully, he asked me who I favored in the up-coming Canadian elections.  I have never been in Canada for more than a few days at a time.

Mr. Thipu has often thought to come from the Midwest.  He has never lived west of the Hudson River.  However, he did spend seven years at the same boarding school as Franklin Graham (Billy Graham's son).  Many of the teachers were from the Midwest and probably influenced his speech patterns.





Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Morticia on April 03, 2012, 03:13:38 PM
As a Canadian, my words end in "eh".  ;D My Grandmother was from rural Ontario, though, and she had some interesting ones:
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Margo on April 04, 2012, 08:04:45 AM
I'm from the UK, and as other postes have said, it is definitely Foy-ay, Buff-ay, Val-ay.

I woulod only ever use foyer in relation to a public building - most typically a theatre, but possibly also a large hotel as well.  In a rivate house I would refer to the Hall or front hall.

In the North, 'yard' is used as well as garden. I lived in Manchester for many years and my (2-up/2-down coronation st terrace) had a yard - it was fully paved, with a gate to the back ginnel. I know a lot of people who would still use 'yard' even if they were living in properties which had gardens rather than a yard.

I think that 'garden' is the most common usage , however, and is used for any enclosed outdoor space whcih belongs to a particular home, whether it has grass, plants, hard surface or a combination. (the exception would be if you just have a driveway to park a car on, in which case you'd be likely to call it a drive, not a garden.

Having one parent from either side of the North/Side divide and having lived both in Manchester and in Somerset, I am inconsistent in my pronunciatio of things such as Bath etc.

Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: #borecore on April 04, 2012, 10:21:09 AM
I'm from the UK, and as other postes have said, it is definitely Foy-ay, Buff-ay, Val-ay.

I woulod only ever use foyer in relation to a public building - most typically a theatre, but possibly also a large hotel as well.  In a rivate house I would refer to the Hall or front hall.

In the North, 'yard' is used as well as garden. I lived in Manchester for many years and my (2-up/2-down coronation st terrace) had a yard - it was fully paved, with a gate to the back ginnel. I know a lot of people who would still use 'yard' even if they were living in properties which had gardens rather than a yard.

I think that 'garden' is the most common usage , however, and is used for any enclosed outdoor space whcih belongs to a particular home, whether it has grass, plants, hard surface or a combination. (the exception would be if you just have a driveway to park a car on, in which case you'd be likely to call it a drive, not a garden.

Having one parent from either side of the North/Side divide and having lived both in Manchester and in Somerset, I am inconsistent in my pronunciatio of things such as Bath etc.

"ginnel"?

In my limited experience, the difference in "valet" on either side of the Atlantic is where you put the emphasis -- first syllable for UK, second for US.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: starry diadem on April 05, 2012, 02:01:03 AM

"ginnel"?

In my limited experience, the difference in "valet" on either side of the Atlantic is where you put the emphasis -- first syllable for UK, second for US.

A ginnel is a dialect word for the lane or alley between two buildings or two  terraced streets that are back to back.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: katycoo on April 07, 2012, 09:52:11 AM
Aussie = Foy-ah.

There's no way around it. Anyone saying 'foy-ay' is taking the piss- like in 'Tar-zhey' for Target.

ANd defs only used for a lobby area.  IN a home, it would be the entry.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Ayelle on April 07, 2012, 11:52:58 AM
Foy-yay, and for a long time I thought anybody saying foy - er was embarrassing themselves.

Here's a regional word not too many people know: dooryard.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: jaxsue on May 19, 2012, 02:08:57 PM
I wouldn't usually say foyer (I'd be more likely to say 'hall' or 'entrance'), but if I did, I'd say foy-yay. I'm in the UK, if that helps.
Same here. (except I'm in Ireland)

I say it that way, too. I'm in the NE US. Where I grew up (upper midwest) it was said, "foy-er," but I now say it, "fo-yay."
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: jaxsue on May 19, 2012, 02:11:12 PM
As a Canadian, my words end in "eh".  ;D My Grandmother was from rural Ontario, though, and she had some interesting ones:
  • crick for creek
  • ger-adge for garage
  • sandrich for sandwich
  • ter-anna for Toronto

That's interesting. My dad was from Toronto, my mom from Burlington. My dad's family has been in Toronto for several generations; they say it "trah-no."  :)
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: jaxsue on May 19, 2012, 02:14:21 PM
NYC here and we would say foy-er.

I'm in NJ and always want to know how NYers pronounce "Van Wyck." There doesn't seem to be a consensus.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: marcel on May 20, 2012, 02:35:08 AM
You know what the best part is of threads like this. People are writing out how they would pronounce a word, however, you do not know how others would pronounce that word. maybe my foy-yay is exactly the same as another persons foy-ah.

I assume that this writing works for people that are from the same area, or country, and maybe even if they speak the same language, but when people speak different languages, you definitely can't be sure anymore if the way you write it down, actually clarifies your pronounciation.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Thipu1 on May 20, 2012, 01:47:55 PM
As a Canadian, my words end in "eh".  ;D My Grandmother was from rural Ontario, though, and she had some interesting ones:
  • crick for creek
  • ger-adge for garage
  • sandrich for sandwich
  • ter-anna for Toronto

I know Canadians who call Toronto 'Tranna'. 
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: WillyNilly on May 21, 2012, 12:01:34 PM
NYC here and we would say foy-er.

I'm in NJ and always want to know how NYers pronounce "Van Wyck." There doesn't seem to be a consensus.

Having grown up within a few miles of the Van Wyck (a NYC highway) I've had many occasions to not only say it, but I tend to listen for it during traffic reports because it will often affect traffic where-ever I'm driving to.  Most people pronounce it:

van - like a vehicle bigger then a car but smaller then a truck
wick - like you light on a candle

Some people though say

van - like a vehicle bigger then a car but smaller then a truck
wike - rhymes with like

But its significantly less common to pronounce it that way.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: jaxsue on May 21, 2012, 01:50:36 PM
NYC here and we would say foy-er.

I'm in NJ and always want to know how NYers pronounce "Van Wyck." There doesn't seem to be a consensus.

Having grown up within a few miles of the Van Wyck (a NYC highway) I've had many occasions to not only say it, but I tend to listen for it during traffic reports because it will often affect traffic where-ever I'm driving to.  Most people pronounce it:

van - like a vehicle bigger then a car but smaller then a truck
wick - like you light on a candle

Some people though say

van - like a vehicle bigger then a car but smaller then a truck
wike - rhymes with like

But its significantly less common to pronounce it that way.

I say it as rhyming with "wick," too. I remember reading a NYT article where they interviewed a descendent of the Van Wyck NY family. Since the family was Dutch, it was pronounced in a way that is very difficult for most Americans.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: marcel on May 22, 2012, 02:15:51 PM
NYC here and we would say foy-er.

I'm in NJ and always want to know how NYers pronounce "Van Wyck." There doesn't seem to be a consensus.

Having grown up within a few miles of the Van Wyck (a NYC highway) I've had many occasions to not only say it, but I tend to listen for it during traffic reports because it will often affect traffic where-ever I'm driving to.  Most people pronounce it:

van - like a vehicle bigger then a car but smaller then a truck
wick - like you light on a candle

Some people though say

van - like a vehicle bigger then a car but smaller then a truck
wike - rhymes with like

But its significantly less common to pronounce it that way.

I say it as rhyming with "wick," too. I remember reading a NYT article where they interviewed a descendent of the Van Wyck NY family. Since the family was Dutch, it was pronounced in a way that is very difficult for most Americans.
It is closest to the second, Wyck rhymes wit like.
For the van pronounciation, see the link to the pronounciation of van Gogh (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=114825.msg2682240#msg2682240), earlier in this thread
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Thipu1 on May 23, 2012, 08:58:37 AM
There was always a problem with a town in Rockland County NY.  The name of the town is Nanuet.  Locals pronounce it 'NAN-you-ETTE'. 

However, whenever the place is in the news, it's always pronounced 'NAN-oo-it'.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: jaxsue on May 23, 2012, 09:51:01 AM
There was always a problem with a town in Rockland County NY.  The name of the town is Nanuet.  Locals pronounce it 'NAN-you-ETTE'. 

However, whenever the place is in the news, it's always pronounced 'NAN-oo-it'.

I lived one town over from Nanuet for a few years. Hint: it has a huge Irish population.  :)

I've heard talking heads on TV mispronounce it. Fingernails on a chalkboard!
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: WillyNilly on May 24, 2012, 02:28:46 PM
There was always a problem with a town in Rockland County NY.  The name of the town is Nanuet.  Locals pronounce it 'NAN-you-ETTE'. 

However, whenever the place is in the news, it's always pronounced 'NAN-oo-it'.

Maybe its because I'm a NYer but it would never occur to me there would even be confusion, of course its Nan-you-ette.  its phonetic.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: jaxsue on May 27, 2012, 12:33:29 PM
NYC here and we would say foy-er.

I'm in NJ and always want to know how NYers pronounce "Van Wyck." There doesn't seem to be a consensus.

Having grown up within a few miles of the Van Wyck (a NYC highway) I've had many occasions to not only say it, but I tend to listen for it during traffic reports because it will often affect traffic where-ever I'm driving to.  Most people pronounce it:

van - like a vehicle bigger then a car but smaller then a truck
wick - like you light on a candle

Some people though say

van - like a vehicle bigger then a car but smaller then a truck
wike - rhymes with like

But its significantly less common to pronounce it that way.

I say it as rhyming with "wick," too. I remember reading a NYT article where they interviewed a descendent of the Van Wyck NY family. Since the family was Dutch, it was pronounced in a way that is very difficult for most Americans.
It is closest to the second, Wyck rhymes wit like.
For the van pronounciation, see the link to the pronounciation of van Gogh (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=114825.msg2682240#msg2682240), earlier in this thread

Thanks for the info. NY/NJ have a lot of Dutch names (towns, streets, etc.) due to it being colonized way back (X-DH's family came from Holland to NYC in 1659 when it was still a small settlement), but we've apparently lost the original pronunciations.  :-\
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on November 16, 2012, 07:00:27 AM
Bumping this thread, in respect of a regional-pronunciation matter which I encountered lately -- from a song heard on a You Tube item, performed by a Canadian singer.

The word concerned, is "leisure".  Will set out the word's second consonant, as "zh" -- like the J in the French name Jacques. There seem to be (at least) two possible pronunciations for this word. "Lezher" -- to rhyme (vowels-wise) with "fed her"; and "Leezher" -- to rhyme with "feed her".

In my country, the UK, I have only ever heard "lezher".  I've heard from Canadians (including, but not only, in the the You Tube instance mentioned above), "leezher".  And I had a friend who was from New Zealand, who pronounced it "leezher". The "leezher" pronunciation sounds strange, at least to this Brit; but, of course, a case of "whatever is standard practice / accustomed, for you".

Would be interested to know how this word is pronounced in the USA -- maybe it varies according to what part of the States?  And, should any Aussie participants be around; what's the pronunciation in Australia?

Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Hmmmmm on November 16, 2012, 07:42:05 AM
For me in US south, I say lee's her with a long e.  However I do find myself saying it with the short e when talking with my Brit friends, but I pick up on other phrasing easily without realizing it most times.  And I spend hours a week on calls with my London co- workers.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: WillyNilly on November 16, 2012, 08:29:32 AM
NYC here. The first part I say leeze rhymes with sneeze or wheeze or breeze, then "ure" pronounced like sure or cure.

When I hear Brits say it, I hear "lehz" almost like the "mez" sound in measure and not so different then the sound of the word ledge, then "ure" the same way I say it.
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: scotcat60 on November 16, 2012, 10:44:25 AM
 know Canadians who call Toronto 'Tranna'.

Wait til you get to Norfolk in the UK and pronounce Garboldisham as Gar-bosh-am, and Wymondham as Windham.

And Norfolk is pronounced in such a way as the second half would get me thrown off the board if I were to type it out, and not as Nor-folk which I have heard  said on programmes like "NCIS"
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: sparksals on November 16, 2012, 10:46:21 AM
Foy-yay in my part of Canada.  I hear Foy-yer in the US State I live in now. 
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Outdoor Girl on November 16, 2012, 10:53:12 AM
I pronounce Toronto as 'The Big Smoke'.   ;D  (I probably pronounce it more like Tranno - definitely with an 'o' sound at the end.)

It's lee-zhur and foy-yay for me.

I've seen/heard it somewhere, maybe here, but how is samhain pronounced?
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on November 16, 2012, 05:28:21 PM

It's lee-zhur and foy-yay for me.

I've seen/heard it somewhere, maybe here, but how is samhain pronounced?

Hmmmmm, WN, OG: thanks for info on "leisure".  It's rather looking as though it may be: Britain, short "e"; rest of the English-speaking world, long "e".  By proportions and percentages, it seems that us Brits are the weird ones as regards this matter !

"samhain": I've seen an indication that it's pronounced "so-ween" (to rhyme with "go green"). Subject to correction by others on the board who know more about that general area of life, than I do; I have my info from a "speculative fiction" novel in which things so work out that a large segment of the population of the area concerned, adopt the Wiccan faith. (The novel's author is much praised for doing meticulous research, and usually getting things right !)
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: Outdoor Girl on November 16, 2012, 06:01:18 PM
It's kind of funny because we use a lot of British spellings in Canada so I'm surprised we don't pronounce things in the British way.  (Neighbour, colour, sulphur, etc.)
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on November 18, 2012, 03:23:36 AM
It's kind of funny because we use a lot of British spellings in Canada so I'm surprised we don't pronounce things in the British way.  (Neighbour, colour, sulphur, etc.)

I suspect that this is chiefly down to Noah Webster (1758 – 1843). In his grammar and spelling manuals, and his dictionary, published in the early years of US independence, he promulgated what became the characteristic American, as distinct from British, spelling conventions.

If I have things correctly, Webster was concerned just with spelling in its own right, not with trying to reflect pronunciation. He wished to simplify and rationalise spelling, and to emphasise his country’s independence of, and different-ness from, Britain. This appealed to “the temper of the times” in the USA, and his spelling reforms caught on there. A business which didn’t apply in Canada; so while pronunciation there, and in the States, has tended to be similar (with numerous local exceptions), Canada has stuck with the British way of spelling.

This is a Brit’s -- possibly inaccurate -- take on the matter; corrections from folk west of the Atlantic, welcomed.

                                                                                                             



Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: katycoo on November 18, 2012, 04:55:20 PM
Bumping this thread, in respect of a regional-pronunciation matter which I encountered lately -- from a song heard on a You Tube item, performed by a Canadian singer.

The word concerned, is "leisure".  Will set out the word's second consonant, as "zh" -- like the J in the French name Jacques. There seem to be (at least) two possible pronunciations for this word. "Lezher" -- to rhyme (vowels-wise) with "fed her"; and "Leezher" -- to rhyme with "feed her".

In my country, the UK, I have only ever heard "lezher".  I've heard from Canadians (including, but not only, in the the You Tube instance mentioned above), "leezher".  And I had a friend who was from New Zealand, who pronounced it "leezher". The "leezher" pronunciation sounds strange, at least to this Brit; but, of course, a case of "whatever is standard practice / accustomed, for you".

Would be interested to know how this word is pronounced in the USA -- maybe it varies according to what part of the States?  And, should any Aussie participants be around; what's the pronunciation in Australia?

Lezher
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: kareng57 on November 18, 2012, 06:22:28 PM
It's kind of funny because we use a lot of British spellings in Canada so I'm surprised we don't pronounce things in the British way.  (Neighbour, colour, sulphur, etc.)


As usual (metric/imperial is another example) we just can't make up our minds here.........
Title: Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
Post by: cabbageweevil on November 20, 2012, 05:04:37 AM
And, should any Aussie participants be around; what's the pronunciation in Australia?

Lezher

So, it's beginning to look like: Britain and Australia, short "e"; English-speakers elsewhere, long "e" (unless my New Zealander friend was just odd !).