Etiquette Hell

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Title: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: crytoscopophiliac on June 21, 2012, 05:50:25 AM
Hi Everyone,

I am an American and I teach English in Europe. My colleagues and I have decided that it would be nice to post a recipe for traditionally American or English food each week in our training center. This week, I posted one for NY cheesecake, but now I am a bit at a loss for what else might be interesting.  Any suggestions?

Thanks
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: mechtilde on June 21, 2012, 06:25:59 AM
Regional recipes such as Boston Baked Beans or Kentucky Burgoo would be interesting, especially if you could follow it up with a discussion about the region- climate, influences etc.

Another option might be to pick a European or other region and post a recipe typical of that community living in the US- such as a typical Pennsylvania Dutch recipe- then you can have a follow on discussion.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: buvezdevin on June 21, 2012, 07:30:44 AM
Southern fried chicken
Cole slaw (maybe with various regional versions)
Corn bread
Maryland crab cakes
Barbecue (could have various regional versions)
Grits (could compare the hominy and non-hominy, non-hominy is *similar* to polenta)

...yes, I am from the South!
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: wx4caster on June 21, 2012, 08:01:25 AM
Gumbo and Jambalaya
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: SamiHami on June 21, 2012, 08:11:42 AM
Skyline Chili
Shrimp & Grits
Yankee Pot Roast
Frogmore Stew
Crawfish Pie
Catfish Stew
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: lady_disdain on June 21, 2012, 08:37:37 AM
Biscuits
Peanut butter anything
Homemade barbecue sauce
Fudge
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Hmmmmm on June 21, 2012, 08:57:26 AM
Tollhouse Cookies
Potato Salad
Cobb Salad
Sloppy Joes
Mississippi Mud Cake
Pecan Pie
San Fran Style Cioppino
Buffalo wings if you can come up for a subsitute for Frank's Hot Sauce
Texas style chile though you may need to start off with drying chile's and grinding into chile powder
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: AmethystAnne on June 21, 2012, 09:20:35 AM
Sausage, biscuit, and gravy
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: AmethystAnne on June 21, 2012, 09:22:02 AM
Split pea soup
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Thipu1 on June 21, 2012, 09:24:17 AM
Chicken fried steak.
Brownies
Clam chowder (Manhattan or New England)
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: emwithme on June 21, 2012, 10:43:44 AM
I second Chicken Fried Steak.

Mainly because my DF asked for me to cook this for him the other day and I can't find two recipes on the internet that agree on what it is!
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Hmmmmm on June 21, 2012, 11:01:20 AM
I second Chicken Fried Steak.

Mainly because my DF asked for me to cook this for him the other day and I can't find two recipes on the internet that agree on what it is!

I was going to suggest Chicken Fried Steak but unless you already have a favorite method, it's very hard to provide a recipe.

But whenever I'm cooking in another country (or even US State) it is always the item most requested. 

If you need a recipe for one , The Pioneer Woman's recipe is a nice basic one and her photos are very good.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Thipu1 on June 21, 2012, 01:09:04 PM
There are as many ways of making chicken fried steak as there are people who make it. 

We first ate the dish in the early 1980s at the late, lamented Cactus Cafe in Greenwich Village.  Later, we found a recipe from a 1983 cookbook 'The Flavors of America' published by Current.  With minor variations, it's served us well ever since. 

If anyone is interested, I'd be happy to post our version on the recipe thread.  It's not difficult to make and all the ingredients should be readily available in Europe. 
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: mechtilde on June 21, 2012, 01:37:32 PM
If anyone is interested, I'd be happy to post our version on the recipe thread.  It's not difficult to make and all the ingredients should be readily available in Europe.

Good point- any dish featured needs to be made from scratch with no proprietry mixes or specialised ingredients as you can't always get them here. You can't get Bisquick for example.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Thipu1 on June 21, 2012, 02:49:31 PM
Our Chicken Fried Steak recipe has been posted.

Dang, the AC is on, it's 85 degrees in the house and we just made it last week but I'm longing for this dinner! 
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Venus193 on June 21, 2012, 02:52:54 PM
I second jambalaya.

New England Clam Chowder
Manhattan Clam Chowder
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: JoW on June 21, 2012, 08:38:57 PM
Good point- any dish featured needs to be made from scratch with no proprietry mixes or specialised ingredients as you can't always get them here. You can't get Bisquick for example.
You can make your own substitute for Bisquick from readily availble ingredients.  Google Bisquick Substitute.  The same is probably true for most shortcut ingredients.  Google the brand name and "substitute" and you'll probably find a way to make your own. 


I've eaten Chicken Fried Steak exactly once.  Never again.  It was a crime against good meat.  But my mother cooked it, and she's not much of a cook.  Its likely that someone else has a decent recipe for it. 
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: CLE_Girl on June 22, 2012, 10:51:22 AM
Apple Pie
Chicago style deep dish pizza
Baked Potato Soup
Tuna noodle caserol (not a favorite, but very american!)
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Sophia on June 22, 2012, 10:55:33 AM
Cooks had a very good recipe for Tuna Casserole two issues ago. 
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: lady_disdain on June 22, 2012, 12:24:48 PM
How about funeral potatoes? I love the name.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Kitty Hawk on June 22, 2012, 12:45:06 PM
As an American living in Germany, I am most often asked for Brownies and Chocolate Chip Cookies.

Someone mentioned Split Pea Soup -- there is nothing particulalry American about that!

Corn on the cob is also a good one.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: #borecore on June 22, 2012, 12:53:31 PM
Regional recipes such as Boston Baked Beans or Kentucky Burgoo would be interesting, especially if you could follow it up with a discussion about the region- climate, influences etc.

Another option might be to pick a European or other region and post a recipe typical of that community living in the US- such as a typical Pennsylvania Dutch recipe- then you can have a follow on discussion.

Skyline Chili
Shrimp & Grits
Yankee Pot Roast
Frogmore Stew
Crawfish Pie

Catfish Stew

I am American and really into reading cook books and I have never heard of any of the bolded. Unless Yankee pot roast is just pot roast, I guess. (Not to dis those things! I just love how diverse America is.

I know it's not, strictly speaking, exclusive to America, but I think Tex-Mex food like tacos, burritos, nachos (which are basically American) and even stuff like homemade tortillas or salsa is a good idea to show America's diversity. It's definitely not very European!

I love another poster's idea to post "Americanized" versions of Euro-originals.

I've heard the American idea of a big salad as an entree is pretty unusual over there, but I'm not sure about that. Would certainly make an easy recipe, maybe with something like a recipe for the very American ranch dressing.

edited to add disclaimer
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Sophia on June 22, 2012, 12:58:34 PM
That reminds me

King Ranch Chicken Casserole
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: crytoscopophiliac on June 22, 2012, 11:52:51 PM
Wow! Thanks for all of the great tips! It never occurred to me that I could find substitutions on Google. It will make my life a bit easier.
By student request, next week will be Chicken PotPie. I don't know how she heard of it but she is in luck as I have a copy from my Grandmother's cookbook. We are going to try to alternate dessert and main.

Some of the other suggestions around the office included Banana Nut Bread, Zucchini Bread, and Fried Green Tomatoes.

Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Venus193 on June 23, 2012, 05:50:21 AM
Here is the Banana Bread recipe I use:

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/banana-banana-bread/

You can substitute granulated Splenda for the sugar (there is a brown sugar version) and it tastes exactly the same.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Sedorna on June 24, 2012, 05:43:39 PM

Maryland crab cakes


If you do crab cakes, make sure you use fresh (not canned) jumbo lump backfin crabmeat. That really makes a difference, but I'm not sure how expensive/possible that would be where you live.

I'd also recommend Maryland crab soup. I adore the stuff, myself. And pit beef sandwiches, which consists of beef, grilled over high heat and thinly sliced. It's best rare, and served with white onions and horseradish sauce.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 24, 2012, 06:16:26 PM

Maryland crab cakes


If you do crab cakes, make sure you use fresh (not canned) jumbo lump backfin crabmeat. That really makes a difference, but I'm not sure how expensive/possible that would be where you live.

I'd also recommend Maryland crab soup. I adore the stuff, myself. And pit beef sandwiches, which consists of beef, grilled over high heat and thinly sliced. It's best rare, and served with white onions and horseradish sauce.

Proud Marylander here:  Since you'll be in the UK, you'll probably not be able to get fresh crab meat so canned will be fine   Just FYI.  Jumbo Lump meat is preferred.  Lump backfin is still good, but not as high a quality.  Special Crab meat is really the cheapest you want to go for crab cakes. 

And you must must must use Old Bay Seasoning.  Without it, Crab cakes and crab soup are nothing


I actually just made crab soup yesterday.  And had 6 relatives asking for some even before it was done.


Softshell crabs are divine


New England Lobster Rolls


Red Velvet Cake w/ cream cheese frosting
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Sophia on June 24, 2012, 09:49:57 PM
...
Red Velvet Cake w/ cream cheese frosting

Good one.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: heartmug on June 25, 2012, 05:02:28 PM
Meatloaf
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: DaisyG on June 25, 2012, 05:28:36 PM
As a non-American, my vote would be for Pecan Pie - my dad used to make a good one but has now lost the recipe :'(
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Moray on June 25, 2012, 05:31:51 PM
Pecan Pie would definitely be a good one.

Chicken pot pie might be a good choice, or pot roast.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Sophia on June 25, 2012, 10:22:33 PM
I would imagine the pecans would be expensive, and maybe not so good. 
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Iris on June 25, 2012, 11:07:08 PM
As a non-American I am usually fascinated by the things I read about in books etc. that I have no experience of at all and even seem weird. For example I have read about people making smores by the campfire - I don't know what that actually means, other than it has something to do with marshmallows. It also (as an outsider) seems quite American to mix savoury and sweet - pancakes with bacon, for example.

So I would go with some of the great suggestions you have here and then throw in the occassional 'funny American' recipe or combination. I know that when I TRIED pancakes with bacon they were delicious, so it may be good to broaden people's horizons without too much cooking effort.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: violinp on June 26, 2012, 12:20:21 AM
As a non-American I am usually fascinated by the things I read about in books etc. that I have no experience of at all and even seem weird. For example I have read about people making smores by the campfire - I don't know what that actually means, other than it has something to do with marshmallows. It also (as an outsider) seems quite American to mix savoury and sweet - pancakes with bacon, for example.

So I would go with some of the great suggestions you have here and then throw in the occassional 'funny American' recipe or combination. I know that when I TRIED pancakes with bacon they were delicious, so it may be good to broaden people's horizons without too much cooking effort.

Smores are a marshmallow and part of a Hershey's candy bar mashed between two graham cracker halves. It's really delicious, but is really only eaten when camping in my experience.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Iris on June 26, 2012, 02:04:10 AM
As a non-American I am usually fascinated by the things I read about in books etc. that I have no experience of at all and even seem weird. For example I have read about people making smores by the campfire - I don't know what that actually means, other than it has something to do with marshmallows. It also (as an outsider) seems quite American to mix savoury and sweet - pancakes with bacon, for example.

So I would go with some of the great suggestions you have here and then throw in the occassional 'funny American' recipe or combination. I know that when I TRIED pancakes with bacon they were delicious, so it may be good to broaden people's horizons without too much cooking effort.

Smores are a marshmallow and part of a Hershey's candy bar mashed between two graham cracker halves. It's really delicious, but is really only eaten when camping in my experience.

Thanks. I have only heard (read) of them in conjunction with camping, but my suggestion would be to include something like that with a local comparison (eg what local biscuits are most like Graham crackers) on some weeks rather than a recipe a such. I know I'd be interested and probably give it a go whereas I may not make NY cheesecake(say) because I rarely cook desserts anymore.

Just an idea.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Sharnita on June 26, 2012, 07:08:40 AM
As an MAerican I have to say that Chicken Pot Pie and Pecan Pie are two of my favorites, I I jsut never thought of them as being "American".  I also really love chocolate  chip cookies and brownies.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 26, 2012, 10:42:35 AM
mmmmm smores...

They also taste quite yummy from a fireplace too :)
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: FauxFoodist on July 01, 2012, 12:54:47 AM
what local biscuits are most like Graham crackers

I think Digestive biscuits are closest.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Venus193 on July 01, 2012, 04:42:42 AM
Don't forget Chocolate Chip cookies.  Those have to be the most popular in the country.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Thipu1 on July 01, 2012, 09:33:01 AM
As an American living in Germany, I am most often asked for Brownies and Chocolate Chip Cookies.

Someone mentioned Split Pea Soup -- there is nothing particulalry American about that!

Corn on the cob is also a good one.

Yes.  American split pea soup uses green peas.  there's also an excellent Swedish version that uses yellow peas. 
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Ms_Cellany on July 01, 2012, 09:40:20 AM
Back to chicken fried steak - my mom and I once insisted that a German visitor try CFS as a Texas speciality. He ordered it, tasted, and mused for a second, then said "Zis is schnitzel!"

At which point we had a lightbulb moment that of course it came from the German settlers!
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Kitty Hawk on July 01, 2012, 02:32:34 PM
Meatloaf

Quite a populr dish in Germany under the name "Hackbraten".
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Moray on July 01, 2012, 03:34:52 PM
Meatloaf

Quite a populr dish in Germany under the name "Hackbraten".

I think we'd be pretty hard-pressed to come up with something that isn't originally from someplace else. All we can really go for is "American preparation of [x dish]" :D

For example, the iconic image of American meatloaf involves a ketchup-based sauce baked on top. Although frankfurters aren't native to the USA, a Chicago dog, with all the fixins, could reasonably be considered an American institution.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: purplemuse on July 02, 2012, 06:23:06 PM
Chicken Riggies?

I haven't used this recipe myself, but it has good reviews:

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/chicken-riggies/
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Kitty Hawk on July 04, 2012, 01:05:24 AM

I think we'd be pretty hard-pressed to come up with something that isn't originally from someplace else. All we can really go for is "American preparation of [x dish]" :D

For example, the iconic image of American meatloaf involves a ketchup-based sauce baked on top. Although frankfurters aren't native to the USA, a Chicago dog, with all the fixins, could reasonably be considered an American institution.

This is pretty much the point I was trying to make, although too obscurely. Many dishes may be typically American but are most certainly not exclusively American.  The trick is to find what -- if anything -- makes them unique.

One other problem is finding ingredients here in Europe.  Molasses? Cranberry sauce?  Don't exist here.  Pecans? Yes, at Christmas and barely affordable.

One of our most successful parties was an "American-style cookout" with hamburgers and cheeseburgers, chicken breasts, baked beans and watermelon.  All commonly available foods here in Germany, but perhaps not so commonly eaten (the baked beans) or prepared in different ways.

And a brownie trifle for dessert!
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Thipu1 on July 04, 2012, 09:43:13 AM
An interesting exercise would be to compare recipes and trace American dishes back to their European origins. 

Yup, Chicken Fried Steak is a variety of Schnitzel.  It's also a variety of several Italian veal dishes.    Pea soup is known any place where peas are known but there are different recipes specific to the location.  Even clam chowder, that's thought to be American, has roots in European fish soups and bouillabaisse.

That's a course I would really enjoy attending.   
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Kendo_Bunny on July 19, 2012, 09:38:44 PM
I hosted an American food party for the Korean exchange students at my college - their favorites were buttermilk biscuits and milk gravy (I made it two ways - with and without sausage, because I had a vegetarian attending).

They also liked bagel pizzas, corn dogs, and funnel cake.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: PastryGoddess on July 20, 2012, 07:06:32 AM
funnel cakes are universal
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Raina on July 20, 2012, 07:51:46 AM
Wouldn't have thought of this myself until an Aussie friend mentioned it during a conversation about pies, but Key Lime Pie apparently is very difficult to find/make outside of the US :( Shame, because it's so wonderful!
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Venus193 on July 20, 2012, 10:46:27 AM
Did we already mention pumpkin pie?  If I didn't  have to defrost my fridge in the next day or so I'd make one right now that it's cooled off here.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on July 20, 2012, 11:32:46 AM
I love Indian Pudding, served warm with vanilla ice cream.

Also, don't forget Carolina style barbecue.

There is also an omelette ubiquitous in Michigan at every restaurant that serves breakfast: Souther Omelette, and/or Country Omelette.  Omelette stuffed with hash browns, sausage, cheese, and smothered in sausage gravy.

Chicken and dumplings.  Properly made is a dish fit for the gods.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Betelnut on July 20, 2012, 11:40:00 AM
Anything popcorn--that seems real American to me.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Thipu1 on July 21, 2012, 09:24:06 AM
Also, let's consider succotash.  That's supposed to be a native American dish and it's delicious.  However, I'm not sure how available Lima beans and corn are in Europe. 

There's also the New England dish called Indian Pudding. If I properly recall, the ingredients should be fairly easy to find just about anywhere. 
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Brisvegasgal on July 24, 2012, 06:09:50 AM
I would love to try s'mores but according to an American born friend of mine, Australian marshmallows aren't don't melt in the same way.  I think the OP may have a problem finding some of the ingredients so good luck :)
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: PastryGoddess on July 24, 2012, 09:14:06 AM
I would love to try s'mores but according to an American born friend of mine, Australian marshmallows aren't don't melt in the same way.  I think the OP may have a problem finding some of the ingredients so good luck :)

That means you have to make your own marshmallows :D
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: AmethystAnne on July 26, 2012, 06:43:25 PM
Would Shoo Fly Pie be wholly American? 
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: lady_disdain on July 26, 2012, 08:28:08 PM
American carrot cake. From what I read, it seems like it is some sort of spice cake. I think.

The carrot cake I am used to doesn't have any spices, just carrots and the usual cake ingredients, with a dark chocolate glaze. Yummm!
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Hmmmmm on July 26, 2012, 09:49:23 PM
American carrot cake. From what I read, it seems like it is some sort of spice cake. I think.

The carrot cake I am used to doesn't have any spices, just carrots and the usual cake ingredients, with a dark chocolate glaze. Yummm!

Yes, most of our carrot cake recipes have cinammon, allspice, and nutmeg as a minimum.  But now I'm curious about other carrot cakes, especially ones with chocolate frostings.  Can you link me to a recipe?
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: lady_disdain on July 26, 2012, 10:50:09 PM
I can't find a link in English to what I call a carrot cake so here is a quick translation of my mother's (my comments in parenthesis, feel free to ask questions!):

Carrot Cake
2 cups flour
3 eggs
2 medium carrots, grated or chopped
3 cups sugar
1/2 cup oil
1 tablespoon baking powder

In a blender, blend the carrots, sugar and oil
Add flour and baking powder
Pour in a buttered and floured sheet pan
Bake in hot oven for 3 minutes, lower temperature until done (ok, this is an old fashioned recipe - I preheat my oven to a higher temperature than usual for baking cake, then lower it to the usual temperature, whatever that is in your oven)

Chocolate glaze

(this is almost like a pudding and you don't want a very thick layer - 2mm is good)
1.5 cups milk
5 tablespoons cocoa
Some sugar if you want (I hate my mother when she writes things like that in recipes)
1 heaping tablespoon of starch
1/4 cup of butter

Mix the milk, cocoa, sugar and starch until smooth. Cook over low heat until it thickens. Add butter and stir. Pour while still hot over warm cake.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: I'mnotinsane on August 10, 2012, 02:28:39 PM
Would Shoo Fly Pie be wholly American?

Isn't it an Amish dish?  Many Amish people are German descendents.  Of course it could be a version of a german dish using American ingredients.  Off to google.....
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Thipu1 on August 11, 2012, 09:06:12 AM
How about Chess Pie?

I learned about this about a decade ago when I helped some Civil War buffs plan a fund-raising dinner.  I gave them a reproduction of an 1860 cookbook.  Chess Pie was something they especially wanted to serve.

The dish is very tasty and has an interesting story.  Chess Pie is a sort of economy custard pie.  It has only a bottom crust and is rather heavy.  However, it goes quite well with a cup of coffee or tea after dinner.  It's similar to an Italian Grain Pie. 

The name probably evolved when soldiers in the Civil War were welcomed at farms in both the North and South.  The farm couldn't provide much but they could provide pie and coffee. 

When the soldiers asked what kind of pie it was, they usually got the answer, 'It's just pie'. 

Given the differences in pronunciation at the time, ' just pie' could be heard as 'jess pie'.  It isn't a great stretch to see 'Jess pie' becoming 'Chess Pie'.   

Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Library Dragon on February 22, 2013, 12:04:10 AM
A very late reply.....

Key Lime Pie is popular with European friends.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: WillyNilly on February 22, 2013, 02:23:26 PM
Isn't peanut butter an American food invention? Therefore Elvis' fried peanut butter and banana sandwiches would be an American food (and oh so very very good!)

Chocolate chip (toll house) cookies were 'invented' in America. I think whoopie pies are American as well.

Anything using corn (maize) as its main is American, so a roasted corn salad, or popcorn, or corn pudding would fit the bill.

Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: PastryGoddess on February 22, 2013, 10:54:55 PM
A very late reply.....

Key Lime Pie is popular with European friends.

Can you get Key Lime juice in Europe?
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: mechtilde on February 23, 2013, 12:40:15 AM
A very late reply.....

Key Lime Pie is popular with European friends.

Can you get Key Lime juice in Europe?

Not very easily in Britain. Ordinary lime juice is becoming increasingly available, but not key lime juice.

Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Library Dragon on February 23, 2013, 03:23:17 PM
Sometimes is can be found frozen.  You can cheat and use regular lime juice though my oldest DS would shout sacrilege. 

My DH just left for his semi-annual trip trip to Belgium and I sent chocolate chip cookies as a gift for the program coordinator.  I'm thinking I will send peanut butter cookies next time. 

Peanut butter and maple syrup are always things American friends ask us to bring them in Italy.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on February 23, 2013, 03:58:03 PM
Anyone got agile recipe for slow cooked jambalaya? I love Creole Cajun food.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: doodlemor on February 23, 2013, 04:08:51 PM
Here is a recipe for Seneca ghost bread.  The Seneca are the westernmost tribe of the Iroquois - the Keepers of the Western Door.  They called this ghost bread because it is made from white flour which was provided by the government.

http://www.food.com/recipe/seneca-ghost-bread-95915

I have read on the BBC forums that Europeans like recipes for "soft" American cookies. 

An Amish treat available locally are thresher sized raised[yeast] doughnuts with a maple glaze.  Here is a link to a video taken in an Amish bakery in a rural area.  You can see the cinnamon coffee cakes with a maple frosting on the video, also.  I generally stop here if I am in the neighborhood.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3HvQL-KlFE
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Venus193 on February 23, 2013, 07:46:44 PM
My jambalaya recipe is in the Cookbook Folder, but it doesn't use a crockpot.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: SamiHami on February 24, 2013, 03:22:38 PM
Hash & rice is an exclusively South Carolina recipe. It was originally developed by slaves from Barbados, who brought spices with them. It is absolutely delicious. I can send you a link to a page explaining the history and an excelent recipe if you like.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: katycoo on February 24, 2013, 04:56:16 PM
Wouldn't have thought of this myself until an Aussie friend mentioned it during a conversation about pies, but Key Lime Pie apparently is very difficult to find/make outside of the US :( Shame, because it's so wonderful!

The difficulty comes from not being easy to get key limes.  I'd warrant most use regular limes.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 24, 2013, 05:01:41 PM
I live in Florida, and use bottled Key lime juice for my pies. When DH was stationed in Germany, his parents sent peanut butter and peach preserves in the care packages from Georgia, USA.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: PastryGoddess on February 24, 2013, 11:09:58 PM
Wouldn't have thought of this myself until an Aussie friend mentioned it during a conversation about pies, but Key Lime Pie apparently is very difficult to find/make outside of the US :( Shame, because it's so wonderful!

The difficulty comes from not being easy to get key limes.  I'd warrant most use regular limes.

I also use bottled Key Lime juice.  They are a bit sweeter than regular limes so you may have to add sugar to any lime juice you use.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: amandaelizabeth on March 07, 2013, 10:12:42 PM
That is really interesting a out key lime pie is called after Key Limes.

Never having come across it apart from books, I thought it was called that because it was "key" to ending a meal well.

Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Thipu1 on March 08, 2013, 10:36:52 AM
Until we visited Florida with MIL and FIL, they were mystified by Key Lime Pie.  English isn't their first language and they thought that the proper name was 'Key Lion Pie'. 
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Ms_Cellany on March 08, 2013, 11:55:45 AM
Gumbo would be an easy one.  The only "exotic" ingredient is okra.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: menley on March 08, 2013, 04:05:53 PM
Gumbo would be an easy one.  The only "exotic" ingredient is okra.

Many people (mostly from Louisiana, I've found) would say that okra doesn't belong in gumbo anyway! So it might be even easier :)
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: ladyknight1 on March 08, 2013, 08:06:27 PM
That is really interesting a out key lime pie is called after Key Limes.

Never having come across it apart from books, I thought it was called that because it was "key" to ending a meal well.

Key limes originally grew on the Florida Keys (Islands). There are also Key deer, which are a small species of deer.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Sunbeem on March 08, 2013, 09:50:38 PM
How about Wild Rice ____?  I grew up in Minnesota and we often had a creamy Wild Rice & Chicken soup.  PM me if you'd like the recipe.  It might be hard to buy wild rice in Europe, but a little goes a long way- 2 cups dry equals about 8 cups cooked/hydrated.  So it might be feasible to order just a 2-cup (1 pound, I believe) bag of dry, Minnesota-grown wild rice to be shipped overseas... 

USA wild rice has an entirely different flavor than asian rice.  And the "wild rice" soups served in restaurants often use plain brown or white asian rice with only a few sprinkles of REAL wild rice.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: katycoo on March 08, 2013, 10:52:30 PM
Wouldn't have thought of this myself until an Aussie friend mentioned it during a conversation about pies, but Key Lime Pie apparently is very difficult to find/make outside of the US :( Shame, because it's so wonderful!

The difficulty comes from not being easy to get key limes.  I'd warrant most use regular limes.

I also use bottled Key Lime juice.  They are a bit sweeter than regular limes so you may have to add sugar to any lime juice you use.

I don't believe its available here, even bottled. I've never seen it.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: katycoo on March 08, 2013, 11:05:58 PM
Wouldn't have thought of this myself until an Aussie friend mentioned it during a conversation about pies, but Key Lime Pie apparently is very difficult to find/make outside of the US :( Shame, because it's so wonderful!

The difficulty comes from not being easy to get key limes.  I'd warrant most use regular limes.

I also use bottled Key Lime juice.  They are a bit sweeter than regular limes so you may have to add sugar to any lime juice you use.

I don't believe its available here, even bottled. I've never seen it.

Minor correction: I can get it on USAFOods.com.au for $7 a bottle plus shipping from Melbourne...
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: #borecore on March 08, 2013, 11:20:13 PM
Wouldn't have thought of this myself until an Aussie friend mentioned it during a conversation about pies, but Key Lime Pie apparently is very difficult to find/make outside of the US :( Shame, because it's so wonderful!

The difficulty comes from not being easy to get key limes.  I'd warrant most use regular limes.

I also use bottled Key Lime juice.  They are a bit sweeter than regular limes so you may have to add sugar to any lime juice you use.

I don't believe its available here, even bottled. I've never seen it.

Minor correction: I can get it on USAFOods.com.au for $7 a bottle plus shipping from Melbourne...

For what it's worth, I've never seen it, and I'm only 4 states away from Florida.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Slartibartfast on March 09, 2013, 01:47:38 AM
Not sure what's available there, but some suggestions:

peach cobbler
caramel apples
buckeyes (chocolate-dipped peanut butter balls)
hot dogs with various toppings
corn on the cob
Jell-o salad
breakfast casserole or breakfast scramble (eggs, sausage crumbles, cheese, and sometimes potatoes or vegetables)
green bean casserole (if you can get the right canned soups for the base!)
tuna noodle casserole
homemade steak fries
Velveeta dip / Rotel dip / chili cheese dip (depending on what you can get)
sloppy joes (which were called "hot tamales" where I grew up - NOT the same thing, I found out later!)
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on March 10, 2013, 05:07:59 PM
Jell-o salad sounds disgusting to me. Is it also true that Americans add marshmallows to fruit salad? Yuck! Way too much sweetness for me.
My husband did like the Jambalaya I made and has a liking for Cajun seasoning too.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: WillyNilly on March 10, 2013, 05:10:58 PM
Jell-o salad sounds disgusting to me. Is it also true that Americans add marshmallows to fruit salad? Yuck! Way too much sweetness for me.
My husband did like the Jambalaya I made and has a liking for Cajun seasoning too.

I wouldn't be shocked if some American, somewhere did, but its certainly not standard or something a tourist would have to worry about. In my experience typical fruit salad is just an assortment of cut fruits, berries, grapes, etc, mixed together.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Library Dragon on March 10, 2013, 05:27:12 PM
If you're in the southeastern part of the US you may find it.  Wander into a Picadilly cafeteria and it is sometimes an option. 

My family would add marshmallows to jello salad.  At every holiday was a "salad" with fruit cocktail, mandarin oranges, freshly whipped cream, nuts, and mini marshmallows.  As some who dislikes jello and marshmallows the first was doubly icky, the second would have a pile of marshmallows left.  I make a simplier version for dessert.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: violinp on March 10, 2013, 05:55:30 PM
Jell-o salad sounds disgusting to me. Is it also true that Americans add marshmallows to fruit salad? Yuck! Way too much sweetness for me.
My husband did like the Jambalaya I made and has a liking for Cajun seasoning too.

I don't know about the marshmallows, as I've never had it (don't like Jello unless it's orange), but I'm sure someone thought it was good.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Venus193 on March 10, 2013, 06:24:27 PM
The only Jello recipes I use are purely dessert ones:

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx204/Venus193/IMG_0594.jpg)

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-1Xyfy1X16i4/Tjnxr1TUPhI/AAAAAAAAAE8/rcDTFtX8DIg/s1600/BROKEN+WINDOW+GLASS+CAKE.jpg)

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-sttgpQPPx-E/ToAb3dZvpPI/AAAAAAAACF8/w8wfpP6akhE/s1600/Boulder+Locaovre+grasshopper+pie+717.jpg)
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Hmmmmm on March 10, 2013, 06:49:16 PM
Jell-o salad sounds disgusting to me. Is it also true that Americans add marshmallows to fruit salad? Yuck! Way too much sweetness for me.
My husband did like the Jambalaya I made and has a liking for Cajun seasoning too.

Ambrosia salad is a common holiday recipe in the US south, or it used to be. I don't hear of it as often. It has a combination of oranges, pineapple, and coconut with minature marshmallows. The dressing is made with sour cream to cut the sweatiness.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on March 10, 2013, 06:52:40 PM
That just sounds...wrong to me. No offence to people who like it.

But that second photo looks so 70s it could be out of one of my Mums cookbooks.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Venus193 on March 10, 2013, 08:36:37 PM
(mobster voice)  You talkin' to me??

It may actually be in one of your mother's cookbooks from  the 60s. 

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_B3Asx8aG-ZE/S-7M0FYGPDI/AAAAAAAAF_k/ddWc-eMZOQE/s1600/joysofjello.jpg)

My Easter challenge might be:

(http://www.chefandy.com/images/rainbow.jpg)
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Library Dragon on March 10, 2013, 10:45:03 PM
When we first moved to Alabama the church we attended had its annual Christmas party at the local country club.  The dessert was a cranberry jello thingy with a glob of white on top.  Silly me, I thought it was whipped cream.  Nope.  Mayonnaise!  I like mayo on my sandwiches, not my desserts.  I was told it was a specialty of the club.    ??? Why  ???
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Iris on March 11, 2013, 01:11:49 AM
(mobster voice)  You talkin' to me??

It may actually be in one of your mother's cookbooks from  the 60s. 

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_B3Asx8aG-ZE/S-7M0FYGPDI/AAAAAAAAF_k/ddWc-eMZOQE/s1600/joysofjello.jpg)

My Easter challenge might be:

(http://www.chefandy.com/images/rainbow.jpg)

I actually love the look of the pie? Cheesecake? slice on the plate in that second photo. It's so kitsch and pop-arty with the random squares in the slice, like a fabulous stained glass window from the '60s. If you'd be happy to share the recipe I'd love to give it a go.

[brag] I made a rainbow layer cake last year, but it had cream between the layers.[/brag] The one you've pictured looks like it might be all one cake. Is it?
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Venus193 on March 11, 2013, 06:36:20 AM
The rainbow cake in the picture is pure Jello with whipped cream frosting.  The recipes for all these things are here:

http://www.chefandy.com/recipes.html

The cookbooks are available from third-party sellers at Amazon.

I did the Broken Window Glass Cake last year at Easter.  It's a two-day project and it works with sugar-free Jello.  The Grasshopper Pie can be made with sugar-free Cool Whip but not -- per another E-hellion -- fat-free or lower fat versions.  The orange one in the first photo is that recipe with orange Jello and Grand Marnier.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: ladyknight1 on March 11, 2013, 08:15:54 AM
Jell-o salad sounds disgusting to me. Is it also true that Americans add marshmallows to fruit salad? Yuck! Way too much sweetness for me.
My husband did like the Jambalaya I made and has a liking for Cajun seasoning too.

Ambrosia salad is a common holiday recipe in the US south, or it used to be. I don't hear of it as often. It has a combination of oranges, pineapple, and coconut with miniature marshmallows. The dressing is made with sour cream to cut the sweetness.

I love Ambrosia and it is one of the favorite offerings for bring a dish meals.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Iris on March 11, 2013, 03:45:52 PM
The rainbow cake in the picture is pure Jello with whipped cream frosting.  The recipes for all these things are here:

http://www.chefandy.com/recipes.html

The cookbooks are available from third-party sellers at Amazon.

I did the Broken Window Glass Cake last year at Easter.  It's a two-day project and it works with sugar-free Jello.  The Grasshopper Pie can be made with sugar-free Cool Whip but not -- per another E-hellion -- fat-free or lower fat versions.  The orange one in the first photo is that recipe with orange Jello and Grand Marnier.

Thanks! Can't wait to try it!
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on March 11, 2013, 05:23:55 PM
How is it that you guys can take so much sweetness? I have a sweet toothe, love chocolate but I have my limits.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: dawbs on March 11, 2013, 05:38:51 PM
How is it that you guys can take so much sweetness? I have a sweet toothe, love chocolate but I have my limits.
years of practice  ;)

Brownies (the dessert) are actually an American invention--and most of the ingredients are pretty universal (this one is good and I have all the ingredients in my cupboard most days:  http://thebrownieproject.wordpress.com/2009/05/08/supernatural-brownies/)

"Derby pie" is pretty all american too, IMO.

I'd also try an american version of cornbread or jonnycake
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Hmmmmm on March 11, 2013, 06:27:54 PM
How is it that you guys can take so much sweetness? I have a sweet toothe, love chocolate but I have my limits.
As the other poster said, we grew up with it.

As a child, this was my absolute favorite chocolate cake.
http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/coca-cola-cake-10000000332011/ (http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/coca-cola-cake-10000000332011/)
Has a cup of coca cola, almost 2 cups of sugar, and a cup and a half of marhmallows.  And then there is the frosting with more coke and 16 oz of powdered sugar. 

I didn't have it for almost 2 decades and decided to make it 3 cakes for my DD's 7th bday party. Oh my, I took one bite and almost went into sugar shock. Thank goodness it was a swim party because I had 24 7 year olds on the ultimate sugar rush. (But I still think it has the best texture of any chocolate cake. Now I just reduce the sugar but have to keep the marshmallows for texture.) 
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on March 11, 2013, 06:32:16 PM
I think my teeth just screamed and ran to the back of my mouth.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Sophia on March 11, 2013, 10:20:34 PM
My parents had this nifty sugar dispenser.  It was glass with a metal screw-on lid and built into the lid a metal straw maybe 1/3" wide (little less than a cm).  So, you could literally pour out the sugar into your morning coffee or cereal.  My parents tossed theirs because when I was a kid they caught me pouring it directly into my mouth. 
Although, now that I am older I frequently find things too sweet.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Library Dragon on March 11, 2013, 10:34:46 PM
How is it that you guys can take so much sweetness? I have a sweet toothe, love chocolate but I have my limits.

We don't all love it.  As a child Easter was candy  >:D for me. Don't like milk chocolate because it's too sweet.  No chocolate bunnies.  I've covered my disgust for marshmallows, so peeps were no fun. No jelly beans, except for licorice or cinnamon flavors. I would have a basket of candy that I didn't like.

I was stationed in Heidelberg, Gemany when I was 18.  I made this wonderful discovery.  German milk chocolate wasn't as sweet and I could buy dark chocolate Ritter Sport bars with nuts, raisins, etc. Pastries weren't as sweet!  Hot chocolate was to be sweented to MY taste level.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Elfmama on March 11, 2013, 10:38:10 PM
funnel cakes are universal
And very, very old.  There are medieval recipes that says to let the batter run "thurgh thy fyngours or thrugh a skymour" or a bowl with holes in the bottom instead of a funnel.

(googling happens here... .... ... ) Got it!


This is an excerpt from Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books
(England, 1430)
 The original source can be found at the University of Michigan's "Corpus of Middle English Prose and Verse" (http://www.hti.umich.edu/c/cme/)
lj - Cryspe3. Take Whyte of Eyroun, Mylke, and Floure, and a lytel Berme, and bete it to-gederys, and draw it thorw a straynoure, so that it be renneng, and not to styf, and caste Sugre ther-to, and Salt; thanne take a chafer ful of freysshe grece boyling, and put thin hond in the Bature, and lat thin bature renne dowun by thin fyngerys in-to the chafere; and whan it is ronne to-gedere on the chafere, and is y-now, take and nym a skymer, and take it vp, and lat al the grece renne owt, and put it on a fayre dyssche, and cast ther-on Sugre y-now, and serue forth.
http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?twofi:204
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on March 11, 2013, 10:39:28 PM
Library Dragon, you need to try Lindt dark chocolate.

And I wouldn't talk about over sweetness. I just had a Neenish Tart. Cream and jam in  a tarts he'll with brown and pink icing in top

And I've never had funnel cake. Is it like trifle?
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Library Dragon on March 11, 2013, 10:49:17 PM
Thanks for the recommendation. 

Funnel cakes are a fired batter, done a spiral or round squiggly pattern, the dusted with confectioners sugar. Think pancake batter fried.  Your heart is clogging up right now!  It's a standard now at every fun fair.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on March 11, 2013, 11:01:44 PM
Oh, you mean like long hot donuts. Sounds nice.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: PastryGoddess on March 12, 2013, 08:13:27 AM
Oh, you mean like long hot donuts. Sounds nice.

yes but they are more circular.  You have to eat them hot or otherwise they taste gross.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: ladyknight1 on March 12, 2013, 08:14:17 AM
Dutch oven or drop donuts (must be cooked outside on a cold morning!)
Hot chocolate or apple cider
S'mores brownies
King Ranch chicken casserole
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: MurPl1 on December 03, 2013, 06:47:09 PM
I don't know how I just now stumbled on this thread.  But I'm loving the interaction.  And I'm totally giggling over the Jell-O pics.

I have a few Southern Living cooking books from the early 80's.  Before Jell-O was the allowed term.  They all refer to gelatin salad.  And they've got some with tomatoes, and onions and other not so common today items.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Ms_Cellany on December 04, 2013, 09:57:07 AM
Funnel cake:

(http://www.holderconcession.com/images/FunnelCake/Tastemaker%20Funnel%20Cake.jpg)

Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Venus193 on December 05, 2013, 06:02:10 AM
I don't know how I just now stumbled on this thread.  But I'm loving the interaction.  And I'm totally giggling over the Jell-O pics.

I have a few Southern Living cooking books from the early 80's.  Before Jell-O was the allowed term.  They all refer to gelatin salad.  And they've got some with tomatoes, and onions and other not so common today items.

I have some of the Jello cookbooks from the early 60s.  Some of the recipes are quite ridiculous, but some of the dessert recipes are cool.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Elfmama on December 05, 2013, 01:21:32 PM
I don't know how I just now stumbled on this thread.  But I'm loving the interaction.  And I'm totally giggling over the Jell-O pics.

I have a few Southern Living cooking books from the early 80's.  Before Jell-O was the allowed term.  They all refer to gelatin salad.  And they've got some with tomatoes, and onions and other not so common today items.

I have some of the Jello cookbooks from the early 60s.  Some of the recipes are quite ridiculous, but some of the dessert recipes are cool.
Well, come on, SHARE!  At least the list of ingredients. (http://www3.telus.net/smile/images/prettyplease.gif)
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: EllenS on December 05, 2013, 02:03:03 PM
Hoppin' john
corn pone (made with 100% corn meal, no wheat flour - that is cornbread if it also has wheat)
sweet potato pie (although I prefer them baked in the skin with just butter and salt like a jacket potato)
Turnip or collard greens (cooked with ham)

Yes, I am from the South.
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: that_one_girl on December 08, 2013, 07:34:16 PM
philly cheesesteak sandwiches maybe?
Title: Re: What American recipes would interest you?
Post by: Thipu1 on December 11, 2013, 10:16:52 AM
Jello recipes can be ghastly but the poke cakes can be cool. 

For a poke cake, you bake any kind of cake you wish then 'poke' the top of the cake and pour in semi-congealed Jello.  The contrast of color of the cake and the color of the Jello provided the drama. 

A devils-food poke cake with cherry or raspberry Jello was always a Halloween triumph.  The flavors went well together and a cake that seemed to be oozing 'blood' when it was cut was always a hit. 

On the other hand, I have seen recipes for congealed salads that included gummy bears cavorting in a broccoli forest. 

No.  just no.