Etiquette Hell

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Title: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on August 20, 2012, 06:55:56 PM
I was thinking about this when I heard that Phyllis Diller died at 95. Here we would say that she had a good innings. Do Americans say that? It's a cricketing term because 95 or 88 or 100 or a large number like that is a good amount of runs to make, ie a good score.

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on August 20, 2012, 07:42:51 PM
I've never heard of good innings. I live in Colorado. We have a saying here that I've never heard anywhere else in the US, but most people in my generation (born in the 1970s and 1980s) in Colorado are familiar with it. One of the words won't make it past the filter, so I'll try to get creative. The saying is "flipping a witch." Only the word isn't "witch." It means to make a U-turn. An example would be "Oh, I missed my exit. I'll flip a witch and go back."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: camlan on August 20, 2012, 08:08:06 PM
"She had a good innings" isn't used in the US, from what I can tell. I've sometimes heard, "He had a good long run," but I'm not sure how common that is.

What we do have is a variety of ways of saying that someone died, without actually using the word "die."

He passed
She passed on
She passed away
He was taken
She has breathed her last
He's gone to glory

Informal:
He kicked the bucket
She cashed in her chips
He bought the farm
She gave up the ghost

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on August 20, 2012, 08:52:39 PM
camlan, my favorite saying for dying was in a Miami Vice episode when one of the characters said "He went on ahead." What?! I also snicker at the saying "He's pushing up daisies."

I like the number of sayings for vomiting:

He tossed his cookies
He harked
He hurled
He puked
He ralphed
Bowing to the porcelain god
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on August 20, 2012, 08:55:44 PM
"She had a good innings" isn't used in the US, from what I can tell. I've sometimes heard, "He had a good long run," but I'm not sure how common that is.

What we do have is a variety of ways of saying that someone died, without actually using the word "die."

He passed
She passed on
She passed away
He was taken
She has breathed her last
He's gone to glory

Informal:
He kicked the bucket
She cashed in her chips
He bought the farm
She gave up the ghost

Also, among certain people "called home"
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on August 20, 2012, 09:01:10 PM
Danika we saying Praying to the porcelain god, but spewing is the most common, probably.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: violinp on August 20, 2012, 09:26:14 PM
"She had a good innings" isn't used in the US, from what I can tell. I've sometimes heard, "He had a good long run," but I'm not sure how common that is.

What we do have is a variety of ways of saying that someone died, without actually using the word "die."

He passed
She passed on
She passed away
He was taken
She has breathed her last
He's gone to glory

Informal:
He kicked the bucket
She cashed in her chips
He bought the farm
She gave up the ghost

Also, among certain people "called home"

Gone home to Jesus
Fell asleep (in the arms of Jesus)
Pushing up daisies
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Isometric on August 20, 2012, 09:57:00 PM
My favourite Australian saying is "Not happy Jan" - to express mild annoyance/displeasure.

It originated from a TV ad a several years ago. (Yellow Pages, I think?)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Slartibartfast on August 20, 2012, 10:32:52 PM
There's a great song by the Happy Schnopps Combo about regionalisms specific to the area of Wisconsin where I grew up:

I saw a man confused one day just wandering around
He said he needed help and that he was from outa town
He said "Sir I am thirsty and a beverage I do seek
But I do not understand the local language that you speak"

I says com'ere once...com'ere once...why don't you come by here
We'll have a hot tamale and a couple two tree beers      (<--- "hot tamales" = sloppy joes, and I tease my dad about "couple or two or three")
Or you can go dere by dat bubbler, but don't you budge in line   (<--- "bubbler" = drinking fountain, and "budge" = cut)
She's a nice day out, hey, an' so     (<--- the old guy who used to live next door to us said this ALL THE TIME.  Never did figure it out!)

The stranger said "I still don't grasp a word you people say
Are you from some foreign land or were you born this way?
It sounds a bit like English, and Polish and Chinese
So if you'd use sign language I'd appreciate it please"

I says com'ere once...com'ere once...why don't you come by here
We'll have a hot tamale and a couple two tree beers
Or you can go dere by dat bubbler, but don't you budge in line
She's a nice day out, ain' so

Com'ere once...com'ere once...for cry I come by here
We'll have a brat and kraut and den a couple two tree beers
Or you can go dere by dat bubbler, but don't you budge in line
She's a nice day out, ain' so
She's a nice day out, ain' so..oo..oo..oo..oo..oo.oo...

HEY ! !
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on August 20, 2012, 10:33:54 PM
I like Not Happy Jan, too and yes it was from Yellow Pages. A saying that has certainly outlived the campaign.

I don't actually know what sloppy joes are either.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Slartibartfast on August 20, 2012, 10:41:26 PM
I like Not Happy Jan, too and yes it was from Yellow Pages. A saying that has certainly outlived the campaign.

I don't actually know what sloppy joes are either.

Essentially a mixture of ground beef, tomato paste, and spices, mixed and cooked together, and served on a bun.  Here you can buy packets of sloppy joe spice mix which you just add to a pound of beef and a can of tomato paste, but you could probably find a recipe online specifying which spices to add.  I think they're delicious, but they are indeed sloppy if you overfill the buns!  They're a good cheap dinner and often used for cookouts/barbecues since it's easy to mix up a big batch and turn out many sandwiches very quickly.  They go well with cookout/barbecue food - chips/crisps, vegetables and dip, baked beans, potato salad, watermelon, etc.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Jape on August 20, 2012, 10:42:58 PM
I love all our Aussie sayings.  We spent a night once 'educating' a Chinese friend.  The only one she knew was "Flat out like a lizard drinking"  We introduced her to some of the cruder ones as well as "As useless as an ashtray on a motorbike" and "As funny as a fart in a space-suit".  That last one is probably crude too, but pales into insignificance compared to some of them! 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on August 21, 2012, 02:57:32 AM
To the vomiting vocabulary, the Scots and Irish can add 'boaking' (spelling variable), which implies vomiting with a degree of violence about it. So the baby who spits up the last mouthful of milk isn't boaking, but when you have food poisoning, and you lose everything you've eaten for about the last year, you are.

Sorry, but you did ask...
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Iris on August 21, 2012, 03:59:04 AM
For us, vomiting was "being on the big porcelain telephone to God".

I also use "Not Happy Jan". I can still picture the ad in my mind actually - definitely a successful campaign in terms of longevity. How good it was at advertising yellow pages I don't know :)

For an even older phone ad, who uses "That'll be the phone, Reg"?

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on August 21, 2012, 05:38:31 AM
For us, vomiting was "being on the big porcelain telephone to God".

I also use "Not Happy Jan". I can still picture the ad in my mind actually - definitely a successful campaign in terms of longevity. How good it was at advertising yellow pages I don't know :)

For an even older phone ad, who uses "That'll be the phone, Reg"?


I have an uncle named Reg, what do you think? lololol.
 ;D  ;D
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on August 21, 2012, 05:40:29 AM
"She had a good innings" isn't used in the US, from what I can tell. I've sometimes heard, "He had a good long run," but I'm not sure how common that is.

What we do have is a variety of ways of saying that someone died, without actually using the word "die."

He passed
She passed on
She passed away
He was taken
She has breathed her last
He's gone to glory

Informal:
He kicked the bucket
She cashed in her chips
He bought the farm
She gave up the ghost


What about "took a dirt nap?"
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redsoil on August 21, 2012, 07:23:48 AM
We regularly use "That'll be the phone, Reg" (can't even remember the ad now!) and "Not happy Jan!".

Other phrases include such things as:

Dry as a dead dingo's donger.

Crackin' hardy.  (Mainly used when it's cold and someone is wearing a t-shirt)

Dead horse.  (Tomato sauce)

G'arn git!  (As in "go and get *coughed*")

Mad as a cut snake.

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 21, 2012, 08:09:59 AM
For vomiting we have

Driving the porcelain bus
Calling Ralph

Cold, raw, windy weather is sometimes called 'Hawk'. 
I love that image.

In upstate NY and New England, 'wicked' is used as an intensifier mostly in a positive way.
'That pie was wicked good.'
'He's a wicked pitcher!'



Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: gadget--gal on August 21, 2012, 08:15:23 AM
i
I was thinking about this when I heard that Phyllis Diller died at 95. Here we would say that she had a good innings. Do Americans say that? It's a cricketing term because 95 or 88 or 100 or a large number like that is a good amount of runs to make, ie a good score.



it's a known phrase in the UK, though I think it's becoming less common
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: mrs_deb on August 21, 2012, 09:31:53 AM
It means to make a U-turn. An example would be "Oh, I missed my exit. I'll flip a witch and go back."

Here in New England they say, "Bang a u-ie" (pronounced yooie).

A couple other regional sayings that drive me nuts are "Not for nuthin, but..." and "So don't I" (for "So do I").
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on August 21, 2012, 10:35:32 AM
It means to make a U-turn. An example would be "Oh, I missed my exit. I'll flip a witch and go back."

Here in New England they say, "Bang a u-ie" (pronounced yooie).

A couple other regional sayings that drive me nuts are "Not for nuthin, but..." and "So don't I" (for "So do I").

We say "bang a u-ie" in NYC too.  And when you are parallel parking you start in at an angle then you "cut the wheel" (or "cut it") to turn in the other direction to straighten out.

One of my favorite regionisms is deli sandwiches on a long roll.  In NYC they are "heros" you can get a regular hero (about 8-12 inches long) or a 3 or 6 foot for parties.  A NYer would probably know what you meant if you said a "sub" or "hoagie" but we'd know you were from out of town.

A lot of NY-isms are just us speaking quickly.  lots of people know "fuggetaboutit" but we also often say/hear "lemmegeta" (let me get a) and "cannageta" (can I get a) or "omigosh" (oh my gosh) "s'up" (what's up).

And of course there is "yo" which can mean hello, hey you, excuse me, what, you dropped something, come here, go away, you startled me, that's outrageous, and several other things all depending on context and tone.  One can have an entire conversation of "yo!" "yo?" "yo" "yo" and the two people will totally understand (they have just said "hey you!" "what?" "you dropped something" "thanks").  Of course its also a thing to call a person - "s'up, yo?" "good lookin' out yo" "yo thanks".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 21, 2012, 11:20:50 AM
It means to make a U-turn. An example would be "Oh, I missed my exit. I'll flip a witch and go back."

Here in New England they say, "Bang a u-ie" (pronounced yooie).

A couple other regional sayings that drive me nuts are "Not for nuthin, but..." and "So don't I" (for "So do I").

Despite now living in CO, I grew up in Pennsylvania and learned "flip a witch".

Speaking of northwest PA...we have a few regional "things" (not necessarily sayings) and a lot of a regional accent.  Y'ins is our form of y'all.  Gum band and rubber band.  "Go red up your room" means to go clean up your room, or you would red up because people are coming over.

Dark Boyfriend, Texan, likes to say, "How much time do you like?" to ask how much longer it is going to take me to do something.  Drives me nuts.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: baglady on August 21, 2012, 06:06:51 PM
Someday I'm going to write down all the slang terms for getting drunk, dying and playing Scrabble, just to see which list is the longest. I suspect Scrabble, because it's the most fun!

In Massachusetts, what's known elsewhere as a roundabout or traffic circle is a rotary.

These are very old Bostonisms I learned from my mom: A straight pin is a common pin (to distinguish it from a safety pin). Baseboards are mopboards. If you have a double sink, the side that isn't being used to wash the dishes in is the settub.

I haven't lived in New England for 30 years, so I don't know if anyone still says "tonic" for soda or pop. When I was a kid "soda" meant only one thing: an ice cream soda. Coke, Pepsi etc. were tonic.

This is a pronunciation thing, not a saying thing, but how do you pronounce "sauna"? Like "fawn" and "dawn" or like "sauerkraut"?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on August 21, 2012, 06:19:04 PM
This is a pronunciation thing, not a saying thing, but how do you pronounce "sauna"? Like "fawn" and "dawn" or like "sauerkraut"?

I work with a Finn.  He pronounces it like 'sauerkraut'.  I pronounce it like 'f/dawn'.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on August 21, 2012, 06:33:17 PM
I tend to pronounce it more the Finnish way.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on August 21, 2012, 07:07:30 PM
This is a pronunciation thing, not a saying thing, but how do you pronounce "sauna"? Like "fawn" and "dawn" or like "sauerkraut"?

Saw-na.

In Australia We'd 'chuck a u-ie', not bang one...
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on August 21, 2012, 07:11:13 PM
I say "sauna" "sah-nah."

I commonly hear:

"I'm fixin' to ..." (As in "I will soon do ...")

"Those y'alls'?" (As in "Are those things yours (plural or singular)?") "Y'all" is so common I barely register it anymore, but "y'alls" as extra-plural or possessive is weird to me, still.

What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

Some people around here "hang a left" whereas I "turn left."

I say, "Oh my goodness!" or "Oh my gosh!" and people look at me funny, like I'm a prude or a *gasp* northerner. It seems to be "Oh my G-d" or nothing.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on August 21, 2012, 08:57:06 PM
What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

That is so confusing. We were in Houston for a wedding and the driving instructions to get to the rehearsal dinner said "Take Feeder Road." DH and I keep looking for a road named "Feeder." We flipped a witch about four times before I said "Maybe 'Feeder' means 'frontage.'"
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 21, 2012, 09:01:18 PM
I say "sauna" "sah-nah."

I commonly hear:

"I'm fixin' to ..." (As in "I will soon do ...")

"Those y'alls'?" (As in "Are those things yours (plural or singular)?") "Y'all" is so common I barely register it anymore, but "y'alls" as extra-plural or possessive is weird to me, still.

What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

Some people around here "hang a left" whereas I "turn left."

I say, "Oh my goodness!" or "Oh my gosh!" and people look at me funny, like I'm a prude or a *gasp* northerner. It seems to be "Oh my G-d" or nothing.

Dark Boyfriend loves to make possessive y'all. I'm slowly getting used to it but it always sounded so weird at first.

I both "turn" and "hang a" left.

A pididdle (sp?) is a car with one headlight out. Learned that in PA; nobody I met had heard it called that in CO.


My Hawaiin "family" calls flip flops (also known as thongs ;) "slippers".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on August 21, 2012, 09:04:26 PM
In Michigan I have heard of a  pididdle and I have heard flip lops called thongs but only when they go etween the toes.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: I'mnotinsane on August 21, 2012, 11:28:32 PM
I say "sauna" "sah-nah."

I commonly hear:

"I'm fixin' to ..." (As in "I will soon do ...")

"Those y'alls'?" (As in "Are those things yours (plural or singular)?") "Y'all" is so common I barely register it anymore, but "y'alls" as extra-plural or possessive is weird to me, still.

What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

Some people around here "hang a left" whereas I "turn left."

I say, "Oh my goodness!" or "Oh my gosh!" and people look at me funny, like I'm a prude or a *gasp* northerner. It seems to be "Oh my G-d" or nothing.

Dark Boyfriend loves to make possessive y'all. I'm slowly getting used to it but it always sounded so weird at first.

I both "turn" and "hang a" left.

A pididdle (sp?) is a car with one headlight out. Learned that in PA; nobody I met had heard it called that in CO.


My Hawaiin "family" calls flip flops (also known as thongs ;) "slippers".

some might even say "hang a louie"
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 22, 2012, 12:35:00 AM
I say "sauna" "sah-nah."

I commonly hear:

"I'm fixin' to ..." (As in "I will soon do ...")

"Those y'alls'?" (As in "Are those things yours (plural or singular)?") "Y'all" is so common I barely register it anymore, but "y'alls" as extra-plural or possessive is weird to me, still.

What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

Some people around here "hang a left" whereas I "turn left."

I say, "Oh my goodness!" or "Oh my gosh!" and people look at me funny, like I'm a prude or a *gasp* northerner. It seems to be "Oh my G-d" or nothing.

Dark Boyfriend loves to make possessive y'all. I'm slowly getting used to it but it always sounded so weird at first.

I both "turn" and "hang a" left.

A pididdle (sp?) is a car with one headlight out. Learned that in PA; nobody I met had heard it called that in CO.


My Hawaiin "family" calls flip flops (also known as thongs ;) "slippers".

some might even say "hang a louie"

I heard that for the first time when I lived outside of Toronto.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Bluenomi on August 22, 2012, 01:03:54 AM
This is a pronunciation thing, not a saying thing, but how do you pronounce "sauna"? Like "fawn" and "dawn" or like "sauerkraut"?

Saw-na.

In Australia We'd 'chuck a u-ie', not bang one...

We Aussie check everying. Chuck a uie, check a left/right, chuck things to people etc etc.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on August 22, 2012, 03:35:07 AM
This is a pronunciation thing, not a saying thing, but how do you pronounce "sauna"? Like "fawn" and "dawn" or like "sauerkraut"?

Saw-na.

In Australia We'd 'chuck a u-ie', not bang one...

We Aussie check everying. Chuck a uie, check a left/right, chuck things to people etc etc.
Chuck a sicke.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on August 22, 2012, 05:08:53 AM
This is a pronunciation thing, not a saying thing, but how do you pronounce "sauna"? Like "fawn" and "dawn" or like "sauerkraut"?

Saw-na.

In Australia We'd 'chuck a u-ie', not bang one...

We Aussie check everying. Chuck a uie, check a left/right, chuck things to people etc etc.
Chuck a sicke.

Chuck a wobbly.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redsoil on August 22, 2012, 05:18:04 AM
Chuck a brown...

Oops.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on August 22, 2012, 05:20:44 AM
Chuck a brown...

Oops.


 ;D  ;D  ;D
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: jalutaja on August 22, 2012, 05:31:01 AM
This is a pronunciation thing, not a saying thing, but how do you pronounce "sauna"? Like "fawn" and "dawn" or like "sauerkraut"?

That would be a perfect song to practise saying "sauna" (well, not in Finnish way, but close enough) :

http://youtu.be/9O81AjaqwAU
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: gadget--gal on August 22, 2012, 06:06:05 AM
[quote author=Dark Magdalena link=topic=119919.msg2780958#msg2780958 date=1345600878


My Hawaiin "family" calls flip flops (also known as thongs ;) "slippers".
[/quote]

Ditto for west Africa
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: readingchick on August 22, 2012, 08:12:13 AM
I like the number of sayings for vomiting:

He tossed his cookies
He harked
He hurled
He puked
He ralphed
Bowing to the porcelain god

Call Ralph (on the porcelain telephone)
Call Earl (on the porcelain telephone)
Making a technicolor pizza
Doing the technicolor yawn
Blow chunks
Spew chunks
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on August 22, 2012, 08:32:12 AM
"Those y'alls'?" (As in "Are those things yours (plural or singular)?") "Y'all" is so common I barely register it anymore, but "y'alls" as extra-plural or possessive is weird to me, still.

In NYC its not uncommon for people to puralize "you", as in "Yous goin' to the game later?" or "hey yous get off my stoop!"

What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

And to make it more confusing lets add another word - we call it a service road.  I have heard it referred to as an access road and might figure out feeder in context but frontage?  Never heard it and would never figure that one out...

some might even say "hang a louie"

I've heard hang a louie and bang a louie interchangeably... with a slight distinction often being to "hang a louie" is to just casually, regularly turn left "hang a louie at the next light" and bang being more urgent "d'oh!  Its this one, quick, bang a louie!"
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 22, 2012, 09:39:04 AM
Here in NYC, we 'take a right turn' or 'hang a right'.

As to long sandwiches, 'sub' or 'submarine', 'hero' or 'hoagie' would all be easily understood. 'Grinder' tends to be a more New England usage but would still be intelligible.

Like 'dese', 'dem' and 'dose', 'youse' is not common in NYC except among very old residents. In the 1950s, Brooklyn College offered remedial speech courses for students to help them lose the 'Brooklyn accent'.       
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Decimus on August 22, 2012, 10:33:53 AM
I'll agree "youse" is rather rare in NYC nowadays.  On the other hand, I think just about every New Yorker knows (if not uses) Yiddish phrases.  Oy vey!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 22, 2012, 12:34:49 PM
Oh yes. 

Yiddish is very common in NYC.

People of all ethnic origins enjoy bagels and almost everyone orders them with a 'schmear'.  That means a spread of butter or cream cheese.  At the very best places, a 'schmear' could weigh as much as a quarter pound.   

'I could care less?' with the appropriate shoulder shrug and hand gesture, is as likely to be heard from a person born in the Bahamas or Yemen as from a person whose parents came from Eastern Europe.

 

 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Cat-Fu on August 22, 2012, 02:58:04 PM
I haven't lived in New England for 30 years, so I don't know if anyone still says "tonic" for soda or pop. When I was a kid "soda" meant only one thing: an ice cream soda. Coke, Pepsi etc. were tonic.

I haven't heard anyone say "tonic" when referring to soda, but then I've only been in MA for about 30 years, so... ;) I'm sure folks still do it, though!

We also say frappe, which is a milkshake, but with icecream.

The liquor store is a packie (package store). When I went to Michigan recently, I was pretty amused by the "party stores."

ETA: I almost forgot! wicked = very (That was wicked awesome, you are wicked drunk, he's wicked cute!)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on August 22, 2012, 03:03:14 PM
I haven't lived in New England for 30 years, so I don't know if anyone still says "tonic" for soda or pop. When I was a kid "soda" meant only one thing: an ice cream soda. Coke, Pepsi etc. were tonic.

I haven't heard anyone say "tonic" when referring to soda, but then I've only been in MA for about 30 years, so... ;) I'm sure folks still do it, though!

We also say frappe, which is a milkshake, but with icecream.

The liquor store is a packie (package store). When I went to Michigan recently, I was pretty amused by the "party stores."

ETA: I almost forgot! wicked = very (That was wicked awesome, you are wicked drunk, he's wicked cute!)

Frap or Frap-ay?

I went from "party store" MI to "liquor store" TX. Liquor store seems pretty clear.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: camlan on August 22, 2012, 03:08:05 PM
I haven't lived in New England for 30 years, so I don't know if anyone still says "tonic" for soda or pop. When I was a kid "soda" meant only one thing: an ice cream soda. Coke, Pepsi etc. were tonic.

I haven't heard anyone say "tonic" when referring to soda, but then I've only been in MA for about 30 years, so... ;) I'm sure folks still do it, though!

We also say frappe, which is a milkshake, but with icecream.

The liquor store is a packie (package store). When I went to Michigan recently, I was pretty amused by the "party stores."

ETA: I almost forgot! wicked = very (That was wicked awesome, you are wicked drunk, he's wicked cute!)

You still hear "tonic" occasionally, mostly in the Boston area and mostly from older (over 50) people. My parents were from Boston and always said "tonic." Which caused problems when we were living in Philadelphia and my high school friends reported to their parents that my dad offered them all alcohol, because they interpreted the offer of a "tonic" as meaning a "gin and tonic."

And "bubbler" or "bubbla" for water fountain is dying out as well.

"Wicked" as in "wicked good!" continues strong.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Cat-Fu on August 22, 2012, 03:23:19 PM
I haven't lived in New England for 30 years, so I don't know if anyone still says "tonic" for soda or pop. When I was a kid "soda" meant only one thing: an ice cream soda. Coke, Pepsi etc. were tonic.

I haven't heard anyone say "tonic" when referring to soda, but then I've only been in MA for about 30 years, so... ;) I'm sure folks still do it, though!

We also say frappe, which is a milkshake, but with icecream.

The liquor store is a packie (package store). When I went to Michigan recently, I was pretty amused by the "party stores."

ETA: I almost forgot! wicked = very (That was wicked awesome, you are wicked drunk, he's wicked cute!)

Frap or Frap-ay?

I went from "party store" MI to "liquor store" TX. Liquor store seems pretty clear.

Frap.

I have heard bubbla a bit here and there, more often when I was living in central MA, though.  ???
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on August 22, 2012, 03:36:09 PM
Oh yes. 

Yiddish is very common in NYC.

People of all ethnic origins enjoy bagels and almost everyone orders them with a 'schmear'.  That means a spread of butter or cream cheese.  At the very best places, a 'schmear' could weigh as much as a quarter pound.   

'I could care less?' with the appropriate shoulder shrug and hand gesture, is as likely to be heard from a person born in the Bahamas or Yemen as from a person whose parents came from Eastern Europe.

I was born & raised in NYC, 36 years now.  Both of my parents were born and raised (and still live in NYC), my grandfather was born & raised in NYC & lived here till he died.  We all went to school here, worked here, etc.

I have never, ever in my life ever heard anyone in real life ask for a "schmear" and my first job ever was working in a bagel shop (about 1 year) and I spent 4 years managing a deli in my early 20's.  Only tourists and TV personalities IME say "with a schmear".

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on August 22, 2012, 04:26:01 PM
"Those y'alls'?" (As in "Are those things yours (plural or singular)?") "Y'all" is so common I barely register it anymore, but "y'alls" as extra-plural or possessive is weird to me, still.

In NYC its not uncommon for people to puralize "you", as in "Yous goin' to the game later?" or "hey yous get off my stoop!"

What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

And to make it more confusing lets add another word - we call it a service road.  I have heard it referred to as an access road and might figure out feeder in context but frontage?  Never heard it and would never figure that one out...

some might even say "hang a louie"

I've heard hang a louie and bang a louie interchangeably... with a slight distinction often being to "hang a louie" is to just casually, regularly turn left "hang a louie at the next light" and bang being more urgent "d'oh!  Its this one, quick, bang a louie!"

They all sound very South-Jersey-ish, as well.
...where, FWIW, NO ONE says Joisey. Get it out of your head right now. Maybe in Brooklyn? I don't know; but no one from here actually talks like that, except on television.



Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on August 22, 2012, 04:38:12 PM
^ And few people say "New Jersey" either, at least not in New York, its just straight Jersey, or South Jersey, or North Jersey or right-across-the-river-Jersey (or AC if talking about Atlantic City).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Pippen on August 22, 2012, 05:20:17 PM
Ones I could never get used to when I was working with South Africans was their multiple concepts of 'now'. They had 'right now', 'just now' and 'now now' and they all featured at wildly different ends of the time scale. If they said something like "Oh I will get that document to you just now" it meant sometime indeterminate time in the future, right now meant something totally different and now now actually did mean now.

One from China which always cracks me up is if you get an unflattering haircut they ask you if a dog has chewed your hair
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on August 22, 2012, 05:31:37 PM
^ And few people say "New Jersey" either, at least not in New York, its just straight Jersey, or South Jersey, or North Jersey or right-across-the-river-Jersey (or AC if talking about Atlantic City).

You know, i never noticed that; but you're right.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 22, 2012, 06:23:27 PM
I've never heard 'bubbla' or 'bubbler' for a drinking fountain in New England.  However, it's very common in WI.  The Wisconsin State Museum even sells a T-shirt with a picture of one and the legend, 'It's a bubbler'.

I will maintain that 'schmear' is still used in our area of Brooklyn. 

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: baglady on August 22, 2012, 06:35:21 PM
When I lived in the Boston area I don't think I ever heard "package store" except in commercials on radio or TV. Never heard "packie." We just called it the liquor store. I thought maybe "package store" was one of those advertising euphemisms, like "bathroom tissue" for "toilet paper."

The newspaper in the southern New Hampshire town where I grew up used to run ads every week for "novelty parties." Not what you're thinking! It meant bingo, not scrabble. I think it was either a law or newspaper policy that you couldn't advertise gambling -- except, of course, for the state lottery (or "Sweepstakes," as it was called then).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: mrs_deb on August 22, 2012, 08:40:55 PM
The liquor store is a packie (package store).

When I moved to MA, I had a terrible time with the accent.  There's that broad "a", and the habit of removing perfectly good "r"s from some words and putting them haphazardly into other words that didn't come with them in the first place and certainly don't need them.

For example, a vendor called my office from some company named Ah-see-eh.  I  kept asking her to spell it and she just kept repeating, "ah! see! eh!  ah! see! eh!"  Finally I just wrote down "Assier" in case it was a French company.  Turns out it was RCA.  How was I supposed to know?

Then there was the woman who called from the Sharrrmut Bank.  Funny, I'd seen that bank before and it was Shawmut.  There's no "r" in Shawmut.

I then met a guy who tried to tell me a joke about three guys going into a desert - one brought food, one brought water, and the third brought a caaaaah duuuuah.  By the time I figured out he meant a car door, he was too mad to finish the joke.

And then he said we were going to stop by the "packie" on the way to a party.  Well, I knew enough Bostonian by now to know I had to insert an "r" into that word.  And he couldn't figure out why I kept asking him what a parkie was.

We didn't date much longer.

Sorry, threadjack over  ;D.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: MERUNCC13 on August 22, 2012, 08:54:46 PM
If you all don't mind me chiming in from the Southeastern US.  We tend to use a lot of other words to describe some passages in life; for example, if someone has died we tend to say "he or she has passed on or passed away".  If someone needs to throw up depending on the age, we either say "upchucking" or praying to the porcelean gods".

But the phrase that some of us use the most, which covers everything from finding out that your teenage granddaughter is pregnat to your husband has run off with his secretary and you don't want to be heard using profanity or seem like you are gossiping (which we know that you are)  is "bless your/his/her heart".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 22, 2012, 09:16:43 PM
If you all don't mind me chiming in from the Southeastern US.  We tend to use a lot of other words to describe some passages in life; for example, if someone has died we tend to say "he or she has passed on or passed away".  If someone needs to throw up depending on the age, we either say "upchucking" or praying to the porcelean gods".

But the phrase that some of us use the most, which covers everything from finding out that your teenage granddaughter is pregnat to your husband has run off with his secretary and you don't want to be heard using profanity or seem like you are gossiping (which we know that you are)  is "bless your/his/her heart".

Yes! I was born and raised in MD, but my family is from NC, AL, and LA.  So a lot of the southern sayings are in my vocabulary.

I use bless your/her/his heart all the time, mostly to take the sting out of not so nice things. 

I also use fixin' a lot as well.  Fixin' to go to the store.  Fixin' to get my hair done.  Fixin' to whoop your behind.  etc
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on August 22, 2012, 09:41:57 PM
On the subject of fixin' many of my students use fi'n.  You instruct them to do somethign or go somewhere and they respond "I'm fi'n to"

Out of curiosity, do people say bag, sack or something else?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on August 22, 2012, 09:53:56 PM
Out of curiosity, do people say bag, sack or something else?

In reference to what precisely?  To me, a 'bag' is a general word for any soft-shaped carrying device, regardless of how carried or worn. 

Sack is very specific - large, shapeless, may or may not have a closing device at the open end, but other than perhaps draw-string strings, has no handles and is grasped around the neck.  There is no interior structure such as pockets or dividers.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on August 22, 2012, 09:59:28 PM
Out of curiosity, do people say bag, sack or something else?
In reference to what precisely?  To me, a 'bag' is a general word for any soft-shaped carrying device, regardless of how carried or worn. Sack is very specific - large, shapeless, may or may not have a closing device at the open end, but other than perhaps draw-string strings, has no handles and is grasped around the neck. There is no interior structure such as pockets or dividers.

To me those are both bags. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: baglady on August 22, 2012, 10:20:35 PM
To me, all bags are bags, with the possible exception of Santa's sack. But I once had a cashier (transplant from Texas) offer me a "sack" for my purchases. From what I can deduce, in some places "sack" is the term for a brown paper bag or the equivalent -- as in "sack lunch."

I also call that thing with the handles that holds my wallet, keys, etc. my bag, because to me (and YMMV!) "purse" sounds prissy, "pocketbook" sounds old-ladyish, and "handbag" sounds like retail-speak ("All handbags on sale!").
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: snowdragon on August 22, 2012, 10:45:38 PM
I say "sauna" "sah-nah."

I commonly hear:

"I'm fixin' to ..." (As in "I will soon do ...")

"Those y'alls'?" (As in "Are those things yours (plural or singular)?") "Y'all" is so common I barely register it anymore, but "y'alls" as extra-plural or possessive is weird to me, still.

What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

Some people around here "hang a left" whereas I "turn left."

I say, "Oh my goodness!" or "Oh my gosh!" and people look at me funny, like I'm a prude or a *gasp* northerner. It seems to be "Oh my G-d" or nothing.

Dark Boyfriend loves to make possessive y'all. I'm slowly getting used to it but it always sounded so weird at first.

I both "turn" and "hang a" left.

A pididdle (sp?) is a car with one headlight out. Learned that in PA; nobody I met had heard it called that in CO.


My Hawaiin "family" calls flip flops (also known as thongs ;) "slippers".


In NY we play pididdle with License Plates during the day and headlights at night. 

here Alaska or Hawaii wins automatically, I've always wondered what wins in Canada.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 23, 2012, 12:39:13 AM
I say "sauna" "sah-nah."

I commonly hear:

"I'm fixin' to ..." (As in "I will soon do ...")

"Those y'alls'?" (As in "Are those things yours (plural or singular)?") "Y'all" is so common I barely register it anymore, but "y'alls" as extra-plural or possessive is weird to me, still.

What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

Some people around here "hang a left" whereas I "turn left."

I say, "Oh my goodness!" or "Oh my gosh!" and people look at me funny, like I'm a prude or a *gasp* northerner. It seems to be "Oh my G-d" or nothing.

Dark Boyfriend loves to make possessive y'all. I'm slowly getting used to it but it always sounded so weird at first.

I both "turn" and "hang a" left.

A pididdle (sp?) is a car with one headlight out. Learned that in PA; nobody I met had heard it called that in CO.


My Hawaiin "family" calls flip flops (also known as thongs ;) "slippers".


In NY we play pididdle with License Plates during the day and headlights at night. 

here Alaska or Hawaii wins automatically, I've always wondered what wins in Canada.

I've never done it with license plates, though that could be fun.




On the topic of "bag" and "sack", I got made fun of by more than one person for calling my "backpack" a "bookbag".  When I inquired as to why that was wrong, I was told that a bookbag was something you carried as a kid, and now it's a backpack.  (This happened in high school in Colorado). Can anyone explain this to me by chance? I still call it a bookbag.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on August 23, 2012, 07:09:16 AM
Everyone I know calls backpacks and bookbags interchangeably, with a few people saying knapsack (that one I never understood the root of, but its a normal enough word here). I had a friend from the Quad cities (Illinios) who called it a rucksack, never heard anyone else say that!

In general anything can be a bag: a grocery bag, a backpack isa bag, a purse is a bag, a garbage bag is a bag, a tote is a bag, etc. But a "sack", unless part of a compound word, in my experience is a shapeless bag like Santa's sack or a potato sack, or using a pillowcase as a Halloween sack.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: camlan on August 23, 2012, 07:14:46 AM

On the topic of "bag" and "sack", I got made fun of by more than one person for calling my "backpack" a "bookbag".  When I inquired as to why that was wrong, I was told that a bookbag was something you carried as a kid, and now it's a backpack.  (This happened in high school in Colorado). Can anyone explain this to me by chance? I still call it a bookbag.

Way back in the 60s, we carried bookbags to school. They looked similar to this:

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af241/TheLadyMacduff/briefcase_175.jpg)

Yeah, it does look like a briefcase, but these were not expensive leather book bags. They were made of vinyl and sold specifically as book bags for school. It was a hassle if yours fell apart in the middle of the school year, as most stores only carried them in the late summer/early fall when people were back-to-school shopping.

So your back pack is a back pack by design. It is a book bag because that is how you use it. Just looking at a back pack, I'd call it a back pack, no matter how it is used. But I'm starting to hear more people refer to them as book bags, at least when talking to the kids who are using them.

I think in your case, the change in terminology has to do with trying to sound older and more mature. Little kids carry book bags. Teenagers have back packs. Even if they are the same thing, the connotation of the words is different. To the people who were correcting you, "book bag" sounded more childish and out of place coming from a teenager in high school. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on August 23, 2012, 07:41:33 AM
When I think of sayings for "they died" all I can think of usually are the sayings used in the Dead Parrot Sketch. 

In Maryland, people don't really say "I'm going to Ocean City" but rather "We're goin' downee ocean!"

In this town, if you live in a duplex, people say you live in "half a double". 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 23, 2012, 09:07:34 AM
Here in NYC, almost anything that isn't a box is a bag.  This includes both the little brown paper thing that holds a bagel and the big thing with wheels that holds everything needed for a two-week vacation. 

Purses are also bags.  Oddly enough though, backpacks and waist wallets go by their proper names. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on August 23, 2012, 10:33:06 AM
Here in NYC, almost anything that isn't a box is a bag.  This includes both the little brown paper thing that holds a bagel and the big thing with wheels that holds everything needed for a two-week vacation. 

Purses are also bags.  Oddly enough though, backpacks and waist wallets go by their proper names.

Never heard that term. A fanny pack?

I use specific terms -- I have, in my closet, a messenger bag, a tote bag, a beach bag, a bunch of purses, a clutch, a backpack (never said bookbag etc.), and a wallet.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 23, 2012, 03:54:47 PM
Here in NYC, almost anything that isn't a box is a bag.  This includes both the little brown paper thing that holds a bagel and the big thing with wheels that holds everything needed for a two-week vacation. 

Purses are also bags.  Oddly enough though, backpacks and waist wallets go by their proper names.

Never heard that term. A fanny pack?

Yes.  Waist wallets are fanny packs.  We've learned that's a more internationally acceptable term. 

I use specific terms -- I have, in my closet, a messenger bag, a tote bag, a beach bag, a bunch of purses, a clutch, a backpack (never said bookbag etc.), and a wallet.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on August 23, 2012, 04:15:59 PM
On the bag versus sack.  I've never thought about how I'm completely confused on these two words and not even sure why I use them the way I do. 

If I'm describing the item as a paper product, I refer to it as a sack.  I think I also think of grocery bag's as sacks.  Growing up the person putting your groceries in the bags were called sackers, not baggers, and they were sacking your groceries.  I now refer to them bagging my grocerings.   I never use the term grocey sack.  It is always grocery bag.  I'll tell my kids to go get a paper sack to put their lunch in, but once it is filled I'll remind them to put their lunch bag in their backpack.

My purse is the handbag that I carry my personal items in.  I'll say "DD, bring me my brown purse."  But if DD and I are about to leave, I'll say "Let me grab my bag first."  I would also never say "I need a new black shoulder purse."  I'd say "I need a new black shoulder bag." though I'm refering to the same thing I would later tell my daughter to go get my black purse. 

My suitcase is my suitcase, but I'll also occasionally refer to it as a bag.  "How many bags of luggage are you going to take?"  or "Let me check my bag."

I think I do this with lots of words. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: camlan on August 23, 2012, 04:18:33 PM
I don't think I've ever used the word "sack" except for the potato sacks that you would use in a race. Everything's a bag. Including Santa's bag filled with toys. Never heard it called Santa's sack until this thread.

I'm from New England, if that makes a difference.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on August 23, 2012, 06:13:11 PM
Here in NYC, almost anything that isn't a box is a bag.  This includes both the little brown paper thing that holds a bagel and the big thing with wheels that holds everything needed for a two-week vacation. 

Purses are also bags.  Oddly enough though, backpacks and waist wallets go by their proper names.

Never heard that term. A fanny pack?
Yes.  Waist wallets are fanny packs.  We've learned that's a more internationally acceptable term. 

I can't speak beyond Australia, but "Fanny Pack", which while internationally understood, is less acceptable here.  "Fanny" in Australia is a euphemism for vagina.  We call them "Bum Bags".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on August 23, 2012, 06:53:45 PM
Exactly, it's rather tricky to fall on your fanny in Australia ;)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Leafy on August 24, 2012, 01:18:39 AM
Harking back to the driving references do young men in other areas do "bog laps". I'm not sure if this is just a West Australian thing or the whole of Australia. Basically it means guys in cars (sometimes hotted up, sometimes not) do loops on a certain stretch of road, just circling around, up and down, usually only going a distance of a few hundred metres (yards). Often this is in front of clubs or cafes and when you see them you say "Look at those idiots doing bog laps".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on August 24, 2012, 01:44:24 AM
Exactly, it's rather tricky to fall on your fanny in Australia ;)

Not if you do it properly.   :-X
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 24, 2012, 02:07:44 AM
Harking back to the driving references do young men in other areas do "bog laps". I'm not sure if this is just a West Australian thing or the whole of Australia. Basically it means guys in cars (sometimes hotted up, sometimes not) do loops on a certain stretch of road, just circling around, up and down, usually only going a distance of a few hundred metres (yards). Often this is in front of clubs or cafes and when you see them you say "Look at those idiots doing bog laps".

Both major places I've lived (Colorado and Pennsylvania, so different sides of the country), we have called that "Cruising the *Name*".  One place I lived, there was a diamond all of about 100 yards long; driving around that diamond again and again and again and again, sometimes slowing down to whistle or holler at someone you know or don't, was called "Cruising the Diamond".  Another place I lived, you "Cruised the Park", which was about a mile stretch where you could turn at each end, and you just kept driving the loop looking out for people you knew.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Aoife on August 24, 2012, 03:05:13 AM
I'll agree "youse" is rather rare in NYC nowadays.  On the other hand, I think just about every New Yorker knows (if not uses) Yiddish phrases.  Oy vey!

Youse is very common in Northern Ireland (Norn Iron in my best broad Belfast accent) but I think it's derived from our accents rather than Yiddish.

We also have mineral for fizzy drinks, which can be baffling to a visitor - " Do you want a mineral with that?" "Umm, no I'd like a coke please." "Mineral coming up!"  ???

My two favourite (I think they're regional) are "Catch yerself on" as in "wise up" and "Away and feel yer head" which is similar but more along the lines of "don't be daft I don't believe you".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on August 24, 2012, 03:15:18 AM
Harking back to the driving references do young men in other areas do "bog laps". I'm not sure if this is just a West Australian thing or the whole of Australia. Basically it means guys in cars (sometimes hotted up, sometimes not) do loops on a certain stretch of road, just circling around, up and down, usually only going a distance of a few hundred metres (yards). Often this is in front of clubs or cafes and when you see them you say "Look at those idiots doing bog laps".
Here in Melbourne, we'd just say "look at those hoons".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 24, 2012, 08:37:46 AM
Then there's 'uff dah' that's fairly common among people of Scandanavian descent in the Upper Middle West. 

We've never gotten a satisfying explanation of what it means. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Pippen on August 24, 2012, 04:30:25 PM
Harking back to the driving references do young men in other areas do "bog laps". I'm not sure if this is just a West Australian thing or the whole of Australia. Basically it means guys in cars (sometimes hotted up, sometimes not) do loops on a certain stretch of road, just circling around, up and down, usually only going a distance of a few hundred metres (yards). Often this is in front of clubs or cafes and when you see them you say "Look at those idiots doing bog laps".
Here in Melbourne, we'd just say "look at those hoons".

You guys are lucky. Here the unhygienic looking 'yoofs' in their Nissan Skylines or Subarus call themselves "Car Enthusiasts". Most people have another name for them but I can't say it here. One idiotic thing they do which the police let them get away with is something stupid called a 'drive train'. Basically it involves around 80 to 100 of them and their skanky girlfriends driving around doing about 70km/hr on 100 km/hr roads looking like a bunch of tools. Good luck to you if you get stuck behind one of these stupid things for 30ks as you have no hope of passing them. They all drive so close together it you are at a roundabout you can basically be there for 10 minutes waiting for the cars to go through.

The only thing worse is getting stuck in the middle of one by accident. I did once and had to drive through my towns entertainment strip with everyone in the bars going 'here come the morons again' and mocking them and thinking I was part of the stupid thing. The shame.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sapphire on August 25, 2012, 03:38:34 AM
Everyone I know calls backpacks and bookbags interchangeably, with a few people saying knapsack (that one I never understood the root of, but its a normal enough word here). I had a friend from the Quad cities (Illinios) who called it a rucksack, never heard anyone else say that!

In general anything can be a bag: a grocery bag, a backpack isa bag, a purse is a bag, a garbage bag is a bag, a tote is a bag, etc. But a "sack", unless part of a compound word, in my experience is a shapeless bag like Santa's sack or a potato sack, or using a pillowcase as a Halloween sack.

I'm in the UK here and we would always say rucksack, never backback or knapsack.

Also, here, a purse is always the small thing that you keep your money in which you keep in your handbag. A handbag may be shortened to bag, but never to purse.

Grocery shopping is packaged in carrier bags which are plastic and free (or, these days, sometimes charged a small fee) from the store or shopping bags that you bring yourself from home.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on August 25, 2012, 11:30:54 AM
See I never use the word "handbag" because well... well I use it but not in reference to myself and my family and friends because rich and suburban women use handbags, as they have a free hand to carry it.  My daily bag is my purse, or just my bag or maybe even my pocketbook (how that makes sense I have no idea  :D its just a normal word around here) but its got straps long enough it can go on my shoulder, because I need my hands free to commute via public transportation.  So to call it a handbag just IMO is a misnomer as its not held in the hands (again though the word pocketbook is somehow to me not a stranger misnomer even though it should be).

The word purse though certainly could mean a coin purse or a card purse, which would be more like a wallet in size and use, just slightly differently shaped (more bag-like).  My small fancy party bags are always referred to as purses though, either just purse or cocktail purse.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: baglady on August 25, 2012, 11:47:24 PM
I'm old enough to remember when kids carried their books to school in either the briefcase-looking book bags a PP posted a picture of, or cloth sacklike things with drawstrings (the terms "book bag" and "school bag" were used interchangeably for these), or loose in their arms. In the third case, boys carried them in one arm hanging straight down, while girls held theirs horizontally at waist level, elbow bent. You risked teasing if you were a boy and carried your books "like a girl," or vice versa.

This was in elementary and junior high, when kids generally didn't have big stacks of books to take home each night. Homework was lighter (heck, in my district it was policy not to assign any homework until fourth grade!) and much of it could be done in study hall.

Carrying books in a backpack (we called them knapsacks) came into vogue when I was in high school.

I've seen bookstraps, which were rubber straps about an inch wide that you buckled around your books to hold them together on the trip to/from school, but they were passe by the time I came along. Never actually saw one in use.

Here's Baglady's bag breakdown:

Bag = Any soft-sided thing you carry stuff in

Sack = Shapeless cloth thing that Santa carries, and that potatoes and flour used to come in

Grocery bag = Paper bag without handles, or plastic bag with handles that you get your purchases packed in at the grocery store

Shopping bag = Paper bag with flat bottom and jute handles that you get your purchases packed in at upscale department or clothing stores.

Tote bag = Cloth bag with handles of the same material as the bag itself. If used for shopping, it's generally owned by the purchaser and presented at checkout for packing of purchases.

Pocketbook/Purse/Handbag = Soft-sided bag with handles generally carried by women and containing the stuff they need/use daily (money, makeup, phone, comb/brush, etc.). Can be made of leather, cloth, vinyl or other materials.

Change purse: Small pouch for coins only (although some people carry bills in it as well)

Wallet: Contains paper money, credit and other cards, and may also contain photos and other keepsakes. Women's wallets may also have a built in checkbook and/or change purse, and live in the pocketbook, if she is the pocketbook-carrying kind. Men's wallets, aka billfolds, do not have change purses and live in the hip pocket.

Clutch/clutch purse = Small handbag either without handle or with a wrist strap, used by women on formal occasions. Wildly impractical, if you ask me.

YMMV as always. I have had fun picking my own brain about these definitions!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: finecabernet on August 25, 2012, 11:52:23 PM
What does chuffed mean? As in "I was chuffed to learn...." I heard a British actor say it recently.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Iris on August 26, 2012, 12:29:33 AM
What does chuffed mean? As in "I was chuffed to learn...." I heard a British actor say it recently.

Not British, but I've always interpreted it as pleased, but with a personal pride twist. So you would be chuffed to learn that someone you respect has said they admire you, but you would be pleased to learn that you won a raffle (no personal achievement involved).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: CakeEater on August 26, 2012, 04:28:53 AM
What does chuffed mean? As in "I was chuffed to learn...." I heard a British actor say it recently.

Not British, but I've always interpreted it as pleased, but with a personal pride twist. So you would be chuffed to learn that someone you respect has said they admire you, but you would be pleased to learn that you won a raffle (no personal achievement involved).

Good definition!

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 26, 2012, 09:12:27 AM
Here in NYC, a fairly close equivalent to 'chuffed' would be the Yiddish 'Kvell'. 

You can kvell when your child gets into Harvard.

The two terms are very close but not exact in meaning. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Shopaholic on August 26, 2012, 11:07:17 AM
Here in NYC, a fairly close equivalent to 'chuffed' would be the Yiddish 'Kvell'. 

You can kvell when your child gets into Harvard.

The two terms are very close but not exact in meaning.

So kvell is when something good happens, and kvetch (=complaining) is the rest of the time?

-An Israeli with very little Yiddish.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Snooks on August 26, 2012, 04:43:10 PM
Harking back to the driving references do young men in other areas do "bog laps". I'm not sure if this is just a West Australian thing or the whole of Australia. Basically it means guys in cars (sometimes hotted up, sometimes not) do loops on a certain stretch of road, just circling around, up and down, usually only going a distance of a few hundred metres (yards). Often this is in front of clubs or cafes and when you see them you say "Look at those idiots doing bog laps".

Is bog short for bogan?

Is there a common term elsewhere for being able to see the top of someone's backside over their trousers?  In the UK we call it builder's bum but I heard someone on a podcast call it a plumber's crack, is that the common term or a one off?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 26, 2012, 06:36:11 PM
Here in NYC, a fairly close equivalent to 'chuffed' would be the Yiddish 'Kvell'. 

You can kvell when your child gets into Harvard.

The two terms are very close but not exact in meaning.

So kvell is when something good happens, and kvetch (=complaining) is the rest of the time?

-An Israeli with very little Yiddish

 

Think of 'Kvell' as a rooster at dawn.  The bird throws out his chest and displays beautiful feathers on wings and tail.  He lifts his head high and announces the arrival of the sun. 

When a person receives wonderful news such as a Grandson being granted a full scholarship to Yale or a daughter receiving a Pulitzer Prize, s/he might say, 'I'm so happy I could kvell'.  Of course the person doesn't actually do it but everyone can see how proud the speaker is. 

'Kvetch' is the exact opposite.  To 'kvetch' is to make a big deal of complaining about things that don't really matter very much.

  'This nail polish is all wrong! I wanted cherry and this is raspberry!'
  'There weren't enough noodles in the soup'.
  'Who told him he could sing?'

This is 'kvetching' and it's never pretty. 

Of course, that's how we see things here in NYC.  Others may have very different definitions for these terms.   

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Slartibartfast on August 26, 2012, 10:41:09 PM
"Plumber's crack" is pretty common - there are other variations on the same theme but I'm having trouble thinking of them  :P  The only one I can think of is a whale tail, which is when someone is wearing a thong and you can see the whale-tail-like shape at the top because their jeans/shorts are too low  ::)

ETA: Ooh, similar issue is "camel toe," which is when a woman's pants/shorts are so tight they present a, er, cloven appearance from the front.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Shopaholic on August 26, 2012, 10:57:36 PM
In my family, 'kvetch" is used as a noun.
When someone is a "kvetch" it meand that they are not feeling so great, mostly fatigued and irritable.
The best illustration of it is a toddler who is tired, hungry and nothing can please him. "Someone's a kvetch."
I guess it could come from complaining.

Here we say that "a plumber effect is going on" and a camel's toe is known as "Army lips" because it is commonly caused by the standard-issued women's uniform pants *shudder*.

I guess the most common Israeli saying is "leave it in your mother", but that's really a mistranslation. It means leave it, let it go but there was supposed to be a comma before the second part, just like "let it go, by ...'. Since the mistranslation has become popular abroad amongst Israeli backpackers, the English verse is currently used in Israel.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Pippen on August 26, 2012, 11:40:42 PM
My favorite one of all time is the Finnish translation for 'Do Not Disturb'. DO NOT Goggle this is you are of a sensitive disposition.

I vote the Finns as having the best insults of any language.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Ereine on August 27, 2012, 12:36:12 AM
Pippen, you've made me very curious as googling didn't bring up anything and the translation Älä häiritse means just Do not disturb and as a Finn I can't think of anything. Can you pm me?

I also can't think of any particularly inventive Finnish insults, the most common ones are just different combinations of curses or stupidly illogical. Some circles are probably more creative but I assume that they exist in every country. Our curse words are maybe stronger than in some other languages or at least they sound that way.

There are also people whose hobby it seems to be make Finns seem as crazy and strange as possible to foreigners, including making up sayings and odd customs (though some people do it, it's not compulsory to roll in snow after sauna, pronounced like sauerkraut, no matter how many victims/visitors have been told that).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 27, 2012, 03:19:30 AM
My favorite one of all time is the Finnish translation for 'Do Not Disturb'. DO NOT Goggle this is you are of a sensitive disposition.

I vote the Finns as having the best insults of any language.

I googled it too and I didn't see anything weird/special about it
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 27, 2012, 12:31:35 PM
Here, in NYC, kvetch can also be used as a noun.  If someone's in a bad mood and complains about everything in sight a relative or close friend could chide that person by saying, 'Don't be such a kvetch'.

My German Grandmother used a different term with identical meaning.  Even if the person being fussy was a young child she'd tell that person not to act like such an 'Old Schnull'. 

Somehow, 'Old Schnull' sounds worse than 'Kvetch' especially when a child is involved.   

FWIW, the comedian Soupy Sales used a character who was a detective. The name of the character was Philo Kvetch. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Pippen on August 27, 2012, 04:22:28 PM
Pippen, you've made me very curious as googling didn't bring up anything and the translation Älä häiritse means just Do not disturb and as a Finn I can't think of anything. Can you pm me?

I also can't think of any particularly inventive Finnish insults, the most common ones are just different combinations of curses or stupidly illogical. Some circles are probably more creative but I assume that they exist in every country. Our curse words are maybe stronger than in some other languages or at least they sound that way.

There are also people whose hobby it seems to be make Finns seem as crazy and strange as possible to foreigners, including making up sayings and odd customs (though some people do it, it's not compulsory to roll in snow after sauna, pronounced like sauerkraut, no matter how many victims/visitors have been told that).

OK I will send you a link to this  page with loads of sayings on it. I just need to try and find it. Everyone I have shown it too agrees the Finns win the Awesome Insults of Any Language Award hands down.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: GeauxTigers on August 28, 2012, 08:41:38 PM
What is this?


(http://ts1.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=4812966815662592&id=71db5516659d37d92a8a09732fdac12b)

I call it a shopping cart.

Down here the locals call it a "buggy".

In the Boston area it becomes a "carriage". (How grand!)

What do you call it?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on August 28, 2012, 08:54:46 PM
I call it a cart.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on August 28, 2012, 08:55:27 PM
Cart.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Bluenomi on August 28, 2012, 09:09:06 PM
What is this?


(http://ts1.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=4812966815662592&id=71db5516659d37d92a8a09732fdac12b)

I call it a shopping cart.

Down here the locals call it a "buggy".

In the Boston area it becomes a "carriage". (How grand!)

What do you call it?

Shopping trolley or just a trolley.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on August 28, 2012, 09:37:33 PM
It is a cart.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 28, 2012, 10:25:44 PM
I call it a cart, and I swear it was Dark Boyfriend, but he denies it, who I have heard called it a buggy.  Now I must search for this "buggy" person so I can find the specific region from which the term comes...maybe it was his mom (those silly Texans  ;)).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on August 29, 2012, 01:05:54 AM
Its a trolley.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redsoil on August 29, 2012, 04:17:28 AM
Trolley.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on August 29, 2012, 04:54:30 AM


That's a trolley.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 29, 2012, 08:32:57 AM
In NYC, it's a cart.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 29, 2012, 09:14:02 AM
it's a cart
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on August 29, 2012, 09:17:35 AM
From Texas and I do remember now that it's been mentioned hearing  it called a buggy.  I think it is now most often called a shopping cart.  But the more I think about it, I'm pretty sure I can hear myself saying to a husband to "grab a buggy".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 29, 2012, 09:26:44 AM
From Texas and I do remember now that it's been mentioned hearing  it called a buggy.  I think it is now most often called a shopping cart.  But the more I think about it, I'm pretty sure I can hear myself saying to a husband to "grab a buggy".

I can hear it in Dark Boyfriend's mother's voice, too, and that's why I'm sure I've also heard Dark Boyfriend say it; though I ask him now and he says it's a cart and he has never called it a buggy.  Then again, he also swears that he never said he hates mac and cheese even though four other people sitting there heard him say it, too.  "Why would I say that?  I love mac and cheese."  "I don't know, DB, why do you change your mind about things all of the time then forget you did?"  ::)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on August 29, 2012, 09:50:31 AM
In NYC, it's a cart.

Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on August 29, 2012, 11:00:19 AM
In NYC, it's a cart.

Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

That'd just be 'the ad' here (TX).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on August 29, 2012, 11:04:58 AM
it's the ad in Michigan too
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 29, 2012, 11:49:39 AM
it's an ad in MD
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on August 29, 2012, 12:15:34 PM
It's a flyer here in my part of Ontario.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on August 29, 2012, 12:21:48 PM
It's a flyer here in my part of Ontario.

Hmm, here a flier is just a paper tacked to a bulletin board, street post or such, or something someone hands to you on the street (similar in content, but different in distribution, I guess).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Jones on August 29, 2012, 12:23:12 PM
I've heard it referred to as a "basket", which causes some confusion as I think a "basket" is one of those little baskets that hangs off one's arm for quick shopping trips. I've also heard "wagon".

I call it a cart, and I've taken to checking the ads online rather than try to grab them at the store; it's a planning thing.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on August 29, 2012, 12:47:26 PM
It's a flyer here in my part of Ontario.

Hmm, here a flier is just a paper tacked to a bulletin board, street post or such, or something someone hands to you on the street (similar in content, but different in distribution, I guess).

That's a flyer in NYC too (on a bulletin board or handed to you, etc), although if someone called the grocery store coupon pamphlet thingie a flyer I wouldn't bat an eye or probably even register the word.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: datcat on August 29, 2012, 04:01:51 PM
In the UK that is a shopping trolly
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Pippen on August 29, 2012, 05:06:24 PM
It's a trolley. Or a very cheap Taxi university students use to help get their drunk friends home from the pub.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on August 29, 2012, 05:10:49 PM
In NYC, it's a cart.

Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

Which brings up another question.  Here, we have two types of baskets in the supermarket.  There's the traditional type you hold in your hand or hang over your arm.  There's also a new type with wheels and a tall handle.  This kind you handle like a wheel-aboard.  Do you have different names for these?
That'd just be 'the ad' here (TX).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on August 29, 2012, 10:53:05 PM
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on August 29, 2012, 11:25:27 PM
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 29, 2012, 11:45:01 PM
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

Ditto....JC Penney's would have a catalog, but a local shopper would not.  That "Local Shopper", depending on where and for what, I would call either the local shopper or a coupon book.  I also pronounce that "q-PON" as in what you say when you say the name of the letter "q" and "pon" like the last three letters of "upon".

Dark Boyfriend had to chime in...he says, verbatim, "Poop* fire, save matches!" is something his very Texan grandmother has always said.  It's a general exclamation like, "Holy poop*!"

*The naughty word for poop.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Iris on August 30, 2012, 01:20:37 AM
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

In Australia they're all called catalogues. From the little 8 page thing you get in your letterbox or at the shops telling you what's on sale that week all the way up to the massive book that Ikea puts out each year. All catalogues.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on August 30, 2012, 04:18:29 AM
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

In Australia they're all called catalogues. From the little 8 page thing you get in your letterbox or at the shops telling you what's on sale that week all the way up to the massive book that Ikea puts out each year. All catalogues.


This.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Pippen on August 30, 2012, 06:33:07 AM
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

In Australia they're all called catalogues. From the little 8 page thing you get in your letterbox or at the shops telling you what's on sale that week all the way up to the massive book that Ikea puts out each year. All catalogues.


This.

If anyone is heading to Ikea let me know. I have a list. We don't have it here and it annoys me greatly. I spacked out with the excitement last time I was in Melbourne and totally forgot to get all the stuff I went for.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Iris on August 30, 2012, 06:46:00 AM
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

In Australia they're all called catalogues. From the little 8 page thing you get in your letterbox or at the shops telling you what's on sale that week all the way up to the massive book that Ikea puts out each year. All catalogues.


This.

If anyone is heading to Ikea let me know. I have a list. We don't have it here and it annoys me greatly. I spacked out with the excitement last time I was in Melbourne and totally forgot to get all the stuff I went for.

I'll probably head to the one in Sydney sometime in the next couple of months though I couldn't give you a firm date right now. Pm me if that is of any use.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Pippen on August 30, 2012, 04:34:22 PM
Cheers but my brother is in Melbourne and I might pop over for a weekend in the next few months. I just totally lost focus the last time I was there and got loads of stuff I didn't need and none of the stuff I did.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on August 30, 2012, 06:17:51 PM
When we can hear a baby has woken up from a nap or their night's sleep, we say "Another country heard from!"  I always heard my grandmother say it, and DH heard his gmother say it too.   For older people who are up from sleeping it's "Trouble's coming!" or "It's alive!" :)

When we're having someone over I say we're "Having company."

I got confused once when my Midwestern friend said she was going to be "out of pocket" as I always took it to mean "I'm paying for something out of my own pocket" (as opposed to using company funds or something like that) but she meant it as "I'm going out of town."  Now I've kinda picked up on it.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: White Lotus on August 30, 2012, 06:20:40 PM
Hi, all.  Now official -- former lurker.  Where I am from, in the cold northwest, people DIE.  "Left us" or "Gone" are OK, but can be confusing. "Lost" as in, "I"m sorry you lost your uncle," works.  Otherwise, euphemisms aren't generally done around here: a bit too "refeened" to seem quite correct.  "Passed" sounds to me like they're playing bridge.   I'd put in a smiley, but I don't know how! 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on August 30, 2012, 07:16:50 PM
Just click on any of the ones that appear above the posting box.  Easy peasy.   :)

As for a saying, maybe someone could explain this one for me:  my aunt (who's passed  ;)) used to say 'Carry four' anytime somebody said the word for poop that starts with S.  No idea where it came from or what it means but since I can't ask her now...
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on August 30, 2012, 07:23:39 PM
I'm from the US south.  I worked in Australia for a short time.  A common phrase to say to a coworker when leaving the office for the day is "Have a good one." as in have a good evening.  I later found out I was confusing lots of my Australian co- workers because they had no idea what the "one" was and why I insisted it be good.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 30, 2012, 10:42:46 PM
When we can hear a baby has woken up from a nap or their night's sleep, we say "Another country heard from!"  I always heard my grandmother say it, and DH heard his gmother say it too.   For older people who are up from sleeping it's "Trouble's coming!" or "It's alive!" :)

When we're having someone over I say we're "Having company."

I got confused once when my Midwestern friend said she was going to be "out of pocket" as I always took it to mean "I'm paying for something out of my own pocket" (as opposed to using company funds or something like that) but she meant it as "I'm going out of town."  Now I've kinda picked up on it.

I'm in MD and I use out of pocket quite a bit.  Typically it is used when someone is going to be out of reach for a while.  So if I'm hiking, I'll say that I'll be "out of pocket" for most of the day since I'll be in the middle of nowhere with no/intermittent cell signal.  Or if I need to focus on my job and will not be checking emails or answering non-work phone calls, I'll be "out of pocket" for so many days until I get caught up.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on August 31, 2012, 01:10:31 AM
I'm from the US south.  I worked in Australia for a short time.  A common phrase to say to a coworker when leaving the office for the day is "Have a good one." as in have a good evening.  I later found out I was confusing lots of my Australian co- workers because they had no idea what the "one" was and why I insisted it be good.

What?  As an Australian, how is that confusing?  Its commonly said here IME.  Where abouts were you?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on August 31, 2012, 05:54:17 AM
When we can hear a baby has woken up from a nap or their night's sleep, we say "Another country heard from!"  I always heard my grandmother say it, and DH heard his gmother say it too.   For older people who are up from sleeping it's "Trouble's coming!" or "It's alive!" :)

When we're having someone over I say we're "Having company."

I got confused once when my Midwestern friend said she was going to be "out of pocket" as I always took it to mean "I'm paying for something out of my own pocket" (as opposed to using company funds or something like that) but she meant it as "I'm going out of town."  Now I've kinda picked up on it.

I'm in MD and I use out of pocket quite a bit.  Typically it is used when someone is going to be out of reach for a while.  So if I'm hiking, I'll say that I'll be "out of pocket" for most of the day since I'll be in the middle of nowhere with no/intermittent cell signal.  Or if I need to focus on my job and will not be checking emails or answering non-work phone calls, I'll be "out of pocket" for so many days until I get caught up.

Ah, okay, so it's not just a Midwestern thing then! :) I'd never heard anyone else in Maryland use the phrase but maybe that's just cause I didn't know the right people! LOL! ;)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on August 31, 2012, 07:17:34 AM
I used to hear "out of pocket" often when I had a corporate job (in NYC). It meant out of reach: "I have to visit the client on-site and will be out of pocket all day."

I work in... well sorta medical sorta retail now. I often say "have a good one!" As I bid my patients/customers goodbye. I've been saying it for years without comment, until 2 days ago some guy turned back around, walked back to me and started in about have a good what, and why only one and where did this meaningless phrase come from. It was very uncomfortable. I wanted to scream "its a generic pleasantry you buffoon!"
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Leafy on August 31, 2012, 08:07:41 AM
Harking back to the driving references do young men in other areas do "bog laps". I'm not sure if this is just a West Australian thing or the whole of Australia. Basically it means guys in cars (sometimes hotted up, sometimes not) do loops on a certain stretch of road, just circling around, up and down, usually only going a distance of a few hundred metres (yards). Often this is in front of clubs or cafes and when you see them you say "Look at those idiots doing bog laps".

Is bog short for bogan?

Is there a common term elsewhere for being able to see the top of someone's backside over their trousers?  In the UK we call it builder's bum but I heard someone on a podcast call it a plumber's crack, is that the common term or a one off?

Snooks I was all set to say no bog isn't short for bogan, but I don't know where it comes from. However, DH tells me that bog is short for bogan. I've only ever heard it used in reference to doing laps though.
 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redneck Gravy on August 31, 2012, 09:11:35 AM
I am from West Texas, one of the stranger sayings I remember hearing growing up was "rat killing" meaning business.

"Stay out of my rat killing" (frequently said by my mother if you tried to help with the cooking)

"Get back to your own rat killing"  if you attempted to help her with a task she was perfectly capable of managing without your help. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on August 31, 2012, 09:23:56 AM
I'm from the US south.  I worked in Australia for a short time.  A common phrase to say to a coworker when leaving the office for the day is "Have a good one." as in have a good evening.  I later found out I was confusing lots of my Australian co- workers because they had no idea what the "one" was and why I insisted it be good.

What?  As an Australian, how is that confusing?  Its commonly said here IME.  Where abouts were you?

Perth, but maybe it was because there were lots of S. African's and Scottish that I was working with. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: cabbageweevil on August 31, 2012, 12:15:51 PM
I used to hear "out of pocket" often when I had a corporate job (in NYC). It meant out of reach: "I have to visit the client on-site and will be out of pocket all day."

I work in... well sorta medical sorta retail now. I often say "have a good one!" As I bid my patients/customers goodbye. I've been saying it for years without comment, until 2 days ago some guy turned back around, walked back to me and started in about have a good what, and why only one and where did this meaningless phrase come from. It was very uncomfortable. I wanted to scream "its a generic pleasantry you buffoon!"
Your encounter must have been with my pedantic and very-annoying friend -- he's a great "precisian" about all aspects of language, and a particular hobby of his, is "meaningless-phrase-skewering". Re this guy, "get a life" is a "meaningless phrase" which often comes to mind.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Pippen on August 31, 2012, 03:42:59 PM
Harking back to the driving references do young men in other areas do "bog laps". I'm not sure if this is just a West Australian thing or the whole of Australia. Basically it means guys in cars (sometimes hotted up, sometimes not) do loops on a certain stretch of road, just circling around, up and down, usually only going a distance of a few hundred metres (yards). Often this is in front of clubs or cafes and when you see them you say "Look at those idiots doing bog laps".

Is bog short for bogan?

Is there a common term elsewhere for being able to see the top of someone's backside over their trousers?  In the UK we call it builder's bum but I heard someone on a podcast call it a plumber's crack, is that the common term or a one off?

Snooks I was all set to say no bog isn't short for bogan, but I don't know where it comes from. However, DH tells me that bog is short for bogan. I've only ever heard it used in reference to doing laps though.

This is only a guess but bogging your car means filling in all the rust holes and dings with some kind of material like poylfiller which gets painted over, so it is still as inherently dangerous as it was before but just looks a little bit better.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Nuku on August 31, 2012, 05:18:36 PM
Harking back to the driving references do young men in other areas do "bog laps". I'm not sure if this is just a West Australian thing or the whole of Australia. Basically it means guys in cars (sometimes hotted up, sometimes not) do loops on a certain stretch of road, just circling around, up and down, usually only going a distance of a few hundred metres (yards). Often this is in front of clubs or cafes and when you see them you say "Look at those idiots doing bog laps".

Is bog short for bogan?

Is there a common term elsewhere for being able to see the top of someone's backside over their trousers?  In the UK we call it builder's bum but I heard someone on a podcast call it a plumber's crack, is that the common term or a one off?

I've also heard "plumber's cleavage."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on August 31, 2012, 11:24:05 PM
Harking back to the driving references do young men in other areas do "bog laps". I'm not sure if this is just a West Australian thing or the whole of Australia. Basically it means guys in cars (sometimes hotted up, sometimes not) do loops on a certain stretch of road, just circling around, up and down, usually only going a distance of a few hundred metres (yards). Often this is in front of clubs or cafes and when you see them you say "Look at those idiots doing bog laps".

Is bog short for bogan?

Is there a common term elsewhere for being able to see the top of someone's backside over their trousers?  In the UK we call it builder's bum but I heard someone on a podcast call it a plumber's crack, is that the common term or a one off?

I've also heard "plumber's cleavage."

We used to call it a "tradesmen's smile"
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Army Mom on September 03, 2012, 10:30:11 AM
One more on the bag/sack issue. Does anyone else use the term "poke" ? I think it's a southern thing but once I learned that poke meant bag or sack, the phrase "buying a pig in a poke" suddenly made sense!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on September 03, 2012, 10:41:30 PM
One more on the bag/sack issue. Does anyone else use the term "poke" ? I think it's a southern thing but once I learned that poke meant bag or sack, the phrase "buying a pig in a poke" suddenly made sense!

I have definitely heard it and identify it more with the south, though I don't know that it is  used a lot currently.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Leafy on September 06, 2012, 06:50:54 AM
I'm from the US south.  I worked in Australia for a short time.  A common phrase to say to a coworker when leaving the office for the day is "Have a good one." as in have a good evening.  I later found out I was confusing lots of my Australian co- workers because they had no idea what the "one" was and why I insisted it be good.

What?  As an Australian, how is that confusing?  Its commonly said here IME.  Where abouts were you?

Perth, but maybe it was because there were lots of S. African's and Scottish that I was working with.

It's definitely a known and used phrase in Perth. Though that is no guarantee that everyone in Perth knows it. I would be surprised to find a whole workplace where no-one knows it.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: baglady on September 06, 2012, 12:26:38 PM
Growing up in the Boston area I called that four-wheeled thing you push around at the grocery store a carriage. Now it's a cart. Same for those two-wheeled things that people who walk to the store carry their groceries home in. Formerly "two-wheeled carriage," now cart. A friend calls them "blue-haired lady carts," because she associates them with older women.

To me "out of pocket" refers to money. As in, stuff you pay for out of whatever money (cash or plastic) you're carrying as opposed to what is already covered (e.g., for a vacation you pay in advance for your hotel and rental car, but you still have to pay out of pocket for meals, souvenirs, park admissions, etc.). I've never heard it used to mean out of the area or not reachable.

My mom says "mind your own beeswax" as a slangy alternative to "mind your own business." She's Boston-born and raised.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 06, 2012, 12:31:56 PM
Growing up in the Boston area I called that four-wheeled thing you push around at the grocery store a carriage. Now it's a cart. Same for those two-wheeled things that people who walk to the store carry their groceries home in. Formerly "two-wheeled carriage," now cart. A friend calls them "blue-haired lady carts," because she associates them with older women.

To me "out of pocket" refers to money. As in, stuff you pay for out of whatever money (cash or plastic) you're carrying as opposed to what is already covered (e.g., for a vacation you pay in advance for your hotel and rental car, but you still have to pay out of pocket for meals, souvenirs, park admissions, etc.). I've never heard it used to mean out of the area or not reachable.

My mom says "mind your own beeswax" as a slangy alternative to "mind your own business." She's Boston-born and raised.

Ditto for "out of pocket".  I've only ever heard it to mean paying money that wasn't covered elsewhere.

My family also says that, as have I on occasion; we're from northwestern PA.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on September 06, 2012, 04:10:21 PM
I think of "out of pocket" in the alternate sense as serious "business speak."

It's not something I hear people say unless they come from a pretty corporate career background, or spend lots of time around those types. I'm sure there's some trickle-down, but it's primarily one of those complicated ways to say something that businesspeople seem to adore.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on September 06, 2012, 04:13:16 PM
When we can hear a baby has woken up from a nap or their night's sleep, we say "Another country heard from!"  I always heard my grandmother say it, and DH heard his gmother say it too.   For older people who are up from sleeping it's "Trouble's coming!" or "It's alive!" :)

When we're having someone over I say we're "Having company."

I got confused once when my Midwestern friend said she was going to be "out of pocket" as I always took it to mean "I'm paying for something out of my own pocket" (as opposed to using company funds or something like that) but she meant it as "I'm going out of town."  Now I've kinda picked up on it.

I'm in MD and I use out of pocket quite a bit.  Typically it is used when someone is going to be out of reach for a while.  So if I'm hiking, I'll say that I'll be "out of pocket" for most of the day since I'll be in the middle of nowhere with no/intermittent cell signal.  Or if I need to focus on my job and will not be checking emails or answering non-work phone calls, I'll be "out of pocket" for so many days until I get caught up.

Similary (maybe?) we will use "in my pocket" for being in contact, sort of. Say you need something done by the title department, and you have a contact there. You might say "I have a title agent in my pocket," or somene might ask, "How did you get that so quickly? Do you have an underwriter in your pocket?" Oddly enough, though, you wouldn't say it the other way around. My friend Brian might say about me that he has an underwriter in his pocket because whenever he needs something quick i am his go-to person. I would never say that i am in Brian's pocket, though; that just sounds weird and wrong.

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Jones on September 06, 2012, 04:34:25 PM
See, and if someone told me he had someone in his pocket, I would assume that meant he was bribing the someone.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on September 06, 2012, 04:37:45 PM
See, and if someone told me he had someone in his pocket, I would assume that meant he was bribing the someone.

You know what? I have heard it used that way, too. I wonder if that is where it came from.  >:D I also wonder if i should start demanding bribes.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Nibsey on September 06, 2012, 05:42:31 PM
Growing up in the Boston area I called that four-wheeled thing you push around at the grocery store a carriage. Now it's a cart. Same for those two-wheeled things that people who walk to the store carry their groceries home in. Formerly "two-wheeled carriage," now cart. A friend calls them "blue-haired lady carts," because she associates them with older women.

To me "out of pocket" refers to money. As in, stuff you pay for out of whatever money (cash or plastic) you're carrying as opposed to what is already covered (e.g., for a vacation you pay in advance for your hotel and rental car, but you still have to pay out of pocket for meals, souvenirs, park admissions, etc.). I've never heard it used to mean out of the area or not reachable.

My mom says "mind your own beeswax" as a slangy alternative to "mind your own business." She's Boston-born and raised.

This is a really common phrase in Ireland so I'm not surprised with the Boston connection.  :) Even though I'm pretty sure it's used in the UK as well.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 06, 2012, 05:47:46 PM
See, and if someone told me he had someone in his pocket, I would assume that meant he was bribing the someone.

You know what? I have heard it used that way, too. I wonder if that is where it came from.  >:D I also wonder if i should start demanding bribes.

I'd associate "having someone in your pocket" meaning they'll do whatever you want them to without question - which may mean bribes, but also may mean having other influence over them.  Usually you hear about a politician being in someone's pocket, typically someone who has a lot of money - so maybe not out-and-out bribes, but more like lots of campaign contributions --> the politician owes them a favor.  Although usually "having someone in your pocket" means more than just a favor, it's more like ongoing favors of any magnitude.

ETA: "Pulling some strings" is similar - if you need something bureaucratic done, you might "pull some strings" and get it done faster because you know people on the inside.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on September 06, 2012, 07:34:27 PM
See, and if someone told me he had someone in his pocket, I would assume that meant he was bribing the someone.

You know what? I have heard it used that way, too. I wonder if that is where it came from.  >:D I also wonder if i should start demanding bribes.

I'd associate "having someone in your pocket" meaning they'll do whatever you want them to without question - which may mean bribes, but also may mean having other influence over them.  Usually you hear about a politician being in someone's pocket, typically someone who has a lot of money - so maybe not out-and-out bribes, but more like lots of campaign contributions --> the politician owes them a favor.  Although usually "having someone in your pocket" means more than just a favor, it's more like ongoing favors of any magnitude.

ETA: "Pulling some strings" is similar - if you need something bureaucratic done, you might "pull some strings" and get it done faster because you know people on the inside.

This, but "pull seom strings" I associate solely with favour, and never with bribery.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 06, 2012, 09:55:19 PM
I think of "out of pocket" in the alternate sense as serious "business speak."

It's not something I hear people say unless they come from a pretty corporate career background, or spend lots of time around those types. I'm sure there's some trickle-down, but it's primarily one of those complicated ways to say something that businesspeople seem to adore.

I actually agree with this.  Before I was PastryGoddess.  I was MeetingGoddess and I picked it up from my various jobs.  FTR I live in DC where almost everyone is from somewhere else.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: mrs_deb on September 06, 2012, 11:47:42 PM
When something is askew or lopsided, we say it's "whompy jawed".  I met a woman once who called it "caddy wumpus".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 07, 2012, 09:23:59 AM
The talk about 'out of pocket' reminded me of an old NYC saying that I haven't heard in years.  That's probably because it's not PC.  It also doesn't make a bit of sense. 

In a situation in which success is assured, doubters are told, 'Don't worry.  We've got a Rabbi in the closet'.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: camlan on September 07, 2012, 09:28:46 AM
Growing up in the Boston area I called that four-wheeled thing you push around at the grocery store a carriage. Now it's a cart. Same for those two-wheeled things that people who walk to the store carry their groceries home in. Formerly "two-wheeled carriage," now cart. A friend calls them "blue-haired lady carts," because she associates them with older women.

To me "out of pocket" refers to money. As in, stuff you pay for out of whatever money (cash or plastic) you're carrying as opposed to what is already covered (e.g., for a vacation you pay in advance for your hotel and rental car, but you still have to pay out of pocket for meals, souvenirs, park admissions, etc.). I've never heard it used to mean out of the area or not reachable.

My mom says "mind your own beeswax" as a slangy alternative to "mind your own business." She's Boston-born and raised.

Pod to all of this. My parents were from Boston, as well.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redneck Gravy on September 07, 2012, 10:00:16 AM
I am familiar with catty whompus and whomperjawed (same words, different spellings) as off center also.

A phrase I have been saying a lot lately is about everyone having their hand in my pocket...which means everytime I turn around someone's got their hand out for money. 

I work for a home builder and EVERYONE is in your pocket in that industry...architect, city hall for permits, inspectors, subcontractors, realtors, appraisers, mortgage company, insurance company, bank and surveyors (geez, I'm sure I missed someone in there).

 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: GeauxTigers on September 07, 2012, 02:59:00 PM
Oh, I've got a good one.

Louisiana has parishes as opposed to counties. (Louisiana law is based on old French common law).

The local governing body of a Louisiana parish is called the police jury.

It's neither the police or a jury. It will encompass the sheriff's department, non-city water districts, schools, the local court system,(other than city or federal) the parish jail, mosquito control, non-city taxes, voter registration, etc.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on September 07, 2012, 04:20:41 PM
I grew up in the Rocky Mountain region of the US and had never heard this till I moved to the Northeast. When someone makes a mistake, they say "my bad." And I had a friend from Michigan who said that where she lived, they didn't say "my bad" but they said "my bag" instead, when they were correcting themselves.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 07, 2012, 04:38:11 PM
I grew up in the Rocky Mountain region of the US and had never heard this till I moved to the Northeast. When someone makes a mistake, they say "my bad." And I had a friend from Michigan who said that where she lived, they didn't say "my bad" but they said "my bag" instead, when they were correcting themselves.

Having grown up in the northeast and then moving to the Rocky Mountain region, I never noticed that one...but now I'm going to see if people don't say it here (because I'm oh so far from you :D). I grew up saying it so I never paid attention for people not saying it...challenge accepted!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Jones on September 07, 2012, 04:42:39 PM
I was chatting with a gal from Oklahoma and was about to say something about the weather in her "neck of the woods." Then I realized she didn't live where there were or ever had been a forest, and didn't know if it would confuse her.

Do people use that phrase in non-woodsy areas?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on September 07, 2012, 05:14:37 PM
Yeah, I think "neck of the woods" is pretty common regardless of the woodedness of one's region.

I have never heard "my bag." I wonder if that person was just mishearing what other people were saying. I spent much of my childhood in Michigan. "My bad," I think, is more of a youth culture thing -- or it was 20 or so years ago, onward.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 07, 2012, 05:24:21 PM
I grew up in the Rocky Mountain region of the US and had never heard this till I moved to the Northeast. When someone makes a mistake, they say "my bad." And I had a friend from Michigan who said that where she lived, they didn't say "my bad" but they said "my bag" instead, when they were correcting themselves.

I'm from the Mid Atlantic area and "my bad" is very common around here.  I did get into an argument with someone who insisted that it was "my bag" but we eventually agreed to disagree. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on September 07, 2012, 05:39:13 PM
I was chatting with a gal from Oklahoma and was about to say something about the weather in her "neck of the woods." Then I realized she didn't live where there were or ever had been a forest, and didn't know if it would confuse her.

Do people use that phrase in non-woodsy areas?

Oh sure!  Me and Thipu1 are both from NYC, but she's from Brooklyn, and in my neck of the woods (urban Queens... which does have some wooded areas but is still NYC afterall) is a whole different world then hers  :D

Although, I also haven't heard it in years but I have heard:
In a situation in which success is assured, doubters are told, 'Don't worry.  We've got a Rabbi in the closet'.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on September 07, 2012, 05:59:20 PM
I grew up in the Rocky Mountain region of the US and had never heard this till I moved to the Northeast. When someone makes a mistake, they say "my bad." And I had a friend from Michigan who said that where she lived, they didn't say "my bad" but they said "my bag" instead, when they were correcting themselves.

Having grown up in the northeast and then moving to the Rocky Mountain region, I never noticed that one...but now I'm going to see if people don't say it here (because I'm oh so far from you :D). I grew up saying it so I never paid attention for people not saying it...challenge accepted!

Glad you accepted after I threw down the gauntlet.  ;) And if you do hear "my bad" be sure to follow that up with "where are you from?"

Like when my husband and I were in FL where I believe they drink "soda" and he ordered a "pop." The guys at the pizzeria counter all looked at him like he had three heads. I had to quickly excuse us and explain "yeah, we're not from around here."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 07, 2012, 06:22:50 PM
I grew up in the Rocky Mountain region of the US and had never heard this till I moved to the Northeast. When someone makes a mistake, they say "my bad." And I had a friend from Michigan who said that where she lived, they didn't say "my bad" but they said "my bag" instead, when they were correcting themselves.

Having grown up in the northeast and then moving to the Rocky Mountain region, I never noticed that one...but now I'm going to see if people don't say it here (because I'm oh so far from you :D). I grew up saying it so I never paid attention for people not saying it...challenge accepted!

Glad you accepted after I threw down the gauntlet.  ;) And if you do hear "my bad" be sure to follow that up with "where are you from?"

Like when my husband and I were in FL where I believe they drink "soda" and he ordered a "pop." The guys at the pizzeria counter all looked at him like he had three heads. I had to quickly excuse us and explain "yeah, we're not from around here."

And see, I grew up saying pop and people out here cringe when I say it; everyone I've encountered calls it soda out here.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 07, 2012, 06:23:07 PM
I was chatting with a gal from Oklahoma and was about to say something about the weather in her "neck of the woods." Then I realized she didn't live where there were or ever had been a forest, and didn't know if it would confuse her.

Do people use that phrase in non-woodsy areas?

Oh yes,  'neck of the woods' is generic American.  Whether or not trees are present, you know it means the place where you live. 

We never have quite figured out how woods have a neck but, who really cares?  it's fun to say.  :)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: squeakers on September 07, 2012, 06:29:37 PM
I was chatting with a gal from Oklahoma and was about to say something about the weather in her "neck of the woods." Then I realized she didn't live where there were or ever had been a forest, and didn't know if it would confuse her.

Do people use that phrase in non-woodsy areas?

Oh yes,  'neck of the woods' is generic American.  Whether or not trees are present, you know it means the place where you live. 

We never have quite figured out how woods have a neck but, who really cares?  it's fun to say.  :)

http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/31/messages/10.html  8)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: misha412 on September 07, 2012, 09:48:44 PM
"Larapin" (other spellings larruping, larrapin)

This was a word my grandfather used to say about food that was especially good. If he told the cook the food was "larapin good" it was his highest compliment.

The only other person I ever heard say the word was the Gunsmoke character Festus (played by Ken Curtis).

Now, one source I found said it was used especially in Kansas and Oklahoma in the late 1800s and into the 1900s. Considering my grandfather was born in Kansas within 20 miles of the Oklahoma border, I think it fits.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on September 09, 2012, 09:24:20 AM
I was chatting with a gal from Oklahoma and was about to say something about the weather in her "neck of the woods." Then I realized she didn't live where there were or ever had been a forest, and didn't know if it would confuse her.

Do people use that phrase in non-woodsy areas?

Absolutely. Refers merely to the sayer's local area, regardless of actual woods.
Not restricted to USA either.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on September 09, 2012, 10:18:53 AM
Does anyone else refer to an umbrella as a bumbershoot?  My mother called them that and I've never heard it anywhere else.  Of course, my mother had a myriad of unusual expressions.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 09, 2012, 10:39:05 AM
Grandmother used to call the things 'Bumbleshoots'.  Another old term is 'Gamp' as in Charles Dickens' character Sairy Gamp.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Cat-Fu on September 11, 2012, 11:44:55 AM
Growing up in the Boston area I called that four-wheeled thing you push around at the grocery store a carriage. Now it's a cart. Same for those two-wheeled things that people who walk to the store carry their groceries home in. Formerly "two-wheeled carriage," now cart. A friend calls them "blue-haired lady carts," because she associates them with older women.

To me "out of pocket" refers to money. As in, stuff you pay for out of whatever money (cash or plastic) you're carrying as opposed to what is already covered (e.g., for a vacation you pay in advance for your hotel and rental car, but you still have to pay out of pocket for meals, souvenirs, park admissions, etc.). I've never heard it used to mean out of the area or not reachable.

My mom says "mind your own beeswax" as a slangy alternative to "mind your own business." She's Boston-born and raised.

This is a really common phrase in Ireland so I'm not surprised with the Boston connection.  :) Even though I'm pretty sure it's used in the UK as well.

Ha, that might explain why my family is so liberal with the use of it! I never realized that minding your own beeswax was something other than what kids say 'round here! ;)

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on September 11, 2012, 11:50:47 AM
We said it, too, North of the border.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Valentines Mommy on September 11, 2012, 12:03:23 PM
All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on September 11, 2012, 12:14:40 PM
"none of your beeswax" is common around here, too.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on September 11, 2012, 07:01:34 PM
I grew up in the Rocky Mountain region of the US and had never heard this till I moved to the Northeast. When someone makes a mistake, they say "my bad." And I had a friend from Michigan who said that where she lived, they didn't say "my bad" but they said "my bag" instead, when they were correcting themselves.

Having grown up in the northeast and then moving to the Rocky Mountain region, I never noticed that one...but now I'm going to see if people don't say it here (because I'm oh so far from you :D). I grew up saying it so I never paid attention for people not saying it...challenge accepted!

I will be interested to hear the results. I am in the Northeast and had no idea "my bad" was regional. I have heard (seen?) people on here complaining that it is rude; but i have always thought it to be a handy little phrase. I also kind of thought it originated or was at least popularized by the TV show "Martin" so shows what i know  :P


Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 11, 2012, 07:21:39 PM
I grew up in the Rocky Mountain region of the US and had never heard this till I moved to the Northeast. When someone makes a mistake, they say "my bad." And I had a friend from Michigan who said that where she lived, they didn't say "my bad" but they said "my bag" instead, when they were correcting themselves.

Having grown up in the northeast and then moving to the Rocky Mountain region, I never noticed that one...but now I'm going to see if people don't say it here (because I'm oh so far from you :D). I grew up saying it so I never paid attention for people not saying it...challenge accepted!


I will be interested to hear the results. I am in the Northeast and had no idea "my bad" was regional. I have heard (seen?) people on here complaining that it is rude; but i have always thought it to be a handy little phrase. I also kind of thought it originated or was at least popularized by the TV show "Martin" so shows what i know  :P

So far, nothin'.  I used it once and the other person didn't bat an eyelash.  I'm going to ask her the next time I see her, though, because she has lived in Colorado all of her life.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on September 11, 2012, 09:39:29 PM
I tend to think "my bad" is more urban than regional.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 11, 2012, 10:30:55 PM
I tend to think "my bad" is more urban than regional.

I grew up in a town of 1,000 people; definitely not just an urban thing.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Bluenomi on September 11, 2012, 10:47:47 PM
I was chatting with a gal from Oklahoma and was about to say something about the weather in her "neck of the woods." Then I realized she didn't live where there were or ever had been a forest, and didn't know if it would confuse her.

Do people use that phrase in non-woodsy areas?

Oh yes,  'neck of the woods' is generic American.  Whether or not trees are present, you know it means the place where you live. 

We never have quite figured out how woods have a neck but, who really cares?  it's fun to say.  :)

I'd say it's just pretty generic. I know plenty of Aussie who use it.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redsoil on September 12, 2012, 03:18:58 AM
I do wonder if the "my bad" is a mangulation (ha!) of the English translation for "mea culpa".  ("My fault" or "my mistake".)  Possible?

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 12, 2012, 03:19:58 AM
I'd never encountered the expression "my bad", before discovering the Internet. Had thus imagined that it was pure "Net-speak", and quite recently come into being. Various recent posts inform me otherwise.  To the best of my knowledge, it was unused and unknown here in the UK, before the Net era.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 12, 2012, 03:50:55 AM
I do wonder if the "my bad" is a mangulation (ha!) of the English translation for "mea culpa".  ("My fault" or "my mistake".)  Possible?

I always assumed as such, myself, but now am going to try to find actual evidence to support it.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on September 12, 2012, 04:24:59 AM
Does anyone else refer to an umbrella as a bumbershoot?  My mother called them that and I've never heard it anywhere else.  Of course, my mother had a myriad of unusual expressions.

Not a bumbershoot, but a bumberstalk - my father called it that and I always assumed it was a made up word and never thought to ask where it came from. Now I look it up and I find http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bumbershoot . I'm not sure that I believe it, but fairly obviously a bumbershoot is a little one (pocket folding umbrella?) and a bumberstalk is a big one (golf umbrella?)

Another one to throw into the mix: when I have to put up with something unpleasant because it simply can't be helped, I have to thole it. Anybody else do that?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 12, 2012, 08:31:21 AM
I do wonder if the "my bad" is a mangulation (ha!) of the English translation for "mea culpa".  ("My fault" or "my mistake".)  Possible?



I would say you are probably right.  my bad (at least in MD/DC) is used to take the blame for doing something wrong.  I remember starting to use it around middle school which would be about 15 years ago. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on September 12, 2012, 08:31:59 AM
^  That is how my nephews use it.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Anniissa on September 12, 2012, 09:15:55 AM
I'd never encountered the expression "my bad", before discovering the Internet. Had thus imagined that it was pure "Net-speak", and quite recently come into being. Various recent posts inform me otherwise.  To the best of my knowledge, it was unused and unknown here in the UK, before the Net era.

I think the phrase was pretty much popularised by the film "Clueless" and then by Buffy the Vampire Slayer - that's certainly how I and many others I know came across the phrases as it was definitely unknown in my part of the UK before that.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on September 12, 2012, 12:02:14 PM
Another one to throw into the mix: when I have to put up with something unpleasant because it simply can't be helped, I have to thole it. Anybody else do that?

I've never heard that. How does one pronounce that? Just th like in "throw" and ole rhyming with hole? Most of the folks I know use the slang "suck it up." I'm not sure of the derivation of "suck it up" and I'm not sure I want to know.  ;)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on September 12, 2012, 01:23:30 PM
Another one to throw into the mix: when I have to put up with something unpleasant because it simply can't be helped, I have to thole it. Anybody else do that?

I've never heard that. How does one pronounce that? Just th like in "throw" and ole rhyming with hole? Most of the folks I know use the slang "suck it up." I'm not sure of the derivation of "suck it up" and I'm not sure I want to know.  ;)

Yup. Thole to rhyme with hole. According to Merriam Webster it's derived from Old English tholian and is very old but now only used in 'the corners of England's northern dialects' but it's still in use in Scotland and Ulster.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 13, 2012, 09:21:57 AM
I tend to think "my bad" is more urban than regional.

I think 'my bad' is recent.  I never heard it until the Social Networks on the Web became popular. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 13, 2012, 09:24:26 AM
I tend to think "my bad" is more urban than regional.

I think 'my bad' is recent.  I never heard it until the Social Networks on the Web became popular.

How recent do you mean by "recent"?  I grew up saying it and I'm 24...
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on September 13, 2012, 09:39:32 AM
^  For us boomers, that is recent.   ;D
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 13, 2012, 10:18:43 AM
^  For us boomers, that is recent.   ;D

Haha!   ;D

That's why I was asking, to see how recent "recent" was.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 13, 2012, 12:02:59 PM
By 'recent' I meant within the last five or ten years.

As you get older, 'recent' tends to expand a bit.  :D 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Ereine on September 13, 2012, 12:20:50 PM
I got curious and googled it and it appears to have been used at least since the 70s but it was maybe restricted more to people involved with sports, especially basketball.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on September 13, 2012, 01:07:48 PM
I got curious and googled it and it appears to have been used at least since the 70s but it was maybe restricted more to people involved with sports, especially basketball.

This is how I remember it starting.  Basketball players admitting to personal fouls.  I absolutely detest the term used to acknoweledge a mistake.  It sounds so ignorant to me.  What is so hard about saying "my fault" or "my mistake" or just sorry. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on September 13, 2012, 01:17:05 PM
I got curious and googled it and it appears to have been used at least since the 70s but it was maybe restricted more to people involved with sports, especially basketball.

This is how I remember it starting.  Basketball players admitting to personal fouls.  I absolutely detest the term used to acknoweledge a mistake.  It sounds so ignorant to me.  What is so hard about saying "my fault" or "my mistake" or just sorry.

What is so hard about it? Using alternate phrases adds flavor and nuance to our language. It is limiting language that is "ignorant" not expanding it.

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 13, 2012, 03:34:59 PM
By 'recent' I meant within the last five or ten years.

As you get older, 'recent' tends to expand a bit.  :D 

While I didn't grow up in the inner city, a lot of the kids at my school were transfers and I distinctly remember using "my bad" A LOT in middle school.  It was the new phrase about town and everyone and their mother was using it.  I can totally see it coming the basketball court.  Especially in the city as basketball is super popular around here

That would be about 17 years ago.  And I think it usually takes 3-5 years for a popular phrase to move from regional to national usage
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on September 13, 2012, 03:51:26 PM
Like I mentioned before, I first heard "my bad" when I moved to the northeast, and that was in 1992. So, 20 years ago now.  :o It makes me feel old.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on September 14, 2012, 01:27:42 AM
I'm not sure if this is regional or universal. But do you use the word 'dear' to mean expensive? I was talking with someone today and she used the word to mean that an item cost a lot. It's a bit old fashioned I guess.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Iris on September 14, 2012, 01:28:36 AM
I got curious and googled it and it appears to have been used at least since the 70s but it was maybe restricted more to people involved with sports, especially basketball.

This is how I remember it starting.  Basketball players admitting to personal fouls.  I absolutely detest the term used to acknoweledge a mistake.  It sounds so ignorant to me.  What is so hard about saying "my fault" or "my mistake" or just sorry.

What is so hard about it? Using alternate phrases adds flavor and nuance to our language. It is limiting language that is "ignorant" not expanding it.

See, I don't know that I agree with this entirely. I personally like to flavour my speech with all sorts of 'mad' sayings that I've picked up from international friends or my students. Playing with language is one of my personal delights.

However in this *specific* case I am finding that a significant portion of the teenagers that I teach ONLY know "my bad". They would never, ever say "my fault" or another alternative because they just don't know they are available, or if they do they see them as archaic terms used only by teachers. Something about that bothers me. It feels too much like "ungood" I guess. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 14, 2012, 07:19:42 AM
I'm not sure if this is regional or universal. But do you use the word 'dear' to mean expensive? I was talking with someone today and she used the word to mean that an item cost a lot. It's a bit old fashioned I guess.

Yes.  'dear' is commonly used in NYC as a synonym for 'expensive'.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on September 14, 2012, 07:21:34 AM
I'm not sure if this is regional or universal. But do you use the word 'dear' to mean expensive? I was talking with someone today and she used the word to mean that an item cost a lot. It's a bit old fashioned I guess.

I would consider "dear" to mean a high cost, but not financial cost. Like if some saves someone else's life but looses a leg or an eye or even dies themselves one would say "yes John saved Jane but at a dear personal cost". Or if someone sues an employer for harassment or unpaid wages but then ends up blacklisted from the whole industry "sure she won the suit, but despite the pay out ultimately it cost her dearly."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on September 14, 2012, 08:30:41 AM
Growing up in the Boston area I called that four-wheeled thing you push around at the grocery store a carriage. Now it's a cart. Same for those two-wheeled things that people who walk to the store carry their groceries home in. Formerly "two-wheeled carriage," now cart. A friend calls them "blue-haired lady carts," because she associates them with older women.

To me "out of pocket" refers to money. As in, stuff you pay for out of whatever money (cash or plastic) you're carrying as opposed to what is already covered (e.g., for a vacation you pay in advance for your hotel and rental car, but you still have to pay out of pocket for meals, souvenirs, park admissions, etc.). I've never heard it used to mean out of the area or not reachable.

My mom says "mind your own beeswax" as a slangy alternative to "mind your own business." She's Boston-born and raised.

This is a really common phrase in Ireland so I'm not surprised with the Boston connection.  :) Even though I'm pretty sure it's used in the UK as well.

Funny, I grew up hearing that saying, as my grandma and grandpa were originally from Boston and both Irish-American. :)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on September 14, 2012, 08:59:40 AM
I got curious and googled it and it appears to have been used at least since the 70s but it was maybe restricted more to people involved with sports, especially basketball.

This is how I remember it starting.  Basketball players admitting to personal fouls.  I absolutely detest the term used to acknoweledge a mistake.  It sounds so ignorant to me.  What is so hard about saying "my fault" or "my mistake" or just sorry.

What is so hard about it? Using alternate phrases adds flavor and nuance to our language. It is limiting language that is "ignorant" not expanding it.

See, I don't know that I agree with this entirely. I personally like to flavour my speech with all sorts of 'mad' sayings that I've picked up from international friends or my students. Playing with language is one of my personal delights.

However in this *specific* case I am finding that a significant portion of the teenagers that I teach ONLY know "my bad". They would never, ever say "my fault" or another alternative because they just don't know they are available, or if they do they see them as archaic terms used only by teachers. Something about that bothers me. It feels too much like "ungood" I guess.

LOL, double ungood +2 ... It would be the same thing, though, if they only said "my fault" because they didn't know "my bad" was available. It isn't the phrase itself that is limiting language, it is the people using it.

- hobish, who could probably talk about the nuances of language all day until the thread was unrecognizable  :P
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on September 14, 2012, 11:12:35 AM
I would know what someone meant if they used "dear" in the expensive sense, but I just don't hear it.

It does sound old-fashioned to me.

"Mind your own beeswax" isn't (exclusively) Irish. I think it's just slangy English language. Google seems to think it's 1930s slang, which would give it plenty of time to spread globally or close enough.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Iris on September 14, 2012, 04:11:23 PM
*One thing I've noticed as a difference when speaking to friends from the UK is how they manage their contractions. For example, where I would say "I haven't walked the dog yet" they'd say "I've not walked the dog yet". Basically if there are two available contractions we will consistently choose differently.

*I am familiar with using the word "dear" to mean expensive, but mostly from my mother so perhaps it is a little old fashioned.

*Hobish - you make a good point. I will leave it at that though in order to keep the thread recognisable :)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 14, 2012, 04:22:53 PM
My cell phone's gone walkabout.  Although nobody says "walkabout" around here.  In this case it's the right word, though!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Julian on September 15, 2012, 08:53:23 PM
All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.

All mouth, no trousers.

More front than Myers.  (Myers is a large national chain of department stores).

I've frequently heard of 'camel-toe' inducing pants as mumble-pants.  PM if you really need to know why...  I'd probably get dinged for it here.

Is muffin-top common elsewhere besides Australia?  You know, over-tight lowrise pants, short midriff revealing top, muffin of extra flesh exposed over the pants?

'All over it like a fat kid on a cupcake' - I'm onto the issue. 

Dropped a clanger - can refer to either obnoxious gas passing or a big obvious mistake.



Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 15, 2012, 09:06:36 PM
All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.

All mouth, no trousers.

More front than Myers.  (Myers is a large national chain of department stores).

I've frequently heard of 'camel-toe' inducing pants as mumble-pants.  PM if you really need to know why...  I'd probably get dinged for it here.

Is muffin-top common elsewhere besides Australia?  You know, over-tight lowrise pants, short midriff revealing top, muffin of extra flesh exposed over the pants?

'All over it like a fat kid on a cupcake' - I'm onto the issue. 

Dropped a clanger - can refer to either obnoxious gas passing or a big obvious mistake.

Sometimes it is called cupcaking, too, and can also refer to a bra that does not fit properly and this results in cup spillage.

There are also many sayings mea ing "I'm onto the issue." "Like white on rice" is the first that comes to mind, and "Like flies on dung."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 15, 2012, 11:45:15 PM
All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.

All mouth, no trousers.

More front than Myers.  (Myers is a large national chain of department stores).

I've frequently heard of 'camel-toe' inducing pants as mumble-pants.  PM if you really need to know why...  I'd probably get dinged for it here.

Is muffin-top common elsewhere besides Australia?  You know, over-tight lowrise pants, short midriff revealing top, muffin of extra flesh exposed over the pants?

'All over it like a fat kid on a cupcake' - I'm onto the issue. 

Dropped a clanger - can refer to either obnoxious gas passing or a big obvious mistake.

Sometimes it is called cupcaking, too, and can also refer to a bra that does not fit properly and this results in cup spillage.

There are also many sayings mea ing "I'm onto the issue." "Like white on rice" is the first that comes to mind, and "Like flies on dung."

I've heard muffin top, but not cupcaking.  And the bra thing I've more commonly heard as "quadraboob" (when the cup cuts each side in half . . . yeah, y'all know what I mean!)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 15, 2012, 11:48:39 PM
All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.

All mouth, no trousers.

More front than Myers.  (Myers is a large national chain of department stores).

I've frequently heard of 'camel-toe' inducing pants as mumble-pants.  PM if you really need to know why...  I'd probably get dinged for it here.

Is muffin-top common elsewhere besides Australia?  You know, over-tight lowrise pants, short midriff revealing top, muffin of extra flesh exposed over the pants?

'All over it like a fat kid on a cupcake' - I'm onto the issue. 

Dropped a clanger - can refer to either obnoxious gas passing or a big obvious mistake.

Sometimes it is called cupcaking, too, and can also refer to a bra that does not fit properly and this results in cup spillage.

There are also many sayings mea ing "I'm onto the issue." "Like white on rice" is the first that comes to mind, and "Like flies on dung."

I've heard muffin top, but not cupcaking.  And the bra thing I've more commonly heard as "quadraboob" (when the cup cuts each side in half . . . yeah, y'all know what I mean!)

I've definitely heard quadraboob, too...that's the same thing as cupcaking as I described, though I've heard the bottom half (tight pants) called cupcaking and the top half (quadraboob) called muffintopping...I guess it really just depends who you talk to, but we all get the same general idea from it.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: CakeEater on September 16, 2012, 05:32:21 AM
*One thing I've noticed as a difference when speaking to friends from the UK is how they manage their contractions. For example, where I would say "I haven't walked the dog yet" they'd say "I've not walked the dog yet". Basically if there are two available contractions we will consistently choose differently.

*I am familiar with using the word "dear" to mean expensive, but mostly from my mother so perhaps it is a little old fashioned.

*Hobish - you make a good point. I will leave it at that though in order to keep the thread recognisable :)

I love the British version of this, and decided I'd use it when I could. But you're right, I would  never have chosen those before my visit there.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on September 16, 2012, 06:41:38 AM
I'm not sure if this is regional or universal. But do you use the word 'dear' to mean expensive? I was talking with someone today and she used the word to mean that an item cost a lot. It's a bit old fashioned I guess.

Yes, in Australia.  Its not common with the young-folk though.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: MummySweet on September 16, 2012, 09:46:45 AM
I've heard muffin top, but not cupcaking.  And the bra thing I've more commonly heard as "quadraboob" (when the cup cuts each side in half . . . yeah, y'all know what I mean!)
[/quote]

I've definitely heard quadraboob, too...that's the same thing as cupcaking as I described, though I've heard the bottom half (tight pants) called cupcaking and the top half (quadraboob) called muffintopping...I guess it really just depends who you talk to, but we all get the same general idea from it.
[/quote]

I always thought the top bit was called "Rushmoring."   I wonder if that's more of an Upper Midwest of the US thing?   
   

** Sorry I messed up the quote tree!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on September 16, 2012, 10:00:38 AM
I got curious and googled it and it appears to have been used at least since the 70s but it was maybe restricted more to people involved with sports, especially basketball.

This is how I remember it starting.  Basketball players admitting to personal fouls.  I absolutely detest the term used to acknoweledge a mistake.  It sounds so ignorant to me.  What is so hard about saying "my fault" or "my mistake" or just sorry.

What is so hard about it? Using alternate phrases adds flavor and nuance to our language. It is limiting language that is "ignorant" not expanding it.

I'm fine with a flavorful language.  However, this phrase is too close to"almost" correct use.  To me it's like hearing someone use good when well is correct.  Or someone saying me and Joe instead of Joe and I. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on September 18, 2012, 05:46:34 PM
I got curious and googled it and it appears to have been used at least since the 70s but it was maybe restricted more to people involved with sports, especially basketball.

This is how I remember it starting.  Basketball players admitting to personal fouls.  I absolutely detest the term used to acknoweledge a mistake.  It sounds so ignorant to me.  What is so hard about saying "my fault" or "my mistake" or just sorry.

What is so hard about it? Using alternate phrases adds flavor and nuance to our language. It is limiting language that is "ignorant" not expanding it.

I'm fine with a flavorful language.  However, this phrase is too close to"almost" correct use.  To me it's like hearing someone use good when well is correct.  Or someone saying me and Joe instead of Joe and I.

That makes sense - and it is your opinion and you are entitled to it, in any case.  :)

MummySweet, "Rushmoring" is a completely new one to me. I think i love it.

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on September 19, 2012, 05:02:03 AM
Haven't heard it for a while, but somebody who went for style over substance used to be referred to in the UK as 'fur coat and no knickers'.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 19, 2012, 08:31:31 AM
Haven't heard it for a while, but somebody who went for style over substance used to be referred to in the UK as 'fur coat and no knickers'.

Here I've heard

All hat and no saddle

All talk and no walk
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on September 19, 2012, 09:20:36 AM
What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

That is so confusing. We were in Houston for a wedding and the driving instructions to get to the rehearsal dinner said "Take Feeder Road." DH and I keep looking for a road named "Feeder." We flipped a witch about four times before I said "Maybe 'Feeder' means 'frontage.'"

I'm just now making my way through this thread but I had to comment on this. I had a similar experience in New York (state). We were given directions which said to turn at "Jug Handle". We kept looking for a street called Jug Handle. There wasn't one. It took us a while to realize what a jug handle was.

The funny thing is, I'm from Houston and yes, we say feeder when others say access or frontage. And a recently redesigned section of freeway way south of where I live now has a jug handle! Although I'm not sure anyone around here calls it that. It's the first jug handle I'd ever seen here in Houston, now that I know what they are!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on September 19, 2012, 09:23:06 AM
Dark Boyfriend loves to make possessive y'all. I'm slowly getting used to it but it always sounded so weird at first.

I both "turn" and "hang a" left.

A pididdle (sp?) is a car with one headlight out. Learned that in PA; nobody I met had heard it called that in CO.

My Hawaiin "family" calls flip flops (also known as thongs ;) "slippers".

When I was a teenager, we called a car with one headlight "spidoodle" which is pretty cloe to pididdle.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Cat-Fu on September 19, 2012, 10:23:26 AM
Padiddle! I used to play by the hardcore rules where the last person to hit the ceiling for a padiddle takes off a piece of clothing.  >:D
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on September 19, 2012, 10:25:33 AM
Catching up...

This is what I call the things discussed above:
Purse (not bag or handbag or pocket book)
Bag = noun
Sack = verb
... as in, Would you please sack my groceries in a paper bag?
Cart (although I have heard basket). I've heard of buggy but never actually knew someone who used that term.
out of pocket - I've heard it used both ways. The money reference, especially in reference to insurance. "Maximum out of pocket with this plan is $2500". It's not all that common to say "I'll be out of pocket for the rest of the day" meaning incommunicado, but I've definitely heard it used.
in your pocket = definitely means you're bribing someone. "The mobster has the mayor in his pocket."

Regarding GeauxTigers' mention of police jury, it kind of reminds me of County Judge which is a political office in Texas (don't know if it's used elsewhere as well). The county judge isn't a judge at all, but more of something like a mayor for the county.

"My bad" is pretty commonly used here, it's one of those sayings that became so over used it's trite. Like "having said that" or "I know, right?"

Coke. Coke = soda = pop = genereic name for a carbonated beverage.
Example conversation:
-- You want a coke?
-- Sure, what kind do you have?
-- Dr. Pepper and Sprite.
-- OK, I'll take a Sprite.

"None of your beeswax" was what we said as kids. I have always thought of it as a child's expression, not something adults would say.  :)

Dear as expensive is not something that I've heard commonly used. However, my mother, whose first language was French, used "cher" (which means dear) to mean expensive. I associate the word dear meaning expensive with the Beatles song, When I'm Sixty-four.
Every summer we can rent a cottage
In the Isle of Wight, if it's not too dear
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on September 19, 2012, 10:32:36 AM
What are "nachos" to you?

To me, they're a baked dish with melted cheese and possibly lots of other stuff (veggies, beans, meats) on tortilla chips. Or maybe tortilla chips with a side of that weird melted cheese stuff -- from a can or a dispenser if you're at a ballpark or something.

To BF, they're that ... or just the chips. I've never known anyone else to call tortilla chips "nachos," and since he's vegan, it's even weirder for him to suggest nachos, in the traditional sense, as a snack. FWIW, he's from Pennsylvania. Is this common there or elsewhere?

Another one that I'm pretty sure isn't regional but still confuses me: "Heavens to Betsy!"
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on September 19, 2012, 10:40:05 AM
Nachos are tortilla chips with cheese melted onto them. Additional toppings such as jalepenos, beans, meat, onions, tomatoes, etc., are optional.

The only way I've ever heard the word nachos in reference to chips themselves is as a flavor of Doritos. Nacho cheese flavored Doritos are not my favorite but they're not bad either!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 19, 2012, 11:32:29 AM
Got a few new ones courtesy of my family. 

Burn meaning someone who can cook really well.
"Girl, you sure know how to burn in the kitchen"

Stick/Stuck/Put your foot in it meaning really flavorful food
After cooking all day and night the chef carefully takes her foot out of the food and the ravenous hordes descend
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Cat-Fu on September 19, 2012, 11:42:49 AM
I use nachos and tortilla chips interchangably, and when they have cheese and beans and such melted on them, they're loaded nachos. Just the cheese and tortilla chips is nachos and cheese. And now I really want some!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 19, 2012, 12:12:12 PM
Another one from Pennsylvania that calls just the chips "nachos".  If they have cheese, they're nachos and cheese (or cheese and nachos).  Anything else on them becomes nachos and whatever else is on them.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on September 19, 2012, 12:23:49 PM
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on September 19, 2012, 01:15:57 PM
Haven't heard it for a while, but somebody who went for style over substance used to be referred to in the UK as 'fur coat and no knickers'.

Here I've heard

All hat and no saddle

All talk and no walk

Here, there's a saying to describe someone who's all talk or all show and no substance to back it up. It goes something like "he has the [cowboy] hat and the buckle, but no horse."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 19, 2012, 01:37:59 PM
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

He can be reformed!  Haha, Mental Boyfriend is Texan...I now say oil like y'all (and say y'all for that matter), and I know he doesn't necessarily want Coke when he says he wants a coke.  He also knows what I mean when I say sweep and don't mean with a broom (I mean with a vacuum).  Thus I have started to ask him if he wants a coke to see what he wants to drink, though I still ask for a pop for myself, and he says he'll sweep the floor and get the vacuum out.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 19, 2012, 02:10:19 PM
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

Dear Jmarvellous.  We hope you'd have little problem in Park Slope

Here, nachos aren't just sad, little naked tortilla chips. A decent dish of nachos will include chips and salsa.  Perhaps refritos will be included.  A good dish of nachos will include some jalapeños.  A generous amount of good, grated cheese will be added and the whole thing dipped under the broiler for a minute or two.

This sort of misunderstanding isn't limited to nachos. A local restaurant named 'Mr.  Falafel' claims to have had a hard time at the beginning because locals didn't know what falafel was.  Local people thought that 'falafel' and 'pita' were the same thing.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: violinp on September 19, 2012, 03:19:14 PM
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

Dear Jmarvellous.  We hope you'd have little problem in Park Slope

Here, nachos aren't just sad, little naked tortilla chips. A decent dish of nachos will include chips and salsa.  Perhaps refritos will be included.  A good dish of nachos will include some jalapeños.  A generous amount of good, grated cheese will be added and the whole thing dipped under the broiler for a minute or two.

This sort of misunderstanding isn't limited to nachos. A local restaurant named 'Mr.  Falafel' claims to have had a hard time at the beginning because locals didn't know what falafel was. Local people thought that 'falafel' and 'pita' were the same thing.

*blinkblink* What. I mean, they're both amazingly good, but they're not even remotely in the same culture. Ow.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on September 19, 2012, 03:43:01 PM
Local people thought that 'falafel' and 'pita' were the same thing.

But, pita is a flat bread and a felafel is a chickpea patty.  They're 2 ingredients in a felafel kebab...
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on September 19, 2012, 03:46:55 PM
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

Dear Jmarvellous.  We hope you'd have little problem in Park Slope

Here, nachos aren't just sad, little naked tortilla chips. A decent dish of nachos will include chips and salsa.  Perhaps refritos will be included.  A good dish of nachos will include some jalapeños.  A generous amount of good, grated cheese will be added and the whole thing dipped under the broiler for a minute or two.

This sort of misunderstanding isn't limited to nachos. A local restaurant named 'Mr.  Falafel' claims to have had a hard time at the beginning because locals didn't know what falafel was.  Local people thought that 'falafel' and 'pita' were the same thing.

In NYC?  This must have been several decades ago, as falafel has been standard issue street cart food in NY for at least 20 years, and its as often as not, not served on a pita.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 19, 2012, 04:19:19 PM
This WAS about 30 years ago.  The story surfaced in a local newspaper article about long-term Slope businesses. 

Even back then, it would have been a bit odd.  I remember enjoying falafel with baba ganouj at Amy's in the mid-1970s. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on September 19, 2012, 04:19:38 PM
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

Dear Jmarvellous.  We hope you'd have little problem in Park Slope

Here, nachos aren't just sad, little naked tortilla chips. A decent dish of nachos will include chips and salsa.  Perhaps refritos will be included.  A good dish of nachos will include some jalapeños.  A generous amount of good, grated cheese will be added and the whole thing dipped under the broiler for a minute or two.

This sort of misunderstanding isn't limited to nachos. A local restaurant named 'Mr.  Falafel' claims to have had a hard time at the beginning because locals didn't know what falafel was.  Local people thought that 'falafel' and 'pita' were the same thing.

In NYC?  This must have been several decades ago, as falafel has been standard issue street cart food in NY for at least 20 years, and its as often as not, not served on a pita.

Veering off topic, but in the same vein, my mom moved to Boulder, Colorado in the late 1960s. No one there seemed to know what yogurt was. She would explain it and people would say "ewww. Sour milk." So she had to find cultures and make her own.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on September 19, 2012, 05:50:04 PM
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

That is interesting. I am not too far away in South Jersey and to me nachos have stuff on them - cheese at the very least, but probably ground beef, tomatos, jalapenos, maybe some black olives, and that kind of thing. Plain they are just tortilla chips.

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 19, 2012, 07:13:59 PM
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

That is interesting. I am not too far away in South Jersey and to me nachos have stuff on them - cheese at the very least, but probably ground beef, tomatos, jalapenos, maybe some black olives, and that kind of thing. Plain they are just tortilla chips.

If it makes any difference, I am from northwestern Pennsylvania, where we have our own complete way of talking.  Seriously; there are about 6 regional accents in the US and northwestern Pennsylvania has its very own.  Pool and pull are pronounced exactly the same to me.  So are dull and doll and dawn and don.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Shopaholic on September 20, 2012, 04:56:49 AM
Local people thought that 'falafel' and 'pita' were the same thing.

But, pita is a flat bread and a felafel is a chickpea patty.  They're 2 ingredients in a felafel kebab...

In Israel:
Falafel is both the ball/patty and the pita + balls + salads + hummus + tehini it is served as.
Kebab is a meat patty. It can be served on a plate, with salads, hummus and more in a pita or in a "lafa" which is a large, flat pita-like bread with no pocket.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 20, 2012, 09:25:00 AM
Here, kabobs are served on a skewer.  'Kufta' kabob is ground meat.  The meat is usually lamb or a mix of lamb and beef.  Kabos can also be made with chunks of beef, lamb or chicken. A kabob is normally served with pita and salad or rice. 

Mr. Falafel serves an Egyptian hamburger of seasoned, ground lamb that's just wonderful. 

Hmmm.  We may go there for lunch. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on September 20, 2012, 04:13:06 PM
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

That is interesting. I am not too far away in South Jersey and to me nachos have stuff on them - cheese at the very least, but probably ground beef, tomatos, jalapenos, maybe some black olives, and that kind of thing. Plain they are just tortilla chips.

If it makes any difference, I am from northwestern Pennsylvania, where we have our own complete way of talking.  Seriously; there are about 6 regional accents in the US and northwestern Pennsylvania has its very own.  Pool and pull are pronounced exactly the same to me.  So are dull and doll and dawn and don.

Oh, yeah ... completely different. I know not all of PA is Philly bit for some reason i had it in my head you were near there :) You are in Steelers country. Nice.

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 20, 2012, 05:56:29 PM
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

That is interesting. I am not too far away in South Jersey and to me nachos have stuff on them - cheese at the very least, but probably ground beef, tomatos, jalapenos, maybe some black olives, and that kind of thing. Plain they are just tortilla chips.

If it makes any difference, I am from northwestern Pennsylvania, where we have our own complete way of talking.  Seriously; there are about 6 regional accents in the US and northwestern Pennsylvania has its very own.  Pool and pull are pronounced exactly the same to me.  So are dull and doll and dawn and don.

Oh, yeah ... completely different. I know not all of PA is Philly bit for some reason i had it in my head you were near there :) You are in Steelers country. Nice.

Haha, no worries, it happens.  I most certainly am, and proud of it.  There is a video of my 5th Christmas in which I get a Steelers sweatshirt and am over the moon about it.  I'm a long time fan  ;D

ETA:  I grew up in northwestern PA, but I live in Colorado now.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: baglady on September 20, 2012, 07:26:21 PM
In my world, a kebab is meat and veggies on a skewer. Falafel is the chick-pea stuff usually served in a pita. I suppose if I were ordering it from a street cart, I'd ask for "a falafel" if I meant some of that stuff in a pita, same as if I ordered a hot dog, I'd expect a wiener in a bun.

In my house growing up, we used "hot dog" to refer to both the wiener itself and the wiener in a bun. ("Go to the supermarket and pick up a package of hot dogs.") Not so with hamburgers, though. A ground beef patty on a bun was "a hamburger," but the ground beef itself was "hamburg."

Nachos for me definitely means tortilla chips covered with stuff -- melted cheese at the very least. But there's a bar near Bagman that serves its own version of nachos: homemade potato chips covered with cheese, meat, refried beans, jalapenos, sour cream ... darn, now I'm hungry.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on September 20, 2012, 08:04:38 PM
Local people thought that 'falafel' and 'pita' were the same thing.

But, pita is a flat bread and a felafel is a chickpea patty.  They're 2 ingredients in a felafel kebab...

In Israel:
Falafel is both the ball/patty and the pita + balls + salads + hummus + tehini it is served as.
Kebab is a meat patty. It can be served on a plate, with salads, hummus and more in a pita or in a "lafa" which is a large, flat pita-like bread with no pocket.

OK.  Here the kebab is the whole wrapped parcel - meat/felafel, salad, sauces in pita.

Shishkebab is on a skewer.  Kofta is ground meat on a skewer as opposed to chunks of meat.  Kofta can also be elongated meatballs but that's far less common.  Itr is always ground meat.  The meat in a kebab is usually shaved.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: camlan on September 22, 2012, 06:57:12 AM

Veering off topic, but in the same vein, my mom moved to Boulder, Colorado in the late 1960s. No one there seemed to know what yogurt was. She would explain it and people would say "ewww. Sour milk." So she had to find cultures and make her own.

In the mid-1970s, my family took a long camping trip across the US. Bagels were unheard of in several places we stopped. No bagel shops, not even frozen bagels in the supermarkets.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 22, 2012, 08:35:32 AM
When you live in a big city, all sorts of ethnic foods are likely to be available and you forget that the same may not be true elsewhere.

A few years ago we were amused by a TV ad for a brand of frozen pirogi.  The ad carefully explained that pirogi are 'All your favorite foods-- pasta, cheese and potato rolled into one'. 

Also, back in the 1970s a local chain that specialized in bagel sandwiches was trying to expand.  Their TV ad explained what a bagel is.

  I miss that place.  It made the world's greatest chicken salad sandwich. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 01, 2012, 10:23:26 AM
Getting away from food for a bit.

Most people these days seem to use laptops, I-pads and the like.  Lately, I've been hearing a desk top computer called a 'Grandpa Box'. 

Has anyone else encountered this?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on October 02, 2012, 06:19:22 PM
Getting away from food for a bit.

Most people these days seem to use laptops, I-pads and the like.  Lately, I've been hearing a desk top computer called a 'Grandpa Box'. 

Has anyone else encountered this?

Hahah  :) That is funny stuff. I had to Google. I never heard that before and couldn't even find it on Urban Dictionary; but there was a Dilbert cartoon about it in 2011.
http://www.avaya.com/blogs/archives/2011/08/dilbert-and-the-grandpa-box.html (http://www.avaya.com/blogs/archives/2011/08/dilbert-and-the-grandpa-box.html)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mmirth on October 14, 2012, 09:34:51 PM
We do "Bottle shop"  for liquor store.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on October 15, 2012, 05:22:48 PM


Here we sometimes call it a "bottle'o"
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: mw8242 on October 17, 2012, 01:43:40 PM
central jersey here.

The one thing I get picked on is that drawer & draw are pronounced the same way to me.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 17, 2012, 03:44:22 PM
That's similar to the Bostonian accent.  The standard joke is 'Pahk the Cah in Hahvahd Yahd'.

Bostonians also tend to insert the dropped 'r's into places where they didn't quite belong.

My mother adored the Kennedy family but their ways of speaking drove her to distraction.  She could not  stand it when JFK talked about 'Cuber' or 'Chiner'. 

In her view it sounded 'uneducated' and these were highly educated people. 

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 17, 2012, 04:01:05 PM
Hence the pirate jokes:

What's a pirate's favorite letter?   Arrrrrrr!

What's a pirate from Boston say?   Ahhhhhh!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Iris on October 17, 2012, 04:03:40 PM
central jersey here.

The one thing I get picked on is that drawer & draw are pronounced the same way to me.

Well, I'm from Australia and draw and drawer ARE pronounced the same way, so there  :D
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: violinp on October 17, 2012, 04:11:56 PM
central jersey here.

The one thing I get picked on is that drawer & draw are pronounced the same way to me.

Well, I'm from Australia and draw and drawer ARE pronounced the same way, so there  :D

Same here, and I'm from the Appalachian South of the United States.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on October 17, 2012, 04:29:16 PM
The drawer/draw reminded me of a discussion I had with a friend. 

In my childhoold bedroom, I had a bed, a night stand, a dressing table, a dresser, and a chest of drawers.  She had never heard of a piece of furniture being called a chest of drawers.  When I described it to her, she said she would call it a dresser or a highboy if the room already had a dresser. 

To me:
A dressing table has a place to sit in front of a mirror and has a few drawers for storing things like makeup and hair products.
A dresser is around 3-4 ft tall and has several vertical drawers.  A double dresser has two sets side by side.
A chest of drawers is around 5 ft tall and has multiple verticle drawers stacked above each other.
A highboy is like a chest of drawers but has legs and is more intricate.

I now have a mule chest in my bedroom which is like a double dresser but taller. 

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on October 17, 2012, 05:01:09 PM
I'm from northwestern PA, where we pronounce things strangely anyway.  The first one (draw) is with an "awe" sound.  The other (drawer) is with an "oor" sound like in door...it is pretty much pronounced droor to me.

ETA:  The "awe" sound is as in ma, pa, saw, caw, haw, law, et cetera.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on October 17, 2012, 05:51:28 PM
The drawer/draw reminded me of a discussion I had with a friend. 

In my childhoold bedroom, I had a bed, a night stand, a dressing table, a dresser, and a chest of drawers.  She had never heard of a piece of furniture being called a chest of drawers.  When I described it to her, she said she would call it a dresser or a highboy if the room already had a dresser. 

To me:
A dressing table has a place to sit in front of a mirror and has a few drawers for storing things like makeup and hair products.
A dresser is around 3-4 ft tall and has several vertical drawers.  A double dresser has two sets side by side.
A chest of drawers is around 5 ft tall and has multiple verticle drawers stacked above each other.
A highboy is like a chest of drawers but has legs and is more intricate.

I now have a mule chest in my bedroom which is like a double dresser but taller. 

Agreed, a dressing table has a mirror.

A dresser is as you desribe, also known as a lowboy.

A chest of drawers is also as you describe, also known as a tallboy.

Highboy isn't used, but I wouldn't distinguishe between feet v non-feet in any event.

I'm from northwestern PA, where we pronounce things strangely anyway.  The first one (draw) is with an "awe" sound.  The other (drawer) is with an "oor" sound like in door...it is pretty much pronounced droor to me.

Draw and door have the same sound in Oz.  Except one has an 'r' after the 'd', obviously.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: kherbert05 on October 17, 2012, 07:35:12 PM
What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

That is so confusing. We were in Houston for a wedding and the driving instructions to get to the rehearsal dinner said "Take Feeder Road." DH and I keep looking for a road named "Feeder." We flipped a witch about four times before I said "Maybe 'Feeder' means 'frontage.'"
We like confusing people - every freeway in Houston has multiple names


I10  Katy Freeway (from downtown W to Katy) and East or Beaumont (From downtown E to baytown)


59 Southwest Freeway (from downtown W to Fort Bend) and East Tex (Downtown to Kingwood)

45 - Gulf freeway downtown to Galveston and North Freeway Downtown to Conroe

 290 Northwest Freeway from Memorial to Austin

 At least in Houston if you miss an exit, there is a feeder road to get off on and you can turn around and go back. In San Antonio just after 9/11 this guy would NOT let me get in the lane to keep on I10. He forced me onto a different HW. We kept driving thinking we would be able to get off on a feeder and turn around.  Drove straight on to one of the military bases. Thankfully every other person in the car had military ID. The guard helped us get back on I10. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Bluenomi on October 17, 2012, 07:55:18 PM

Draw and door have the same sound in Oz.  Except one has an 'r' after the 'd', obviously.

Really? Cause I'm an Aussie and door and draw are 2 differently pronounced words to me.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on October 17, 2012, 09:34:45 PM

Draw and door have the same sound in Oz.  Except one has an 'r' after the 'd', obviously.

Really? Cause I'm an Aussie and door and draw are 2 differently pronounced words to me.

Regional thing, I guess.  I'm in Sydney.  if there's any different its so slight as to be indescernable.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on October 18, 2012, 03:32:35 AM

Draw and door have the same sound in Oz.  Except one has an 'r' after the 'd', obviously.

Really? Cause I'm an Aussie and door and draw are 2 differently pronounced words to me.


I'm in Melbourne. Door and draw rhyme.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: camlan on October 18, 2012, 09:30:55 AM
To me:
A dressing table has a place to sit in front of a mirror and has a few drawers for storing things like makeup and hair products.
A dresser is around 3-4 ft tall and has several vertical drawers.  A double dresser has two sets side by side.
A chest of drawers is around 5 ft tall and has multiple verticle drawers stacked above each other.
A highboy is like a chest of drawers but has legs and is more intricate.

I now have a mule chest in my bedroom which is like a double dresser but taller.

Pod to the dressing table. But as a kid, all the rest, we would have called "bureaus." Later, in my teens, we started to say "dresser," but again, dresser would have applied to everything you list. Tall dressers and short dressers.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on October 18, 2012, 02:42:54 PM
My friend's dad had a thick Boston accent. There was a girl she was friends with named Dana Miller. He pronounced her name Daner Millah.


Do you all use the expression "pan out"? It means for plans to work out. For example "We planned to have a picnic, but it didn't pan out because it rained."

I believe it comes from using a pan in a river to collect gold. Here's a definition (http://www.lexic.us/definition-of/pan_out).

I didn't know it if was something only used in US states that had a gold rush at the end of the 1800s, like where I live, or if it's more widely used.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on October 18, 2012, 02:56:00 PM
From Texas and have always used the phrase "things didn't pan out".  But I never hear it or use it in the affirmative like "our plans for the picnic did pan out".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on October 18, 2012, 03:00:23 PM
I've used it in the negative, as well.  I don't think I've ever used it in the affirmative.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on October 18, 2012, 03:34:17 PM
I have heard it used in a question - "how did that pan out?"
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on October 18, 2012, 03:57:30 PM
I have heard it used in a question - "how did that pan out?"

I, too, have heard it as a question; and I've heard it in the negative. Otherwise, I don't think I've ever heard it in the affirmative.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 18, 2012, 05:44:11 PM
From Texas and have always used the phrase "things didn't pan out".  But I never hear it or use it in the affirmative like "our plans for the picnic did pan out".

NYC here.  We always used 'pan out' in the negative sense.  if something went well, we might use the term 'hit pay dirt'.

'The weather was too windy so the picnic didn't pan out'.

'The weather was perfect for the picnic.  We really hit pay dirt there'.

Both are mining terms but they're not limited to gold rush areas. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: baglady on October 18, 2012, 07:38:24 PM
To me:
A dressing table has a place to sit in front of a mirror and has a few drawers for storing things like makeup and hair products.
A dresser is around 3-4 ft tall and has several vertical drawers.  A double dresser has two sets side by side.
A chest of drawers is around 5 ft tall and has multiple verticle drawers stacked above each other.
A highboy is like a chest of drawers but has legs and is more intricate.

I now have a mule chest in my bedroom which is like a double dresser but taller.

Pod to the dressing table. But as a kid, all the rest, we would have called "bureaus." Later, in my teens, we started to say "dresser," but again, dresser would have applied to everything you list. Tall dressers and short dressers.

I'm another who grew up calling them bureaus except the dressing table ... which we didn't call a dressing table. It was a vanity.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: camlan on October 19, 2012, 07:55:56 AM
To me:
A dressing table has a place to sit in front of a mirror and has a few drawers for storing things like makeup and hair products.
A dresser is around 3-4 ft tall and has several vertical drawers.  A double dresser has two sets side by side.
A chest of drawers is around 5 ft tall and has multiple verticle drawers stacked above each other.
A highboy is like a chest of drawers but has legs and is more intricate.

I now have a mule chest in my bedroom which is like a double dresser but taller.

Pod to the dressing table. But as a kid, all the rest, we would have called "bureaus." Later, in my teens, we started to say "dresser," but again, dresser would have applied to everything you list. Tall dressers and short dressers.

I'm another who grew up calling them bureaus except the dressing table ... which we didn't call a dressing table. It was a vanity.

Oh, gosh, yes. I'd forgotten about the vanity. We didn't have any in our house, but my aunt, who lived in a big city and was very glamorous to my childhood eyes, had a lovely, mirrored vanity table.

I still get a little confused when someone refers to their bathroom sink/cabinet combination as a vanity. To me, a vanity is something that goes in a bedroom, not a bathroom.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on October 24, 2012, 09:10:50 AM
To me:
A dressing table has a place to sit in front of a mirror and has a few drawers for storing things like makeup and hair products.
A dresser is around 3-4 ft tall and has several vertical drawers.  A double dresser has two sets side by side.
A chest of drawers is around 5 ft tall and has multiple verticle drawers stacked above each other.
A highboy is like a chest of drawers but has legs and is more intricate.

I now have a mule chest in my bedroom which is like a double dresser but taller.

Pod to the dressing table. But as a kid, all the rest, we would have called "bureaus." Later, in my teens, we started to say "dresser," but again, dresser would have applied to everything you list. Tall dressers and short dressers.

I'm another who grew up calling them bureaus except the dressing table ... which we didn't call a dressing table. It was a vanity.

Yup exactly the same for me.  It was "bureau" and "vanity".  Bureau only changed to "dresser" once I got older and had cause to write the words - dresser is easier to spell and thus became the default.  I never heard the terms highboy or low boy.

A "tallboy" is not furniture at all to me, its a 16oz beer (as opposed to a standard 12oz). "Amy and I got a 6 pack of tallboys for the softball game."  Unless its a Fosters, then its an "oilcan". A 40oz beer is simply a "forty" - as in "there were a bunch of rowdy teens drinking forties in the park last night, I had to call the cops."

And I too have used/heard "pan out" as a question or a negative, but never an affirmative.

And of course drawer and door rhyme! With draw being *almost* indistinguishable from draw.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 25, 2012, 09:53:28 AM
In my youth, what most people here call a 'vanity' was a 'dressing table'.  there was always some sort of bench or chair associated with it. 

What most people here call a 'bureau' was called a 'chest of drawers'.  It was about chest high and had about six drawers.  Dear Aunt Loretta, who always had her own way of saying things, called the item a 'Chester Drawers'.

A 'dresser' was something that was only about waist high.  It was considered something very modern and my family never had one. 

The bathroom combination of sink and cabinet was virtually unknown in my youth.  I assume the modern version is called a 'Vanity' because of the large mirror over the installation. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on October 25, 2012, 12:35:26 PM
In my youth, what most people here call a 'vanity' was a 'dressing table'.  there was always some sort of bench or chair associated with it. 

What most people here call a 'bureau' was called a 'chest of drawers'.  It was about chest high and had about six drawers.  Dear Aunt Loretta, who always had her own way of saying things, called the item a 'Chester Drawers'.

A 'dresser' was something that was only about waist high.  It was considered something very modern and my family never had one. 

The bathroom combination of sink and cabinet was virtually unknown in my youth.  I assume the modern version is called a 'Vanity' because of the large mirror over the installation.

I called it a chester drawer until I was 8 or so because that's what I thought I was hearing.  I rember seeing it written for the first time and thinking, well that makes so much more sense.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on November 07, 2012, 06:27:41 PM

A "tallboy" is not furniture at all to me, its a 16oz beer (as opposed to a standard 12oz). "Amy and I got a 6 pack of tallboys for the softball game."  Unless its a Fosters, then its an "oilcan". A 40oz beer is simply a "forty" - as in "there were a bunch of rowdy teens drinking forties in the park last night, I had to call the cops."

And I too have used/heard "pan out" as a question or a negative, but never an affirmative.

And of course drawer and door rhyme! With draw being *almost* indistinguishable from draw.

Why is Fosters an oilcan?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on November 08, 2012, 01:44:48 PM

A "tallboy" is not furniture at all to me, its a 16oz beer (as opposed to a standard 12oz). "Amy and I got a 6 pack of tallboys for the softball game."  Unless its a Fosters, then its an "oilcan". A 40oz beer is simply a "forty" - as in "there were a bunch of rowdy teens drinking forties in the park last night, I had to call the cops."

And I too have used/heard "pan out" as a question or a negative, but never an affirmative.

And of course drawer and door rhyme! With draw being *almost* indistinguishable from drawer.

Why is Fosters an oilcan?

I always assumed because the fat can resembles a can of motor oil, but honestly I don't know.  I just know if someone say "hey while you are the store could you pick me up an oilcan?" or "we were tailgating with a few oilcans" they mean a can of Foster's beer.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: emwithme on November 08, 2012, 06:21:21 PM
Same for those two-wheeled things that people who walk to the store carry their groceries home in. Formerly "two-wheeled carriage," now cart. A friend calls them "blue-haired lady carts," because she associates them with older women.

Ah, the Doris* trolley

*so named for the (generally) old ladies who use them. 

All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.

One of my junior school (I was 10/11) teachers had a saying for some of the boys - that they were all mouth and no trousers.  It finally dawned on me about five years later what he meant. 

What do you guys call a bread roll?  You know, one of these (http://uk.images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_ylt=A0PDodk8TJxQbnYAUkVNBQx.;_ylu=X3oDMTBlMTQ4cGxyBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDaW1n?back=http%3A%2F%2Fuk.images.search.yahoo.com%2Fsearch%2Fimages%3Fp%3Dbread%2Broll%26fr%3Dnectar-tb-v2%26fr2%3Dpiv-web%26tab%3Dorganic%26ri%3D4&w=500&h=500&imgurl=www.noveltyproducts.co.uk%2Fimages%2Fproducts%2F982_Round_Bread_Roll.jpg&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.noveltyproducts.co.uk%2Fproduct%2Flarge_stress_bread_roll.html&size=185.5+KB&name=Large+%3Cb%3EBread+Roll+%3C%2Fb%3EStress+Shape+%7C+Realistic+Bakery+%7C+Novelty+Products&p=bread+roll&oid=890b032646e0721111af76ef4e57736b&fr2=piv-web&fr=nectar-tb-v2&tt=Large%2B%253Cb%253EBread%2BRoll%2B%253C%252Fb%253EStress%2BShape%2B%257C%2BRealistic%2BBakery%2B%257C%2BNovelty%2BProducts&b=0&ni=96&no=4&ts=&tab=organic&sigr=125rqa4f1&sigb=139122q2u&sigi=122sdtt9p&.crumb=AWOrIxp60JL)

Where I grew up, they were called a "batch" - but that's pretty specific within about a 20 mile radius, apparently.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: PastryGoddess on November 08, 2012, 07:30:54 PM
ha! I call them Granny carts.  I first heard the term in Chicago, where I went to college
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on November 09, 2012, 07:40:53 AM
I call them "granny carts" too even though in my area they are very common among all ages. DH and I use ours at least weekly if not multiple times a week - to bring the laundry down to the [apartment building communial] laundry room, to bring the groceries in (about 1 block and 6 flights from the building parking lot), etc.

Emwithme - I'd call that a dinner roll.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on November 09, 2012, 10:55:58 AM
Emwithme, that is just a roll.

We don't have many of those 2-wheeled things, but they're just carts.

What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WillyNilly on November 09, 2012, 11:03:14 AM
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

One of these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All-terrain_vehicle)? Either a "quad" or an "ATV", although if someone called it a "4x4" I'd know what they meant.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on November 09, 2012, 11:05:05 AM
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

One of these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All-terrain_vehicle)? Either a "quad" or an "ATV", although if someone called it a "4x4" I'd know what they meant.

ATV's or 4 wheelers.

I always refer to the two wheeled carts as "pull carts".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redsoil on November 10, 2012, 01:55:18 AM
Quadrunner, quadbike or just the quad.  Much prefer 2 wheels.  Way too many farm accidents with people thinking they're somehow "safe" because it has 4 wheels and they then try to do silly things, like go up the side of a steep hill at a bad angle etc.  Handy things in the mud, though.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: scotcat60 on November 10, 2012, 09:42:16 AM
Kick the bucket
Drop off your twig

Euphemisms for dying in the UK

To be out of pocket means that  you have paid out for something but got no return e;g if someone has asked you for a loan, you have given it but not been paid back, you are out of pocket, because your money has not been replaced.

Yup. Thole to rhyme with hole. According to Merriam Webster it's derived from Old English tholian and is very old but now only used in 'the corners of England's northern dialects' but it's still in use in Scotland and Ulster.

My Dad was a Scot and used this term. It is used in Robert Burns's poem"The Cottar's Saturday Night" the peom refers to the cottar (cottager) having to thole the factors "snash" ie. put up with the rudeness of the landlord's agent
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on November 18, 2012, 05:02:25 PM

A "tallboy" is not furniture at all to me, its a 16oz beer (as opposed to a standard 12oz). "Amy and I got a 6 pack of tallboys for the softball game."  Unless its a Fosters, then its an "oilcan". A 40oz beer is simply a "forty" - as in "there were a bunch of rowdy teens drinking forties in the park last night, I had to call the cops."

And I too have used/heard "pan out" as a question or a negative, but never an affirmative.

And of course drawer and door rhyme! With draw being *almost* indistinguishable from drawer.

Why is Fosters an oilcan?

I always assumed because the fat can resembles a can of motor oil, but honestly I don't know.  I just know if someone say "hey while you are the store could you pick me up an oilcan?" or "we were tailgating with a few oilcans" they mean a can of Foster's beer.

Having just been in the states and seen one, I have now worked this out.  I had no idea that Fosters and a couple of other brands were sold in larger cans.  They aren't here.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on November 18, 2012, 05:02:36 PM
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

Quadbike
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on November 18, 2012, 06:22:39 PM
ATVs up here (All Terrain Vehicle).  We still have an ATC - All Terrain Cycle.  They haven't been available for almost 30 years because the were deemed too dangerous.  A number of the rolled over and the operator was hurt/killed.  But it was really more operator error than anything.

We call it the buggy.   :)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: JonGirl on November 18, 2012, 08:16:24 PM
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

Quadbike


This.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on November 18, 2012, 08:40:45 PM
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

Quadbike

Funny, I have heard three or more terms for this, but never that one.

I think 4-wheeler is most common here.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Sharnita on November 18, 2012, 09:27:37 PM
I've heard ATV and 4-Wheeler
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Elfmama on November 18, 2012, 11:40:47 PM
Back on the first page, someone used 'dirt nap' as a euphemism/synonym for 'dying'.  Rather surprised me, because I've always heard it to mean 'got knocked out/down.' The dirt-napper is just lying there in the dirt.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on November 19, 2012, 08:38:40 AM
Back on the first page, someone used 'dirt nap' as a euphemism/synonym for 'dying'.  Rather surprised me, because I've always heard it to mean 'got knocked out/down.' The dirt-napper is just lying there in the dirt.

I wonder if this is more of a difference of interpretation than a difference of meaning. That is, no one took the time to explain it in detail to you, so you assumed a more literal meaning, or you did so because people around you also had. I say this because I was pretty certain, up to now, that there was just one metaphorical meaning for the phrase -- "napping" in the dirt = dead and buried.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Elfmama on November 19, 2012, 04:03:29 PM
Back on the first page, someone used 'dirt nap' as a euphemism/synonym for 'dying'.  Rather surprised me, because I've always heard it to mean 'got knocked out/down.' The dirt-napper is just lying there in the dirt.

I wonder if this is more of a difference of interpretation than a difference of meaning. That is, no one took the time to explain it in detail to you, so you assumed a more literal meaning, or you did so because people around you also had. I say this because I was pretty certain, up to now, that there was just one metaphorical meaning for the phrase -- "napping" in the dirt = dead and buried.
I don't think so.  The only contexts in which I've heard it used are those where there is actual possibility of someone being knocked out.  SCA sword-and-shield fighters, for instance.  "Make him take a dirt-nap" is the usual phrasing, although since we pretend that a fighter is "dead" when he is defeated, it's possible that I did misunderstand. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: hobish on November 19, 2012, 04:23:59 PM
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

One of these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All-terrain_vehicle)? Either a "quad" or an "ATV", although if someone called it a "4x4" I'd know what they meant.

I am familiar with quad and ATV. I would think a 4x4 was a truck. Three wheelers (now illegal as mentioned, but I still see some around) are three wheelers or a nugget, because it is just a little nugget, not a whole bike or quad? I dunno, but I love the term; I think it is rather South Jersey specific but i am not positive.

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: baglady on December 02, 2012, 06:54:32 PM
Same for those two-wheeled things that people who walk to the store carry their groceries home in. Formerly "two-wheeled carriage," now cart. A friend calls them "blue-haired lady carts," because she associates them with older women.

Ah, the Doris* trolley

*so named for the (generally) old ladies who use them. 

All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.

One of my junior school (I was 10/11) teachers had a saying for some of the boys - that they were all mouth and no trousers.  It finally dawned on me about five years later what he meant. 

What do you guys call a bread roll?  You know, one of these (http://uk.images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_ylt=A0PDodk8TJxQbnYAUkVNBQx.;_ylu=X3oDMTBlMTQ4cGxyBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDaW1n?back=http%3A%2F%2Fuk.images.search.yahoo.com%2Fsearch%2Fimages%3Fp%3Dbread%2Broll%26fr%3Dnectar-tb-v2%26fr2%3Dpiv-web%26tab%3Dorganic%26ri%3D4&w=500&h=500&imgurl=www.noveltyproducts.co.uk%2Fimages%2Fproducts%2F982_Round_Bread_Roll.jpg&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.noveltyproducts.co.uk%2Fproduct%2Flarge_stress_bread_roll.html&size=185.5+KB&name=Large+%3Cb%3EBread+Roll+%3C%2Fb%3EStress+Shape+%7C+Realistic+Bakery+%7C+Novelty+Products&p=bread+roll&oid=890b032646e0721111af76ef4e57736b&fr2=piv-web&fr=nectar-tb-v2&tt=Large%2B%253Cb%253EBread%2BRoll%2B%253C%252Fb%253EStress%2BShape%2B%257C%2BRealistic%2BBakery%2B%257C%2BNovelty%2BProducts&b=0&ni=96&no=4&ts=&tab=organic&sigr=125rqa4f1&sigb=139122q2u&sigi=122sdtt9p&.crumb=AWOrIxp60JL)

Where I grew up, they were called a "batch" - but that's pretty specific within about a 20 mile radius, apparently.

Just a roll. I can't tell from that image if that's the kind of roll you'd serve with dinner and put butter on, or one you'd cut open and make a sandwich with. I might use "dinner roll" for the former, to distinguish it from the latter, but at the dinner table it'd just be "Please pass me a roll."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on December 08, 2012, 09:06:59 AM
Here's a new one for me.

We've recently returned from England where I loaded up own a good supply of Crossword books.

Several times, in puzzles by different setters,  the term 'The Black Dog' has turned up as an synonym for 'Depression'. 

It's a vivid image that I'd never heard before. 

Is this regional or is it more wide-spread? 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Iris on December 08, 2012, 02:54:22 PM
One organisation in Australia that works to raise awareness and help those with depression and bipolar disorder is called the "Black Dog Institute". According to their website the term was coined by Winston Churchill, who used it to describe his own depression.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on December 09, 2012, 10:00:03 AM
Thank you, Iris. 

I'm thinking that a good New Year's Resolution might to do some reading on Churchill.  after all, his Mother was a New York girl. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Leafy on November 15, 2013, 01:58:11 AM
I have one short question so I thought I would use this old thread rather than starting a new one. My husband was watching a YouTube video about Anglo-Indian words used around the world. One of the people, a guy in Canada, stated that "Ta" used for thank you was Anglo-Indian as he had only ever heard his parents say it. We found this a bit odd as "ta" is used very commonly in Australia, though most often with young children.

Does anyone else, who is not necessarily Anglo-Indian, use "ta" for "thank you"?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: veryfluffy on November 15, 2013, 03:22:58 AM
Totally normal in England everywhere I've been to use "ta." It's like a small thank-you (eg for holding the door, or when the cashier gives you your change in a shop). If you are feeling effusive, you might say "ta muchly", but I think that might be more Australian?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Margo on November 15, 2013, 03:23:24 AM
yes.It's fairly common (though I would say slightly old fashioned) British English. I've certainly come across it in novels written in the 1920s and later.

Having lived in different parts of the UK I personally have found it to be used much more in Northern England than in the South, so I've always tended to assume that it was originally a Northern expression.

I wouldn't think of it as Anglo-Indian at all. (I'd be curious to know which area of the UK he/his parents lived in. A lot of Indian and Pakistani immigrants came to Manchester and other areas in the North due to conections with the cotton trade, so if his parents (or grandparents) originally came to / lived in the North they may have picked it up as a commonly used Northern expression, rather than an Anglo-Indian one.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Outdoor Girl on November 15, 2013, 07:59:00 AM
As a Canadian, I've only ever heard 'ta' used with children too young to be able to say a full thank you.  The only adults I've heard use it have British roots and really only the older generations.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on November 15, 2013, 08:07:12 AM
To add to that: I've never before heard "Anglo Indian."

 It really rubs me the wrong way, but it's interesting to see and fairly obvious where it might come from.

I'm missing Texas these days, but I'm glad to be free of most of these (the only one I'd never heard used is on the final page, a quote from "Selena"--which I admit to seeing far more times than necessary, even): 14 things all Texans have said at least once (http://yestotexas.com/14-things-all-texans-have-said-at-least-once/)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redneck Gravy on November 15, 2013, 12:30:04 PM
To add to that: I've never before heard "Anglo Indian."

 It really rubs me the wrong way, but it's interesting to see and fairly obvious where it might come from.

I'm missing Texas these days, but I'm glad to be free of most of these (the only one I'd never heard used is on the final page, a quote from "Selena"--which I admit to seeing far more times than necessary, even): 14 things all Texans have said at least once (http://yestotexas.com/14-things-all-texans-have-said-at-least-once/)

Anglo Indian?

I'm fixin to get some lunch ... over yonder
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on November 15, 2013, 12:47:03 PM
I have lived in Houston my whole life and I've never heard of that Selena thing mentioned on that website.

Funny thing is that they left out the most commonly used word that Texans are known for: y'all.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: cwm on November 15, 2013, 01:09:40 PM
Yes, but y'all isn't just Texan, it's a whole Southern-ism. When I go down to Arkansas, everyone says y'all. And it's at least a two syllable word. At least.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on November 15, 2013, 01:11:33 PM
Yeah I know it's not only Texan. I didn't mean to imply it was. Just that the name of the article is "things all Texans have said at least once" and y'all is the quintessential item on that list.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on November 15, 2013, 01:51:43 PM
Yeah I know it's not only Texan. I didn't mean to imply it was. Just that the name of the article is "things all Texans have said at least once" and y'all is the quintessential item on that list.

Well, it's probably true that all Texans have said "the" and "Texas" at least once, but I think they were going for ultra-Texan expressions rather than single words.

"Y'all" is something said in about 1/5 of the country at this point, I'd guess. Funnily enough, I only lived outside of Texas for my first 7 years, but I still say "you guys" instead of "y'all."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: AfleetAlex on November 15, 2013, 02:34:11 PM
Somebody way upthread mentioned this, and I have been meaning to ask about it: I am from Michigan and I've noticed that a lot of times when we say "Bless her heart" we really mean something like, "Oh, how sweet of her!" or we will say to someone, "Bless your heart!" for something good that they did, especially if the thing they did was difficult in some way so doing it was really going above-and-beyond.

I have of course heard the US-Southern interpretation, but if you use the phrase, how do you use it and what do you mean by it?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: menley on November 15, 2013, 02:40:50 PM
It's a multipurpose saying for me :) I use it differently based on tone of voice and perhaps an accompanying eyeroll if I mean it in the Southern sense. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Slartibartfast on November 15, 2013, 02:44:29 PM
Yeah, "bless her heart" always does have the "how sweet" sense, but sometimes it's a heartfelt "how sweet" and sometimes it's sarcastic.  It's all in the context and tone of voice.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on November 15, 2013, 02:49:37 PM
To add to that: I've never before heard "Anglo Indian."

 It really rubs me the wrong way, but it's interesting to see and fairly obvious where it might come from.

I'm missing Texas these days, but I'm glad to be free of most of these (the only one I'd never heard used is on the final page, a quote from "Selena"--which I admit to seeing far more times than necessary, even): 14 things all Texans have said at least once (http://yestotexas.com/14-things-all-texans-have-said-at-least-once/)

Anglo Indian?

I'm fixin to get some lunch ... over yonder
This week I was at an event where a nationally well known financial market wizard was a giving a key note speech about global job market and the impact of global national debt. I giggled he started his second sentence with "I'm fixin' to tell you...".  Yep, native Texan.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on November 15, 2013, 03:01:08 PM
"Bless his heart": The way it's usually used (in my experience) is to sort of excuse the insult you're throwing out.
Example:
He's as dumb as a rock, bless his heart.
or
She's not going to win any beauty contests, bless her heart.

It's sort of like, if you put in the "bless his heart" after the insult, it wasn't really an insult after all, just a statement of fact for which you have nothing by sympathy for the subject.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: cwm on November 15, 2013, 03:06:09 PM
I've heard the phrase "Oh, well..." used in the same tone as "Bless his/her heart!"

It generally means "Oh, well, I don't have any polite words to say, so I'm just going to not say anything, but you're being judged."

Also, when my great grandmother would say it when I was young (mostly in response to news stories), I thought she was saying "Oh, whale." I was really confused.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Psychopoesie on November 15, 2013, 06:30:52 PM
To add to that: I've never before heard "Anglo Indian."

 It really rubs me the wrong way, but it's interesting to see and fairly obvious where it might come from.

I'm missing Texas these days, but I'm glad to be free of most of these (the only one I'd never heard used is on the final page, a quote from "Selena"--which I admit to seeing far more times than necessary, even): 14 things all Texans have said at least once (http://yestotexas.com/14-things-all-texans-have-said-at-least-once/)

Just curious about what rubbed the wrong way about the term Anglo-Indian?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Leafy on November 16, 2013, 03:53:31 AM
To add to that: I've never before heard "Anglo Indian."

 It really rubs me the wrong way, but it's interesting to see and fairly obvious where it might come from.

I'm missing Texas these days, but I'm glad to be free of most of these (the only one I'd never heard used is on the final page, a quote from "Selena"--which I admit to seeing far more times than necessary, even): 14 things all Texans have said at least once (http://yestotexas.com/14-things-all-texans-have-said-at-least-once/)

Just curious about what rubbed the wrong way about the term Anglo-Indian?

Anglo-Indians are a defined group of people who have Indian heritage as well as some English or Portugese colonist in their genealogy. They define themselves as such. There is a very large population of Anglo-Indians in Australia - many of whom belong to the Anglo-Indian club (they have dinners, dances and reunions in India).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redneck Gravy on November 17, 2013, 12:30:40 PM
I saw the Anglo Indian as a negative connotation...

I have heard "he thinks he's a white Mexican" meaning he thinks he's better than other Mexican people - meant to be very negative.  I hate the term. 

I am trying to beat back my racist/sexist upbringing and think of race as HUMAN (that's hard enough without others adding to the racist comments around me)

I was unaware of the Australian connection.





Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on November 17, 2013, 04:30:58 PM
I saw the Anglo Indian as a negative connotation...

I have heard "he thinks he's a white Mexican" meaning he thinks he's better than other Mexican people - meant to be very negative.  I hate the term. 

I am trying to beat back my racist/sexist upbringing and think of race as HUMAN (that's hard enough without others adding to the racist comments around me)

I was unaware of the Australian connection.

I'm Australian and unfamiliar with the term but just read it as someone who identifies as both - like African Amercian.

"Ta" used by adults here is only for very perfunct thank yous.  Like when someone passes something to you.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on May 25, 2014, 07:06:56 PM
Hope you don't mind me dredging up this again, but I've thought of another regional saying.

If I said 'I came a cropper'.  Would you know what I was talking about?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: SadieBaby on May 25, 2014, 09:22:25 PM
Hope you don't mind me dredging up this again, but I've thought of another regional saying.

If I said 'I came a cropper'.  Would you know what I was talking about?

It means you made a mistake, failed, had a bad result in something -- Not a good thing for you!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on May 25, 2014, 09:29:44 PM
I dug way into the recesses of my mind. I never would have come up with the meaning of that phrase. I figured it must mean something like,  "became a sharecropper."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Katana_Geldar on May 25, 2014, 10:48:41 PM
One of my favourites is "flat out like a lizard drinking". Any guesses?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: perpetua on May 26, 2014, 01:20:36 AM
Hope you don't mind me dredging up this again, but I've thought of another regional saying.

If I said 'I came a cropper'.  Would you know what I was talking about?

It means you made a mistake, failed, had a bad result in something -- Not a good thing for you!

Orrrr (here) it would mean you fell flat on your face in a literal sense, ie, falling over, usually quite badly. Ie, "She tripped on the way out of the pub and came a right cropper".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on May 26, 2014, 01:47:32 AM
What I did was trip over some rough ground and landed heavily on my knee and hand.  :(
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on May 26, 2014, 08:27:01 AM
One of my favourites is "flat out like a lizard drinking". Any guesses?

I would think someone was passed out drunk.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on May 26, 2014, 09:40:02 AM
One of my favourites is "flat out like a lizard drinking". Any guesses?

I would think someone was passed out drunk.

I wouldn't necessarily think 'drunk'.  When a lizard is drinking from a stream it does tend to really flatten out.  I would get the mental image of someone who, for whatever reason, fell and landed face-first. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on May 26, 2014, 09:57:28 AM
No you're both wrong :) I'll leave it to Katana though .
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Katana_Geldar on May 26, 2014, 05:17:17 PM
It means "extremely busy". It's a play on both means of the expression "flat out", stretched out flat and doing something fast. And lizards drink water very fast.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Elfmama on May 26, 2014, 08:09:52 PM
One from my family in Oklahoma: "It don't make me no nevermind."

I think I'll let the Aussies guess this one.  >:D
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Psychopoesie on May 26, 2014, 08:12:13 PM
One from my family in Oklahoma: "It don't make me no nevermind."

I think I'll let the Aussies guess this one.  >:D

It's no trouble?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Katana_Geldar on May 26, 2014, 08:32:19 PM
I don't care?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Luci on May 26, 2014, 08:59:22 PM
My favorite from my childhood is "sorry", as in "move his sorry [rear end]" for "he had better move on" or the project I sewed was 'sorry' - just not good enough.

I haven't heard "yonder" since my grandmother passed in 1983. It meant "over there", as a slight walk, but seeable. Never used inside the home, just for field's or garden's distances.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Psychopoesie on May 26, 2014, 09:16:14 PM
I don't care?

Along this line of thought...

It's none of my business?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on May 26, 2014, 10:15:27 PM
My favorite from my childhood is "sorry", as in "move his sorry [rear end]" for "he had better move on" or the project I sewed was 'sorry' - just not good enough.

I haven't heard "yonder" since my grandmother passed in 1983. It meant "over there", as a slight walk, but seeable. Never used inside the home, just for field's or garden's distances.

I still say "his sorry rear end" and although I don't think I've used it since I was small, I know what "it was a sorry little project" means.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: CakeEater on May 26, 2014, 11:29:08 PM
One from my family in Oklahoma: "It don't make me no nevermind."

I think I'll let the Aussies guess this one.  >:D

It doesn't matter?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: iridaceae on May 27, 2014, 01:53:09 AM
One from my family in Oklahoma: "It don't make me no nevermind."

I think I'll let the Aussies guess this one.  >:D

I'm from Wisconsin and I have often baffled co-workers here in Arizona with "it's close enough as makes no nevermind".

Edited because my kindle was acting up.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: WolfWay on May 27, 2014, 01:59:05 AM
In Southern Africa, we have the incredibly confusing time spans of "Now", "Now now", "Right now" and "Just now".

"Now" actually means soon (like in the next couple of minutes).
"Now Now" means fairly soon, but later than "Now".
"Right Now" means kinda soon, but later than "Now Now".
"Just Now" means later (or maybe never depending on mood).

So if you say you're going to do something "Right now" it could take a while to get to it.

And now I've typed the word "Now" so many times it's stopped looking like a sensible word and just looks like gibberish.



There's also the lovely phrase "Yah well no fine". Means quite a few things (or nothing at all), all depending entirely on tone.

Person1: "Sally is going to be an hour late."
Person2: "Yah well no fine".  <-- in an annoyed tone, it means "Ugh Seriously!?", in a relaxed tone it mean "Oh well, nevermind, she'll get here when she gets here".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: ClaireC79 on May 27, 2014, 07:45:17 AM
Makes our 'I'll be there now in a minute' make perfect sense
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Margo on May 27, 2014, 08:00:57 AM
In British English, 'right now' would be 'now this minute' - it has a definite sense of urgency to it.
'now' would be,  now, but less urgent / immediate than 'right now'
'just now' would be something which has happened in the [very] recent past.
'now now' is not a time frame at all - it is a mild warning - something you might say if you were interrupting someone who is just about to say something inappropriate, or it might be mildly questioning (a sort of 'whats all this about', to a child, maybe)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on May 27, 2014, 08:59:20 AM
In British English, 'right now' would be 'now this minute' - it has a definite sense of urgency to it.
'now' would be,  now, but less urgent / immediate than 'right now'
'just now' would be something which has happened in the [very] recent past.
'now now' is not a time frame at all - it is a mild warning - something you might say if you were interrupting someone who is just about to say something inappropriate, or it might be mildly questioning (a sort of 'whats all this about', to a child, maybe)

That would be the exact meanings for those terms here in NYC as well. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Hmmmmm on May 27, 2014, 09:00:31 AM
In Southern Africa, we have the incredibly confusing time spans of "Now", "Now now", "Right now" and "Just now".

"Now" actually means soon (like in the next couple of minutes).
"Now Now" means fairly soon, but later than "Now".
"Right Now" means kinda soon, but later than "Now Now".
"Just Now" means later (or maybe never depending on mood).

So if you say you're going to do something "Right now" it could take a while to get to it.

And now I've typed the word "Now" so many times it's stopped looking like a sensible word and just looks like gibberish.



There's also the lovely phrase "Yah well no fine". Means quite a few things (or nothing at all), all depending entirely on tone.

Person1: "Sally is going to be an hour late."
Person2: "Yah well no fine".  <-- in an annoyed tone, it means "Ugh Seriously!?", in a relaxed tone it mean "Oh well, nevermind, she'll get here when she gets here".

Interesting. I would have thought the opposite definitions. I used to use now, now with my kids to mean "do it this very second" not their definition of now which could mean when they stopped what they were doing and got to it.

Just now is also a regional phrase I grew up with to mean something had just occurred. "He just now drove up."

I'd have always been confused in S.A.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Elfmama on May 27, 2014, 03:45:48 PM
One from my family in Oklahoma: "It don't make me no nevermind."

I think I'll let the Aussies guess this one.  >:D

It doesn't matter?
It's a tossup  between this and "I don't care."  :) 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on May 27, 2014, 04:48:56 PM
I've heard that "quite good" in Britain means mediocre or not very good. In the U.S. it means something that's better than average, so a little better than good, but not fantastic.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: mime on May 27, 2014, 05:14:48 PM
I've heard that "quite good" in Britain means mediocre or not very good. In the U.S. it means something that's better than average, so a little better than good, but not fantastic.

I had a British boss for a while. Now I'm trying to remember if he ever used that phrase for my work!

I always smiled when he would refer to my numbers as "bang on". It sounded so much more forceful than "they're right".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Margo on May 28, 2014, 02:58:16 AM
I've heard that "quite good" in Britain means mediocre or not very good. In the U.S. it means something that's better than average, so a little better than good, but not fantastic.

Yes, I think in most conexts 'quite good' = less good than 'good'.

On he other hand, 'not bad' generally means better than 'good' :)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on May 28, 2014, 03:10:50 PM
I've heard that "quite good" in Britain means mediocre or not very good. In the U.S. it means something that's better than average, so a little better than good, but not fantastic.

Yes, I think in most conexts 'quite good' = less good than 'good'.

On he other hand, 'not bad' generally means better than 'good' :)

Here (US), quite good and not bad are pretty much equals.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: jilly on May 28, 2014, 03:22:41 PM
Apparently soon used to mean now, but people kept saying they'd do something soon and then doing it later so often the meaning shifted  ::) you can see the same thing happening with now, people add qualifiers for urgency.

anyone else understand nammet?

Oh and as it's nearly holiday season, grockle?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: perpetua on May 28, 2014, 05:09:12 PM
Oh and as it's nearly holiday season, grockle?

Or, depending which side of the Tamar you grew up on: Emmet :)

Grockles were the bane of my life growing up... so yes, perfectly well understood here!

(This one's even regional within the UK, I think).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Elfmama on May 28, 2014, 06:23:40 PM
Oh and as it's nearly holiday season, grockle?

Or, depending which side of the Tamar you grew up on: Emmet :)

Grockles were the bane of my life growing up... so yes, perfectly well understood here!

(This one's even regional within the UK, I think).
Well, this is a grackle.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Grackle)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c4/Common_Grackle_male_RWD.jpg/320px-Common_Grackle_male_RWD.jpg)

A big, noisy bird that congregates in large messy flocks and makes a nuisance of itself.   Is there any similarity? ;)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: jilly on May 29, 2014, 01:59:57 AM
Oh and as it's nearly holiday season, grockle?

Or, depending which side of the Tamar you grew up on: Emmet :)

Grockles were the bane of my life growing up... so yes, perfectly well understood here!

(This one's even regional within the UK, I think).

I have a suspicion that nammet is so regional in the uk it's limited to one county and going out of use :(  I'm actually on the isle of wight but I know there are several towns in Australia and I think the US named after towns here so I thought there maybe spread some regional sayings too :).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: perpetua on May 29, 2014, 02:19:43 AM
Oh and as it's nearly holiday season, grockle?

Or, depending which side of the Tamar you grew up on: Emmet :)

Grockles were the bane of my life growing up... so yes, perfectly well understood here!

(This one's even regional within the UK, I think).
Well, this is a grackle.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Grackle)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c4/Common_Grackle_male_RWD.jpg/320px-Common_Grackle_male_RWD.jpg)

A big, noisy bird that congregates in large messy flocks and makes a nuisance of itself.   Is there any similarity? ;)

Ohhhhhhhh yes :)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on May 29, 2014, 03:34:15 AM
To my Scottish husband grockle is little bits n pieces of whatever. We buy small presents for the kids before Xmas and he calls that grockle.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redsoil on May 29, 2014, 09:35:44 AM
Those outside Australia can try their hand at this one - I'm interested to see if other countries use it at all.

"Bangin' like a dunny door."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on May 29, 2014, 09:43:22 AM
Those outside Australia can try their hand at this one - I'm interested to see if other countries use it at all.

"Bangin' like a dunny door."

I'm going to guess it is much like what we call a screen door, the second door that allows wind through if you leave the first door open. They are notorious racket makers when not secured during a storm.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Ms_Cellany on May 29, 2014, 09:56:50 AM
Those outside Australia can try their hand at this one - I'm interested to see if other countries use it at all.

"Bangin' like a dunny door."

I'm going to guess it is much like what we call a screen door, the second door that allows wind through if you leave the first door open. They are notorious racket makers when not secured during a storm.

I'm guessing "dunny" is what USAians call an outhouse. Doors unsecured when empty.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Elfmama on May 29, 2014, 12:10:23 PM
Those outside Australia can try their hand at this one - I'm interested to see if other countries use it at all.

"Bangin' like a dunny door."

I'm going to guess it is much like what we call a screen door, the second door that allows wind through if you leave the first door open. They are notorious racket makers when not secured during a storm.

I'm guessing "dunny" is what USAians call an outhouse. Doors unsecured when empty.
I think you're right on 'dunny' but I didn't think that it meant banging in the wind, but banging because of heavy use, one person goes out and the next person in line goes in.  (Either it's a family reunion, or a family that's passing a severe digestive virus back and forth.) 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: ClaireC79 on May 29, 2014, 12:22:09 PM
Grockles are tourists in Cornwall I think
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: jaxsue on May 30, 2014, 10:53:20 AM
Grockles are tourists in Cornwall I think

Interesting what tourists are called around the world.

Here in NJ, at the shore, they're called "bennies." (in some towns, anyway)
When I was in VT to see the fall foliage we were called "leaf peepers."
Where I grew up, in N. MI (a town that was mainly tourism) they were "fudgies."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: AfleetAlex on May 30, 2014, 01:02:52 PM
Can't turn down that Mackinac Island fudge! :-)  I think that's where the name came from, anyway.

Of note: If you get the chance in Michigan to buy fudge, I encourage it.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on May 30, 2014, 01:55:47 PM
Grockles are tourists in Cornwall I think

Interesting what tourists are called around the world.

Here in NJ, at the shore, they're called "bennies." (in some towns, anyway)
When I was in VT to see the fall foliage we were called "leaf peepers."
Where I grew up, in N. MI (a town that was mainly tourism) they were "fudgies."

NW Pennsylvania here...lots of Pittsburghers came to my small every year, every weekend. We called them "mup-eres", as in a crammed together shortening of "I'm up here for the weekend."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: jilly on May 30, 2014, 02:37:35 PM
That's a lot of different words for tourist.

Nammet was lunch.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Fi on May 31, 2014, 06:39:13 AM
Grockles are tourists in Cornwall I think

Grockles are Somerset and Devon for tourist; Cornwall calls them Emmetts.

Here's one for you: "Now you're sucking diesel."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Snooks on May 31, 2014, 07:30:21 AM
Grockles are tourists in Cornwall I think

Interesting what tourists are called around the world.

Here in NJ, at the shore, they're called "bennies." (in some Townsville, anyway)
When I was in VT to see the fall foliage we were called "leaf peepers."
Where I grew up, in N. MI (a town that was mainly tourism) they were "fudgies."

Living in a very touristy city I wish we had a good name for them but generally they're just "bloody tourists"!
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Redsoil on May 31, 2014, 07:33:12 AM
Those outside Australia can try their hand at this one - I'm interested to see if other countries use it at all.

"Bangin' like a dunny door."

I'm going to guess it is much like what we call a screen door, the second door that allows wind through if you leave the first door open. They are notorious racket makers when not secured during a storm.

I'm guessing "dunny" is what USAians call an outhouse. Doors unsecured when empty.
I think you're right on 'dunny' but I didn't think that it meant banging in the wind, but banging because of heavy use, one person goes out and the next person in line goes in.  (Either it's a family reunion, or a family that's passing a severe digestive virus back and forth.) 

Interesting to see the interpretations!

Correct in the assumption that a "dunny" is indeed an "outhouse".  (The phrase is at times used to indicate vigorous scrabble activity.)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Peppergirl on May 31, 2014, 08:02:32 AM
I haven't gotten through the entire thread yet, but since this is *extremely* regional, I think I'm safe to say it's not been mentioned:

Where I'm from (at least back-in-the-day), one would use the word 'Please?' instead of 'Pardon?'.

Example -

Person #1  "Do you have the time?"
Person #2  (if they didn't hear them) "Please?"


When growing up, we knew never to utter it on vacation or we'd get odd stares and quizzical looks.   :D
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: oz diva on May 31, 2014, 08:39:05 AM

Here's one for you: "Now you're sucking diesel."
I'd imagine it was now you're doing it right. I say 'now you're cooking with gas.'
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Fi on May 31, 2014, 08:44:56 AM

Here's one for you: "Now you're sucking diesel."
I'd imagine it was now you're doing it right. I say 'now you're cooking with gas.'

Exactly! Irish country phrase.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: menley on May 31, 2014, 09:10:17 AM
I haven't gotten through the entire thread yet, but since this is *extremely* regional, I think I'm safe to say it's not been mentioned:

Where I'm from (at least back-in-the-day), one would use the word 'Please?' instead of 'Pardon?'.

Example -

Person #1  "Do you have the time?"
Person #2  (if they didn't hear them) "Please?"


When growing up, we knew never to utter it on vacation or we'd get odd stares and quizzical looks.   :D

Hah! In Hungary, the word that you'd say is "Tessék" - which translates to "here you go", "go ahead", or strangely, "action!" (like what you say before starting filming). So if someone says something you don't understand, the response is essentially "Go ahead?" which made zero sense to me for months.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 02, 2014, 06:50:04 AM
Grockles are Somerset and Devon for tourist; Cornwall calls them Emmetts.

"Emmett" in this context comes, I'm given to understand, from the word for "ant" in the Cornish language !
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on June 02, 2014, 10:19:06 AM
'Emmett' for 'ant' is a staple in American crosswords although I've never heard it in conversation. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: baglady on June 03, 2014, 05:35:23 PM
I went to a college in northern New Hampshire, and "emmett" was the local slang (among students and townies) for people from New Hampshire. Vermonters were called "newts."

I currently live near Lake George, N.Y., where the locals refer to the tourists as "tourons" -- a portmanteau of "tourist" and "moron." Not all tourists are tourons, though -- just the boorish ones.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: jaxsue on June 03, 2014, 08:47:07 PM
'Emmett' for 'ant' is a staple in American crosswords although I've never heard it in conversation.

ITA
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: jaxsue on June 03, 2014, 08:48:38 PM
Can't turn down that Mackinac Island fudge! :-)  I think that's where the name came from, anyway.

Of note: If you get the chance in Michigan to buy fudge, I encourage it.

And don't forget the pasties! :-)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: scotcat60 on June 04, 2014, 09:20:19 AM
I'm guessing "dunny" is what USAians call an outhouse. Doors unsecured when empty.
I think you're right on 'dunny' but I didn't think that it meant banging in the wind, but banging because of heavy use, one person goes out and the next person in line goes in.  (Either it's a family reunion, or a family that's passing a severe digestive virus back and forth.) 

In short, because someone has a severe case of the back-door trots, as we'd say in the UK.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on June 04, 2014, 07:23:25 PM
I'm guessing "dunny" is what USAians call an outhouse. Doors unsecured when empty.
I think you're right on 'dunny' but I didn't think that it meant banging in the wind, but banging because of heavy use, one person goes out and the next person in line goes in.  (Either it's a family reunion, or a family that's passing a severe digestive virus back and forth.) 

In short, because someone has a severe case of the back-door trots, as we'd say in the UK.

To my knowledge, in the U.S., "dunny" isn't even a word. I'd never heard it before this thread (born and raised in the U.S.). I believe it's an Australian term.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Psychopoesie on June 04, 2014, 07:33:37 PM
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on June 04, 2014, 07:49:49 PM
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Psychopoesie on June 04, 2014, 08:01:21 PM
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

Had heard of that one as a naval expression more generally. Think it turned up in something I was reading. I haven't heard anyone actually say it.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on June 04, 2014, 08:52:22 PM
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

Had heard of that one as a naval expression more generally. Think it turned up in something I was reading. I haven't heard anyone actually say it.

I'll hear it one in a while. Here in the western U.S. you'll also sometimes (rarely) hear "I've got to see a man about a horse" meaning the same thing. Or when you're boating on a lake with friends, you excuse yourself and say "I have to check the propeller."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Psychopoesie on June 04, 2014, 08:55:30 PM
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

Had heard of that one as a naval expression more generally. Think it turned up in something I was reading. I haven't heard anyone actually say it.

I'll hear it one in a while. Here in the western U.S. you'll also sometimes (rarely) hear "I've got to see a man about a horse" meaning the same thing. Or when you're boating on a lake with friends, you excuse yourself and say "I have to check the propeller."

Same sort of thing here, although i tend to hear it as "have to see a man about a dog."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 04, 2014, 11:42:41 PM
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

"Head" can be a tricky one, though, since it's WAY too easy to say something that can be misconstrued as a double entendre for fellatio ::)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on June 05, 2014, 01:08:20 PM
In my experience, "head" meaning toilet is now a common military expression and has worked its way into para-military institutions, such as police departments and corrections related areas.  I hear it used on a weekly basis.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Margo on June 06, 2014, 06:12:22 AM
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

the reason is that back in the days of wooden ships, you relieved yourself over the side of the ship, and the designated place was right at the front of the ship, next to the figurehead, so it was purely descriptive, and the name stuck even after the location changed.

Dunny I think is originally an English term but as it tended to mean a bucket toilet or earth closet it is obsolete.  (there used to be 'dunnycarts' which came round to collect the contents of the buckets, in towns) I would guess that perhaps the term survived in Australia partly as it may have continued to be more common *not* to have mains drainage for longer, particualrly in rural areas, although I may be wrong.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on June 06, 2014, 01:05:21 PM
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

the reason is that back in the days of wooden ships, you relieved yourself over the side of the ship, and the designated place was right at the front of the ship, next to the figurehead, so it was purely descriptive, and the name stuck even after the location changed.

Interesting! Thanks for telling us. That's so strange that they would go at the front of the ship, instead of off the back of the ship. It brings to mind another saying I have seldom heard, but laugh every time I hear it: "pissin' into the wind."
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Margo on June 06, 2014, 02:40:38 PM
I thought that, but in a sailing ship, he wind would be coming from behind (ideally) so apparently anything unpleasant or smelly was placed as far forward as possible, and the captain got the nice big cabin at the stern.

Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: nolechica on June 08, 2014, 04:37:44 AM
I went to a college in northern New Hampshire, and "emmett" was the local slang (among students and townies) for people from New Hampshire. Vermonters were called "newts."

I currently live near Lake George, N.Y., where the locals refer to the tourists as "tourons" -- a portmanteau of "tourist" and "moron." Not all tourists are tourons, though -- just the boorish ones.

LOL, I rather like touron.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: miranova on June 26, 2014, 07:01:15 AM
I was fascinated reading about nachos=just chips because my husband's entire family is from PA and I encountered this recently.  For our Super Bowl party my MIL asked what she could bring and I suggested nachos.  She showed up with a bag of chips.  I was mystified.  My husband explained that that's what nachos means to her.  I had no idea it was a PA thing but that explains it!

There are many things my husband and his family say that must be regional to PA (or maybe not but they are the only people I ever hear saying them).

Hamburg for ground beef
mile an hour for miles per hour.  For instance "I was going 50 mile an hour back there".
Someone isn't a bus driver, they "drive bus".  This one was so hard for me to get used to.
Similarly, my husband needs to "mow lawn".  Not "mow the lawn".  He drops words in other places too.  "This invoice needs paid" instead of "needs to be paid" all the time.  After meeting and listening to his family I realized they all do it so it came from either them specifically or that regional area.
They pronounce creek "crick".
They pronounce "roof" like "ruff" and "root" like "rut".
When my MIL buys furniture for a whole room she calls it an outfit.  Like "come look at the bedroom outfit we found".

I am not making fun, I just find it fascinating to listen to when he is around his family.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: iridaceae on June 26, 2014, 07:22:17 AM
My father is from west central Illinois- Quncy- and her says crick for creek.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Thipu1 on June 26, 2014, 09:54:16 AM
Here in Brooklyn, nachos involve at least chips and melted cheese.  That's the economy version.  A deluxe variety can also include refried beans, salsa, sour cream and perhaps even chili meat.  A good plate of nachos can be a whole meal. 

I'd be puzzled if someone said they were bringing nachos and showed up with only a bag of chips. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on June 26, 2014, 03:42:16 PM
He drops words in other places too.  "This invoice needs paid" instead of "needs to be paid" all the time.

I live in the central U.S. I've heard this from time to time. It drives me nuts! And when I ask the person why they do that, they always reply "I don't do that. I don't know what you're talking about." I think I even mentioned this type of speech in the EHell thread Grammar and spellling that make you twitch (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=130045.0).
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on June 30, 2014, 09:58:12 AM
Here in Brooklyn, nachos involve at least chips and melted cheese.  That's the economy version.  A deluxe variety can also include refried beans, salsa, sour cream and perhaps even chili meat.  A good plate of nachos can be a whole meal. 

I'd be puzzled if someone said they were bringing nachos and showed up with only a bag of chips.

Yeah, nachos, at minimum, are chips topped with cheese. They have misunderstood the meaning if they think it just means chips. "Chips" just means chips.

Per dictionary.com:


na·cho

noun, plural na·chos. Mexican Cookery. 
a snack or appetizer consisting of a small piece of tortilla topped with cheese, hot peppers, etc., and broiled.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on June 30, 2014, 10:02:41 AM
Here in Brooklyn, nachos involve at least chips and melted cheese.  That's the economy version.  A deluxe variety can also include refried beans, salsa, sour cream and perhaps even chili meat.  A good plate of nachos can be a whole meal. 

I'd be puzzled if someone said they were bringing nachos and showed up with only a bag of chips.

Yeah, nachos, at minimum, are chips topped with cheese. They have misunderstood the meaning if they think it just means chips. "Chips" just means chips.

Per dictionary.com:


na·cho

noun, plural na·chos. Mexican Cookery. 
a snack or appetizer consisting of a small piece of tortilla topped with cheese, hot peppers, etc., and broiled.


Since I was the first to post this thing about nachos just being chips, and this is the regional sayings thread, I think it's pretty clear that what's "wrong" everywhere else is reasonably easily understood in PA.

The first time I made nachos, as we understand them, for my PA-reared husband, he said something like, "I didn't know you meant fancy nachos! Wow!" When his mom serves "nachos" for a snack, it's chips and salsa or another dip.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on June 30, 2014, 01:34:30 PM
Ok, I give. I didn't mean to offend.

So, just wondering, do they ever offer nachos as a dish on a menu? Or is it called something else when they mean chips topped with cheese, etc.?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on June 30, 2014, 01:43:27 PM
I think if nachos were on a menu, they'd be 'real' nachos. Chips would be chips.

I honestly think it's a small regional quirk that is quite outdated. The only reason my husband says it is because his mom did, and I haven't seen it in a store or anything. I posted it here because I wondered if anyone else in the world did that or if it was just a family thing.

I wasn't offended, I promise. I just thought it was funny to dissect it in this way in a thread about mostly nonsense-if-taken-literally expressions.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on June 30, 2014, 02:15:46 PM
 ;D
Yeah, sometimes, when I'm reading the latest updates to a thread days (or weeks) after it was originally begun, I tend to forget what it was all about in the first place and just respond to the latest thread of the conversation or one particular comment instead of taking it in context.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on June 30, 2014, 02:48:44 PM
I think if nachos were on a menu, they'd be 'real' nachos. Chips would be chips.

I honestly think it's a small regional quirk that is quite outdated. The only reason my husband says it is because his mom did, and I haven't seen it in a store or anything. I posted it here because I wondered if anyone else in the world did that or if it was just a family thing.

I wasn't offended, I promise. I just thought it was funny to dissect it in this way in a thread about mostly nonsense-if-taken-literally expressions.

Oh, it's definitely a PA thing (as is calling Pennsylvania PA!). It was something that confused me as a child when we traveled. Nachos can be both just the chips and the chips with toppings. In the first, we're just shortening "nacho chips" to "nachos". In the second, we'll probably say "nachos and cheese".
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: AfleetAlex on June 30, 2014, 02:50:20 PM
And then you have chips like Doritos, which bill themselves as nacho chips...you know, because we aren't confused enough already.  ;D

(I love Doritos. And nachos. And, well, chips!)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on June 30, 2014, 03:32:46 PM
I think Doritos are nacho flavored although people usually don't say the word "flavored". They're suppose to taste like chips with cheese and Jalapeños. Just as their taco (flavored) chips are supposed to taste like you're eating a taco.  ;)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Danika on July 01, 2014, 06:50:34 PM
I'm in the U.S. but I'm closer to Mexico, so I think I'm confused. Here when they say Nachos, they mean Tortilla chips. So:

Nachos ==> (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-QnJe4SUj9dE/TfaZzE8_nwI/AAAAAAAAAcc/1TWA8Xv3qzM/s1600/IMG_4786.JPG)

Chips ==> (http://savalfoods.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Potato-Chips.jpg)


Are you all saying that in PA, they say Nachos and mean (http://savalfoods.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Potato-Chips.jpg)

or that they mean just the Tortilla chips without any cheese?
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on July 01, 2014, 07:04:31 PM
Tortilla chips without cheese.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on July 01, 2014, 07:25:40 PM
In Australia, tortilla chips are called corn chips and potato chips are just chips.  Nachos are only nachos if they have toppings.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Psychopoesie on July 01, 2014, 07:49:10 PM
In Australia, tortilla chips are called corn chips and potato chips are just chips.  Nachos are only nachos if they have toppings.

& the topping is usually more than just cheese. Most places I've been to here do vegetarian (like the pic below) or beef versions. It seems to be a popular menu offering, even if the restaurant/cafe doesn't have a Mexican theme. Not sure how different that is to US - we're a long way from Mexico.

(http://www.taste.com.au/images/recipes/sfi/2011/11/28320_l.jpg)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Mental Magpie on July 01, 2014, 08:12:03 PM
In Australia, tortilla chips are called corn chips and potato chips are just chips.  Nachos are only nachos if they have toppings.

& the topping is usually more than just cheese. Most places I've been to here do vegetarian (like the pic below) or beef versions. It seems to be a popular menu offering, even if the restaurant/cafe doesn't have a Mexican theme. Not sure how different that is to US - we're a long way from Mexico.

(http://www.taste.com.au/images/recipes/sfi/2011/11/28320_l.jpg)

It's the same here in the US in all of the states I've lived at restaurants.  At ballparks and the likes, they're usually not as fancy, cheese and sometimes jalapenos.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Elfmama on July 01, 2014, 11:01:28 PM
Now I would call that a taco salad. 

And just to confuse the issue, there are corn chips that are not tortilla chips.   
(http://crockpotofgold.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/fritos.jpg)

Much smaller, thicker, saltier, and greasier than tortilla chips. 
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: katycoo on July 02, 2014, 01:26:21 AM
Now I would call that a taco salad. 

And just to confuse the issue, there are corn chips that are not tortilla chips.   
(http://crockpotofgold.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/fritos.jpg)

Much smaller, thicker, saltier, and greasier than tortilla chips.

We don't have those here, AFAIK.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: Peppergirl on July 02, 2014, 02:51:53 AM
Stop it, ya'll!  Making my mouth water!  ;D
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on July 02, 2014, 07:41:27 AM
In Australia, tortilla chips are called corn chips and potato chips are just chips.  Nachos are only nachos if they have toppings.

& the topping is usually more than just cheese. Most places I've been to here do vegetarian (like the pic below) or beef versions. It seems to be a popular menu offering, even if the restaurant/cafe doesn't have a Mexican theme. Not sure how different that is to US - we're a long way from Mexico.

(http://www.taste.com.au/images/recipes/sfi/2011/11/28320_l.jpg)

It's the same here in the US in all of the states I've lived at restaurants.  At ballparks and the likes, they're usually not as fancy, cheese and sometimes jalapenos.

Yup, definitely that's how they are in Texas.
Or something like this:
(http://angrytrainerfitness.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/NachosBeef.jpg)

A taco salad involves lettuce, which you will pretty much never see on nachos, unless they're made wrong!  :o ;D 8)
And it normally comes in a taco shaped bowl, as opposed to on a pile of chips.

(http://www.kraftrecipes.com//assets/recipe_images/Weeknight-Taco-Salad-47156.jpg)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: ChinaShepherdess on July 02, 2014, 07:51:11 AM
Now I would call that a taco salad. 

And just to confuse the issue, there are corn chips that are not tortilla chips.   
(http://crockpotofgold.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/fritos.jpg)

Much smaller, thicker, saltier, and greasier than tortilla chips.

In my neck of the woods (SoCal) , everyone I know consistently calls tortilla chips tortilla chips, in part, I think, to mitigate precisely this confusion.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on July 02, 2014, 07:58:01 AM
Now I would call that a taco salad. 

And just to confuse the issue, there are corn chips that are not tortilla chips.   
(http://crockpotofgold.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/fritos.jpg)

Much smaller, thicker, saltier, and greasier than tortilla chips.

In my neck of the woods (SoCal) , everyone I know consistently calls tortilla chips tortilla chips, in part, I think, to mitigate precisely this confusion.

Ditto.
I call those pictured above, Fritos. Yes, I realize that's a brand name, but pretty much those are either Fritos brand Fritos or a generic brand, probably made by FritoLay anyway.

I mean, there are tons of brands of tortilla chips and potato chips but other than generics, I've never seen anyone else make Fritos.
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: #borecore on July 02, 2014, 08:07:20 AM
The latest image is what I call Fritos (as a generic term) or "corn chips" (suitable for Frito pie, which is not a pie at all) but never "tortilla chips." I've seen people call the flatter, thinner ordinary tortilla chips "corn chips," too, but it's not common.

Frito pie (served in a boat, rather than in the chip bag, which is just asking to get burned, if you're a slob like me), generally chili over Fritos, topped with onions/peppers/cheese/sour cream as regional variations go:
(http://www.saveur.com/sites/saveur.com/files/images/2011-12/7-SAV144-FritoPie-400x254.jpg)
Title: Re: Regional sayings
Post by: lowspark on July 02, 2014, 08:19:53 AM
Man, I love me some Frito Pie!