Etiquette Hell

General Etiquette => All In A Day's Work => Topic started by: RebeccainGA on September 04, 2012, 11:56:41 AM

Title: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: RebeccainGA on September 04, 2012, 11:56:41 AM
We have a few Mrs. Malaprops clones in our office - the worst is our (not mourned) former big boss, but there are lots of others who are moderately educated but like to use big words to 'sound smart' - not that using inappropriate or even large words does make you sound more intelligent, but whatever floats their boat.

There are a couple of things that keep going around, incorrectly, and being repeated. Someone told someone that the word 'magnanimous' was the same as 'enormous' - I think they were going for magnificent and enormous and stumbled on a portmanteau that IS a real word with a different meaning. The usage is "Since we have such a magnanimous work load this week...." I keep picturing a beaming pile of files holding out a hand or something... it's all I can do not to giggle. I'm a word geek, and am wont to use large words if they are appropriate - but I don't use words unless I'm SURE of the meaning.

My etiquette question is twofold - one, do you say something when you hear it used wrong? Should you try to use the correct word, or use the word in the correct context so they can hear the error? the second question (and I admit, the more fun part of the assignment) - what other badly misused words have you heard?
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: bah12 on September 04, 2012, 12:18:09 PM
For the word in your example, I would not bother correcting them...what's the purpose?

Now, if their "intelligent" sounding words really make them (and by association your company) look like idiots in front of clients, then correcting them would be appropriate.  Just minor office talk, then no.

The only time I bother correcting vocabulary in the office is if the words mean different things legally.  For example, if we're talking about the difference between accelerated and advanced work.  Easily confused terminology, that legally and policy wise in our organization hold two very different meanings.  In that case I'm sure to correct the misuse.  Both so that everyone understands what we are actually doing (avoid some miscommunication) and to be sure that we don't accidently communicate something incorrectly to clients.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: hobish on September 04, 2012, 06:40:21 PM

I will quietly let people know that word does not mean what they think it means. It's partially selfish, because i don't want to listen to it; but also because i like my coworkers for the most part and i don't want them to sound like idiots. I try to be gentle about it. I did laugh, though, when an HR person kept using one of those made-up corporate slang jargon words in a class and someone finally busted out with, "You know that's not a real word, right?" Considering it was a 2 day class - i kid you not - about phone etiquette and how to talk to customers the use of made-up corporate slang jargon was especially grating.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: wonderfullyanonymous on September 04, 2012, 11:06:08 PM
I have a coworker who uses tex, texing, and texes, instead of text, texting and, texts. This drives me flipping batty. DF uses pacific instead of specific, but always manages to do this where there are other people around, so correcting him is harder.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: hyzenthlay on September 04, 2012, 11:13:45 PM
Well if they are of an age to have see Princess Bride 'You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means . . . '  >:D

Otherwise I would look at them oddly and say 'Magnanimous? I don't understand?'  and then have a simple definition ready to go when they tell you it means magnificently enormous.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: cicero on September 05, 2012, 12:31:31 AM
I *do* correct people (politely, of course) but it is kind of expected of me. I am a native English speaker with a degree in English/Linguistics, in an organization that has some native English speakers and some who speak English on a *very* high level but it's not their native language. I work in a country where English is not the first language but it's a common language and I work in an organization where we use english a lot of the time (most of the time in fact.). Plus, I am the unofficial editor and communications person. so I do allow myself to correct people

If a friend of mine was using the word incorrectly, i would correct them gently. "I think you mean humungous; that's a pretty common switch that people make" or something along those lines.

We have a few Mrs. Malaprops clones in our office - the worst is our (not mourned) former big boss, but there are lots of others who are moderately educated but like to use big words to 'sound smart' - not that using inappropriate or even large words does make you sound more intelligent, but whatever floats their boat.

There are a couple of things that keep going around, incorrectly, and being repeated. Someone told someone that the word 'magnanimous' was the same as 'enormous' - I think they were going for magnificent and enormous and stumbled on a portmanteau that IS a real word with a different meaning. The usage is "Since we have such a magnanimous work load this week...." I keep picturing a beaming pile of files holding out a hand or something... it's all I can do not to giggle. I'm a word geek, and am wont to use large words if they are appropriate - but I don't use words unless I'm SURE of the meaning.

My etiquette question is twofold - one, do you say something when you hear it used wrong? Should you try to use the correct word, or use the word in the correct context so they can hear the error? the second question (and I admit, the more fun part of the assignment) - what other badly misused words have you heard?
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: oz diva on September 05, 2012, 01:26:50 AM
In my work place there is a tendency to turn verbs into nouns. So the outcome of a training session is 'learnings' instead of lessons.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: hjaye on September 05, 2012, 05:42:43 AM
I had a boss years ago that was a real idiot.  To say I did not like him is a huge understatement.  We were discussing something one afternoon and I brought up what I thought was a significant issue, he looked at me and said "That's irreverent".  I looked at him and said "Irreverent?"  In a very condescending tone he said " Yes, it means it's not important to the discussion." 

I looked at him and said "I think you mean irrelevant, unless you feel I've offended God by not agreeing with you."
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: lmyrs on September 05, 2012, 11:29:09 PM
My office environment is pretty casual and I am friends with a lot of my coworkers and friendly with pretty much all of them. In a meeting or a situation where I can do it without embarrassing them, I'll usually say "I don't think that means ehat you think it means." (Shout out to Princess Bride and hyzenthlay.) It works fine but it's definitely a know your audience situation.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: FlyingBaconMouse on September 06, 2012, 06:32:53 AM
Fortunately, a large part of my job is knowing what words mean, so if I say something like, "I thought 'magnanimous' meant something else..," people are likely to listen.

That said, I used to have a coworker who mixed up specific/pacific constantly. It was like she either couldn't hear the S or, in this one case out of all of English words, could not say the S. It drove me nuts.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: GrammarNerd on September 06, 2012, 08:59:24 AM
Fortunately, a large part of my job is knowing what words mean, so if I say something like, "I thought 'magnanimous' meant something else..," people are likely to listen.

That said, I used to have a coworker who mixed up specific/pacific constantly. It was like she either couldn't hear the S or, in this one case out of all of English words, could not say the S. It drove me nuts.

My own mother had some sort of mental/speech block where she couldn't say some consonant blends if they were on the ends of words, but she could say them if they were at the beginning of the word.  Example: lisp.  It always came out of her mouth as 'liss'.  Yet she could say words like 'speck'.  Drove my sister nuts.  I think some people's brains just have little short circuits with some specific things like that (no pun intended, actually ... LOL). 

One of my pet peeves is the word 'escape', when people (including my hubby, grrrr) say 'eks-scape'.  I always want to grab them and say 'NO!  There's no X in it.  Divide the word between the 's' and the 'c' and then just sound it out.  It's NOT hard.'

I think I did break the hubby of the use of 'unthaw', however.  He would say, "I think there's some chicken in the freezer.  Let's unthaw it and have it for dinner." I started asking him, "So you want to refreeze it?"  But that was a family thing....his mother said the same thing, so he just picked it up from her and never really thought about it.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: FlyingBaconMouse on September 06, 2012, 09:33:31 AM
GrammarNerd's post above reminded me of my friend who pronounces "breakfast" as though the S were an X: "brekfixt." Drives me nuts, but I don't think he can hear himself doing it.

My favorite from that friend, though, was the day he was telling me, on the phone,  about someone who suffered an injury working on some "rhubarb." As the nature of the injury became clearer (the guy's ability to have children was threatened, among other things!), the light slowly dawned...

"Do you perchance mean rebar?" I finally asked.

"Right! Rhubarb!" my friend replied. 
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: VorFemme on September 06, 2012, 09:59:56 AM
And I thought that someone pronouncing that word for reproduction as if it were an adjective for a religious group was bad......(sect for - well, you know) - plant name used for iron reinforcing rods is worse (rhubarb for rebar). 

The mind boggles.

How do some people get through their day while managing to communicate when they speak in near-homonyms?  And ones not all that close in sound, either...
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: lowspark on September 06, 2012, 10:00:49 AM
Unthaw... I have a friend who always says "dethaw". Never really understood the reasoning behind it but I never bothered to correct her, probably because I've known her since we were kids so who knows how old we were when I first heard her say it.

I will usually correct someone on the misuse of a word if it's egregious or if the misuse can potentially lead to embarrassment for the user. I tend to say something like, "magnanimous, do you mean enormous?" Or "Magnanimous, I'm not sure what you mean by that".

I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with correcting someone on word usage, as long as it's called for (a situation where it actually makes a difference, not just for the sake of trying to prove that I know more than someone else) and as long as it's done politely.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: SamiHami on September 06, 2012, 10:07:38 AM
When I was in college, a guy in our study group habitually replaced words he didn't know with other words that started with the same letter. For example, if the correct word was "salient," he might replace it with "serious." Used to drive me straight up the wall.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Thipu1 on September 06, 2012, 10:14:28 AM
One thing that drives me up the wall is the use of 'enormity' when describing something of very large size. 

'Enormity' is used to describe something horrible, not something big. 

Another that drove me nuts in the office was the the head librarian's  insistence on pronouncing 'obelisk' as 'oh-bee-lesk'. When we were working together on a show about Ancient Egypt, this problem came up a lot because we would both be giving tours of the show. 
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Minmom3 on September 06, 2012, 01:09:37 PM
One thing that drives me up the wall is the use of 'enormity' when describing something of very large size. 

'Enormity' is used to describe something horrible, not something big. 

Another that drove me nuts in the office was the the head librarian's  insistence on pronouncing 'obelisk' as 'oh-bee-lesk'. When we were working together on a show about Ancient Egypt, this problem came up a lot because we would both be giving tours of the show.

According to Dictionary.com - something big would be the 3rd meaning of it.  Not the most common, but not wrong, either.

1.
outrageous or heinous character; atrociousness: the enormity of war crimes.
2.
something outrageous or heinous, as an offense: The bombing of the defenseless population was an enormity beyond belief.
3.
greatness of size, scope, extent, or influence; immensity: The enormity of such an act of generosity is staggering.

Got nothin' for your obelisk, though.  I'm right there with you on that - it makes me nuts when people mispronounce words.  My best friend and my mother are the co-queens of it.  Gah!  :-[
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: SeptGurl on September 06, 2012, 04:28:55 PM
My work involves grading college students on their grammar, so I do correct misused words. An error I see frequently in students' work is use of "rather" when they mean "whether," as in "rather or not."

Another one is misuse of "detrimental." Some students use it incorrectly when they seem to mean "necessary."

DH uses one that makes my hair stand on end: "irregardless." My mother uses it, too. Yes, it is listed in the dictionary, but its nonstandard status doesn't mean it's a real word!
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Sheila Take a Bow on September 06, 2012, 04:56:07 PM
I used to have a boss who'd tell us he needed something ASP instead of ASAP.  This stopped when my co-worker, who had an excellent relationship with the boss, asked him if we should find Cleopatra to get that asp.  Boss thought about it for a second and laughed and (mostly) started using the right term after that.

Back when I was in grad school, as a TA I read a student's paper that referred to "vast suppositories of power."  (I think he meant "repositories.")  I just circled the word and wrote him a note suggesting he look it up before using it again.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: #borecore on September 06, 2012, 05:23:17 PM
Unthaw... I have a friend who always says "dethaw". Never really understood the reasoning behind it but I never bothered to correct her, probably because I've known her since we were kids so who knows how old we were when I first heard her say it.

I will usually correct someone on the misuse of a word if it's egregious or if the misuse can potentially lead to embarrassment for the user. I tend to say something like, "magnanimous, do you mean enormous?" Or "Magnanimous, I'm not sure what you mean by that".

I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with correcting someone on word usage, as long as it's called for (a situation where it actually makes a difference, not just for the sake of trying to prove that I know more than someone else) and as long as it's done politely.

I agree with your stance on when to correct people, yet I can't resist pointing out that "unthaw" and "dethaw" are both wrong. It's just "thaw."

Unthawing something would be freezing it.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on September 06, 2012, 05:54:45 PM
My work involves grading college students on their grammar, so I do correct misused words. An error I see frequently in students' work is use of "rather" when they mean "whether," as in "rather or not."

Another one is misuse of "detrimental." Some students use it incorrectly when they seem to mean "necessary."

DH uses one that makes my hair stand on end: "irregardless." My mother uses it, too. Yes, it is listed in the dictionary, but its nonstandard status doesn't mean it's a real word!

That's it, I'm pulling this thread over.  You are hereby ordered to report to the "Exchanges that make your brain hurt" thread for processing!

YeGADS, detrimental for necessary?!
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Nikko-chan on September 06, 2012, 06:26:25 PM
Another one I hear a lot is aks for ask...

*Sigh* I do hear other ones too and I will keep my ears open.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: VorFemme on September 06, 2012, 06:30:29 PM
I hear it as "axe" a question instead of "aks" - but either way it makes me want to take an axe to the person making inquiries.

Then there is anyone saying that "Me and her were conversating" - those two misused parodies of real words have me ready to spork my ears to avoid having to hear them used like that again.

Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: MissNomer on September 06, 2012, 09:03:22 PM
I work in a call center, although I'm not on the phone. Instead, I handle some processes and then give the information to the customer service reps. I usually makes charts and whatnot as I've found that it's easier for people on the phone to took at a flow chart rather than a paragraph explaining what to do.

Recently I was in a meeting with my supervisor and a coworker (who does the same thing I do) about a change in one of our processes. My supervisor was telling me to be sure to get the information to the customer service reps when my coworker piped up.

"Oh! [Nomer] has a great diaphragm we can use!".

Supervisor paused. "Did you mean diagram?"

"Oops."
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: GrammarNerd on September 06, 2012, 11:10:38 PM
Unthaw... I have a friend who always says "dethaw". Never really understood the reasoning behind it but I never bothered to correct her, probably because I've known her since we were kids so who knows how old we were when I first heard her say it.

I will usually correct someone on the misuse of a word if it's egregious or if the misuse can potentially lead to embarrassment for the user. I tend to say something like, "magnanimous, do you mean enormous?" Or "Magnanimous, I'm not sure what you mean by that".

I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with correcting someone on word usage, as long as it's called for (a situation where it actually makes a difference, not just for the sake of trying to prove that I know more than someone else) and as long as it's done politely.

I agree with your stance on when to correct people, yet I can't resist pointing out that "unthaw" and "dethaw" are both wrong. It's just "thaw."

Unthawing something would be freezing it.

Yes...exactly!  DH would use it and I'd say, "So you want to freeze it again?"  I think the first time I had to explain that 'thaw' meant to go from the frozen state to a warmer, non-frozen state, so unthaw would be to basically refreeze something, but after that, I'd just have to say something like, "Really?" and he'd get it.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: lowspark on September 07, 2012, 07:31:22 AM
Unthaw... I have a friend who always says "dethaw". Never really understood the reasoning behind it but I never bothered to correct her, probably because I've known her since we were kids so who knows how old we were when I first heard her say it.

I will usually correct someone on the misuse of a word if it's egregious or if the misuse can potentially lead to embarrassment for the user. I tend to say something like, "magnanimous, do you mean enormous?" Or "Magnanimous, I'm not sure what you mean by that".

I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with correcting someone on word usage, as long as it's called for (a situation where it actually makes a difference, not just for the sake of trying to prove that I know more than someone else) and as long as it's done politely.

I agree with your stance on when to correct people, yet I can't resist pointing out that "unthaw" and "dethaw" are both wrong. It's just "thaw."

Unthawing something would be freezing it.

Yes...exactly!  DH would use it and I'd say, "So you want to freeze it again?"  I think the first time I had to explain that 'thaw' meant to go from the frozen state to a warmer, non-frozen state, so unthaw would be to basically refreeze something, but after that, I'd just have to say something like, "Really?" and he'd get it.

Ya! Exactly. Unthaw=Dethaw. Like I said, I never understood why she would say that when "thaw" was the correct word and Un/De impiles refreezing (although I'm pretty sure neither of those is an actual word).
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: athersgeo on September 07, 2012, 07:50:47 AM
I used to work with someone who constantly called semi-colons commas (and vice versa). Now, this would be irritating in the run-of-the-mill office, but we were (are!) both programmers, where commas, semi-colons, apostrophes and just about every other punctuation mark under the sun have entirely different meanings.

It all came to a head one morning where she'd repeatedly told me to put commas at the end of my lines of code. I can't remember what I ended up saying, but it was something to the effect of "Are you sure? Shouldn't it be semi-colons?" and she darn nearly ate me without salt for DARING to question her, then stormed out of the office like a petulant seven year old, leaving me sitting at my desk going "What just happened here?!"

She was a nice enough lady, but oh-so touchy...

**edited to fix a very silly typo
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: SeptGurl on September 07, 2012, 09:00:17 AM
My work involves grading college students on their grammar, so I do correct misused words. An error I see frequently in students' work is use of "rather" when they mean "whether," as in "rather or not."

Another one is misuse of "detrimental." Some students use it incorrectly when they seem to mean "necessary."

DH uses one that makes my hair stand on end: "irregardless." My mother uses it, too. Yes, it is listed in the dictionary, but its nonstandard status doesn't mean it's a real word!

That's it, I'm pulling this thread over.  You are hereby ordered to report to the "Exchanges that make your brain hurt" thread for processing!

YeGADS, detrimental for necessary?!

Ha! Yes, I had a student over the summer who misused "detrimental" consistently in nearly every assignment she submitted. And she wasn't the first! I usually suggest that they review the definition of "detrimental" and consider using "necessary," "important," or "instrumental" instead.

Because these are college students, I think it's appropriate to let them know that their grammar and word usage reflects on their professionalism. I try to do that constructively.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: MrTango on September 07, 2012, 09:26:32 AM
Sometimes, I just can't bring myself to correct someone.  Instead, I just act based on what they said, not what I think they meant.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Queen of Clubs on September 07, 2012, 09:50:58 AM
Sometimes, I just can't bring myself to correct someone.  Instead, I just act based on what they said, not what I think they meant.

I have to do that with my sister, though, she doesn't end up with the wrong word; normally, it's a mispronounced word.  Like skellington (skeleton) and mammarygram (mammogram).  She hates being corrected, so now I let it go.  I'd rather know if I'm mispronouncing something or misusing a word, but some people just hate to be corrected.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: WillyNilly on September 07, 2012, 01:42:12 PM
We have a particularly obnoxious young woman in my office who likes to boss people around despite not being above anyone in rank or title and who uses a very nasty condescending tone with people very often.  This morning she was berating a co-worker who was asking (legitimate, work related) questions.  Annoying co-workers looks over to inquisitive co-workers personal notes and starts in "well first off you need to spell the patient's name correct.  It screws everyone up when you don't spell correct."

Right, 'cause its ok to use terrible grammar to complain about someone's spelling  ::)
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: GrammarNerd on September 08, 2012, 10:35:20 AM
Just thought of this one.  It doesn't really concern anything in the workplace, but I suppose it could.

I read fanfiction (and write some) and one thing I see a lot is that writers use the word 'defiantly' in place of the word 'definitely', as in "You are defiantly the right person for the job."  Huh?  I mean, really, sound it out.  If you do that you can see that it's the wrong word!
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Elfmama on September 08, 2012, 03:56:00 PM
Just thought of this one.  It doesn't really concern anything in the workplace, but I suppose it could.

I read fanfiction (and write some) and one thing I see a lot is that writers use the word 'defiantly' in place of the word 'definitely', as in "You are defiantly the right person for the job."  Huh?  I mean, really, sound it out.  If you do that you can see that it's the wrong word!
That's what happens when you trust spell-check.  Type "definately" (sic) into your word-processor and see what happens. 

For a very long example of why you don't trust spell-check, google for "Ladle Rat Rotting Hut." 
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: crella on September 08, 2012, 05:24:37 PM
'Eck-cetera' drives me nuts, and lately it's my brother's pet phrase, so 50 times a day I hear 'and clean out the garage, eck-cetera, eck-cetera' ARGH!
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on September 08, 2012, 05:29:25 PM
Just thought of this one.  It doesn't really concern anything in the workplace, but I suppose it could.

I read fanfiction (and write some) and one thing I see a lot is that writers use the word 'defiantly' in place of the word 'definitely', as in "You are defiantly the right person for the job."  Huh?  I mean, really, sound it out.  If you do that you can see that it's the wrong word!
That's what happens when you trust spell-check.  Type "definately" (sic) into your word-processor and see what happens. 

For a very long example of why you don't trust spell-check, google for "Ladle Rat Rotting Hut."

How said it is that I knew what the was supposed to be the instant I read it?
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: AmysAuntie on September 09, 2012, 12:43:12 AM
Pet peeve?  "Prolly" in place of "probably".
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: GrammarNerd on September 09, 2012, 02:05:18 PM
In honor of football season (in the US):

For the love of all that is football, please do not pronounce the Jacksonville team as the "Jag-wires".

There is no wire. They are not made of wire.  There is not even the letter 'I' anywhere in the word.

Jag-wahr.  It's not hard.

(And no, the Jaguars are not 'my' team, but it still bugs me when I hear this.)
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: WillyNilly on September 09, 2012, 04:23:09 PM
A lot of people here really are criticizing pronunciation not bad usage or grammar.  That seems rather unfair - who's to say the way any one person pronounces a word is the right way and others are wrong?  Unless its your personal name, pronunciation is going to vary and several variations are correct in different places and with different accents.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: MrTango on September 09, 2012, 04:36:34 PM
In honor of football season (in the US):

For the love of all that is football, please do not pronounce the Jacksonville team as the "Jag-wires".

There is no wire. They are not made of wire.  There is not even the letter 'I' anywhere in the word.

Jag-wahr.  It's not hard.

(And no, the Jaguars are not 'my' team, but it still bugs me when I hear this.)

Or the car company that pronounces it "Jag-you-are"
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: girlysprite on September 10, 2012, 08:47:29 AM
My boss does this often. For example, when he talks about tooltips he calls them 'hoover statements'. This caused quite some confusion when he discussed 'hoover statement design' with an interface designer. The designer thought he was talking about the hoover states from the buttons (where the color changes when you mouse over it, or click on it) and proceeded to redesign the buttons in that interface.

But my boss gets a lot of things wrong - an 'overlayer' can mean a tooltip, a popup or an actual overlayer. A header & footer means stuff that is on the top of an interface and bottom of an interface (header and footer are usually used on the context of text makeup). He says roadmap instead of backlog, upscaling means 'improve the quality', clickpaths mean links, 'the road is ending' means that something is a dead end.

Conversations with him are quite tiring because he keeps making up new words on the spot or use words in an incorrect manner. I keep correcting him, or play clueless and ask him what he means. I tried to be nice about it first but now every time 'hoover statement' crosses his lips, I immediately say 'tooltip'. He is hurting his own business by confusing the people who work for him, but is very resistant to learning...anything.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Miss Misha on September 10, 2012, 01:26:31 PM
This thread has brought up memories of my childhood! My mother would pronounce things wrong and absolutely *insist* she was right.  Think oregano pronounced like the state with an o at the end:  Or-ee-gon-o or the city of Kiev pronounced as one syllable: Keev.  To this day, I always ask for the correct pronounciation of something if I'm not sure.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Carpathia on September 10, 2012, 04:33:47 PM
Not the office, but my husband uses 'nonplussed' to mean 'really angry' which drives me up the wall. Also leads to some confusing conversations.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Bookgirl on September 10, 2012, 05:02:57 PM
We have someone here who uses advice for advise.  As in, "advice me when that is done."  It hurts my brain.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Petticoats on September 10, 2012, 10:20:09 PM
One thing that drives me up the wall is the use of 'enormity' when describing something of very large size. 

'Enormity' is used to describe something horrible, not something big. 

Another that drove me nuts in the office was the the head librarian's  insistence on pronouncing 'obelisk' as 'oh-bee-lesk'. When we were working together on a show about Ancient Egypt, this problem came up a lot because we would both be giving tours of the show.


According to Dictionary.com - something big would be the 3rd meaning of it.  Not the most common, but not wrong, either.

1.
outrageous or heinous character; atrociousness: the enormity of war crimes.
2.
something outrageous or heinous, as an offense: The bombing of the defenseless population was an enormity beyond belief.
3.
greatness of size, scope, extent, or influence; immensity: The enormity of such an act of generosity is staggering.


One of the great griefs of my life (I'm an editor) is that dictionaries are descriptive rather than prescriptive--but most people believe they're prescriptive. I believed it myself for years. But wrong usages and wrong definitions are often included if they are commonly used.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: AmysAuntie on September 11, 2012, 02:00:59 AM
A lot of people here really are criticizing pronunciation not bad usage or grammar.  That seems rather unfair - who's to say the way any one person pronounces a word is the right way and others are wrong?  Unless its your personal name, pronunciation is going to vary and several variations are correct in different places and with different accents.

My example of "prolly" is not a criticism of pronunciation--I see it written that way fairly often.  I don't know if you were specifically addressing this one or not, though.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: kckgirl on September 11, 2012, 04:45:38 AM
Just thought of this one.  It doesn't really concern anything in the workplace, but I suppose it could.

I read fanfiction (and write some) and one thing I see a lot is that writers use the word 'defiantly' in place of the word 'definitely', as in "You are defiantly the right person for the job."  Huh?  I mean, really, sound it out.  If you do that you can see that it's the wrong word!

Drives. me. crazy!!!
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: mrs_deb on September 11, 2012, 05:35:29 PM
This thread has brought up memories of my childhood! My mother would pronounce things wrong and absolutely *insist* she was right.  Think oregano pronounced like the state with an o at the end:  Or-ee-gon-o or the city of Kiev pronounced as one syllable: Keev.  To this day, I always ask for the correct pronounciation of something if I'm not sure.

My mother's favourite was "al-blum" for a record album.  She passed on before CDs became popular...wonder what she'd have called those  ;D.

Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Charliebug on September 12, 2012, 01:07:49 AM
I worked with a lady back in the early 90s, around the time Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure came out. She consistently used "bogus" to describe things she felt were actually "awesome" and I didn't have the heart to tell her that she had the wrong cool terminology of the day.   :-\
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: msulinski on September 12, 2012, 03:21:01 PM
A lot of people here really are criticizing pronunciation not bad usage or grammar.  That seems rather unfair - who's to say the way any one person pronounces a word is the right way and others are wrong?  Unless its your personal name, pronunciation is going to vary and several variations are correct in different places and with different accents.

The dictionary?
Despite the fact that some words can be pronounced correctly in multiple ways, a particular pronunciation can still be incorrect and not a result of an accent.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: msulinski on September 12, 2012, 03:22:01 PM
My boss does this often. For example, when he talks about tooltips he calls them 'hoover statements'. This caused quite some confusion when he discussed 'hoover statement design' with an interface designer. The designer thought he was talking about the hoover states from the buttons (where the color changes when you mouse over it, or click on it) and proceeded to redesign the buttons in that interface.

But my boss gets a lot of things wrong - an 'overlayer' can mean a tooltip, a popup or an actual overlayer. A header & footer means stuff that is on the top of an interface and bottom of an interface (header and footer are usually used on the context of text makeup). He says roadmap instead of backlog, upscaling means 'improve the quality', clickpaths mean links, 'the road is ending' means that something is a dead end.

Conversations with him are quite tiring because he keeps making up new words on the spot or use words in an incorrect manner. I keep correcting him, or play clueless and ask him what he means. I tried to be nice about it first but now every time 'hoover statement' crosses his lips, I immediately say 'tooltip'. He is hurting his own business by confusing the people who work for him, but is very resistant to learning...anything.

Does he actually say "hoover" (like the vaccuum cleaner) or "hover?"
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Elfmama on September 12, 2012, 04:24:40 PM
A lot of people here really are criticizing pronunciation not bad usage or grammar.  That seems rather unfair - who's to say the way any one person pronounces a word is the right way and others are wrong?  Unless its your personal name, pronunciation is going to vary and several variations are correct in different places and with different accents.

The dictionary?
Despite the fact that some words can be pronounced correctly in multiple ways, a particular pronunciation can still be incorrect and not a result of an accent.
Yep.  My MIL was the only person I've ever heard who pronounced 'difficulty' as 'dih-FEW-cul-tee.'
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on September 12, 2012, 04:56:44 PM
A lot of people here really are criticizing pronunciation not bad usage or grammar.  That seems rather unfair - who's to say the way any one person pronounces a word is the right way and others are wrong?  Unless its your personal name, pronunciation is going to vary and several variations are correct in different places and with different accents.

The dictionary?
Despite the fact that some words can be pronounced correctly in multiple ways, a particular pronunciation can still be incorrect and not a result of an accent.
Yep.  My MIL was the only person I've ever heard who pronounced 'difficulty' as 'dih-FEW-cul-tee.'

And now I'm thinking of National Lampoon's Loaded Weapon 1.  "Where is... the mee-cro-feelm..?"
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Mikayla on September 12, 2012, 04:57:37 PM
In honor of football season (in the US):

For the love of all that is football, please do not pronounce the Jacksonville team as the "Jag-wires".

There is no wire. They are not made of wire.  There is not even the letter 'I' anywhere in the word.

Jag-wahr.  It's not hard.

(And no, the Jaguars are not 'my' team, but it still bugs me when I hear this.)

The other one announcers are famous for has already been mentioned:  using adjectives in place of adverbs.

"He broke off that pattern really quick". 

Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: GrammarNerd on September 12, 2012, 08:36:00 PM
Oh, just thought of another one, and I can't believe I haven't remembered it before now.

Nuclear.

New-clee-ur.  Not Nuke-U-lar.

Drives me up a wall.  DH likes to say Nuke-u-lar.  I correct him every time.  And I've tried to teach the kids the right way to say it.

But, like 'definitely', just sound it out, for goodness sake.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Elfmama on September 14, 2012, 04:08:20 PM
That's what happens when you trust spell-check.  Type "definately" (sic) into your word-processor and see what happens. 

For a very long example of why you don't trust spell-check, google for "Ladle Rat Rotting Hut."

Oh, that just made my brain hurt.  a LOT.
(http://www3.telus.net/smile/images/teehee.gif)  I will note that I made a small error.  That should be Ladle Rat Rotten Hut.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: squeakers on September 15, 2012, 10:06:54 AM
Unthaw... I have a friend who always says "dethaw". Never really understood the reasoning behind it but I never bothered to correct her, probably because I've known her since we were kids so who knows how old we were when I first heard her say it.

I will usually correct someone on the misuse of a word if it's egregious or if the misuse can potentially lead to embarrassment for the user. I tend to say something like, "magnanimous, do you mean enormous?" Or "Magnanimous, I'm not sure what you mean by that".

I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with correcting someone on word usage, as long as it's called for (a situation where it actually makes a difference, not just for the sake of trying to prove that I know more than someone else) and as long as it's done politely.

I agree with your stance on when to correct people, yet I can't resist pointing out that "unthaw" and "dethaw" are both wrong. It's just "thaw."

Unthawing something would be freezing it.

Yes...exactly!  DH would use it and I'd say, "So you want to freeze it again?"  I think the first time I had to explain that 'thaw' meant to go from the frozen state to a warmer, non-frozen state, so unthaw would be to basically refreeze something, but after that, I'd just have to say something like, "Really?" and he'd get it.

Ya! Exactly. Unthaw=Dethaw. Like I said, I never understood why she would say that when "thaw" was the correct word and Un/De impiles refreezing (although I'm pretty sure neither of those is an actual word).

I think they are conflating Defrost and Thaw, hence dethaw.  I do it with "Would you itch my back?" and "The ice truck is spreading ice right now." (Scratch my back and salt truck.)
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Itza on September 16, 2012, 03:07:39 PM
A former coworker who was an English teacher asked another coworker, "What are you inferring?" I bit my tongue wanting to say, "She wasn't inferring anything; you were. She was implying."
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: jaxsue on September 16, 2012, 08:44:56 PM
In honor of football season (in the US):

For the love of all that is football, please do not pronounce the Jacksonville team as the "Jag-wires".

There is no wire. They are not made of wire.  There is not even the letter 'I' anywhere in the word.

Jag-wahr.  It's not hard.

(And no, the Jaguars are not 'my' team, but it still bugs me when I hear this.)

I lived in Jax for 22 yrs (hence my ehell name). Yeah, the Jag-wire was annoying.  :P
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Paws on September 17, 2012, 01:54:58 AM
I had a very magnanimous  ;) boss  who would often make announcements like:  "In lieu of the July Fourth holiday, we will have casual dress all week".   What he meant was "In light of the July Fourth holiday..."   This was a pretty constant misuse from an otherwise well-spoken person,  but since we got both the holidays and the casual dress week, no one ever corrected him on it. :)
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Miss Understood on September 17, 2012, 05:51:58 PM
I used to have a boss who'd tell us he needed something ASP instead of ASAP.  This stopped when my co-worker, who had an excellent relationship with the boss, asked him if we should find Cleopatra to get that asp.  Boss thought about it for a second and laughed and (mostly) started using the right term after that.

Back when I was in grad school, as a TA I read a student's paper that referred to "vast suppositories of power."  (I think he meant "repositories.")  I just circled the word and wrote him a note suggesting he look it up before using it again.

I have to admit this one has me LOL. 

I used to have a colleague who would confuse "incredulous" with "incredible" as in "he thought such-and-such situation was incredulous."
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: wonderfullyanonymous on September 18, 2012, 05:42:37 PM
Drives me crazy when people pronounce Illinois with the S. The end S is silent in Illinois.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on September 18, 2012, 05:50:58 PM
Drives me crazy when people pronounce Illinois with the S. The end S is silent in Illinois.

How about "Dez Moynes", Iowa?  (Or, even more amusing, Day Moynes)
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: bansidhe on September 18, 2012, 07:15:38 PM
Back when I was in grad school, as a TA I read a student's paper that referred to "vast suppositories of power."  (I think he meant "repositories.")  I just circled the word and wrote him a note suggesting he look it up before using it again.

Pretty sure I would have burst some blood vessels laughing if I'd seen that.  :D

A few of my pet peeves:

Two jobs ago, I worked for a great company and really enjoyed my time there - except for the widespread use of the word "timely." No clue why nearly everyone did it, but they all said things like "Be sure you get that report to me timely" and "We need to perform this task timely."

Utilize. Substituting that word for "use" does not make anyone sound smarter.  ::)

One former boss used to say "flustrated" instead of "frustrated" and another repeatedly talked about handling touchy situations with "kit" gloves.

Not a pet peeve, but amusing: The head of HR at a former job came from the East Coast (US) somewhere and didn't know a word of Spanish. I'm in southern Arizona and my place of work at the time hired a lot of Spanish speakers to handle international calls. We were planning a big party for the employees at one point and decided to have a Mexican fiesta theme. At a center meeting, the head of HR asked brightly, "So how is planning going for the big Mexican fiasco?"



Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: baglady on September 18, 2012, 08:40:33 PM
"Jag-you-are" is the British pronunciation of "jaguar." Personally I prefer the Winnie-the-Pooh version: "Jagular."  :)

The modeling method is a nice polite, understated way to "correct" someone's word usage. Don't come out and say, "That's wrong!" Just say it right. Parents have been using it forever.

Little kid: "Look, Mommy, I drawed you a picture!"
Mom: "You drew this all by yourself? It's beautiful! Honey, come see this picture Susie drew!"

Mrs. Malaprop: "We have a magnanimous work load this week."
Co-worker: "Yes, and since it is such an enormous work load, I suggest we divide it up/work in teams/hire a temp/whatever."

Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: violinp on September 19, 2012, 12:33:29 AM
Back when I was in grad school, as a TA I read a student's paper that referred to "vast suppositories of power."  (I think he meant "repositories.")  I just circled the word and wrote him a note suggesting he look it up before using it again.

Pretty sure I would have burst some blood vessels laughing if I'd seen that.  :D

A few of my pet peeves:

Two jobs ago, I worked for a great company and really enjoyed my time there - except for the widespread use of the word "timely." No clue why nearly everyone did it, but they all said things like "Be sure you get that report to me timely" and "We need to perform this task timely."

Utilize. Substituting that word for "use" does not make anyone sound smarter.  ::)

One former boss used to say "flustrated" instead of "frustrated" and another repeatedly talked about handling touchy situations with "kit" gloves.

Not a pet peeve, but amusing: The head of HR at a former job came from the East Coast (US) somewhere and didn't know a word of Spanish. I'm in southern Arizona and my place of work at the time hired a lot of Spanish speakers to handle international calls. We were planning a big party for the employees at one point and decided to have a Mexican fiesta theme. At a center meeting, the head of HR asked brightly, "So how is planning going for the big Mexican fiasco?"

I see you've met the cousins of my parents' co - worker. He pronounces chaos as "chowse" and Copernicus as "Coh - purr - NICK - us."
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: lowspark on September 19, 2012, 07:27:53 AM
Just thought of another one: myself.
As in, "Please contact Susan or myself if you have any questions."

"Myself" is reflexive. Only I can do something to myself.
I hurt myself. I sent myself a letter.
You hurt me. You sent me a letter.

But I have seen "myself" misused when "me" should have been used in countless emails.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: RingTailedLemur on September 19, 2012, 08:20:43 AM
Drives me crazy when people pronounce Illinois with the S. The end S is silent in Illinois.

How about "Dez Moynes", Iowa?  (Or, even more amusing, Day Moynes)

How should it be pronounced?
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on September 19, 2012, 08:22:17 AM
Drives me crazy when people pronounce Illinois with the S. The end S is silent in Illinois.

How about "Dez Moynes", Iowa?  (Or, even more amusing, Day Moynes)

How should it be pronounced?

Duh Moyn
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: bopper on September 19, 2012, 09:10:43 AM
One former boss used to say "flustrated" instead of "frustrated" and another repeatedly talked about handling touchy situations with "kit" gloves.

Flustered + Frustrated = Flustrated.    I like it.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Elfmama on September 19, 2012, 03:32:35 PM
Just thought of another one: myself.
As in, "Please contact Susan or myself if you have any questions."

"Myself" is reflexive. Only I can do something to myself.
I hurt myself. I sent myself a letter.
You hurt me. You sent me a letter.

But I have seen "myself" misused when "me" should have been used in countless emails.
Ah, I see you've been getting messages from DH.  He has me proofread really important stuff, but the little green gods only know how many "myselfs" he's sent out into the ether with casual emails.

My own: if you are a reporter/newscaster/radio person and you don't know how to pronounce a place name in a language not your own, FIND OUT before you make an idiot of yourself on-air nationwide.  We heard two just recently, both on the same day. I'm fairly certain that the Texas place name 'Pandale' is not pronounced 'PAN-da-LEE' and I KNOW that Piedras Negras is not pronounced "PIE-dras" (like the pie that you serve for dessert.)
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Eden on September 19, 2012, 04:32:16 PM
Oh man, I love this thread.

I had a boss who repeatedly left out a letter of my last name when he introduced me to others. He did the same for my coworker. He also called the internet browser "Foxfire" instead of "Flamingvixen" which was a pretty big deal as we were the web publishing group. He once asked me what I was going to do for Valentimes Day. And also told me there were so many flashes going off at his son's wedding he thought they had been taken over by the "pafferati."

I am fascinated by regional pronunciations. Like how in the east it's "CarNEHgie Mellon" and in the midwest it's "Carnugie Mellon." My boss pronounces the word "room" like not quite "rum" but lighter like "ruhm." I know it's a regional thing and not a mispronunciation.

A friend of mine pointed out I pronounced "triathlon" like "triath-uh-lon." People often do the same with "realtor." There are no real-uh-tors.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on September 19, 2012, 04:58:54 PM
Oh man, I love this thread.

I had a boss who repeatedly left out a letter of my last name when he introduced me to others. He did the same for my coworker. He also called the internet browser "Foxfire" instead of "Flamingvixen" which was a pretty big deal as we were the web publishing group. He once asked me what I was going to do for Valentimes Day. And also told me there were so many flashes going off at his son's wedding he thought they had been taken over by the "pafferati."

I am fascinated by regional pronunciations. Like how in the east it's "CarNEHgie Mellon" and in the midwest it's "Carnugie Mellon." My boss pronounces the word "room" like not quite "rum" but lighter like "ruhm." I know it's a regional thing and not a mispronunciation.

A friend of mine pointed out I pronounced "triathlon" like "triath-uh-lon." People often do the same with "realtor." There are no real-uh-tors.

Just so I'm clear, the "oo"in room would be the same truncated short u sound like in woof, right?  Yeah, I've heard that a lot.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Venus193 on September 19, 2012, 06:53:25 PM
I once had a cow-irker who would axe you the same questions repeatedly in the hope you'd  be more pacific in your answers.

It was a good thing she never had to actually meet with clients.

A friend of mine says that a popular saying in her family was "She wasn't no chicken spring."  This either sounds like ignorance or pretentiousness.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: lowspark on September 20, 2012, 08:09:41 AM
<snip>
My own: if you are a reporter/newscaster/radio person and you don't know how to pronounce a place name in a language not your own, FIND OUT before you make an idiot of yourself on-air nationwide.  We heard two just recently, both on the same day. I'm fairly certain that the Texas place name 'Pandale' is not pronounced 'PAN-da-LEE' and I KNOW that Piedras Negras is not pronounced "PIE-dras" (like the pie that you serve for dessert.)

Double points if you roll your Rs when pronouncing Piedras Negras. But yeah, even without the rolled Rs, especially nowadays with the internet, it can't be all that hard to find out the correct pronunciation of a word. Way back a long time ago, maybe in the 80s, a reporter on TV said the word "junta" in reference to something going in a Latin American country. I don't remember the details, only that the reporter pronounced the J as in "just" instead of as an "h" sound which is correct. Those foreign languages, they'll get you every time!
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Eden on September 20, 2012, 01:17:38 PM
Just so I'm clear, the "oo"in room would be the same truncated short u sound like in woof, right?  Yeah, I've heard that a lot.

Sorry I'm just now seeing this. Yes, that's correct.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: msulinski on September 20, 2012, 03:17:31 PM
One former boss used to say "flustrated" instead of "frustrated" and another repeatedly talked about handling touchy situations with "kit" gloves.

Flustered + Frustrated = Flustrated.    I like it.

I like it too. I wonder if the poster's former boss intended that, or if it was just a mistake.

This reminds me of a former boss of mine liked to say "automagically."
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Redneck Gravy on September 20, 2012, 04:09:05 PM
I have a friend that constantly uses the wrong word, I love her and don't tell her.  One of our mutual friends asked me about it one time and we both agreed that somehow we know what she means...there's no way we are going to embarass her and correct her.

Pitcher for picture, temperatureometer for thermometer (which I actually like and think makes more sense) lethal & legal are interchangeable.

I have a friend that gets tee box and green mixed up on the golf course. 

I used to work with a lady that got similar names mixed up: Jack Nicklaus and Jack Nicholson, Jack Black and Jack Daniels  ;)  (no really Jack Daniels)

I have met people that get Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone mixed up, it doesn't do any good to try to figure that one out, just smile and get past it.   The Alamo and the Revolutionary War were so similar... 
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: hobish on September 20, 2012, 04:18:16 PM
One former boss used to say "flustrated" instead of "frustrated" and another repeatedly talked about handling touchy situations with "kit" gloves.

Flustered + Frustrated = Flustrated.    I like it.

I like it too. I wonder if the poster's former boss intended that, or if it was just a mistake.

This reminds me of a former boss of mine liked to say "automagically."

Oh, oh, oh... i am so stealing that. Automagically. I can't wait to use it in a sentence.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Elfmama on September 20, 2012, 04:21:06 PM
One former boss used to say "flustrated" instead of "frustrated" and another repeatedly talked about handling touchy situations with "kit" gloves.

Flustered + Frustrated = Flustrated.    I like it.

I like it too. I wonder if the poster's former boss intended that, or if it was just a mistake.

This reminds me of a former boss of mine liked to say "automagically."

Oh, oh, oh... i am so stealing that. Automagically. I can't wait to use it in a sentence.
My car's headlights come on automagically when I start the engine.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: hobish on September 20, 2012, 04:26:46 PM

I am thinking, "I cannot automagically approve this co-op for you." Maybe even, "I cannot automagically approve this co-op for you; i am fresh out of pixie dust and the elves are on strike."  (http://www.desismileys.com/smileys/desismileys_6535.gif) (http://www.desismileys.com/)

Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Redneck Gravy on September 20, 2012, 04:28:21 PM

I am thinking, "I cannot automagically approve this co-op for you." Maybe even, "I cannot automagically approve this co-op for you; i am fresh out of pixie dust and the elves are on strike."  (http://www.desismileys.com/smileys/desismileys_6535.gif) (http://www.desismileys.com/)

ha, ha that's funny right there
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: lilfox on September 20, 2012, 04:51:24 PM
This one is becoming a classic in my office.
One of my colleagues, who thinks a lot of herself, gave a presentation.  On one slide, she had a chart showing the percentage of responses given by a set of people on how they felt about a number of ideas.
Let's say it looked like this:
47% said they supported X
36% said they supported Y
24% said they supported Z

The presenter then said "the majority of respondents supported X" blah blah blah.  Er, no, the majority actually didn't support X, it just received the highest level of support.  That's probably an easy semantic mistake to make, but she went on to defend X on the basis that most people wanted it.

Incidentally, her approach to leading her team is very much "I, the people".
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: baglady on September 20, 2012, 06:34:38 PM
Quote
I have met people that get Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone mixed up, it doesn't do any good to try to figure that one out, just smile and get past it.   The Alamo and the Revolutionary War were so similar...

It's the coonskin caps. And the fact that both of them were played by Fess Parker on TV.

I've also heard newscasters say "jun-tah" instead of "hoon-tah." It's not really a mispronunciation; it's an Anglicization of a foreign word, like saying Mexico instead of "May-hee-co" or Paris instead of "Pah-rhee."
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: violinp on September 20, 2012, 06:40:58 PM
Quote
I have met people that get Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone mixed up, it doesn't do any good to try to figure that one out, just smile and get past it.   The Alamo and the Revolutionary War were so similar...

It's the coonskin caps. And the fact that both of them were played by Fess Parker on TV.

I've also heard newscasters say "jun-tah" instead of "hoon-tah." It's not really a mispronunciation; it's an Anglicization of a foreign word, like saying Mexico instead of "May-hee-co" or Paris instead of "Pah-rhee."

It's really said that way?  ??? Well, I learned something today!
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Amava on September 20, 2012, 07:04:16 PM
Quote
I have met people that get Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone mixed up, it doesn't do any good to try to figure that one out, just smile and get past it.   The Alamo and the Revolutionary War were so similar...

It's the coonskin caps. And the fact that both of them were played by Fess Parker on TV.

I've also heard newscasters say "jun-tah" instead of "hoon-tah." It's not really a mispronunciation; it's an Anglicization of a foreign word, like saying Mexico instead of "May-hee-co" or Paris instead of "Pah-rhee."

It's really said that way?  ??? Well, I learned something today!

Funny, isn't it, how things can be different in different languages!  :D
If you want to actually hear "Pah-rhee" pronounced in French, here is a song for you.
"Paris s'Úveille" (means: Paris awakens)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7whXkifG_ms
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: BeagleMommy on September 25, 2012, 11:54:19 AM
Love this thread!  I will usually only correct DH and DS. Others, I would love to correct, but I don't think much good would come of it.

Annoying Coworker thinks "criteriers" is a word.  Every fiber of my being wants to scream "Criteria is the plural; the singular is criterion!".  She also told a professor he would be in a promiscuous position if he wasn't careful.  She meant precarious.  She seems to think congruent and concurrent are interchangeable.

My father uses furnitures if we are going to buy more than one piece of furniture.

A local radio DJ pronounces Enrique Iglesias as Enricki Inglesias.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: SeptGurl on September 25, 2012, 12:27:24 PM
DH was grading students' papers (a college course) the other day and came upon a good one. A student used the word "gorillas" to describe the soldiers who were involved in a certain battle. DH wrote a comment stating that it seems she meant "guerrilla" rather than "gorilla." She responded and said that she indeed meant "gorilla." She wanted to emphasize the primitive nature of the attack.
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on September 25, 2012, 01:01:43 PM
DH was grading students' papers (a college course) the other day and came upon a good one. A student used the word "gorillas" to describe the soldiers who were involved in a certain battle. DH wrote a comment stating that it seems she meant "guerrilla" rather than "gorilla." She responded and said that she indeed meant "gorilla." She wanted to emphasize the primitive nature of the attack.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QyG0G96UB6k

 ;D
Title: Re: Misused words in the office - propogating bad word use!
Post by: SeptGurl on September 25, 2012, 01:11:52 PM
DH was grading students' papers (a college course) the other day and came upon a good one. A student used the word "gorillas" to describe the soldiers who were involved in a certain battle. DH wrote a comment stating that it seems she meant "guerrilla" rather than "gorilla." She responded and said that she indeed meant "gorilla." She wanted to emphasize the primitive nature of the attack.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QyG0G96UB6k

 ;D

Ha! I'm sending that link to DH ...  ;D