Etiquette Hell

General Etiquette => All In A Day's Work => Topic started by: Mental Magpie on September 24, 2012, 01:08:31 PM

Title: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 24, 2012, 01:08:31 PM
An unfortunate situation has arisen at work.  I originally had my shift covered for Oct. 6; when that fell through I went to my supervisor.  After talking to him and the other breakfast server, who also happens to be my best friend, I still can't get the shift covered.  I e-mailed the general manager to see if she could help me work out something.  I explained to her that I have a test that day that I can't miss (it's the LSAT, if you're wondering; yes, it is more important to me than my job at this point) and offered what I thought was a possible solution.

Her first e-mail back to me felt like it had dismissed everything I had said.  Just before I was going to reply to it, I got another e-mail from her saying she was trying to work on it and asking me if I was available at all that day.  I replied yes, I will be able to make my bartender shift, just not the breakfast server one.  The next e-mail asked if I could even cover a little bit of my morning shift; I replied no, because I can't.

I have a feeling that she won't find anyone to be able to cover it, but what I pretty much am going to have to tell her is (but will put much nicer when I say it) is, "Well, I'm still not going to be there."  I realize that will probably get me written up (as a no-show) and/or leave me with no good references if I put in my 2 weeks and still don't show up if I'm scheduled that day.  I fully understand the consequences of my actions.  What I don't know how to do is tell this to general manager.

I was thinking something like this:

Dear GM,

I am sorry this situation has happened and even more sorry that I am going to put any of you in a bind, but as I mentioned, I cannot miss this test.  I know you worked hard to try to get that shift covered and I am sorry you weren't able to find anyone who could fill in.  However, I still will not be able to be at work that day.  I will turn in my two weeks notice immediately so that Supervisor can get the ball rolling on hiring someone else in hopes of getting that shift covered.  Again, I am sorry I am putting any of you in this position.

Sincerely,
Mental Magpie
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: bopper on September 24, 2012, 01:12:12 PM
Do you want to quit?

If not:

"Dear GM,

I am sorry this situation has happened and even more sorry that I am going to put any of you in a bind, but as I mentioned, I cannot miss this exam.  I know you worked hard to try to get that shift covered and I am sorry you weren't able to find anyone who could fill in.  However, I still will not be able to be at work that day.  After the exam I will be able to return to my regular schedule."

If they want to fire you, let them. Otherwise you could offer to tender your resignation. But don't quit unless you really want to.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: AustenFan on September 24, 2012, 01:13:44 PM
You're overthinking it.

You've already told them what you can do, so they know you won't be there for the breakfast shift. At this point I would drop it, it's not your problem. Are you putting in your notice over this? If so, I think that's an over reaction.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: bopper on September 24, 2012, 01:16:59 PM
Also I think the GM is trying to make it YOUR PROBLEM, where as you are telling them it is now THEIR PROBLEM.
If you are a good worker and they generally would want to keep you and you have given them sufficient notice, then they will keep you on. If they won't let you take off because of the LSAT (do they know what that is and why it is important?) and they would fire you over missing one time then your position was very tenuous to begin with.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 24, 2012, 01:36:41 PM
I've given them two weeks notice as far as when it came up that I wouldn't be able to be there.  Originally, I had the shift covered, but as soon as I found out that wouldn't work (it would put the other server into overtime), I e-mailed the general manager (which is still within the two weeks timeframe).

I think you're right, I am over thinking this.  I honestly don't think they would fire me over no-showing one day (I think my mind went there because it is going to be an extremely busy day and would make people want to tear out their hair if I didn't show up), and I will take a write up for it if I have to.  I guess my brain said, "Head off the firing by putting in your two weeks!" with a little bit of "If you put in your two weeks, they will be able to hire someone in the mean time to work that shift and then you won't get in trouble/a write up."  I was only going to put in my two weeks notice as a way of not getting fired (which now that I think about it probably wouldn't happen, especially because I have had no other problems) and of allowing them time to hire someone to cover the shift.

Technically it is kind of my problem since I didn't get the time off approved by my supervisor.  I see now where I am telling them it is their problem, though, and now I need to just stop worrying about it.  Either it gets covered or I get a write up, and I am okay with that.  As it will be my second write up ever, I think I can handle it.  Thanks for talking sense into me no matter that it only took a few posts.  Sometimes I think I cover all of the angles and just need a reminder that I haven't in order to see the light.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Deetee on September 24, 2012, 01:38:42 PM
Do you want to quit?

If not:

"Dear GM,

I am sorry this situation has happened and even more sorry that I am going to put any of you in a bind, but as I mentioned, I cannot miss this exam.  I know you worked hard to try to get that shift covered and I am sorry you weren't able to find anyone who could fill in.  However, I still will not be able to be at work that day.  After the exam I will be able to return to my regular schedule."

If they want to fire you, let them. Otherwise you could offer to tender your resignation. But don't quit unless you really want to.


I like this better, I might edit it and say


"Dear GM,

I am sorry this situation has happened and even more sorry that I am going to put any of you in a bind, but as I mentioned, I cannot miss this exam.  the LSAT exam is required for entrance to law schooland is only given 4 times a year. I will need to be there from 7:00 AM (note, I know it starts at 9:00, but you need to be there at least an hour early) until 5:00 PM  I know you worked hard to try to get that shift covered and I am sorry you weren't able to find anyone who could fill in.  However, I still will not be able to be at work that day.  After the exam I will be able to return to my regular schedule."


Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on September 24, 2012, 01:59:59 PM
Is it even necesary to put it in writing to the GM? if not, I wouldn't even bother.  And if you do, keep it short and sweet. DOn't apologize, don't make excuses.  Simply let them know that you are not available for that shift, and while you tried to find coverage, your backup fell through.  I don't even think its necesary to say you'll lbe back to your regular schedule since its just one day, and that kind of goes without saying you will be.

Also, had you asked for this day off in advance? Not trying to be snarky, but it seems like for soemthing like this you might have known the date more than 2 weeks in advance and maybe should have put it for it as soon as you knew.

I know with my PT job; I put in my time off as soon as I know, sometimes months in advance, and don't usually have any issues with getting approved for the time off.  But if this is the only issue you've had, and you are otherwise a reliable employee, I'd just let it go, and let them deal with it.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 24, 2012, 02:34:31 PM
I didn't put in for the time off because I had it covered (normal practice at my job to say to the supervisor, "I cleared it with the other server and she's going to work for me on the 12th.").  I only put in for the "time off" when I found out it was no longer covered.  I don't care what is normal practice, I'm not doing that again and will put in for time off even if that day is already covered my by availability schedule; lesson learned.  I also only registered for the LSAT on September 3 and promptly asked the other server to cover my shift that day, when she agreed.

As far as being necessary, no, I don't know that it is, but I wanted to be prepared in case it was.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on September 24, 2012, 02:47:03 PM
I didn't put in for the time off because I had it covered (normal practice at my job to say to the supervisor, "I cleared it with the other server and she's going to work for me on the 12th.").  I only put in for the "time off" when I found out it was no longer covered.  I don't care what is normal practice, I'm not doing that again and will put in for time off even if that day is already covered my by availability schedule; lesson learned.  I also only registered for the LSAT on September 3 and promptly asked the other server to cover my shift that day, when she agreed.

As far as being necessary, no, I don't know that it is, but I wanted to be prepared in case it was.

Aha - in that case, it seems like its not really your issue anymore.  I know at my job if I got someone to cover for me, and THEY were not able to work after all, it then becomes their responsibility or the manager's to find coverage.  It seems like you did everything you could to find someone to work for you.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: GirlyGirl on September 24, 2012, 04:54:15 PM
I've given them two weeks notice as far as when it came up that I wouldn't be able to be there.  Originally, I had the shift covered, but as soon as I found out that wouldn't work (it would put the other server into overtime), I e-mailed the general manager (which is still within the two weeks timeframe).

If the problem is that the other server will go into overtime covering your shift, could you take one of her shifts earlier in the week?
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Klein Bottle on September 24, 2012, 07:41:24 PM
I didn't put in for the time off because I had it covered (normal practice at my job to say to the supervisor, "I cleared it with the other server and she's going to work for me on the 12th.").  I only put in for the "time off" when I found out it was no longer covered.  I don't care what is normal practice, I'm not doing that again and will put in for time off even if that day is already covered my by availability schedule; lesson learned.  I also only registered for the LSAT on September 3 and promptly asked the other server to cover my shift that day, when she agreed.

As far as being necessary, no, I don't know that it is, but I wanted to be prepared in case it was.

Aha - in that case, it seems like its not really your issue anymore.  I know at my job if I got someone to cover for me, and THEY were not able to work after all, it then becomes their responsibility or the manager's to find coverage.  It seems like you did everything you could to find someone to work for you.

Not necessarily.  As I learned during my stint at restaurant management, (thank goodness that's over!), our policy was that any schedule changes had to be approved and signed off on by a manager.  I don't know that this is policy where Mental Magpie is employed, but it kind of sounds so, due to the fact that she is still worried about having the shift covered. 
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Ceallach on September 24, 2012, 07:47:28 PM
I think resigning from your job is an overly dramatic response to the situation.   Be clear and honest about the situation and what you can and can't do, but there's no need to jump to that step.   If they decide that they no longer want you employed it will be clear.   
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 24, 2012, 08:12:35 PM
I've given them two weeks notice as far as when it came up that I wouldn't be able to be there.  Originally, I had the shift covered, but as soon as I found out that wouldn't work (it would put the other server into overtime), I e-mailed the general manager (which is still within the two weeks timeframe).

If the problem is that the other server will go into overtime covering your shift, could you take one of her shifts earlier in the week?

It doesn't matter anymore because she got tickets to a football game that morning and now isn't available at all.  Otherwise, that was my plan...or not taking paid time off and just taking a day off.


I think resigning from your job is an overly dramatic response to the situation.   Be clear and honest about the situation and what you can and can't do, but there's no need to jump to that step.   If they decide that they no longer want you employed it will be clear.   

As I explained, resigning was a bit so that they would have time to hire someone else to cover the shift (the non-dramatic part) and a bit to stop them from being able to fire me because I was already quitting kind of thing (only dramatic in the sense that I was thinking they would fire me over my first write up).    Otherwise, I don't understand why you think it is dramatic?  Could you please explain?
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: JenJay on September 24, 2012, 08:26:10 PM
If I understand, you initially didn't request the day off because you had arranged for someone to take the shift? Did you clear that with anyone in management when you made the arrangement with the lady who was going to take the shift?

If so - I would contact whomever cleared it and say "It has come to my attention that Lady is no longer willing to cover my shift on Oct 6, per our agreement on Date. I have asked around in an attempt to find someone else to cover but I'm afraid nobody else is available. I cannot reschedule my test." Don't take any of the blame since the manager authorized the switch, it's now between them and your coworker.

If not, well, I'm afraid you goofed. It really stinks because you tried to do the right thing in being proactive and getting it covered, but you got burned. Live and learn  :-\. I saw that happen to one of my coworkers - she was sick but rather than call in sick and leave us stranded she called another coworker and asked if he'd cover her. He agreed, so she called us and said "I won't be there but he will." Unfortunately he never showed. SHE got in big trouble for a no call/no show. Obviously going forward you know you can't count on that lady to keep her word when she offers to cover for you.  Explain to your manager that you initially had the shift covered and that's why you didn't request the time off, you realize that was a mistake, and in the future you will put in an official request as soon as possible. As someone else suggested, offer to switch shifts with a different coworker (not football lady) so they don't go into overtime, if that's one of your manager's main concerns with juggling schedules.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on September 24, 2012, 08:59:48 PM
I saw that happen to one of my coworkers - she was sick but rather than call in sick and leave us stranded she called another coworker and asked if he'd cover her. He agreed, so she called us and said "I won't be there but he will." Unfortunately he never showed. SHE got in big trouble for a no call/no show. Obviously going forward you know you can't count on that lady to keep her word when she offers to cover for you. 

Not sure if this is the reason, but at my job, if you need to get someone to work for you or switch shifts, once you find someone, you have to call the GM, and the person working for you also has to call, and just let the GM know, yes, I'm working for so and so on this date.  This way, everyone knows who is now responsible for that time, and if the replacement fails to show up, the original employee isn't on the hoook
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Ceallach on September 25, 2012, 12:06:51 AM
I think resigning from your job is an overly dramatic response to the situation.   Be clear and honest about the situation and what you can and can't do, but there's no need to jump to that step.   If they decide that they no longer want you employed it will be clear.   

As I explained, resigning was a bit so that they would have time to hire someone else to cover the shift (the non-dramatic part) and a bit to stop them from being able to fire me because I was already quitting kind of thing (only dramatic in the sense that I was thinking they would fire me over my first write up).    Otherwise, I don't understand why you think it is dramatic?  Could you please explain?

Dramatic in that it something that is over the top, perhaps quite striking and effective but possibly disproportionate to the situation.   

I do understand your reasoning in that maybe it would be best for them to have the role free to full - it's entirely possible that this is a solution that would suit them.  But it's equally possible that they'd go "Oh no!  We thought we were just trying to cover one shift and now she's QUITTING?"   Based on what you've posted re the interaction so far, it just isn't clear what they'd prefer.   So while offering to resign could be a nice gesture if you think it will help solve the problem, it really doesn't seem necessary at this stage for you to outright resign. You're jumping from A to C and skipping B.  If that makes sense.    :)     Hence dramatic as in over the top.  (Not in a dramatic, childish way if that's how you took it - certainly didn't mean to imply that!)
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: TootsNYC on September 25, 2012, 09:03:58 AM
I've given them two weeks notice as far as when it came up that I wouldn't be able to be there.  Originally, I had the shift covered, but as soon as I found out that wouldn't work (it would put the other server into overtime), I e-mailed the general manager (which is still within the two weeks timeframe).

If the problem is that the other server will go into overtime covering your shift, could you take one of her shifts earlier in the week?

It doesn't matter anymore because she got tickets to a football game that morning and now isn't available at all.  Otherwise, that was my plan...or not taking paid time off and just taking a day off.




Wow, really? That's sort of bad--to commit to you that she'd take your shift so you could be free for that important test, and then AFTER that she gets tickets to a football game? I know that football games can be hard to get into, there aren't very many of them in a season, but . . .

The mean me would want to mention that reason every single time I brought it up to anyone at the restaurant.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Decimus on September 25, 2012, 10:31:22 AM
You're overthinking things.  If you ARE switching from bartending into law, frankly, it's extremely unlikely anyone will care even if you DID get fired for skipping work to take the LSAT.  And most people will understand if you tell them "I needed to take the time off to take the LSAT, and gave them advanced notice, and they still wrote me up/fired me/etc over it."

Let it go.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: TootsNYC on September 25, 2012, 10:54:16 AM
Also, if I were hiring for almost any job, if this was the only write-up you had, that doesn't mean I'd worry about hiring you.

Jobs like that are particularly harsh and inflexible. I'd take a single write-up with a grain of salt.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 25, 2012, 11:29:49 AM
I think resigning from your job is an overly dramatic response to the situation.   Be clear and honest about the situation and what you can and can't do, but there's no need to jump to that step.   If they decide that they no longer want you employed it will be clear.   

As I explained, resigning was a bit so that they would have time to hire someone else to cover the shift (the non-dramatic part) and a bit to stop them from being able to fire me because I was already quitting kind of thing (only dramatic in the sense that I was thinking they would fire me over my first write up).    Otherwise, I don't understand why you think it is dramatic?  Could you please explain?

Dramatic in that it something that is over the top, perhaps quite striking and effective but possibly disproportionate to the situation.   

I do understand your reasoning in that maybe it would be best for them to have the role free to full - it's entirely possible that this is a solution that would suit them.  But it's equally possible that they'd go "Oh no!  We thought we were just trying to cover one shift and now she's QUITTING?"   Based on what you've posted re the interaction so far, it just isn't clear what they'd prefer.   So while offering to resign could be a nice gesture if you think it will help solve the problem, it really doesn't seem necessary at this stage for you to outright resign. You're jumping from A to C and skipping B.  If that makes sense.    :)     Hence dramatic as in over the top.  (Not in a dramatic, childish way if that's how you took it - certainly didn't mean to imply that!)

It makes a lot of sense, thanks for explaining!  In that way, I actually agree with you.  For whatever the reason, these things didn't cross my mind...probably because I'm so ticked at the other server for going and getting football tickets when she found out she couldn't work for me that morning due to overtime.

Yes, TootsNYC, my mean side, too; so far, I've only told it to people not at the restaurant, ie my boyfriend and mom.  You want to know what the worst part is?  She's my best friend.  I really need to sit down and talk with her once I cool off a little...I'm going to go with she forgets I'm taking the LSAT that day...at least I hope.

Also, to give a bit better perspective, this is the restaurant in a hotel that is only open for breakfast, thus she and I are the only two servers.  Her being my best friend is also why I trusted her to cover the shift without requesting the day off (which is usually OK where I work, as long as you let the supervisor know (which I did)....but I'm never doing that again.)

I'm not really worried about the write up, I guess, I'm worried about how pissed off people will be at me because I left them in a lurch simply because my best friend and I are the only two servers.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: amylouky on September 25, 2012, 12:22:02 PM
It makes a lot of sense, thanks for explaining!  In that way, I actually agree with you.  For whatever the reason, these things didn't cross my mind...probably because I'm so ticked at the other server for going and getting football tickets when she found out she couldn't work for me that morning due to overtime.

Yes, TootsNYC, my mean side, too; so far, I've only told it to people not at the restaurant, ie my boyfriend and mom.  You want to know what the worst part is?  She's my best friend.  I really need to sit down and talk with her once I cool off a little...I'm going to go with she forgets I'm taking the LSAT that day...at least I hope.

I'm not sure why you are ticked at your friend? She got the football tickets AFTER she found out that she couldn't work for you due to the overtime issue, right? So, she didn't have a commitment to you when she got the tickets.

I agree with PP's, this is the management's problem now. You've given them plenty of time to figure out another solution.. don't let this worry distract you from your LSAT preps.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: gramma dishes on September 25, 2012, 01:54:13 PM
I also wish you wouldn't use the term "no show" in describing yourself in this situation.  A no show is someone who is scheduled to work and simply doesn't show up.  Period.

This is certainly not the case here.  You've done everything possible to do what you could to be fair to your employer, but the scheduling of the LSAT is not something you can control or change.  It wouldn't kill the manager herself to come in and take that shift if necessary this one and only time. 

If they would fire you for this, I think it's not a place you'd want to work for anyway.  But I wouldn't quit.  Quitting won't help them anyway.  They'd still be out a server for that day.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: TootsNYC on September 25, 2012, 03:07:51 PM
seriously, they only have two servers? That's the height of folly.

I think you should start suggesting that they find some "on-call backup servers" in case both of you get sick on the same day.


I missed the overtime problem--I'm going to have to go read the thread to see how that fit in.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 25, 2012, 05:47:23 PM
They found someone to cover the shift, thankfully, and aren't mad at me at all.  Phew.

In other good news, I have to quit anyway...as I start my Corrections Officer job on October 22!
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Ceallach on September 25, 2012, 06:23:29 PM
I also wish you wouldn't use the term "no show" in describing yourself in this situation.  A no show is someone who is scheduled to work and simply doesn't show up.  Period.

This is certainly not the case here.  You've done everything possible to do what you could to be fair to your employer, but the scheduling of the LSAT is not something you can control or change.  It wouldn't kill the manager herself to come in and take that shift if necessary this one and only time. 

If they would fire you for this, I think it's not a place you'd want to work for anyway.  But I wouldn't quit.  Quitting won't help them anyway.  They'd still be out a server for that day.

A very good point!   I actually had to query one of my admin staff about that the other day.  She'd logged a report in the system for one of our workers as a no show.   Except the worker wasn't due to start for another hour, so I knew that couldn't possibly be accurate!  ::)   Turns out, the worker had been running a few minutes late for unavoidable reasons, and they realised that because of that she wouldn't be able to see the particular client and still attend to another very important client later in the day.   The admin called this client and she said she was happy to reschedule until tomorrow.   So not ideal, but all sorted.    And the worker hadn't really done a single thing wrong.

I explained to the admin "A no show is a big deal. It means we were expecting the person to show up, and then they didn't.  If we know in advance that they're not going or if we aren't expecting them to go, then it's no longer a no show!"  It might still be a bad situation, but nowhere near as bad.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: TheaterDiva1 on September 25, 2012, 06:58:33 PM
They found someone to cover the shift, thankfully, and aren't mad at me at all.  Phew.

In other good news, I have to quit anyway...as I start my Corrections Officer job on October 22!

That's great news... and congratulations on the new job! :)
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: RiverSong on September 25, 2012, 07:15:16 PM
I am a little confused. If you had your shift covered and that person decided not to cover it, why is this not their responsibility to find cover now?
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 25, 2012, 08:32:06 PM
I am a little confused. If you had your shift covered and that person decided not to cover it, why is this not their responsibility to find cover now?

Because I didn't have it actually cleared with my supervisor (lesson learned) because it usually isn't necessary.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: JenJay on September 26, 2012, 01:39:29 PM
They found someone to cover the shift, thankfully, and aren't mad at me at all.  Phew.

In other good news, I have to quit anyway...as I start my Corrections Officer job on October 22!

Congratulations!!
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 26, 2012, 03:02:52 PM
Thank you!
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: FauxFoodist on October 02, 2012, 08:32:23 PM
Not sure if this is the reason, but at my job, if you need to get someone to work for you or switch shifts, once you find someone, you have to call the GM, and the person working for you also has to call, and just let the GM know, yes, I'm working for so and so on this date.  This way, everyone knows who is now responsible for that time, and if the replacement fails to show up, the original employee isn't on the hoook

This is how I handle schedule trades with my area.  Sometimes, someone new to the system (someone new to me handling his/her schedule or newly hired) will try some stunt in "authorizing" his her own trade but is set straight pretty quickly (even our dept director, the top dog, has to have his out-of-office time approved by his supervisor).

We had a schedule trade mess-up a few months ago when a new hire agreed on a Friday afternoon to stay an additional hour Sunday afternoon to cover the start of the shift for someone who needed to come in late.  Well, the new hire forgot he agreed to stay and left.  Also, the 2nd employee had gotten the change approved after I was gone for the weekend so the schedule change was not noted on the posted schedule.  Mayhem ensued for the hour that they were short-staffed, culminating with the moronic supervisor in charge that weekend sending an accusatory e-mail to all other supervisors and me blaming me for the schedule not being up to date.  Funny, I didn't get an acknowledgment or apology from her after pointing out on the e-mail notification from 2nd employee that the approved change came AFTER I was gone for the weekend (I don't think I needed to point out to everyone what an unreasonable idiot she was for flying off the handle at me like that so I hope she felt really really REALLY stupid for that because her e-mail was that nasty).

Anyway, by making the supervisors in charge of noting the schedule changes, it takes the employees off the hook (so 2nd employee was not at fault -- however, 1st employee WAS at fault and was told if this happens a 3rd time, because this wasn't the first time he screwed up by forgetting a schedule change, he would no longer be permitted to do schedule trades).
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: BeeGee01 on October 03, 2012, 11:43:12 AM
Good Luck on your LSAT's?  My son teaches LSAT courses, I know this is a big deal for you. 
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Morticia on October 04, 2012, 11:58:45 AM
Yes, good luck tomorrow.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Mental Magpie on October 04, 2012, 05:40:54 PM
Thanks!
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: kglory on October 05, 2012, 10:30:44 PM
Go kick some butt tomorrow morning!
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Morticia on October 17, 2012, 08:11:20 AM
How did it go?
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: Mental Magpie on October 17, 2012, 08:40:38 AM
I won't know until about the 31st  :(  I hate the waiting game.
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: wolfie on October 17, 2012, 10:39:44 AM
I won't know until about the 31st  :(  I hate the waiting game.

Let's play Hungry Hungry Hippos instead!

(10 points if you know where that quote comes from!)
Title: Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
Post by: ilrag on October 17, 2012, 05:43:46 PM
Mr Plow.