Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Humor Me! => Topic started by: Thipu1 on September 30, 2012, 10:10:57 AM

Title: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Thipu1 on September 30, 2012, 10:10:57 AM
SIL and her DH were staying with us.  He could live on pizza and wanted 'real New York pizza'.  Mr. Thipu also loves pizza so it seemed like a good match. 

However, there was a problem because they had different ideas about what New York pizza is.  To us, it has a thin crust and no more than three toppings.  Any more toppings  will make the pie too moist and ruin the crispness of the crust.  The pizza we enjoy when we visit them is very close to what we get at home. 

To our guest, a New York pizza was a slice with enough stuff piled on it to compromise the structural integrity of the dish.  It would be delicious but hard to find around here. 

We compromised and called in some really tasty ribs.  A good time was had by all.

Have you ever encountered a situation in which a guest's perception of something in your area was at variance with reality?

Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Kaypeep on September 30, 2012, 12:47:04 PM
I am also from NYC and while visiting a friend in Daytona, FL i went to a beach snack stand to get hot dogs.  It wasn't busy and the guy asked where I was from.  I said NYC and we chatted.  When my hotdogs arrived they had cole slaw on them.  I balked and asked for new ones, that I didn't order them with cole slaw on them.  He insisted this is how REAL NEW YORKERS eat their hot dogs.  I assured him he was incorrect and we debated it for a few minutes until he made me 2 new hot dogs, plain.  I put ketchup and (yuck) yellow mustard on them.  I didn't want to risk asking for sauerkraut or onions, who knew where that might lead to.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 30, 2012, 01:05:19 PM
Most people who live in the south already know there's regional variation in what we call "barbecue," but there are definitely times that visitors come down from the other side of the Mason-Dixon line and say "I had some really great barbecue once, let's do that again!" and don't take into account they visited Texas (or Tennessee or North Carolina) before and Alabama now.  And then they're shocked that barbecue here is completely different than what they expected.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Zilla on September 30, 2012, 08:48:44 PM
Yes!  With Cuban cuisine.  People expect it to be spicy and I always have to tell them that Cuban food isn't spicy.  Cue shocked looks and questions like but most spanish foods are spicy.  I always have to correct them that Mexican/South American cuisine is a far cry from Cuban cuisine which is island influenced food from Spain. 


It's similar to what Slartibast says about barbeque.  It's influenced by the area and can be completely different.  I actually prefer the vinegar based bbq.  People are often shocked that such a thing exists.





Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 30, 2012, 10:07:13 PM
Not food-related, but how could I forget the exchange students in high school?  We did a program with a French school where some of their students came to visit us, then some of us got to visit them.  Word must have gotten around among some of the French boys that "American girls are easy" and "Americans love French accents" - so some of them came expecting free scrabble favors from every female they ran across.

Sorry, guys - usually American girls love French accents from good-looking French men.  Not scrawny barely-pubescent males, especially those who think they're God's gift to women.  Those particular boys ended up getting a talking-to from their teacher halfway through their month here because they were behaving in ways that made the girls here uncomfortable and were bothering their host families (e.g. propositioning girls left and right and actually expecting the answer to be "yes.")

We were lucky - we had a fantastic girl come stay with us.  She's since come back three or four times, I've visited with her, and my parents are actually going to France next summer to see her and meet her parents and her new baby  ;D
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Hmmmmm on October 02, 2012, 11:05:46 AM
One of my favorites is that Texas has actual trees.  During a flight from the east coast, my seat mate was gobsmacked as we broke through the clouds landing at Houston's large airport.  The area is heavily wooded.  He's expectation was Texas was all dessert and scrub brush like you see in the westerns and from the movie "Giant". I've had other visitors suprised about how green Houston looks from the air, but he was the first to try and convince me the entire National Forest we were circling above was planted. 
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 03, 2012, 08:05:14 AM
We have that sort of thing with NYC, too.

Visitors are amazed to find that the entire city doesn't look like Midtown. 

Yes, in the outer boroughs it's perfectly possible to see the sky without getting the roof of your mouth sunburned.  We also have trees--lots and lots of great, big trees.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: RingTailedLemur on October 03, 2012, 08:12:07 AM
We have that sort of thing with NYC, too.

Visitors are amazed to find that the entire city doesn't look like Midtown. 

Yes, in the outer boroughs it's perfectly possible to see the sky without getting the roof of your mouth sunburned.  We also have trees--lots and lots of great, big trees.

What does this phrase mean?
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 03, 2012, 12:41:49 PM
We have that sort of thing with NYC, too.

Visitors are amazed to find that the entire city doesn't look like Midtown. 

Yes, in the outer boroughs it's perfectly possible to see the sky without getting the roof of your mouth sunburned.  We also have trees--lots and lots of great, big trees.

What does this phrase mean?

I'm assuming it's referring to the parts of the city with huge skyscrapers, so if you want to see the sky you have to look straight up (and most people open their mouths a bit when they do this).
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 03, 2012, 05:14:39 PM
We have that sort of thing with NYC, too.

Visitors are amazed to find that the entire city doesn't look like Midtown. 

Yes, in the outer boroughs it's perfectly possible to see the sky without getting the roof of your mouth sunburned.  We also have trees--lots and lots of great, big trees.

What does this phrase mean?

It's an old joke.

  In Mid-Town Manhattan the buildings are so tall you can't see the top of them unless you throw your head way back.  When you do that, you tend to open your mouth and that's how the roof of your mouth gets sunburned. 
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: RingTailedLemur on October 04, 2012, 03:13:56 AM
Thank you :)
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 04, 2012, 08:32:52 AM
We have that sort of thing with NYC, too.

Visitors are amazed to find that the entire city doesn't look like Midtown. 

Yes, in the outer boroughs it's perfectly possible to see the sky without getting the roof of your mouth sunburned.  We also have trees--lots and lots of great, big trees.

What does this phrase mean?

It was an expression my father used to use.  The buildings in Midtown are so tall that you have crane your head backwards to see the tops. When you do that you often involuntarily open your mouth.  That's how the 'roof of your mouth gets sun burned'.   :D
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: lady_disdain on October 04, 2012, 10:05:56 AM
Yes!  With Cuban cuisine.  People expect it to be spicy and I always have to tell them that Cuban food isn't spicy.  Cue shocked looks and questions like but most spanish foods are spicy.  I always have to correct them that Mexican/South American cuisine is a far cry from Cuban cuisine which is island influenced food from Spain. 


It's similar to what Slartibast says about barbeque.  It's influenced by the area and can be completely different.  I actually prefer the vinegar based bbq.  People are often shocked that such a thing exists.

And a lot of South American food isn't spicy either.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 08, 2012, 09:39:58 AM
We had the Mexican/Spanish misunderstanding with MIL. 
Near her home, there's a Mexican place she really seems to enjoy. Last time we visited, she invited a friend out for 'Spanish' food.  The lady was familiar with neither cuisine.

The Mexican meal was delicious but we tried to explain the differences between Mexican and Spanish food.

'But the language is the same'.

The written language is but a native of Malaga might have a problem being properly understood in Acapulco and vice versa. 

The problem with our explanation was that we developed a real desire for some Veal Estramadura or a good paella.  Some of those wonderful Spanish fried potatoes would also be welcome. 

 
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Mental Magpie on October 09, 2012, 08:48:06 AM
I grew up in a small town surrounded by Amish.  We went on a school trip once, through Ohio, where there are still a lot of Amish.  Apparently, one of my classmates didn't know that there were Amish outside of our county.   ::)  She continued to insist that they were just traveling like we were.  When I pointed out a very obviously Amish farm, she turned her head the other way and pretended like she didn't hear me.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: lowspark on October 09, 2012, 09:08:00 AM
There is definitely a disconnect between Mexican food -- that is, authentic food from Mexico -- and TexMex, which we generally call Mexican. They are really two entirely different things.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Shopaholic on October 09, 2012, 09:14:05 AM
My aunt once told us she was having an even catered "Argentinian style".
To most people I know "Argentinian" means meat, and a lot of it - namely steak and asado.
The closest thing to meat there was tunafish.

OK, now I want asado...
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Itza on October 14, 2012, 12:00:28 PM
A similar situation... Re Fish & Chip shops.

I grew up with one idea of what a fish pattie was and what a fish cake was.

When I left home and moved out of the area (the first time), I was in my new local Fish & Chip shop. I asked for a fish pattie but the woman had no idea what I was asking for. So I pointed to what I knew it to be and asked what it was. She said it was a fish cake. That was no fish cake that I knew of! So I pointed to what I always knew to be a fish cake and asked what it was. She said it was a rissole.  :o

I haven't been to a Fish & Chip shop here yet to see what they call their food.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: kherbert05 on October 14, 2012, 12:31:17 PM
Everyone in Texas either


acts like JR Ewing or


Rides around in white robes and dunce caps. I have a Canadian cousin, who's wife is from Jamaica. When they have layovers at Intercontinental - she refuses to leave the airport and if possible insists the family stay behind security the whole time of their layover (sometimes over 24 hours). She honestly believes they will be lynched for being a mixed marriage if they step out of the airport. She continues to believe this even though her kids are good friends of sis and I and she knew Dad and trusted him with her kids for 30 years. Some of the kids in family hearing this insisted her marriage wasn't the mixed one, my parents' marriage was the mixed one (Protestant/Catholic instead of Irish/Jamaican)


Another time I got punched for burning boats. Apparently a 10 yo from Texas is personally responsible for idiot racists and their terror tactics. (I was playing with an assortment of different cousins of different races and religions at the time. They came to my defense which resulted in quite a dust up. None of us recognized the name of this group and had to ask our parents what it was when we arrived home after the fight.)

Ordered enchiladas got quesadillas at a "Mexican" restaurant on PEI. (younger cousins loved the place and insisted we go.  ::)  ) I don't like quesadillas ate but choked them down after I'm from Texas and these are not enchiladas didn't work.

Heard the all Texas is scrubbrush and cacti thing. No there are lots of Trees in East/Gulf Coast. Lots of water too.

 Galveston Island was abandoned after the 1900 storm and no one lives there.

 In a Houston bookstore Prince Edward Island is a make believe island created by LM Montgomery showing the worker the island on the map did not change her mind.

Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 14, 2012, 01:56:09 PM
If you ask for a hot tamale in my hometown, you will get what the rest of the world calls a sloppy joe.  It does have spices, but it's not at all "hot" other than in the thermal sense.  If you ask for "chili" it will be a mildy spicy mixture of hamburger, macaroni, sometimes beans, and usually things like corn or artichoke hearts.  I love it, but people who expect chili to be spicy and tomato-based are often surprised!
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 14, 2012, 02:14:05 PM
Oh, Slartibartfast.

The dish you describe was known in my youth.  It would have been called 'American Chow Mein'. Let's try to figure that one out.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 14, 2012, 03:10:56 PM
Now that I'm thinking about it, that actually sounds really good for dinner . . .

*leaves to go rummaging through the pantry*
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 14, 2012, 03:23:56 PM
Oh, Slartibartfast.

The dish you describe was known in my youth.  It would have been called 'American Chow Mein'. Let's try to figure that one out.

It does make sense - "American Chow Mein" makes it clear we can't blame any other nationality for this dish  :P
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 14, 2012, 04:06:57 PM
On a cold and snowy or sleety day American Chow Mein can be just the thing you want to eat.  It can smell great while it's cooking and cozily steam up the windows. 

Dang, we were thinking of thawing out some home-made pea soup for dinner.  Now, I'm considering checking the pantry for elbow macaroni. 
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 14, 2012, 05:32:05 PM
We were out of macaroni, and out of canned tomatoes, so I'm sitting here eating hamburger/corn/beans/artichoke with salt and pepper and not much else.  Not what I was craving, but it's close enough  :)  It's proof I really need to get to the grocery store, though . . .
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Bethczar on October 20, 2012, 11:40:46 AM
We had a student from the South who transferred to our high school. He was amazed to find that Wisconsin was hot in summer. He thought it didn't get above 70 here.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 20, 2012, 03:36:17 PM
We had a student from the South who transferred to our high school. He was amazed to find that Wisconsin was hot in summer. He thought it didn't get above 70 here.

Ha!  (Wisconsonian transplant to Alabama here.)  From the other side, I never understood the whole "summer nights are romantic" phenomenon until I moved down here and discovered it's pleasant weather outdoors at midnight.  In Wisconsin the evening is still usually pretty cool all year round - not cold, necessarily, but not "Wow the mugginess went away!" like it is down here  :)
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: mmswm on October 21, 2012, 12:01:50 AM
North Dakota is flat.

Okay, so parts of North Dakota are very flat.  The Red River Valley is, in fact, the flattest bit of land on earth, but that's only a small part of the state.  The rolling hills of the prairies in the eastern and middle part of the state, and the Badlands in the west are anything but flat.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 21, 2012, 09:14:00 AM
North Dakota is flat.

Okay, so parts of North Dakota are very flat.  The Red River Valley is, in fact, the flattest bit of land on earth, but that's only a small part of the state.  The rolling hills of the prairies in the eastern and middle part of the state, and the Badlands in the west are anything but flat.

There was a humorous article published in an otherwise prestigious peer-reviewed journal in which the researchers did an electronic topography of a pancake and an elaborate statistical summary of the topography of Kansas and concluded that yes, Kansas is actually close to 100 times flatter than a pancake.  I'm guessing it was one of those "We have the equipment so we did the experiment, and since we did the experiment, why not write it up and see if they'll take it?" and then it actually got published  ;D

ETA: found it! http://www.improbable.com/airchives/paperair/volume9/v9i3/kansas.html  Includes lines like "Some readers may find the comparing of a pancake and Kansas to be analogous to the comparing of apples and oranges; we refer those readers to a 1995 publication by NASA’s Scott Sandford (3), who used spectrographic techniques to do a comparison of apples and oranges."  Also, their conclusion: "After many hours of programming work, we were able to estimate that Kansas’s flatness is approximately 0.9997. That degree of flatness might be described, mathematically, as “[dingdangity] flat.” "
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 21, 2012, 09:16:24 AM
Did this paper appear in the 'Journal of Irrproducible Results' by any chance?

It sounds like something right up their alley. 
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 21, 2012, 09:20:26 AM
Did this paper appear in the 'Journal of Irrproducible Results' by any chance?

It sounds like something right up their alley.

The Annals of Improbable Research  :P  If you search Google for "Kansas flat pancake study" you get several other references to it.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 21, 2012, 01:53:14 PM
Thank you, Slattibartfast.

 Didn't know about that journal but I will check it out.  Do you remember the 'Worm Runners' Digest'?
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Bijou on October 21, 2012, 03:48:13 PM
I am also from NYC and while visiting a friend in Daytona, FL i went to a beach snack stand to get hot dogs.  It wasn't busy and the guy asked where I was from.  I said NYC and we chatted.  When my hotdogs arrived they had cole slaw on them.  I balked and asked for new ones, that I didn't order them with cole slaw on them.  He insisted this is how REAL NEW YORKERS eat their hot dogs.  I assured him he was incorrect and we debated it for a few minutes until he made me 2 new hot dogs, plain.  I put ketchup and (yuck) yellow mustard on them.  I didn't want to risk asking for sauerkraut or onions, who knew where that might lead to.
Cole Slaw!?  Ugh!
I must have sauerkraut, sweet pickle relish, mustard, mayo and fresh finely chopped onions.  Gosh, now I'm caught between wanting a hot dog or pizza.  I can get HebrewNational franks 97 percent fat free.  I love those things!  If only they made 97% fat free Pizza...with zero carbs.
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: Thipu1 on October 21, 2012, 04:23:25 PM
Mayo!!! Mayo on a hot dog in NYC???

SACRILEGE!!!

A NYC hot dog can have any and all of the following...

Mustard (brown preferred)
Sauerkraut
Green relish
Chili (although that may be considered a bit twee by purists).
A red onion sauce sometimes known as 'dirty water dog dressing'.

But MAYO???

In NYC, that would be considered almost as bad as carrying a 20 oz  cup of soda. 




Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: sourwolf on October 21, 2012, 04:28:07 PM
Mayo!!! Mayo on a hot dog in NYC???

SACRILEGE!!!

A NYC hot dog can have any and all of the following...

Mustard (brown preferred)
Sauerkraut
Green relish
Chili (although that may be considered a bit twee by purists).
A red onion sauce sometimes known as 'dirty water dog dressing'.

But MAYO???

In NYC, that would be considered almost as bad as carrying a 20 oz  cup of soda.

You forgot the ketchup!
Title: Re: Regional Misunderstandings
Post by: mmswm on October 21, 2012, 05:21:22 PM
North Dakota is flat.

Okay, so parts of North Dakota are very flat.  The Red River Valley is, in fact, the flattest bit of land on earth, but that's only a small part of the state.  The rolling hills of the prairies in the eastern and middle part of the state, and the Badlands in the west are anything but flat.

There was a humorous article published in an otherwise prestigious peer-reviewed journal in which the researchers did an electronic topography of a pancake and an elaborate statistical summary of the topography of Kansas and concluded that yes, Kansas is actually close to 100 times flatter than a pancake.  I'm guessing it was one of those "We have the equipment so we did the experiment, and since we did the experiment, why not write it up and see if they'll take it?" and then it actually got published  ;D

ETA: found it! http://www.improbable.com/airchives/paperair/volume9/v9i3/kansas.html  Includes lines like "Some readers may find the comparing of a pancake and Kansas to be analogous to the comparing of apples and oranges; we refer those readers to a 1995 publication by NASA’s Scott Sandford (3), who used spectrographic techniques to do a comparison of apples and oranges."  Also, their conclusion: "After many hours of programming work, we were able to estimate that Kansas’s flatness is approximately 0.9997. That degree of flatness might be described, mathematically, as “[dingdangity] flat.” "

Interesting!  It is worth noting that the "valley" formed by the Red River of the North, is not actually much of a valley and, at Fargo, is only a few hundred feet wide. It merges almost seamlessly into the ancient Lake Agassiz lake bed.  This is one of several reasons why the flooding in Fargo and Grand Forks is so bad (the other two major reasons being  that it's a meandering river, with hairpin curves and near loop-de-loops, and also that it's north flowing).  As you travel west from Fargo, the ancient lake bed gives way to the beautiful rolling hills of the prairie, then into the Badlands.  It's gorgeous country, btw.  If you've never been, I highly recommend visiting.  Well, during the spring and summer, anyway!  It can get a bit brutal during the winter (though still gorgeous.)

NDSU has a great website describing the geology of the area, if you're interested. http://www.ndsu.edu/fargo_geology/briefhistory.htm