Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Time For a Coffee Break! => Topic started by: Pippen on October 09, 2012, 06:09:35 PM

Title: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 09, 2012, 06:09:35 PM
The begging thread had me thinking about how often we encounter people whose sole purpose in life seems to be trying to relieve you of your hard earned money. What methods have people tried to use on you or people you know in the past and how did you handle the situation? The 419 email scammers seem to get a fair bit of exposure but there are so many that aren't as blatant that manage to suck people in.

An elderly person I know answered a flyer in the newspaper pro porting to be able to alleviate arthritis pain. The next day a salesman arrived on their doorstep and did a 5 hour hard sell on this special massage chair. They basically had to give him a cheque to get him to leave (Which was immediately cancelled) The cost of this chair? $17,000. It was in the news and on a consumer affairs show warning people not to deal with them but what they were doing was perfectly legal as by responding to the flyer they had technically been invited rather than cold calling people. $17,000 for a vibrating chair. Outrageous.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RegionMom on October 09, 2012, 09:53:30 PM
My credit union has large signs warning the elderly of checking and banking scams. 
I wish I knew a cure, but as long as people are willing to give even a bit of money, scammers will be there to take as much as they can. 
 >:( >:(
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 09, 2012, 10:50:36 PM
I've actually got a weird version of this going on now.  I'm going to a science fiction convention next week to sell some jewelry - it will be my first overnight convention (that I'll be a vendor for), and I'll have Bittybartfast with me, so it's going to be interesting.  My sister is driving down to help me, and the two of us will split the cost of the hotel room.  Since I'm a vendor, I get my convention badge for free and I can get my "assistant" a free badge too.  Not that badges are hugely expensive - $30 or so - but it's a nice perk.

My sister has a friend in HerCity who is one of those perpetually broke people.  She's very nice, kind, etc. but she's always moaning about how broke she is and if anyone suggests doing something that costs money, she complains about not having any.  Sometimes someone else will cover for her, sometimes the group changes their plans, and sometimes she just doesn't get to go.  (I should mention that she never has money for going out with friends, but frequently has money for things related to her hobbies.)

Anyway, since we'll have the hotel room anyway and it really would be nice to have an extra pair of hands (since I will be dealing with a four-month-old while trying to sell stuff!), my sister and I talked and we decided to invite her friend to come with us.  She wouldn't have to pay toward the hotel room, since we'd be splitting that cost anyway, and all I'd ask is an hour or two during the convention for her to help me at my booth because a friend of mine is giving a presentation and I'd like to see it.

Here's the  ::) ::) ::) part - she's still not willing to make up her mind whether she's going to go or not.  We're offering her a completely free (other than food) trip to a convention she's gone to the last few years, and has been lamenting about not being able to afford this year, and all I want is a "yes" or a "no" so I can start planning the logistics of doing this with a baby.  From what my sister says, it's not a money thing (we can bring our own food and keep a cooler in the room if we want to) - it's a "friend is a flake" thing.  I was thinking this would be a nice thing we could offer her friend to come along with which didn't involve anyone having to chip in for her or cover her or loan her money, but my sister is getting pretty frustrated with this particular friend always being on the receiving end of things and never even attempting to reciprocate with a plate of cookies or an offer to help do stuff.  My sister may be moving sometime soonish (her boyfriend lives five hours away from where she is now), and I'm guessing when she does, this friend will gradually become an ex-friend.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Yarnspinner on October 10, 2012, 12:17:14 AM
Years and years and YEARS ago, I went to a science fiction/fantasy convention with friends.  Bibbie and I both had jobs.  Her friend Mooch did not.  I was told " Instead of trying to divide or split the bill, we just take turns buying meals.  It evens out in the end."  Happily I knew I would only be in this situation for a day and a half as I was meeting up with other friends on Sunday and would be leaving with them for dinner and a play which had already been paid for.

Yeah, not so much, especially since Bibbie abandoned me to the tender mercies of Mooch so Bibbie could spend all her time with her boyfriend, Arrogant. 

Mooch would do stuff like turn on the television as loud as humanly possible and then fall asleep...but yu couldn't turn it off because it would wake her up.  However, if you woke up in the middle of the night and tried to get to the bathroom, Mooch would wait until you were halfway there then she would leap from bed and run into the bathroom and leave you dancing from foot to foot while SHE suddenly decided she needed to take a shower at 4 a.m.  (Yeah, Mooch had issues.)

And then there was fun with food.

The "I want to look cool in front of my girl friend" Scam: Arrogant insisted we all go to "the best restaurant in town" and that money was no object and we should buy anything on the menu and not be intimidated by price.  Bibbie said "He's taking us out tonight."

Because Bibbie had the worst taste in men (and still does) I did not believe it and ordered the least expensive thing on the menu.  Thank heaven's I listened to my gut as Arrogant said "Oh, I should have said that you guys are on your own."

And then there was "I Am Spending Every Penny I Have on First Edition Everything, Especially Since I'm Gonna Con YOU Into Buying Dinner" Mooch.

I had portioned my money out carefully, but since I was locked into the "We buy each other's meals" with Mooch breathing down my neck--and Bibbie off with Arrogant--I decided that I would get my share over with (especially since I knew I would be in writing seminars all day, didn't have much money to my name  and wasn't going to get stuck paying the bill for Mister "I'm Going to Eat A Lot on Your Dime Even Though I Won't Pay For You On Mine.")

I didn't realize that Mooch had an appetite like Sarloc.  I figured we'd spend about 14 bucks total on breakfast...wrong!  I had planned for a small breakfast for myself...Mooch had a more grandiose plan.  I wound up spending almost twenty five dollars in a time and place that that kind of money would have bought a family of four a nice sit down dinner out.  Seven of it was mine.  I can only imagine what supper would have been like.

Happily, I got to eat lunch by myself at a cute little gourmet burger place and since I ate late, I just wasn't hungry for supper.  Because I still needed to pay my other friends for the theater and dinner tickets, I avoided the dealers room, and hung on to my precioius few dollars.

But the next day, as I was packing up with plans to sneak off quietly Mooch came tearing in to our hotel room.

"Quick!  I need you to give me all your money and write me a check that totals about two hundred dollars."

"I don't even have fifty," I told her "and what I have is ear marked for the play this afternoon."

"But I NEEEEEEEEEEED it.  I've just seen the most beautiful painting in the world and it's five hundred dollars, but the artist will hold it if I give hm two hundred dollars and I have to have it."

I repeated that I did not have but twenty left to my name, that that was already earmarked for the play I was going to see and I could not give it to her.

She continued to whine and cajole and beg and plead and even tried to carry my suitcase downstairs so she could beg from my other friends as well.  These days I wish I had said something like "Maybe if you didn't eat everything in sight,  didn't buy every darn pretty painting you see and didn't buy hundreds of dollars worth of books--have yu ever heard of a library?--you would have two hundred for what you really want."  But even without ehell, I knew then that would be mean and rude.  So I just kept repeating that the money I had was already promised to someone else.

And when I found my other friends and we went off to see Forbidden Broadway, I made them promise that they would never ever let me go to another convention with Bibbie, Mooch and Arrogant ever again.

And I never did.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: weeblewobble on October 10, 2012, 06:22:08 AM
I used to work in an office where we handled applications for people who needed utility/grocery assistance. And yes, I can tell you without a doubt that while there are people out there in genuine need, there are people who make their "living" this way.  A good part of my job was calling the utility companies and asking how often the applicant was late paying and how often they received assistance from groups like ours.  If they received frequent help, we were far less likely to help them.

A few doozies from my years there:

- The gentleman who frequently came by our office to ask my boss for $20 for "medicine."  He got angry when the boss refused to give it to him.  So he went around the residential neighborhood where our offices were located, telling the homeowners that he was our "handyman" and would be happy to odd jobs for cash.  This was a neighborhood that wasn't used to homeless people going door-to-door soliciting cash.  We got a lot of complaint calls about it and had to put out word through the neighborhood grapevine that residents should NOT let him into their house.

- The same guy came in a few weeks later saying that his mother had died in a city 600 miles away and he needed a bus ticket to go to the funeral.  My boss hoped that if we bused him home to his family that they might take care of him.  So my boss took him to the bus station and bought him a one-way ticket. 

Guess who came in just two weeks later?  He never got on the bus or made it to the funeral.  But he needed "rent" money and figured we might want to buy the bus ticket back for $250.

Ummm, no.

My boss groaned, "I should have put him ON the bus."

-The woman who came into an unsecured backdoor afterhours and demanded grocery assistance from my coworker.  Coworker tried to tell her that the assistance funds had been locked up for the day and she didn't have a key.  So the woman demanded that coworker hand over cash from her purse.  It took threatening to call 911 before the lady would leave.

-The scariest incident was when a woman followed me into the office (I was always the first one to arrive and unlock).  I walked into the breakroom to start the coffee, turned around and there she was, demanding gas money.  I tried to explain I couldn't give it to her and she snatched the freshly brewed coffee from the machine.  I thought she was going to douse me with it.  She was between me and the phone.  I couldn't call for help. I honestly thought, "OK, I'm going to have to wrestle this woman."  Fortunately, my boss came in and defused this situation.  And no, we didn't give her gas money.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on October 10, 2012, 10:31:09 AM
Your situation is a disaster in the making, Slartibartfast. I would urge you, in the strongest possible terms, to think about getting out of this even if it smacks of a little rudeness. Tell her she cannot come on the trip. Not only won't you get any help at the booth, you will probably end up babysitting her too while she whines worse than your child. Trust me on this; I am speaking from experience. Get out of it while you still can!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CLE_Girl on October 10, 2012, 10:55:25 AM
Craigslist is the worst!

My DH is selling a whole bunch of stuff right now and as the computer savvy one I'm doing the listings with the replies coming to my e-mail address.  For every legitimate reply there are 4-5 scammers replying.  And they are getting smarter every week! 

Week 1 - scammer would reply to every single listing across multiple boards.  The e-mail would always be one line "is item still available?" and sent from a cell phone.  The reply to e-mail address would be different then the sent from address.  I replied and would get the typical "I'm out of town, my assistant will send a check, I'll arrange movers/pick up."  And it was always in Very formal/proper english, like too formal to be a native english speaker.   

Week 2 - Only respond to listings on one board.  I would still get multiple e-mails from the same "person" since I have multiple listings.  The rest would be the same as Week 1.

Week 3 - I'd get a response to only one listing and the reply to e-mail would be the same as the sent from e-mail.  The rest would be the same as week 1

Week 4 - Response to only one listing, now the first response includes questions about the item or information about when they are available to inspect/pick up the item.  The reply to and sent from e-mail would be the same.  Everything would be in overly formal/proper english.  And there would be 2-3 e-mails back and forth before I'm hit with the "I'm out of town, my assistant will send a check, I'll arrange movers/pick up."

It's getting really frustrating because now I'm getting invested in this potential buyer and excited that my item's are selling, then I'm hit with the scam.  DH says that's the price you pay for the service being free...
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on October 10, 2012, 11:20:39 AM
Just last year, I answered a call for the Printer Scam at work.  Many years ago, our office manager was the victim of the very same scam, so I had some familiarity with the way it went.  Snopes explains it here:

http://www.snopes.com/crime/fraud/supplies.asp

There are several variations but this particular scam is if you give the model number off the printer in question, you are either given a hard sell for really crappy but expensive toner or find yourself receiving a large case of very poor quality toner you never ordered, accompanied by a very expensive invoice.  The payoff is that they hope the invoice will just get paid to avoid litigation. 


Some BG:  I'm an assistant but I work at a pretty large company.  While we order supplies like pens, folders, note pads, etc., we have a person whose job is to maintain the printer/copier/fax machines we have.  I am not that person.  Anyone who does such business with our company would know that I am not that person.

So my phone rang.  Most of the time we have a caller ID display but this one was marked "PR-1," which means private.  My primary client's number occasionally comes up private, so I picked it up and answered with my customary greeting of "Company Name, this is 2LM." 

It's Tony and he says something like,

Tony: "Hey 2LM!  Listen, I was getting ready to send out your toner order but I wanted to make sure I had the right one.  Can you run over and get me the model number printer?"  (DING DING DING go the warning bells, LOL.)

Me: "Sir, I'm afraid I haven't ordered any toner and I'm not the person in charge of such things.  Good bye."

I was 99.999% sure it was a scam and had no intention of feeding this guy our real printer guy's name or number.  I let the Keeper of the Printer know about the call on the off chance he really did have a pending order and the guy just mis-dialed.  He didn't so I alerted my team to make them aware.  I have no idea how this guy got my extension. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Ginger G on October 10, 2012, 11:49:15 AM
Regarding the printer scam, I did something years ago that I'm not particulary proud of now, but here it goes...

I used to work at a fairly large company and for some reason these scammer calls kept coming to me even though the department I worked in had nothing to do with office supplies.  I would usually just say "not interested" and hang up.  One day, I just got fed up, and when the guy asked me to verify the model #, I said "okay sure!!" in a very friendly way and put him on hold.  I picked the phone back up and then said the first few actual numbers and then started spelling out in letters  "**** YOU".  You can probably guess what the "****" was.  Not nice I know, but I never got any more calls after that.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 10, 2012, 11:52:19 AM
Last time I got one of those, I tried something I had read about here on eHell  ;D

Her: "I'm about to send your toner order but could you please verify the serial number on your printer?"
Me: "Sure, let me go check.  One second.  Here it is: 4."
Her: "No, that's not it - should be a longer number than that."
Me: "Nope, that's the serial number - this printer is very old."
Her: " . . ."
Me: "Yeah, not falling for it, sorry.  Goodbye.  *click*"
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Winterlight on October 10, 2012, 12:39:35 PM
I've actually got a weird version of this going on now.  I'm going to a science fiction convention next week to sell some jewelry - it will be my first overnight convention (that I'll be a vendor for), and I'll have Bittybartfast with me, so it's going to be interesting.  My sister is driving down to help me, and the two of us will split the cost of the hotel room.  Since I'm a vendor, I get my convention badge for free and I can get my "assistant" a free badge too.  Not that badges are hugely expensive - $30 or so - but it's a nice perk.

My sister has a friend in HerCity who is one of those perpetually broke people.  She's very nice, kind, etc. but she's always moaning about how broke she is and if anyone suggests doing something that costs money, she complains about not having any.  Sometimes someone else will cover for her, sometimes the group changes their plans, and sometimes she just doesn't get to go.  (I should mention that she never has money for going out with friends, but frequently has money for things related to her hobbies.)

Anyway, since we'll have the hotel room anyway and it really would be nice to have an extra pair of hands (since I will be dealing with a four-month-old while trying to sell stuff!), my sister and I talked and we decided to invite her friend to come with us.  She wouldn't have to pay toward the hotel room, since we'd be splitting that cost anyway, and all I'd ask is an hour or two during the convention for her to help me at my booth because a friend of mine is giving a presentation and I'd like to see it.

Here's the  ::) ::) ::) part - she's still not willing to make up her mind whether she's going to go or not.  We're offering her a completely free (other than food) trip to a convention she's gone to the last few years, and has been lamenting about not being able to afford this year, and all I want is a "yes" or a "no" so I can start planning the logistics of doing this with a baby.  From what my sister says, it's not a money thing (we can bring our own food and keep a cooler in the room if we want to) - it's a "friend is a flake" thing.  I was thinking this would be a nice thing we could offer her friend to come along with which didn't involve anyone having to chip in for her or cover her or loan her money, but my sister is getting pretty frustrated with this particular friend always being on the receiving end of things and never even attempting to reciprocate with a plate of cookies or an offer to help do stuff.  My sister may be moving sometime soonish (her boyfriend lives five hours away from where she is now), and I'm guessing when she does, this friend will gradually become an ex-friend.

Offer a disinvite. Now. This will not end well. I've been there, done that and needed Valium afterwards.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on October 10, 2012, 12:42:32 PM
Years ago, before my oldest was born but when I was pregnant with him, DH was in the marines and we were living in a 1br apartment off base. We weren't making a ton of money since he was an E3/Lcpl but we were okay and able to pay all our bills and feed ourselves.

Okay, well I think I was around 6-7 months along at this point and one of the guys in his company sings him a sad tale about how he knows he's going to get into trouble when the results of the latest drug test come back.  It's a bad idea for him to stay in the barracks and he doesn't want to go to the brig, he wants to get clean.  Could he stay with us for a couple days until he finds another solution?

Being naive and a sucker for a sad story, DH tells me and manages to convince me to say yes by saying "it's just a few days and he'll contribute towards food." Okay so I was a sucker too and even more naive.

So, guess what happened? Anyone, anyone? Beuller? That's right, he stayed for two weeks, and we never saw any money. Not only that, but he moved his girlfriend and her little sister in with pleas of "They have nowhere to go!"  Also, I was dealing with some gnarly morning sickness at the time and the best way I found to combat it was to eat something salty first thing in the morning and then have small meals all day, along with staying hydrated.

I had to start hiding food because the guy would be up all night and was eating everything that wasn't nailed down.  Yeah, you guessed it. Meth addict.  ::)

I finally told DH "They are OUT, right now, I'm tired of this bs!" He finally saw that we were being used and the guy wasn't trying to get clean at all, he was still obviously using. DH didn't argue.  I kicked the jerk mooch out and he gave me some money. 

Finally, I thought, then I looked in the cigarette box he gave me. $9.  ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: hermanne on October 10, 2012, 12:46:37 PM
When I was single and had fewer expenses, my sister would call to borrow money, usually for groceries or $x.xx to pay a utility bill. Then I found out she was asking our mom for $x.xx to pay for the same bill! So mom and I told her to give us the phone and account numbers and we'd pay the bill directly.

Sis stopped asking us for money.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: exitzero on October 10, 2012, 01:10:50 PM
My boyfriend's friend is a bartender in a restaurant in Boston. Just this week, someone was going from table to table saying he was the manager and due to a shift change, he would have to take the check right now. Several people paid him or handed over their credit cards.

There was a tourist  who was suspicious, and he started questioning the "manager". The fake manager got nervous and tried to make a run for it.

The tourist yelled out for the bartender and they both grabbed the guy before he could make it very far, and the police arrested him.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: weeblewobble on October 10, 2012, 01:47:31 PM
My boyfriend's friend is a bartender in a restaurant in Boston. Just this week, someone was going from table to table saying he was the manager and due to a shift change, he would have to take the check right now. Several people paid him or handed over their credit cards.

There was a tourist  who was suspicious, and he started questioning the "manager". The fake manager got nervous and tried to make a run for it.

The tourist yelled out for the bartender and they both grabbed the guy before he could make it very far, and the police arrested him.

That's scary!  Something to look out for while traveling!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on October 10, 2012, 02:18:31 PM
In high school there was a group of girls that I am quite sure were not lacking in money. They had professionally cut and dyed hair, manicures, and new dresses every dance. This was not common at my school, where girls would dye each other's hair with drugstore dye and rewear each other's dresses. So, these girls and I had a gym class together. I overheard them one day muttering and figuring up how much money they could get if they asked everyone in the school for a quarter "for the pay phone." Cell phones existed at this point in time, but the high school had a couple of pay phones for student use, presumably to keep them from begging teachers during class time.

Shortly after I overheard this the girls approached me asking for a quarter so they could call a parent for (can't remember the excuse). I refused. They asked some other girls in class, one at a time, separate from each other, I only noticed because I was watching them. The first few gave the rest caught on and refused too. Cue flashing eyes and angry name calling.

I noticed some young men giving them quarters between classes later that day *sigh*. I doubt they made the $350~ they were shooting for, but they did make something.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 10, 2012, 03:29:03 PM
I used to get phone calls at work from people saying they were calling on behalf of the local Lions club and they wanted me to sponsor a disadvantaged child to go to the movies or a magic show at a cost of $40. Now considering a childs movie ticket is around $7 and some popcorn and a drink another maybe $6 that seemed a bit steep. It took and epic amount of googling to get to the bottom of this and find the company behind it. Yes they were associated with the Lions. Basically the would solicit donations from local business collect maybe $25,000 give the Lions a 'donation' of around $5,000 for using their trusted brand and pocket the rest after paying the discounted cost of the services. Often these events never even took place. The Lions got a donation they wouldn't have had otherwise so kept stumm and the owner of this entertainment company makes millions while the donors think it is going to a good cause. If you call the company director getting a new Porsche a good cause.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Firecat on October 10, 2012, 03:36:18 PM
I've gotten the fake toner calls back when I was an admin assistant. I usually just said "no thanks" and hung up.

But a couple of years ago, some guy tried a scam on my parents, probably one aimed mostly at the elderly. He called and wanted to sell them "computer cleanup" software because, he claimed, that he could see their banking information from their computer.

To which Mom replied: "Wow, you must be really good. Because we don't have any banking information on there." Then she hung up. They haven't called back as far as I know.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: heartmug on October 10, 2012, 04:10:05 PM
Last time I got one of those, I tried something I had read about here on eHell  ;D

Her: "I'm about to send your toner order but could you please verify the serial number on your printer?"
Me: "Sure, let me go check.  One second.  Here it is: 4."
Her: "No, that's not it - should be a longer number than that."
Me: "Nope, that's the serial number - this printer is very old."
Her: " . . ."
Me: "Yeah, not falling for it, sorry.  Goodbye.  *click*"

LOL!  I got  that call at work, years ago, when I had to fill in for the receptionist.  I just said "You should know the number."
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Sirius on October 10, 2012, 04:12:53 PM
I didn't realize my ex-BIL got around so much.

When X and Younger Sis were married I invited them to my house for dinner at a town 25 miles from where they lived.  They came to dinner, and we all had a good time.  Then X told me that because I'd invited them to dinner I owed them gas money to get back home.  I told X, "I'll give you gas money if you rake my yard.  To my specifications." 

After the yard inspection I took them over to the local station and filled their car up and my own car up with gas and put it on a credit card.  He got quite upset that I didn't hand over cash and asked me, "Don't you trust me?"  I looked him right in the eye and said, "Quite frankly, no." 

That was one of the more minor incidents.  I can't say that I was sad when my sister divorced him. 

And Slartibartfast:  Take the good advice from the others and rescind your invitation.  I agree with Amara 1000%.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: The Lunchlady on October 10, 2012, 09:57:02 PM
DH and I have been fortunate to have never been scammed, but DH has a work mate that is currently dealing with being scammed.

DH and this mate work all over the country and share a hotel. This mate started chatting on a scrabble site with a young woman in a foreign country who gave him a story about being an orphaned American citizen, living on the generosity and sufferance of relatives in that country and wanted to come back to the US. Work mate sent her a large sum of money to cover airfare to the US. They had planned to start a life together. She never made it.

She contacted him again with the story that she had been arrested and was being held on trumped up charges. Mate sent money because he knew that this poor girl was a decent person (or talked a great game of scrabble). He didn’t hear from her for a while, DH said mate was somewhat despondent over her plight.

Her next contact with him involved her being in an accident, had no insurance and needed bones set at a hospital; again money was sent.

All this was unknown to DH until the last remittance was sent, when the work mate confided what had been going on as far as the loss of several thousand dollars and now the young woman won’t talk to him. DH mentioned that mate has been scammed. The work mate went to the authorities to report and was told because it was international; there was little they could do to help.

Work mate is depressed that someone he thought cared about him has played him for a fool, and DH fears he is suicidal.

The kicker? Work mate must now explain to his wife the loss of several thousand dollars from his their account.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: kherbert05 on October 10, 2012, 10:43:27 PM
Just last year, I answered a call for the Printer Scam at work.  Many years ago, our office manager was the victim of the very same scam, so I had some familiarity with the way it went.  Snopes explains it here:

http://www.snopes.com/crime/fraud/supplies.asp (http://www.snopes.com/crime/fraud/supplies.asp)

There are several variations but this particular scam is if you give the model number off the printer in question, you are either given a hard sell for really crappy but expensive toner or find yourself receiving a large case of very poor quality toner you never ordered, accompanied by a very expensive invoice.  The payoff is that they hope the invoice will just get paid to avoid litigation. 


Some BG:  I'm an assistant but I work at a pretty large company.  While we order supplies like pens, folders, note pads, etc., we have a person whose job is to maintain the printer/copier/fax machines we have.  I am not that person.  Anyone who does such business with our company would know that I am not that person.

So my phone rang.  Most of the time we have a caller ID display but this one was marked "PR-1," which means private.  My primary client's number occasionally comes up private, so I picked it up and answered with my customary greeting of "Company Name, this is 2LM." 

It's Tony and he says something like,

Tony: "Hey 2LM!  Listen, I was getting ready to send out your toner order but I wanted to make sure I had the right one.  Can you run over and get me the model number printer?"  (DING DING DING go the warning bells, LOL.)

Me: "Sir, I'm afraid I haven't ordered any toner and I'm not the person in charge of such things.  Good bye."

I was 99.999% sure it was a scam and had no intention of feeding this guy our real printer guy's name or number.  I let the Keeper of the Printer know about the call on the off chance he really did have a pending order and the guy just mis-dialed.  He didn't so I alerted my team to make them aware.  I have no idea how this guy got my extension.
Random Dialing* could be how he got your extension.


I had the same scam call the museum while the guy that serviced our copier for free (in kind donation) and a San Angelo cop were in the office. We had fun with him.


*Sis used this to restore internet to her neighborhood. After Allison flooded Houston, no one in Sis's street had working internet. When they called in the problem the Time Warner people insisted the internet was working fine and the problem was the customers computers.


Sis used this tactic to  leave messages at the local corporate offices (after she tricked someone into giving her the corporate number) Basically she threatened to get the neighborhood a deal with the competion, including offering to appear in an ad saying that all 20+ families had switched because of bad customer service.


The neighborhood was full of Time Warner techs the next day and evening. Turns out that several pieces of equipment were damaged during the flooding.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Snooks on October 11, 2012, 05:00:58 AM
The kicker? Work mate must now explain to his wife the loss of several thousand dollars from his their account.

Ouch, that's not going to be a fun conversation.

I've got a lot more cautious about the internet as I've got older, when I was younger I believed everyone was what they said they were and for the most part I still think that's true however I'd never hand out cash to someone.

At the moment on another site people just sent nearly $500 to someone's sister who found herself in a bind.  I believe that they're genuine but it blows my mind that people will send money via paypal with no way of knowing where that money is actually going.  Maybe those people are just more charitable than me.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on October 11, 2012, 07:02:28 AM
I remember, at my grandmother's funeral, her eldest son (well Uncle J is 5 minutes older than my dad) was giving the eulogy and spoke of how they had been looking over her accounts after she passed and found out that she'd been donating money to anyone who asked her for it.  Usually by phone, I'm guessing, since she lived in an assisted living facility and I would sure hope they wouldn't let anyone in who was going to coax money from the elderly residents.

Anyway, my grandmother had Alzheimer's, and my uncle joked that they knew that her memory was bad when they found out she'd contributed to the opposite political party than the one she'd been a part of all her life.

But I have heard of people who do target the elderly for money. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on October 11, 2012, 12:58:00 PM
This isn't as major or tragic as a lot of stories, but I have a relative who works with a very well known moocher and I have met her too.  She moans and groans that she has no money for lunch, but somehow shows up with the latest gadgets and designers purses  ::).  She's "that person" who filches your snacks right off your desk in front of you without asking.  One story is that she pulled the pity act on my relative who gave her a few dollars to buy fast food lunch.  Later, another coworker asked Moocher if she had change for a $5.  Moocher pulled out a wallet full of money.  She works harder to get out of work than it would to actually work.

The whole office treats her and her act as entertainment now.  Her reputation for this and other behaviors is totally ruined in the whole building (not just her department), but she is still clueless as how she is seen to others.  The sad part is she truly believe she's entitled to other people's money and things.  If you stumble upon good fortune, she thinks she is entitled to part or all of it.  Scary.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on October 11, 2012, 02:04:52 PM
Why do people cater to her, Rose Red? Or treat her as entertainment? I don't understand.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Outdoor Girl on October 11, 2012, 02:44:55 PM
I think there should be an especially hot place in hell reserved for scammers who prey on the elderly.  My Dad needed new windows.  He paid a deposit to a company that was supposedly affiliated with another company.  And then no windows ever materialized.  But what this scammer didn't count on was that my Dad was friendly with one of the local police detectives.  So he went to see her and she tried to get my Dad's money back.  And when that wasn't forthcoming, she pursued charges against him.  My Dad never did get his money back but the guy did significant jail time.

ETA:  Dad went to court the day he was sentanced.  There were several victims of this guy, including scammer's own church!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 11, 2012, 02:51:08 PM
I think there should be an especially hot place in hell reserved for scammers who prey on the elderly.  My Dad needed new windows.  He paid a deposit to a company that was supposedly affiliated with another company.  And then no windows ever materialized.  But what this scammer didn't count on was that my Dad was friendly with one of the local police detectives.  So he went to see her and she tried to get my Dad's money back.  And when that wasn't forthcoming, she pursued charges against him.  My Dad never did get his money back but the guy did significant jail time.

ETA:  Dad went to court the day he was sentanced.  There were several victims of this guy, including scammer's own church!

Was it for double glazing? When I lived in the UK apparently there was something very dodgy about the industry.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: AreaWoman on October 11, 2012, 02:55:51 PM
I saw a repeat scammer yesterday driving home from work.  There is a guy who walks around to cars in traffic, claiming that he works for some company (don't remember which one; probably changes) and says that his work vehicle ran out of gas and his company requires him to refill it.  So he just needs some cash to get back to the company depot and get the person reimbursed.  He looks pretty convincing, too, as he is wearing some vaguely-branded polo and has a walkie-talkie on one hip and key fob/cards on the other.  Of course, this has seemed to happen to him at least three times that I can recall, and that work vehicle is no where to be found...

And fun spell-check fact -- it tries to change "scammer" to "scummier."  How appropriate.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: lilfox on October 11, 2012, 02:56:29 PM
The funniest scam someone tried against me was a guy I met on a plane.  This was a) before 9/11 and b) when flights were less than half full and moving seats wasn't an issue.  I noticed him because he was good looking, and was flattered when he chose the empty seat next to me (after asking if I minded company).  So we chatted, which meant mostly he would say things like "You're really interesting, I want to know this and that about you" and then proceed to talk about himself at length.   :)  It was amusing, but it definitely made me switch from thinking ooh cute guy! to wow so conceited.  As it happens, he was on his way to a motocross competition, but his day job was something involving fancy sports cars.  And as dumb luck would have it, when he dropped his latest sports car off, he had left his wallet in the glove compartment, with his driver's license and credit cards and cash.  How unfortunate!

(I recall wondering how he got on the flight without ID, but I didn't ask him and it was before 9/11 so it's possible they still accepted other forms of ID than driver's license.)

So he spends the last half hour of the flight dropping hints about how tough it was going to be for him to get to his motocross event 2 hours away without a rental car...  or a ride from a kind stranger...  After we landed, he kept up the hard sell and I, ever the problem solver, suggested he go to the police office in the airport to get a copy of his license but that wouldn't work, for some reason.  He wandered off and that was the last I saw of him.

Until he showed up at the car rental place shortly after I did, with a new girl in tow.  He told me proudly how she, kind stranger that she was, was going to rent a car for him!  Oh my.  All I could think was about how he had wasted 2 hours on me for nothing, and managed to find a new mark *and* get her to rent him a car in less than 10 minutes.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on October 11, 2012, 02:57:34 PM
Why do people cater to her, Rose Red? Or treat her as entertainment? I don't understand.

There's always new employees.  Old pros know to keep food and money away from her; they can't warn everybody and it's awkward to jump on new employees and talk behind her back anyway.  I say "entertainment" not as a mean way (entertainment wasn't quite the word I wanted to use), but more like they either listen to her crazy stories because she does love to tell stories of her woe and her crazy life, or they ignore her antics. 

I'm just glad I don't work in that office as I have no patience with people like that.

eta: if you wonder why the boss won't do anything, I don't know.  I guess it's because she doesn't bother people when they are doing actual work.

eta2: Please keep in mind I get these stories secondhand so I don't really know the day to day stuff.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 11, 2012, 02:59:42 PM
She was going to rent him a car?! For real? Good grief.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Winterlight on October 11, 2012, 03:24:43 PM
DH and I have been fortunate to have never been scammed, but DH has a work mate that is currently dealing with being scammed.

DH and this mate work all over the country and share a hotel. This mate started chatting on a scrabble site with a young woman in a foreign country who gave him a story about being an orphaned American citizen, living on the generosity and sufferance of relatives in that country and wanted to come back to the US. Work mate sent her a large sum of money to cover airfare to the US. They had planned to start a life together. She never made it.

She contacted him again with the story that she had been arrested and was being held on trumped up charges. Mate sent money because he knew that this poor girl was a decent person (or talked a great game of scrabble). He didn’t hear from her for a while, DH said mate was somewhat despondent over her plight.

Her next contact with him involved her being in an accident, had no insurance and needed bones set at a hospital; again money was sent.

All this was unknown to DH until the last remittance was sent, when the work mate confided what had been going on as far as the loss of several thousand dollars and now the young woman won’t talk to him. DH mentioned that mate has been scammed. The work mate went to the authorities to report and was told because it was international; there was little they could do to help.

Work mate is depressed that someone he thought cared about him has played him for a fool, and DH fears he is suicidal.

The kicker? Work mate must now explain to his wife the loss of several thousand dollars from his their account.

Wow, poor her. Not feeling sorry for him though.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Sirius on October 11, 2012, 03:49:21 PM
This happened one year when Mr. Sirius took me to dinner for my birthday.  This woman approached us with a story about how she was stranded and trying to get a bus ticket to Seattle (we're near Portland) to see her poor sick mother.  I gave her my refrigerator-door (blank) expression, so she tried her story on Mr. Sirius and ignored me.  He heard her out, then told her to go away.  Once we were at our table he told me about different times when someone has tried that exact line on him.  For the record, he's nobody's fool, but people seem to think he's a soft touch since he looks like a young Santa.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BarensMom on October 11, 2012, 03:56:30 PM
Friend and I went to Jack-in-the-Box for lunch.  An elderly lady with a young girl came up to us and asked for a few dollars to "buy food for my granddaughter."  Since the woman looked shabby but respectable, I gave her two dollars.  Before we finished our meal, a much younger woman dressed in designer clothing (I know her bustier cost more than my entire outfit) with the same child came to our table and hit us up to "buy food for my daughter."  I got up and told the manager, who booted them out of the place.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RegionMom on October 11, 2012, 05:12:11 PM
I may have told this elsewhere, but it fits here:

When travelling with the in-laws, a drunkard came up to us at an outdoor eating place and asked for money.  My MIL gave him cash, but made him promise that he would not use it for beer.
He promised.
Later that evening, we ran into him, and he recognized her.
"Hey, I wanted to let you know I did NOT buy beer.  I kept my promise!  I bought...vodka!"
 ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Angel B. on October 11, 2012, 05:37:48 PM
I may have told this elsewhere, but it fits here:

When travelling with the in-laws, a drunkard came up to us at an outdoor eating place and asked for money.  My MIL gave him cash, but made him promise that he would not use it for beer.
He promised.
Later that evening, we ran into him, and he recognized her.
"Hey, I wanted to let you know I did NOT buy beer.  I kept my promise!  I bought...vodka!"
 ::)

I hope I'm not the only one who got a smile from this.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 11, 2012, 05:52:25 PM
I love elaborate tales of woe and this woman really took the biscut.

I had just finished a tour of Turkey and had a few days up my sleeve in Istanbul. The place I was staying had a kind of bar restaurant out the front on the street and there were quite a few cafes and the like around. I was sitting out the front having a beer and reading the paper and got chatting to some of the locals. Next thing this strange woman comes and sits down with us and the guys appeared to have some kind of acquaintance with her. She starts telling us about how she has arrived from Germany after fleeing Neo Nazis who wanted to kill her because she had a black boyfriend and that he was in hiding as the police and the government were behind it. She was saying she was homeless, broke and also pregnant. I just sat there nodding going 'Gee that sounds unfortunate'. The guys started indicating that I as a fellow foreigner should some how help her out. Like heck I was. I was not going to give her anything. She then starts asking if I can give her money for a hotel room. Nope That won't happen either. I don't know if the guys were in on this scam or not but I saw her around a fair bit over the next few days by herself trying it on with whoever would listen. Top marks for effort. Zero for execution as everyone I spoke to thought she was as mad as a cut snake.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Thipu1 on October 12, 2012, 08:36:30 AM
We had a truly bizarre one a while back.

There's a nice, little French place we like to go for dinner about once a month.  the food is very good and it's never crowded on weeknights.
 
Once, there was only one other diner.  She was an older lady and was enjoying a large meal including an appetizer, a steak and dessert.  Of course she also had several glasses of wine. 

We didn't speak during the meal but, when her bill arrived, she leaned over and explained that she had no idea the dinner would be so expensive and wanted us to pay for her meal.   :o

You can bet what our answer was to that.  We left before the matter was resolved but I would have liked to have been a fly on the wall to hear what it was. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Miss Misery on October 12, 2012, 11:51:03 AM
This mate started chatting on a scrabble site with a young woman in a foreign country who gave him a story about being an orphaned American citizen, living on the generosity and sufferance of relatives in that country and wanted to come back to the US. Work mate sent her a large sum of money to cover airfare to the US. They had planned to start a life together. She never made it.

She contacted him again with the story that she had been arrested and was being held on trumped up charges. Mate sent money because he knew that this poor girl was a decent person (or talked a great game of scrabble). He didn’t hear from her for a while, DH said mate was somewhat despondent over her plight.

Her next contact with him involved her being in an accident, had no insurance and needed bones set at a hospital; again money was sent.

All this was unknown to DH until the last remittance was sent, when the work mate confided what had been going on as far as the loss of several thousand dollars and now the young woman won’t talk to him.

My older sister, being the gullible fool she is, has fallen for that scam. TWICE.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RebeccainGA on October 12, 2012, 03:20:58 PM
I very nearly fell for a scam (of sorts) a few years ago. Had a date come down with a couple of friends (new person I was 'dating' online for a few weeks) and stay in a hotel, only to learn that the grandfather of one of the friends died the first night they were there, and they all had to rush back to home state, about three hours drive. Only, they had planned on spending the time they were there selling some (really hideous) baskets and blankets and things they'd brought with them (I lived in a tourist destination at the time). Would I mind loaning them the money to drive back? And storing their junk? And letting the person I was 'dating' come back and stay with me in a few weeks to finish selling things and get an apartment?

I did loan them a few $$ (enough to get an average car a couple hundred miles away), but refused to store items. Did agree for the person I was 'dating' to come back in a few weeks. Didn't hear from them for almost a year after I got a 'on my way' call - yes, I spent two weeks frantically calling cops, etc. in the area between there and home. No dice.

I did find out what happened - the 'junk' baskets they were selling were apparently disguising some 'recreational substances' of the herbal variety, and the blankets had some other recreational substances wrapped inside (I had wondered how they planned to get $40 for a hideous lap blanket, but was naive enough to take it at face value). My 'date' got stopped an hour from my house, just across the state line, and the officer called in the narcotics dog, who went nuts. She did call to ask me who I was, as she didn't recognize the phone number on her phone, after she'd been released from jail. Bullet dodged, and lesson learned. I can only blame it on being young and very, very dumb.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: I'mnotinsane on October 14, 2012, 08:13:47 PM
My Uncle was a cook.   Every so often he would tell my grandmother (his MIL) that a vendor had great tomatoes (or fish or eggplant, etc.) at a great price and he would be happy to get some for her.  When asked how much it would always be more than granny paid anywhere else.  She never fell for it. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeBeret on October 14, 2012, 08:43:46 PM
I actually ran into this just a couple nights ago. My friend and I were going to the grocery store when we were approached my a well-dressed dude. He said that he worked at the Ford plant a few miles away and showed us his Ford ID. He went on to tell us a long, sad tale about his car breaking down, was going to be late for his sister's wedding, etc. and he just needed money for a cab. Him showing his ID made me immediately think of eHell and posters talking about scammers showing some sort if ID to make them seem trustworthy.

Anyway, we told the dude, "Sorry, we don't have any money." And then I couldn't help but adding (with a wee bit of sarcasm) "Good luck getting to your sister's wedding."
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Miss Misery on October 15, 2012, 09:14:53 AM
I actually ran into this just a couple nights ago. My friend and I were going to the grocery store when we were approached my a well-dressed dude. He said that he worked at the Ford plant a few miles away and showed us his Ford ID. He went on to tell us a long, sad tale about his car breaking down, was going to be late for his sister's wedding, etc. and he just needed money for a cab.

I guess getting money from an ATM for a cab or calling someone to pick him up would be too easy.  ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeBeret on October 15, 2012, 09:28:54 AM
I actually ran into this just a couple nights ago. My friend and I were going to the grocery store when we were approached my a well-dressed dude. He said that he worked at the Ford plant a few miles away and showed us his Ford ID. He went on to tell us a long, sad tale about his car breaking down, was going to be late for his sister's wedding, etc. and he just needed money for a cab.

I guess getting money from an ATM for a cab or calling someone to pick him up would be too easy.  ::)

Righto. The obvious thing to do, when in danger of missing your sister's wedding, is to ask complete strangers for cash.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: mechtilde on October 15, 2012, 11:13:41 AM
I had a similar one a few weeks ago- a fairly well dressed man came up to me (just that liiitle bit too close though, which set my alarms off anyway) and asked if I could help him. I thought he might want directions or something so I asked how. He then started the sob story about how he didn't have any money left for his fare to Nearbytown, and everyone else he'd asked had turned him down etc etc.

I walked off.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Miss Misery on October 15, 2012, 11:49:59 AM
This mate started chatting on a scrabble site with a young woman in a foreign country who gave him a story about being an orphaned American citizen, living on the generosity and sufferance of relatives in that country and wanted to come back to the US. Work mate sent her a large sum of money to cover airfare to the US. They had planned to start a life together. She never made it.

She contacted him again with the story that she had been arrested and was being held on trumped up charges. Mate sent money because he knew that this poor girl was a decent person (or talked a great game of scrabble). He didn’t hear from her for a while, DH said mate was somewhat despondent over her plight.

Her next contact with him involved her being in an accident, had no insurance and needed bones set at a hospital; again money was sent.

All this was unknown to DH until the last remittance was sent, when the work mate confided what had been going on as far as the loss of several thousand dollars and now the young woman won’t talk to him.

My older sister, being the gullible fool she is, has fallen for that scam. TWICE.

Now it's THREE. Now she has no phone, no job, and no money.  :o
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: NyaChan on October 15, 2012, 11:55:31 AM
Oh dear  :-\  Have you considered asking her what it was about those people that made her want trust them or want to help?  Maybe even offer to check things over for her in the future before she helps someone?  I find that if you flat out tell someone that no you shouldn't help other people, they'll fight against it because it seems uncharitable, or mean.  If you accept that she likes to give, but emphasize that you want to make sure the right people get the help, maybe she'll be more receptive.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Sirius on October 15, 2012, 12:05:15 PM
Many, many years before he met me, Mr. Sirius ran into one of these - someone who always needs money for this or that.  Finally, after she'd cleaned him out, he broke it off and transferred to another base to get away from her...so she called my then-future MIL with a sad story about needing money for health care. 

Not only did MIL not fall for it, she told this person point blank that if she ever called her again she (MIL) would press charges against Person for trying to scam them.  Person got the hint that MIL was not to be messed with, and neither MIL or Mr. Sirius ever heard from her again. 

My MIL is 4"9" or so, and a lovely person - and absolutely not to be messed with.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Miss Misery on October 15, 2012, 12:26:25 PM
Oh dear  :-\  Have you considered asking her what it was about those people that made her want trust them or want to help?

Two words: flaming codependent.

  Maybe even offer to check things over for her in the future before she helps someone?  I find that if you flat out tell someone that no you shouldn't help other people, they'll fight against it because it seems uncharitable, or mean.

That's exactly what she does. Apparently our dad told her she was being played and she didn't listen.

  If you accept that she likes to give, but emphasize that you want to make sure the right people get the help, maybe she'll be more receptive.

There's no helping someone who doesn't want to be helped and won't learn from her mistakes, and I'm not getting involved (since I live 400 miles away there's only so much I could do even if I wanted to). She's already wrecked her job,  her credit, and her life. I'm not going let her wreck mine.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: VorFemme on October 15, 2012, 03:44:51 PM
I ran into a group like this at a rest area on the interstate a few years ago.  Luckily for me, I had no cash in the car.  They had children with them - I did have spare diapers, some fresh fruit, half a loaf of bread, and a few other edibles in the car - so I gave them the food so the kids could eat.  I got a "thank you" but was very clear that I had NO CASH on me or in the car with me, so they knew that asking for cash miles from an ATM was unlikely to get them anything but the food for the kids.

I did have credit cards with me, so I replaced the snack items at the next stop when my kid(s) were hungry!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 15, 2012, 04:05:24 PM
This mate started chatting on a scrabble site with a young woman in a foreign country who gave him a story about being an orphaned American citizen, living on the generosity and sufferance of relatives in that country and wanted to come back to the US. Work mate sent her a large sum of money to cover airfare to the US. They had planned to start a life together. She never made it.

She contacted him again with the story that she had been arrested and was being held on trumped up charges. Mate sent money because he knew that this poor girl was a decent person (or talked a great game of scrabble). He didn’t hear from her for a while, DH said mate was somewhat despondent over her plight.

Her next contact with him involved her being in an accident, had no insurance and needed bones set at a hospital; again money was sent.

All this was unknown to DH until the last remittance was sent, when the work mate confided what had been going on as far as the loss of several thousand dollars and now the young woman won’t talk to him.

My older sister, being the gullible fool she is, has fallen for that scam. TWICE.

Now it's THREE. Now she has no phone, no job, and no money.  :o

That is so sad but not that unusual. The easiest people to scam are those how have been scammed before. The triumph of hope over experience.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on October 15, 2012, 04:53:55 PM
Speaking of well dressed strangers...

One night, I was home alone when the doorbell rang.  I looked out the door window to see who it was and found someone I'd never before seen.  He kept asking me to open the door, but it was a large window and I could see/hear him just fine.  (also, really?   ???)

He spun this sob story about how he'd been locked out of his car and he needed to call his wife so she could come help him and could he please come in and use the phone? 

I was not about to let this guy in under any circumstances, so I offered to make the call for him.  He got very offended and demanded I let him in to make the call.  I don't remember the exact dialogue but I do remember him saying something like, "You don't trust me?"  Well, no.

I kept saying that I wasn't going to let him in but I would be happy to make the call for him. He just kept getting madder so I finally said that he needed to leave or I was going to call the cops.  He left then and I called the non-emergency line to let them know about it anyway.  He really freaked me out.

I was speaking to a neighbor a few days later and apparently she had a gentleman who fit the same description try the same thing with her the day before.  I'm glad I called the police, he was clearly up to no good.  And I'm very glad I had a 3" thick oak door between us.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on October 15, 2012, 05:15:01 PM
BG:  We bought our house almost 3 years ago, and the woman who had lived here was an elderly lady who had unfortunately fallen down the steps and hurt herself, so her family decided it was time to move her up closer to them.   Now, because our town, while not very small, is smallish, people who lived around here knew about her and someone told me that her grandchildren lived with her, supposedly to look after her but it was the opinion of the person who told me this that they didn't do such a hot job of it.

Okay, so, we closed on New Years Eve, and then a few weeks later this guy around mine and dh's age (early 30's) came to the door to say "My grandmother lived here, and I thought you ought to know that there's a lien on the house and it shouldn't have sold, and my grandma wouldn't have wanted me to tell you this.  And I'm not trying to talk you into giving the house up, but just thought you ought to know you could get this house for free if you called the title office about it!  But don't tell your realtor about it, okay?"

His story sounded awfully fishy and I found out from a friend who'd worked for a lawyer for a while that if there was a federal lien on the house, they would have done a search at the title office and we wouldn't have been able to close on the house till it was taken care of.  And we did tell our realtor, who said to be wary of this guy.  Who also claimed he would return with papers to prove his statement, but he never returned.

Methinks he was sore that grandma didn't pass the house onto him and thought he could somehow get us into trouble so we'd lose the house and he could have it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Moralia on October 15, 2012, 10:28:08 PM
My DH fell for a charity magazine sales scam and paid $75 for subscriptions that never arrived. I told him I didn't think it was a legit thing but he didn't listen. I've kindly refrained from pointing out the lack of magazines.

I never buy anything door-to-door other than from neighborhood kids I recognize.  Adults get my best stink eye which, I've been told, coveys the impression I'm compiling a description for the police.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 15, 2012, 10:59:29 PM
Speaking of well dressed strangers...

One night, I was home alone when the doorbell rang.  I looked out the door window to see who it was and found someone I'd never before seen.  He kept asking me to open the door, but it was a large window and I could see/hear him just fine.  (also, really?   ???)

He spun this sob story about how he'd been locked out of his car and he needed to call his wife so she could come help him and could he please come in and use the phone? 

I was not about to let this guy in under any circumstances, so I offered to make the call for him.  He got very offended and demanded I let him in to make the call.  I don't remember the exact dialogue but I do remember him saying something like, "You don't trust me?"  Well, no.

I kept saying that I wasn't going to let him in but I would be happy to make the call for him. He just kept getting madder so I finally said that he needed to leave or I was going to call the cops.  He left then and I called the non-emergency line to let them know about it anyway.  He really freaked me out.

I was speaking to a neighbor a few days later and apparently she had a gentleman who fit the same description try the same thing with her the day before.  I'm glad I called the police, he was clearly up to no good.  And I'm very glad I had a 3" thick oak door between us.

Freaked out. I'll say! How demands to be let into someone else's house?

I had a similar situation but I did actually know the guy. My best friend and I were watching TV one Sunday night and there was a knock at the door so I got up and answered it. It was Bobby the gardener the landlord (who lived next door) had hired to do both our gardens. I asked him what he wanted and he told me he was moving in with me. As in "I'm in love with you" moving in. He even had his bags with him. I was mortified and told him that was not going to happen but he tried to come inside anyway. My friend came out from the lounge to see what was going on and threw him out the door and slammed it behind him. He then stood on the doorstep for a good half hour shouting through the mail slot that I didn't understand and his exact words were "I'm not a rapist!. I'm not a rapist!" Really? He was sure doing a fine impression of one. Then he started writing notes and pushing them them the slot. It was utterly bizarre and in the end quite funny after I had got over the initial shock. I told the landlord the next day and he got fired. I am a freak magnet.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BarensMom on October 16, 2012, 08:21:19 AM
I was the strange person at the door one night.

I had attended a play at my high school and, when it ended at 10 p.m., I found all the pay phones were out of order.  Since home was 6 blocks away, I decided to walk.  A car started tailing me and, in spite of my trying to fake it out several times, I couldn't dodge it.  After it blocked my path across drive-in dairy and the church parking lot, I ran to the nearest house and rang the doorbell like mad.  The elderly couple were freaked out and refused to open the door.  I told them I lived on the next block and to please call my home #.  My mom and sister came and the woman recognized Mom from the grocery store.  When I told Mom why I didn't call from the school, she called the principal the next day.  The school replaced every pay phone in the place by the end of the week.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: buvezdevin on October 16, 2012, 08:54:27 AM
I was also the stranger at the door, in the wee hours, once.

When I went to college and was living on my own for the first time, I woke in the middle of the night when someone broke into my apartment.  I was able to get out the front door and crept up the outdoor stairs to my upstairs neighbor, who I had not met.  I rang their doorbell repeatedly, and whispered (pretty frantically, I am sure) the situation through the door - I wasn't sure if the intruder was following me or not.

It turned out to be a couple who lived above me, let me in and called the police.

I completely agree with others about not letting in a stranger in 99.9999999% of the time, though having been in a truly desperate situation once, I am *forever* grateful to that couple for recognizing the urgent and real nature of my need.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on October 16, 2012, 12:24:51 PM
I was undecided whether to put this here or in the Freecycle/CraigsList thread. It would fit either one. An ad in the "Housing Wanted" section showed up this morning. This is so weird because if it were my mother I would move heaven and earth to get her back home including driving up there and getting her. She might have to wait at the restaurant for about five hours but by god she'd be taken care of. This is such an obvious scam it's hard to believe anyone could fall for it. And I hope no one does. (The area code is for central Texas too.) Is it me or are some criminals just really, really stupid?
 

Presently living in San Diego but have lived in Santa Barbara for the past 10 years. Lost my purse at the restroom under Brophy's and do not have the funds to get home and live for the next three weeks. If anyone needs pet sitting or would like to have a roommate to help clean and cook for a few weeks, it would greatly be appreciated.

I do not use drugs, alcohol or smoke. Middle aged professional female who is honest, clean and personable. I am completely criminal free, bonded and have three children who are in college and cannot assist me due to their financial obligations. I also have a medical background and could assist a senior citizen with cooking, light cleaning, driving, etc., as long as I do not have to lift.

Anyone who could help or assist, please, call me at (512) xxx-xxxx.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on October 16, 2012, 02:49:07 PM
A friend told me about something that happened to a mutual acquaintance last week.  He had made reservations at a very nice, upscale restaurant in the downtown area. 

After dinner, they went back out to their car in the adjacent (non-metered) lot, and found a parking ticket.  So they go back inside to ask the restaurant staff why they got a ticket after having paid $10 to park in the restaurant's lot.

"Our lot?  We don't have a lot."  Customers are supposed to pay metered parking on the street.  The lot attendant who pocketed the $10?  Some guy off the street who had camped out in the closed lot, collecting cash from unsuspecting people.  The phony attendant probably left once the police showed up to write tickets.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: #borecore on October 16, 2012, 04:21:20 PM
I was undecided whether to put this here or in the Freecycle/CraigsList thread. It would fit either one. An ad in the "Housing Wanted" section showed up this morning. This is so weird because if it were my mother I would move heaven and earth to get her back home including driving up there and getting her. She might have to wait at the restaurant for about five hours but by god she'd be taken care of. This is such an obvious scam it's hard to believe anyone could fall for it. And I hope no one does. (The area code is for central Texas too.) Is it me or are some criminals just really, really stupid?
 

Presently living in San Diego but have lived in Santa Barbara for the past 10 years. Lost my purse at the restroom under Brophy's and do not have the funds to get home and live for the next three weeks. If anyone needs pet sitting or would like to have a roommate to help clean and cook for a few weeks, it would greatly be appreciated.

I do not use drugs, alcohol or smoke. Middle aged professional female who is honest, clean and personable. I am completely criminal free, bonded and have three children who are in college and cannot assist me due to their financial obligations. I also have a medical background and could assist a senior citizen with cooking, light cleaning, driving, etc., as long as I do not have to lift.

Anyone who could help or assist, please, call me at (512) xxx-xxxx.


Somehow I skimmed the part where you said it's a Central Texas area code until I reread your post, but that stuck out for me, too. I mean, I haven't changed my cell # in 10 years since moving here, but in this case it's just one more fishy bit on top of the carp sundae.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Yarnspinner on October 16, 2012, 06:55:36 PM
Oh Lord.  Reading some of these brought back an even more painful tale of woe from two years ago.  I've written here before about my elderly neighbor who often shows up at my door seeking help because she doesn't want to bother her kids who live a few states away.  (So I call them and bother them instead.)

Anyway, about two or three years ago, she got involved in what I think is called the 314 scam.  Her kids called me because they hadn't been able to get through on the phone to talk to her.  Her sister called to tell me she couldn't get through.  So I went across the hall to tell her she needed to call them.

And found out that people stationed in a certain country had been calling her every five minutes or so to tell her she had won "The Haitian Millionaire's Lottery" because THAT sounded so legit.  They called about other lotteries.  They called to tell her about this prize she had won and that prize she had won.  But of course, first she had to send them several thousand dollars to pay the taxes on the prizes. 

I told her there was no such thing as a Haitian Millionaire's Lottery.  Her kids told her.  Her sister told her.  I found myself on the phone telling these people to do unenviable things to themselves  I brought her articles about the scam and why it was called a 314 scam (it's the area code).  SHE KEPT SENDING THEM MONEY ANYWAY. 

These people called pretending to be the FBI and telling her they would arrest her and her children if she did not comply with the rulings.  They told her I was lying and her kids were lying and we wanted to claim the  money for themselves.  She was getting neighbors to take her to her bank and the store to get bank checks and money orders. 

FINALLY, she had a stress attack and ended in the hospital and I insisted her kids come up and fix it.  To their credit, they did by getting her a new phone number.  (I argued that they needed to get her caller ID and an unlisted number, but they were SURE this would take care of the problem.)  Amazingly, the phone company even forgave the almost five hundred dollar phone bill she had from dialing back all those 314 numbers.  She couldn't get back the thousands of dollars she had sent, though.

Unfortunately, her kids and I didn't do as good of a scouting/clean up job as we could have:  she found a couple pieces of paper on which she had scrawled some of the 314 numbers AND CALLED THEM TO FIND OUT WHO THEY WERE.  And we were back to the races again. 

Her eldest kid got a clue and got her mother both an unlisted number and caller ID.

Unfortunately, Ruby still falls for this carp.  If you ask her why she says "Because I am an idiot."

Her kids have finally ante'd up to get her a companion three days a week, but I still wish they would consider assisted living for her. 

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 16, 2012, 07:10:17 PM
if you have a look at 419 eater or other scam baiting sites there are some horrendous stories of people who keep getting taken in time and time again. Some victims even post on there knowing they are being scammed but think they are so far in they think if they can just keep going they will make it back. It is kind of like how some people get addicted to gambling. I think the biggest ever single scam pulled off the victim was a bank manager at Lloyds and lost 20 million pounds or something so a little old lady is an easy target.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BabyMama on October 17, 2012, 07:44:21 AM
My DH fell for a charity magazine sales scam and paid $75 for subscriptions that never arrived. I told him I didn't think it was a legit thing but he didn't listen. I've kindly refrained from pointing out the lack of magazines.

I never buy anything door-to-door other than from neighborhood kids I recognize.  Adults get my best stink eye which, I've been told, coveys the impression I'm compiling a description for the police.

My neighbor refuses to buy anything anymore door-to-door--the house up the street from us had an unsavory group of people living there (an undetermined number, sometimes they had kids of various ages, sometimes they didn't, their yard was always littered with toys/garbage, they didn't park in the garage because there were couches and a table in there--and it was quite obvious about what those were for, as they would smoke illegal drugs there and the smoke would float from their house, which was uphill a bit, down to my neighbor's, etc.) We called them The Felons (because the husband had some sort of felony, which my neighbor found out about after this incident. It was either for theft or domestic abuse but I can't remember for sure, maybe both?)

Anyway, one day before all this was known about The Felons, The Felons' kids went to my neighbor's house and asked if she wanted to buy some magazine subscriptions. My neighbor knew that the high school was doing magazines as a fundraiser, so she grabbed her checkbook and signed up for a couple magazines.

Apparently The Felons were able to get enough information off her check to drain at least a couple hundred dollars out of my neighbor's account. The police wouldn't do anything about it because the amount wasn't that high, even though they knew The Felons had done it.

It took them TWO YEARS at least to get evicted.  :-\
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LadyClaire on October 17, 2012, 09:24:01 AM
I read a news article about an elderly couple who spent their life savings and took out a second mortgage on their home because they fell for one of those scams. By the time their children caught on, the elderly couple were over $100,000 in debt, had a lot of "final notice" bills due, and were behind in their mortgage to the point that they nearly got foreclosed on.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: mbbored on October 17, 2012, 11:00:29 AM
I read a news article about an elderly couple who spent their life savings and took out a second mortgage on their home because they fell for one of those scams. By the time their children caught on, the elderly couple were over $100,000 in debt, had a lot of "final notice" bills due, and were behind in their mortgage to the point that they nearly got foreclosed on.

I read a similar, if not the same, article. The craziest part about the article I read was that one or both of the couple were college professors, so it's not like they were unintelligent.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on October 17, 2012, 11:23:30 AM
I was undecided whether to put this here or in the Freecycle/CraigsList thread. It would fit either one. An ad in the "Housing Wanted" section showed up this morning. This is so weird because if it were my mother I would move heaven and earth to get her back home including driving up there and getting her. She might have to wait at the restaurant for about five hours but by god she'd be taken care of. This is such an obvious scam it's hard to believe anyone could fall for it. And I hope no one does. (The area code is for central Texas too.) Is it me or are some criminals just really, really stupid?
 

Presently living in San Diego but have lived in Santa Barbara for the past 10 years. Lost my purse at the restroom under Brophy's and do not have the funds to get home and live for the next three weeks. If anyone needs pet sitting or would like to have a roommate to help clean and cook for a few weeks, it would greatly be appreciated.

I do not use drugs, alcohol or smoke. Middle aged professional female who is honest, clean and personable. I am completely criminal free, bonded and have three children who are in college and cannot assist me due to their financial obligations. I also have a medical background and could assist a senior citizen with cooking, light cleaning, driving, etc., as long as I do not have to lift.

Anyone who could help or assist, please, call me at (512) xxx-xxxx.


Somehow I skimmed the part where you said it's a Central Texas area code until I reread your post, but that stuck out for me, too. I mean, I haven't changed my cell # in 10 years since moving here, but in this case it's just one more fishy bit on top of the carp sundae.

It is, I suppose, quite possible that there is a person with so few people to call upon that they might find themselves stuck if they lost all the money they were carrying.

However, I would assume that most people would have enough money in the bank for a bus ticket home (banks must have some procedure to allow those who have lost their ID to access funds), or friends who could loan them the money. Even an employer who would invest in getting this "professional" person home? Failing that, would there not be some sort of local charity that could help? Are her three children, together, unable to come up with a bus fare for their mother?

I suspect that this is designed to sound plausible, but get people to contact going, "Oh, you poor dear, here's money for a ticket." It's an online version of the "I need 5 dollars for a bus ticket home" scam.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Outdoor Girl on October 17, 2012, 11:26:23 AM
A scam that has been going around in my neck of the woods is teenagers/young adults calling elderly folks and saying 'Hi, Grandma(pa).  I'm stuck in (whatever) town and need money to fix my car.  Can you wire it to me?'  Then Grandma(pa) says, 'Is that you, Billy?' and the scammer now has a name to latch onto and manages to get the money sent.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on October 17, 2012, 11:28:51 AM
Yarnspinner, that is so sad.

I just thought of another one from my college days.

I received a letter in the mail informing me that I had won a diamond.  From what contest, I'll never know.  I could respond to the letter and receive the diamond OR I could send in an exorbitant amount of money to get the diamond set.  I didn't like the settings so I opted to just receive the diamond and have it set later.

Three guesses to what never, ever materialized, LOL.  I was so dumb but at least my finickiness kept me from getting scammed.

We often get "Hey, you've won this fabulous prize for a sweepstakes drawing you never entered!  Just call this number and give us all your personal details and we'll send you two tickets to some random airline/cruise line straight away!"  I put them straight in the shredder bin.  MIL asked me once why we never claim them ("It's a free trip and you're throwing it away!") and finally DH told her that it was at best a time share scheme and at worst, totally bogus and just a way to get info to do further damage.

Outdoor girl, a woman at my old office was contacted by the "Mexican Jail" and told her son was currently in the pokey and they needed 100,000 for bail money.  Unfortunately for them, her son had just come into town for a visit and was no where near Mexico.  She did report the phone number (also American) to the authorities but I don't know what ever happened with that. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on October 17, 2012, 12:07:59 PM
A scam that has been going around in my neck of the woods is teenagers/young adults calling elderly folks and saying 'Hi, Grandma(pa).  I'm stuck in (whatever) town and need money to fix my car.  Can you wire it to me?'  Then Grandma(pa) says, 'Is that you, Billy?' and the scammer now has a name to latch onto and manages to get the money sent.

I was visiting my own mother when she got one of those.

"Hi, Grandma, it's your grandson!" in a voice that sounded early twentyish. Unfortunately, my mother's grandsons are all pre-teen, so she just said it was a wrong number, and hung up.

I warned her about it, so if she gets a call like that when the boys are bigger, she can tell what's going on.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Sirius on October 17, 2012, 12:14:46 PM
A scam that has been going around in my neck of the woods is teenagers/young adults calling elderly folks and saying 'Hi, Grandma(pa).  I'm stuck in (whatever) town and need money to fix my car.  Can you wire it to me?'  Then Grandma(pa) says, 'Is that you, Billy?' and the scammer now has a name to latch onto and manages to get the money sent.

Several years ago various relatives got e-mails like this regarding my brother, who was supposedly stranded in England.  "He" was requesting funds to be wire-transferred.  Now, Bro is in the military, so it's conceivable that he might be in England.  But that's where the plausibility ends.  Fortunately, my aunt who got the first e-mail e-mailed me to ask what was going on, and I called Bro and got his wife - who knew nothing about it.  In fact, he wasn't even traveling, although he does travel a lot, and she expected him home that night.  I called Aunt back and told her it was a scam.  I then got the same e-mail, and so did my sister, but by this time she'd been warned about it being a scam.  Bro took steps to safeguard his e-mail accounts better after that, and there's been no recurrence.

In my case, though, if someone called me claiming to be my grandchild, I'd know it was bogus because I don't have children.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: mbbored on October 17, 2012, 12:16:08 PM
A scam that has been going around in my neck of the woods is teenagers/young adults calling elderly folks and saying 'Hi, Grandma(pa).  I'm stuck in (whatever) town and need money to fix my car.  Can you wire it to me?'  Then Grandma(pa) says, 'Is that you, Billy?' and the scammer now has a name to latch onto and manages to get the money sent.

I was visiting my own mother when she got one of those.

"Hi, Grandma, it's your grandson!" in a voice that sounded early twentyish. Unfortunately, my mother's grandsons are all pre-teen, so she just said it was a wrong number, and hung up.

I warned her about it, so if she gets a call like that when the boys are bigger, she can tell what's going on.

My 91 year old grandmother gets these all the time and has fun with them. "Suzie, is that you? Oh, no, what about the kids Johnny and Beth? Why don't your want your husband Henry to know? Oh wait! I don't have anybody in my family named Suzie, Johnny, Beth or Henry. Oh well!"
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Morticia on October 17, 2012, 12:17:38 PM
I got an email claiming to be from a contract killer who had been hired to eliminate me. He offered to cancel the job if I would pay him instead. I forwarded the email to the RCMP, and no more was heard. But I really think that was crossing the line.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BabyMama on October 17, 2012, 12:22:02 PM
I got an e-mail from a lawyer's office offering me some kind of service (don't remember what, but it was quite clearly a scam--there were typos, vague language, etc.) I Googled the name and a real, legit law office popped up (they were even using the lawyer's real name). I forwarded the scam e-mail to them.  >:D They sent me an e-mail back genuinely thanking me for alerting them and that they would "handle it." I really, really hope they caught the scammer...
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on October 17, 2012, 12:30:55 PM
I got an email claiming to be from a contract killer who had been hired to eliminate me. He offered to cancel the job if I would pay him instead. I forwarded the email to the RCMP, and no more was heard. But I really think that was crossing the line.

 :o  Crossing the line indeed. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jules1980 on October 17, 2012, 12:39:04 PM
I once got an email that said:

Help!  I'm stuck in Mexico and I can't get home.  I am at my wit's end and I have no one else to turn to.  Things are getting really bad.  Please help me, you are my last resort.

Love,
Shaun.

Out of area phone number

Well, since I didn't know any Shauns, I didn't respond.  Especially since I was eating ramen noodles for breakfast, rolling pennies for gas money broke at the time and couldn't have helped anyone get home from Mexico anyway.  Guess they never counted on sending it to someone even more broke than poor Shaun.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: magician5 on October 17, 2012, 01:05:47 PM
I read a news article about an elderly couple who spent their life savings and took out a second mortgage on their home because they fell for one of those scams. By the time their children caught on, the elderly couple were over $100,000 in debt, had a lot of "final notice" bills due, and were behind in their mortgage to the point that they nearly got foreclosed on.

This is going to make me unpopular, I fear.

I'd love to be more outraged at crooks targeting the vulnerable, but in most traditions aren't elders supposed to be wiser than younger folks? There's a certain level of "savvy" you have to have to be out there in the marketplace without supervision.

OF COURSE it's cruel and outrageous, but we all, young and old, are responsible for defending ourselves daily from "the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune". There have always been wolves lurking around, always.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: wolfie on October 17, 2012, 01:11:53 PM
I once got an email that said:

Help!  I'm stuck in Mexico and I can't get home.  I am at my wit's end and I have no one else to turn to.  Things are getting really bad.  Please help me, you are my last resort.

Love,
Shaun.

Out of area phone number

Well, since I didn't know any Shauns, I didn't respond.  Especially since I was eating ramen noodles for breakfast, rolling pennies for gas money broke at the time and couldn't have helped anyone get home from Mexico anyway.  Guess they never counted on sending it to someone even more broke than poor Shaun.

I want to know how come Shaun can get access to a computer, but can't make a phone call. Granted all my knowledge of Mexican prisons is from tv shows but I didn't get the feeling that there was a computer and internet service readily available there.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CharlieBraun on October 17, 2012, 01:13:47 PM
A scam that has been going around in my neck of the woods is teenagers/young adults calling elderly folks and saying 'Hi, Grandma(pa).  I'm stuck in (whatever) town and need money to fix my car.  Can you wire it to me?'  Then Grandma(pa) says, 'Is that you, Billy?' and the scammer now has a name to latch onto and manages to get the money sent.

My parents got caught in that.  Both, college educated, mom has a master's in mathematics.  Instead of it being a car needing fixing, it was that he was arrested in a foreign country, ashamed to call his parents, and needed the money to get bailed out.  A "special agent" then called my parents to give them the particulars of the arrest, saying that he had a way to get him bailed out early, otherwise it was a 6 month backlog of court cases and he would be in prison in Foreign Country for that whole time.

Their opening line?  "Hi Grandma, this is your favorite grandson."  From there they got the name, as mom said "Ted!  How are you?" *  I pointed out to my mother that we don't use "Grandma" in our family, but a different word that is pretty much only used in Philadelphia and the Delaware River Valley.

They lost $2,000.  Once we (the kids) demanded that it be reported to the police, they found out that others had lost thousands or tens of thousands.


*My parents only have one grandson, so it wasn't favoritism....
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jules1980 on October 17, 2012, 03:01:58 PM
I once got an email that said:

Help!  I'm stuck in Mexico and I can't get home.  I am at my wit's end and I have no one else to turn to.  Things are getting really bad.  Please help me, you are my last resort.

Love,
Shaun.

Out of area phone number

Well, since I didn't know any Shauns, I didn't respond.  Especially since I was eating ramen noodles for breakfast, rolling pennies for gas money broke at the time and couldn't have helped anyone get home from Mexico anyway.  Guess they never counted on sending it to someone even more broke than poor Shaun.

I want to know how come Shaun can get access to a computer, but can't make a phone call. Granted all my knowledge of Mexican prisons is from tv shows but I didn't get the feeling that there was a computer and internet service readily available there.

You know, I wondered that too.  If he had a phone number for me to call, why didn't he just call me, or whoever he was intending to call?  I just wrote it off as a phishing scam and forgot about it till this thread.

I have also won millions of dollars from dead Nigerian princes and foriegn lotteries.  Too bad I never have the spare thousands to send them for taxes.
LOL.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 17, 2012, 03:20:56 PM
A couple of months after I moved back from the UK I got an email from my old landlord and next door neighbour but it was actually one of the 419 scammers using his name and details so the coincidence was spooky to say the least. He was a Queens Council in the UK and a High Court judge in his home country and was extremely well known there.

The email was a total fraud but the info they had on him and his activities was all legit so they must have done a bit of research on him. I emailed him at his Chambers to let him know what they were up to. He wasn't pleased but there is nothing you could do about it. I had always thought they used made up people but clearly not.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on October 17, 2012, 03:36:48 PM
The "Hey grandma, it's your grandson!" Makes me chuckle, because I don't know many people who would call and just say "It's your grandson" instead of identifying themselves by name, so that would sound sketchy to me right off the bat.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Sirius on October 17, 2012, 03:42:51 PM
It would be like someone calling me and saying, "It's your favorite brother."  Not going to fool me.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on October 17, 2012, 03:52:25 PM
Right. I mean, it's something my brother would say jokingly because he's my only brother, but I also recognize his voice. 

If my boys called mil saying "It's your grandson!" She'd say "Which one?"  (the older two are close in age and do sound rather similar on the phone) so the scam wouldn't work on her. :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on October 17, 2012, 04:02:27 PM
I once got an email that said:

Help!  I'm stuck in Mexico and I can't get home.  I am at my wit's end and I have no one else to turn to.  Things are getting really bad.  Please help me, you are my last resort.

Love,
Shaun.

Out of area phone number

Well, since I didn't know any Shauns, I didn't respond.  Especially since I was eating ramen noodles for breakfast, rolling pennies for gas money broke at the time and couldn't have helped anyone get home from Mexico anyway.  Guess they never counted on sending it to someone even more broke than poor Shaun.

I got one from my boss, who was supposedly stuck in England without a passport, and needed $2,000 dollars to straighten things out. Before the penny dropped, I thought, "Why on earth would he think I would have it? He knows how much he pays me!"

Of course, the scammers think, "It only takes one...."
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers, lilacrosey
Post by: LilacRosey on October 17, 2012, 05:10:54 PM
I was a ta gas station once and someone came up asking me for money for gas for his car and as he was pointing over at his car a lady came out of the gas station stor and got in and drove off. Tried not to laugh and went into the store instead because that probably would have been rude even though I was being scammed. Some people!  ;)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: tiff019 on October 17, 2012, 06:43:23 PM
I once got an email that said:

Help!  I'm stuck in Mexico and I can't get home.  I am at my wit's end and I have no one else to turn to.  Things are getting really bad.  Please help me, you are my last resort.

Love,
Shaun.

Out of area phone number

Well, since I didn't know any Shauns, I didn't respond.  Especially since I was eating ramen noodles for breakfast, rolling pennies for gas money broke at the time and couldn't have helped anyone get home from Mexico anyway.  Guess they never counted on sending it to someone even more broke than poor Shaun.

I got one from my boss, who was supposedly stuck in England without a passport, and needed $2,000 dollars to straighten things out. Before the penny dropped, I thought, "Why on earth would he think I would have it? He knows how much he pays me!"

Of course, the scammers think, "It only takes one...."

With these, they hack into someone's email account and send the email out to the entire address book hoping to catch someone. It happened to a friend of mine - and he had a hell of a time cleaning his email account up after that (they changed his password so he couldn't get back in to block them out of it!)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: NutellaNut on October 17, 2012, 06:55:41 PM
I was once the "please help me, I have no money to get home!" person.

My boyfriend of the time called me late-ish one evening.  He was diabetic and had just had a fairly major blood sugar episode - where he drove, hallucinating, to the grocery store, and came to himself gobbling cookies in the parking lot.  He told me not to come out to him, but, frantic, I raced across town, taking two buses to get to his place.  I checked on him and we talked a bit, but then he rather firmly sent me home - he wasn't about to have me fussing unnecessarily over him.  I took the first bus I needed to get home, but then, at the bus stop, the second bus never came.  By now it was around midnight in a big city, and apparently the buses had stopped. I had hardly any money - just enough for a bus ride, in fact - and this was before cell phones.  The area I was in was residential, with no cabs in sight.  In tears, I started trying to walk home (a ridiculously long walk).  At some point, I came across a middle-aged man sitting on his front porch having a smoke, and I poured out my whole sob story as only a melodramatic college student could.   He called a cab for me and gave me $5 to pay for it.  He wouldn't hear of me trying to pay him back.   I went back to the area the next day but couldn't figure which house it was, so was never able to give him cookies or thank him otherwise.  I hope he doesn't think I was a scammer - I was so grateful for his kindness.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RegionMom on October 17, 2012, 08:46:39 PM
But see, he paid the cabbie, he did not give you the cash.  Well, he saw you get in the cab. 

That would have to a a pretty elaborate ruse--
have a friend paint a car like a cab, print up business cards, get the victim to call only that number, and then you get the cash and drive off one block, to locate another victim to scam with teh fake cabbie ruse!

 ;D

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Minmom3 on October 17, 2012, 09:41:04 PM
I read a news article about an elderly couple who spent their life savings and took out a second mortgage on their home because they fell for one of those scams. By the time their children caught on, the elderly couple were over $100,000 in debt, had a lot of "final notice" bills due, and were behind in their mortgage to the point that they nearly got foreclosed on.

This is going to make me unpopular, I fear.

I'd love to be more outraged at crooks targeting the vulnerable, but in most traditions aren't elders supposed to be wiser than younger folks? There's a certain level of "savvy" you have to have to be out there in the marketplace without supervision.

OF COURSE it's cruel and outrageous, but we all, young and old, are responsible for defending ourselves daily from "the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune". There have always been wolves lurking around, always.

Elders in the prime of life, with no mental deficits may well be wiser.  The elderly being targeted by these creeps are NOT at their full mental capacity.  They are mentally debilitated, and as such, not capable of the reasoning to know that the plea for help/money/whatever is spurious, that the person ONLY wants their money.  When people are starting to lose cognition and memory, all kinds of things go wrong, and they are no longer wiser than even my cat!  Sometimes it takes an event to make the family aware of how the person's mentation has deteriorated.

At the point where I discovered my mother's new inability to live on her own - she had paid Vanity Fair ahead for the next 3 FULL years, because the magazine, as they so FREQUENTLY DO, sent her a bill to renew every time she paid the last bill.  She had no IDEA she'd paid it three times in 2 months...  Vanity Fair was not trying to be deceitful, that's just how most magazines do business these days.  When I get such a bill, I get annoyed and I tear it up and throw it away.  When Mom got it, she paid it.  It runs out some time next summer...  She also was subject to many UTI's, which severely impair *her* cognition.  Frighteningly so.  She sometimes can't finish a sentence because she can't remember how it started.  She lost track of her check book pretty badly.  Her handwriting deteriorated until it looked like spider on crack cocaine, and nobody could read it, let alone her.  She lost track of check numbers and dates and who she wrote the checks TO.  All this was without anybody at all trying deliberately to take advantage of her. 

Add into that mental mix somebody actively TRYING to trick an old person, and that old person is either up a creek with no paddle in sight, or if they're really lucky, they have family keeping tabs on things and the plan is discovered before it results in a damaged house or an empty bank account.  They have passed the stage of living alone safely, but nobody may yet realize that fact.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 17, 2012, 10:15:40 PM
I read a news article about an elderly couple who spent their life savings and took out a second mortgage on their home because they fell for one of those scams. By the time their children caught on, the elderly couple were over $100,000 in debt, had a lot of "final notice" bills due, and were behind in their mortgage to the point that they nearly got foreclosed on.

This is going to make me unpopular, I fear.

I'd love to be more outraged at crooks targeting the vulnerable, but in most traditions aren't elders supposed to be wiser than younger folks? There's a certain level of "savvy" you have to have to be out there in the marketplace without supervision.

OF COURSE it's cruel and outrageous, but we all, young and old, are responsible for defending ourselves daily from "the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune". There have always been wolves lurking around, always.

Elders in the prime of life, with no mental deficits may well be wiser.  The elderly being targeted by these creeps are NOT at their full mental capacity.  They are mentally debilitated, and as such, not capable of the reasoning to know that the plea for help/money/whatever is spurious, that the person ONLY wants their money.  When people are starting to lose cognition and memory, all kinds of things go wrong, and they are no longer wiser than even my cat!  Sometimes it takes an event to make the family aware of how the person's mentation has deteriorated.

At the point where I discovered my mother's new inability to live on her own - she had paid Vanity Fair ahead for the next 3 FULL years, because the magazine, as they so FREQUENTLY DO, sent her a bill to renew every time she paid the last bill.  She had no IDEA she'd paid it three times in 2 months...  Vanity Fair was not trying to be deceitful, that's just how most magazines do business these days.  When I get such a bill, I get annoyed and I tear it up and throw it away.  When Mom got it, she paid it.  It runs out some time next summer...  She also was subject to many UTI's, which severely impair *her* cognition.  Frighteningly so.  She sometimes can't finish a sentence because she can't remember how it started.  She lost track of her check book pretty badly.  Her handwriting deteriorated until it looked like spider on crack cocaine, and nobody could read it, let alone her.  She lost track of check numbers and dates and who she wrote the checks TO.  All this was without anybody at all trying deliberately to take advantage of her. 

Add into that mental mix somebody actively TRYING to trick an old person, and that old person is either up a creek with no paddle in sight, or if they're really lucky, they have family keeping tabs on things and the plan is discovered before it results in a damaged house or an empty bank account.  They have passed the stage of living alone safely, but nobody may yet realize that fact.

There have also been studies done that show older people are more trusting, despite the fact they have many years of experience of dealing with people who operate for their own self interest. They don't even need to be cognitively compromised in any way to be taken in.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: magician5 on October 18, 2012, 12:33:19 AM
I read a news article about an elderly couple who spent their life savings and took out a second mortgage on their home because they fell for one of those scams. By the time their children caught on, the elderly couple were over $100,000 in debt, had a lot of "final notice" bills due, and were behind in their mortgage to the point that they nearly got foreclosed on.

This is going to make me unpopular, I fear.

I'd love to be more outraged at crooks targeting the vulnerable, but in most traditions aren't elders supposed to be wiser than younger folks? There's a certain level of "savvy" you have to have to be out there in the marketplace without supervision.

OF COURSE it's cruel and outrageous, but we all, young and old, are responsible for defending ourselves daily from "the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune". There have always been wolves lurking around, always.

Elders in the prime of life, with no mental deficits may well be wiser.  The elderly being targeted by these creeps are NOT at their full mental capacity.  They are mentally debilitated, and as such, not capable of the reasoning to know that the plea for help/money/whatever is spurious, that the person ONLY wants their money.  When people are starting to lose cognition and memory, all kinds of things go wrong, and they are no longer wiser than even my cat!  Sometimes it takes an event to make the family aware of how the person's mentation has deteriorated.

At the point where I discovered my mother's new inability to live on her own - she had paid Vanity Fair ahead for the next 3 FULL years, because the magazine, as they so FREQUENTLY DO, sent her a bill to renew every time she paid the last bill.  She had no IDEA she'd paid it three times in 2 months...  Vanity Fair was not trying to be deceitful, that's just how most magazines do business these days.  When I get such a bill, I get annoyed and I tear it up and throw it away.  When Mom got it, she paid it.  It runs out some time next summer...  She also was subject to many UTI's, which severely impair *her* cognition.  Frighteningly so.  She sometimes can't finish a sentence because she can't remember how it started.  She lost track of her check book pretty badly.  Her handwriting deteriorated until it looked like spider on crack cocaine, and nobody could read it, let alone her.  She lost track of check numbers and dates and who she wrote the checks TO.  All this was without anybody at all trying deliberately to take advantage of her. 

Add into that mental mix somebody actively TRYING to trick an old person, and that old person is either up a creek with no paddle in sight, or if they're really lucky, they have family keeping tabs on things and the plan is discovered before it results in a damaged house or an empty bank account.  They have passed the stage of living alone safely, but nobody may yet realize that fact.

Fair enough. It's a frightening issue any way you look at it.

I'm 63, 11 years after a stroke, and I have family members telling me that practically everything I decide, or say, or remember, all (in my opinion) with crystal clarity, is wrong or inaccurate or nonsensical. I mostly think they're just saying these things for their own convenience or to get their way ... but then again, with so many people saying I'm a jack*ss, maybe I should be looking for a saddle. There are SO MANY hooks to hang their opinions on (the age, the stroke, etc).

Surely I ain't what I "used to was", I already know without being told that I don't drive as well as I once did and in a few years I'm going to need to decide when to either retire from driving gracefully, or fight like a wounded tiger to hold onto the car keys. I hope I have the sense to know what's wise.

That's the still-walking-around elder's dilemma ... is it me, or are they just saying that? I've always said that the answer to that sort of either/or question is usually "both".

BUT STILL in response to the previous poster's issue about the elders who got into thousands of dollars in debt to pay magazine scammers, you'd wish some third party or family member had had some oversight and called "shenanigans" a lot earlier. What other wolves are lined up right outside these old folks' door, and who will protect them?

Minmom3, my sincere sympathy to you for being in the difficult and heartbreaking position you described.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: zyrs on October 18, 2012, 01:14:30 AM
About a year after the War in Iraq started I received a letter purporting to be from a US military person wanting to involve me in a scheme to smuggle some of Saddam's gold out of the country.  Instead of being full of typos, it was in perfect English, although very stilted.

It had the normal 419 dreck - they had been assured of my discretion by someone important and only wanted a bunch of money from me in order to ship the gold...

It just didn't seem like a good idea.   

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: glinda on October 18, 2012, 05:25:26 AM
My dad was trying to sell a pool table on kijiji and had a the "I'll send you extra money to pay for the shipping and you send it to my representative" tried on him.

Thankfully, not only did he find it strange that someone in England (we're in Canada) would want to pay to ship a 6 x 12 antique pool table there but he also doesn't have a Paypal account.

He forwarded me the emails and I confirmed it was a scam.

The best part were the threatening emails from PayPal with an originating email of someweirdname@gmail. Because I'm sure paypal's legal department uses google mail.

(Please excuse any weird formatting - first time posting from my phone)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 18, 2012, 06:54:02 AM
The most ambitious / outrageous scam that I have ever heard of, has to be one which has been perpetrated on occasion, for many centuries past, by Gypsies. (Would emphasise that I harbour no hostility toward Gypsies / Romanies: am just, for interest’s sake, telling about stuff which people sometimes do.)

This manoeuvre is called, in the Romany language, “hokkani boro” – the great trick. It involves convincing the “mark” that their financial wealth is, “in whatever way”, possessed / contaminated by evil; and that great misfortune will come to them, if they don’t let the scammer deploy Gypsy powers / wisdom, to cleanse their money from the evil that besets it. The “mark” is told to convert all their money into cash, make it up into a parcel, and hand same over to the scammer, for the necessary rites to be performed.  The scammer returns an identical-looking parcel – containing, of course, torn-up newspaper or the equivalent. Strict instructions have been given, that the victim must not open or in any way tamper with the parcel until such-and-such a time-interval has gone by, as that will undo the spell...

Part of me, considers this a diabolical thing to do. With another part, I feel a little bit of sneaking admiration for the sheer ingenuity and audacity involved in bringing off such a feat; plus – other than in the case of confused old folk, or others who are clinically “cognitively compromised” as Pippen puts it – a bit of the sentiment that Darwin is in the picture here: anyone dim enough to fall for such a preposterous yarn, maybe deserves to lose their life savings.
 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Outdoor Girl on October 18, 2012, 07:59:10 AM
Got an e-mail from TD Bank last night, saying my information had been compromised.  Considering recent news, it isn't out of the realm of possibility.  Except for the fact that I don't have a TD Bank account.

The number of people who've fallen for this type is astounding.  People, your bank will not email you!

I love when either my Dad or me gets the call from the Windows computer folks that your computer has been compromised and you have to do all these various things.  Dad doesn't have a computer and I have a Mac.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on October 18, 2012, 08:36:53 AM
When I was in New Orleans, I was sorely tempted to try the cup-and-ball game. Not because I thought it was possible to win anything, but I was interested in watching the way the scam went down. If I hadn't been on my own, I would have tried, but I was worried about making myself a target for something worse if I drew attention to myself as a mark.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: squashedfrog on October 18, 2012, 09:19:39 AM
Got an e-mail from TD Bank last night, saying my information had been compromised.  Considering recent news, it isn't out of the realm of possibility.  Except for the fact that I don't have a TD Bank account.

The number of people who've fallen for this type is astounding.  People, your bank will not email you!

I love when either my Dad or me gets the call from the Windows computer folks that your computer has been compromised and you have to do all these various things.  Dad doesn't have a computer and I have a Mac.

yeah I love those ones too, especially where I tell them my husband works for the police in the special branch of internet fraud (made up!) and demand their name, to see how fast they put the phone down.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: audhs on October 18, 2012, 10:45:04 AM
I had 2 separate people try to scam me in one day a few years ago.

Guy one come up to me and my mother in a parking lot telling us that the pay machines aren't working so he is a rep from the parking company and we need to pay him $30 to park and then he'll refund the difference in cost when we leave.     I smiled and said oh ok, but you don't mind if I just go over and check the machine for a minute to see if it's working.   He then mumbles something about oh well I think they might have fixed that one already and took off. ::) 

the funny thing is earlier that week I'd actually seen a news mag show about people who were doing this exact scam in the UK - except they were doing a much better job of it, they had fake ID's and clipboards very offical looking, this guy looked well homeless.

The second guy comes up to us in the same parking lot when we are getting back into our car to leave.  He has a sob story about leaving all his money on public trasportation and needing to get a grayhound to his sisters in city 2 hours away.    I was very helpful and gave him about 3 or 4 different ideas of what he could do.  He finally left annoyed because not one of those suggestions involved me giving him money.  - ok I admit I knew he was scaming me and I was stringing him along on purpose.

The bad thing my mother after he left, was seriously concered that we should have given him something poor guy.  I had to convince her that it was a scam.  I'm still not sure she believed me.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: audhs on October 18, 2012, 10:53:45 AM
Oh my DH and I also got a letter in the mail last year saying a man with our last name died while visiting China, he was very rich and had no family so we could claim the money as next of kin.   We just had to do x and y and share the money with this person.  So easy.

It may have been a more convincing scam if our last name wasn't so rediculously common. That and if a friend of a friend hadn't gotten the same letter just the week before.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: staceym on October 18, 2012, 10:59:41 AM
Got an e-mail from TD Bank last night, saying my information had been compromised.  Considering recent news, it isn't out of the realm of possibility.  Except for the fact that I don't have a TD Bank account.

The number of people who've fallen for this type is astounding.  People, your bank will not email you!

this reminds me of the email I received at work aout 3 years ago..from the IRS  ::)

the email looked totally official and I believe it said that I owed back taxes on unclaimed income (I can't really remember the wording) and I was to log on to the link provided (for some reason I can't remember).

Well at first I went  :o  but then after a few seconds I realized that my job is my only source of income and I surely claim that and secondly how would the IRS know my work email address?

then I went to the actual IRS website and right on the homepage they have a blurb about this scam.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on October 18, 2012, 11:51:29 AM
Back in the 1980s, we had a whole office full of gullible people assist two guys to pull of a pretty outrageous one.

The guys show up and announce that they have arrived to fix the copier. No one wonders about the lack of a uniform or name tag. No one asks to see an ID or a work order. No one calls out "hey! who called the copier repair people?" No one even says "I didn't know the copier was down.What's wrong with it?"

After a bit of tinkering, the "repair guys" announce that they have to take the copier back to the shop. They ask for help getting the copier into their car. A car, literally. Not a van with a company logo on it. An unmarked sedan. Helpful employees help the repair guys cram the copier into the back seat. No one asks for a receipt.

Only after the sedan had driven off did it occur to them that something isn't right here.

There is a sequel, however. About 6 months later, the real copier service guy was called to fix a copy at a church. The service guy recognized the serial number. The church had found a newspaper ad for a used copier and were delighted with how cheap it was.  The two thieves were never caught; the office got the copier back and the church was out of luck. (The office was a government agency, so by law couldn't let the church keep the copier or donate money to them.)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ACBNYC on October 18, 2012, 12:14:30 PM
Got an e-mail from TD Bank last night, saying my information had been compromised.  Considering recent news, it isn't out of the realm of possibility.  Except for the fact that I don't have a TD Bank account.

The number of people who've fallen for this type is astounding.  People, your bank will not email you!

I love when either my Dad or me gets the call from the Windows computer folks that your computer has been compromised and you have to do all these various things.  Dad doesn't have a computer and I have a Mac.

I get this from "Bank of America" all of the time, and I do not have a BoA account. My actual bank *does* email me--to say thing like I have a new message in message center, or my deposit statement is online, but what they won't do is ask me for personal information like account numbers or my password!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: pwv on October 18, 2012, 02:11:44 PM
One time I got 6 or 7 emails at the same time, from all different banks stating my account was in jeopardy or something like that.  Only thing was I had never heard of most of the banks, let alone had an account with any of them.  They went straight to trash.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: snowfire on October 18, 2012, 02:25:23 PM
I had someone try to pull the "I'll send you a big check for 'your item' & you wire me the difference" scam on me a while back. 

The thing was, the "item" in question was stud service for our stallion.  Evil Snowfire REALLY wanted to ship them a container of something interesting and gooey, just for giggles but I wrestled her back into her cage.  >:D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 18, 2012, 02:25:48 PM
My flatmate Des has a guy who works for his father who has lost everything through a romance scam. Not that he has much to start with but he has borrowed money from everyone he knows. He even approached Des to see if he could borrow several thousand dollars which was highly unusual and Des told him it was a total scam. He never stopped to question why a gorgeous highly successful model would fall in love over the internet with a much older, not terribly attractive man with a minimum wage job. Poor guy even brought tickets to the US he was so convinced she was real.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: faithlessone on October 18, 2012, 05:31:58 PM
With these, they hack into someone's email account and send the email out to the entire address book hoping to catch someone. It happened to a friend of mine - and he had a hell of a time cleaning his email account up after that (they changed his password so he couldn't get back in to block them out of it!)

The same thing happened to a friend of mine!!

I got a bit concerned, because the reported situation (being stuck in London, bag and phone stolen etc.) was a little plausible. We both lived in a city about an hour's train ride from London, and both often went there. Also, the likelihood of her remembering my email address and not my phone number was fairly high (I couldn't have told you her number either).

However, I decided to give her a ring, just in case, and she answered. Just a hack.

It's a bit scary how convincing some of these scams can be. Some are obviously rubbish, but I can see how some people can be taken in.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hillia on October 18, 2012, 05:57:42 PM
Years ago, my brother was deployed to Kuwait.  His wife was partying her way through the base. She called my mom and told her that a) she was pregnant and b) Bro's paycheck had been messed up by the pay office (this does happen in the military sometimes).  Mom was horrified, of course, and sent cash as well as maternity clothes, baby care books, etc - feeling sorry for her DIL - a young, new mom-to-be whose husband was in a war zone.

Come to find out that Bro's paycheck was rolling in on schedule; she just needed more party money.  There was a baby, but it was demonstrably not Bro's based on dates.  The capper?  After Bro had returned stateside, his (now) ex-wife and her family wanted him to claim paternity so she could have hte baby at a military hospital.  Bro had to provide a DNA sample, in pre-cheek swab days, to prove it was not his baby.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Barney girl on October 18, 2012, 06:22:02 PM
A book was serialised on the radio last year chronicling the emails of someone who pretended to fall for a scam. It was one where you had to send your bank details and he spun the scammer out for ages, asking naive questions. I wish I could remember what it was called, as it was very funny as the scammer got more and more exasperated with him.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on October 18, 2012, 07:07:35 PM
A scam that has been going around in my neck of the woods is teenagers/young adults calling elderly folks and saying 'Hi, Grandma(pa).  I'm stuck in (whatever) town and need money to fix my car.  Can you wire it to me?'  Then Grandma(pa) says, 'Is that you, Billy?' and the scammer now has a name to latch onto and manages to get the money sent.

I was visiting my own mother when she got one of those.

"Hi, Grandma, it's your grandson!" in a voice that sounded early twentyish. Unfortunately, my mother's grandsons are all pre-teen, so she just said it was a wrong number, and hung up.

I warned her about it, so if she gets a call like that when the boys are bigger, she can tell what's going on.

I got this one via FB message when a friend's account got hacked. This is an old friend I have trouble imagining travelling alone in the US, much less overseas. She messaged me saying she was stuck in London, was mugged, lost her money and passport, and needed help getting home. I laughed, asked what the he** she was doing in London, and told her to call her parents. Then I got her mom's phone number from my mom (I couldn't find the friend's actual number), and called her folks to ask them to tell her she'd been hacked.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeEater on October 18, 2012, 07:12:37 PM
My PIL are the most gullible people alive. They fall for every scam ever. DH gets pretty exasperated - 'Just ring me and check if your computer needs fixing!'

There was a horse-racing one they fell for a while ago - I can't even remember the particulars, but they lost several thousand dollars on that one.

They're in their very early 60s and this isn't associated with age. The way DH tells it, they've always been the same.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: suzieQ on October 18, 2012, 07:46:00 PM
For a short while, I had a "cupcake shop". I set up a FB account page for it and included my cell number so people could contact me.
Not too long ago I got a standard scam for this type of business.

First, they contacted me by text.
They texted they wanted to order 300 cupcakes! for an Uncle's wedding. They wanted to use a credit card and wanted them on a date that I was unavailable. I told them I was sorry, I don't take cards and I was unavailable on that date.
Oh, that was ok! They could take them on a different date! (For a wedding?!?!) and they wanted to send me their credit card info.
Sorry, I don't take credit cards.
Again, they ignored that information and texted they would send their credit info and they wanted me to overcharge the card for the cost of paying a refrigerated van they would send for the cupcakes, so I could pay the driver with MY MONEY and get it back from the credit card charge.

Yea, not gonna happen. I informed them that I knew about that scam and they were out of luck.

Just today, I got a text from another person wanting to get "cupcakes to go".  And do I take credit cards? This scammer was at least bright enough to stop after I told them I don't take credit cards.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: kareng57 on October 18, 2012, 09:10:24 PM
Right. I mean, it's something my brother would say jokingly because he's my only brother, but I also recognize his voice. 

If my boys called mil saying "It's your grandson!" She'd say "Which one?"  (the older two are close in age and do sound rather similar on the phone) so the scam wouldn't work on her. :)


My guess would be that they're also counting on the fact that many elderly people think of what long-distance phone calls sounded like decades ago - static-y, low volume and time delays.  So they're counting on the fact that "Granny" might say in response to a confusing call "this is your favourite granddaughter!"  "?Michelle?"  "of course!"

Yes, I've warned my own mom about this scam, although she'd likely already know if her grandsons were travelling out-of-country.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on October 18, 2012, 09:54:11 PM
Frankly, it scares me that my husband or I fall for some of these someday. Right now, we are very good at turning away scams and we recognize our family members' voices.

We are 69 and 67, and I know I am not as sharp as I used to be, forgetting details and taking a little longer on computer puzzles, for example, so, yeah, it scares me.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on October 18, 2012, 10:12:10 PM
Frankly, it scares me that my husband or I fall for some of these someday. Right now, we are very good at turning away scams and we recognize our family members' voices.

We are 69 and 67, and I know I am not as sharp as I used to be, forgetting details and taking a little longer on computer puzzles, for example, so, yeah, it scares me.

Forewarned is forearmed. I guess the easiest way of protecting yourself is increasing your knowledge and being aware that anyone approaching for favours could be up to no good. If you want something you seek it out yourself and if people are offering you things they are operating for their own self interest.

I got conned into buying a stupid life insurance policy in my first job out of Uni. Some flash harry agent rang me and told me he dealt with all the people at my company and I stupidly believed him and signed up for it. I think someone in HR may have been getting kickbacks from him for passing on information about new hires. I also saw and old friend and flatmate from uni in town one day and he said he had just landed this new job at an insurance company and needed to practise his spiel on someone and could he come to my house and see what I thought and give him some feedback. It soon became apparent he was trying to sell me insurance and it was a big con. I told him it wasn't going to happen and asked him to leave. I have a great aversion to insurance sales people these days.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Iris on October 19, 2012, 04:51:26 AM
I am reasonably trusting, so need to watch myself all the time. DH has a great scam radar fortunately. One time I got reverse scammed (if there is such a thing).

Family and I were on holidays, and it was ANZAC day. This is roughly equivalent to Veteran's day and very, very few people work on ANZAC day. Mostly essential services and some shops, and even then most shops are only open in the afternoon. I got a phone call on my mobile from someone purporting to work for Centrelink (who are in charge of all government benefits). The person on the end told me that they had been reviewing my file from when I was a SAHM (a few years before) and it turned out I was eligible for Family Allowance and they owed me $3000! Now, if I just gave him my bank account details they could transfer that money for me.

Yeah, right. I (politely) told them that I don't give banking details to strangers who ring me up and he said "Well....we could send you a cheque, but that could take up to 10 working days". Rolling my eyes at his feeble attempt I said sure, a cheque would be fine. Hung up and discussed it with DH who agreed that it was *definitely* a scam.

Anyhoo, ten working days later I got a cheque for $3000! Best. Scam. Ever.  ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: scotcat60 on October 19, 2012, 07:16:34 AM
A chap turned up at my door one afternoon syhaing he had been told to meet someone in my street re: getting a shipping order to send a car to Nigeria. He had been given the street name but no number of house, and a mobile phone number which rang out. Did I know anyone form Nigeria living on the street? I said no. Were there any persons of colour who did? Yes, but not from Nigeria. I told him to contact the police, and shut my door. I did an internet check, and it was a scam, pay me the money, and I'll arrange shipment. I wonder why he diid it, you can surely buy a car in Africa?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JenJay on October 19, 2012, 07:25:23 AM
I once got an email that said:

Help!  I'm stuck in Mexico and I can't get home.  I am at my wit's end and I have no one else to turn to.  Things are getting really bad.  Please help me, you are my last resort.

Love,
Shaun.

Out of area phone number

Well, since I didn't know any Shauns, I didn't respond.  Especially since I was eating ramen noodles for breakfast, rolling pennies for gas money broke at the time and couldn't have helped anyone get home from Mexico anyway.  Guess they never counted on sending it to someone even more broke than poor Shaun.

I got one from my boss, who was supposedly stuck in England without a passport, and needed $2,000 dollars to straighten things out. Before the penny dropped, I thought, "Why on earth would he think I would have it? He knows how much he pays me!"

Of course, the scammers think, "It only takes one...."

With these, they hack into someone's email account and send the email out to the entire address book hoping to catch someone. It happened to a friend of mine - and he had a hell of a time cleaning his email account up after that (they changed his password so he couldn't get back in to block them out of it!)

Yep. DH got one of those emails from the account of a friend at work. It seemed odd so he walked over to where his friend was sitting and said "So, you're stuck in Ireland, huh?" Friend had to field dozens of concerned calls and emails for a week.

What was scary was that friend had been thoroughly researching his ancestry and was planning a trip to Ireland a few months later so it was plausible. He figured whoever hacked him combed through his emails for details first.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: dawnfire on October 19, 2012, 07:31:50 AM
I think this falls under the too good to be true. There was a guy advertising on craigslist cheap inner city apartments in Melbourne. This apartment was in the center of town, walking distances to 2 universities, all utilities including internet included and going for $90 a week when a bed sitter normally goes for $300 a week. They wanted you to send them your bond money and they'd mail you the key. yeh sure   ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeBeret on October 19, 2012, 10:38:58 AM
I just remembered a rental scam I saw myself.

A house was posted for rent, nice neighborhood, good price. When you contact the landlord he says he needs proof of your credit score, please go to the following website to obtain your credit score. Of course the website is a phishing site and they will steal your identity once you input all the information. It's a smooth one though, because everything is well-written and sounds reasonable until you stop to think about it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Wulfie on October 19, 2012, 11:05:35 AM
The big one we have going around here (Seattle) and I am sure elsewhere in the country/world is the “Rental Housing” scam.

The scammers will go online and post ads for houses and apartments for rent. They make up some reason that they can’t show the unit (usually that it is occupied) or they do everything via email. They take the marks money and give them a key that looks like an apartment key but usually isn’t.   The person shows up to move in to find out that they were scammed. Sometimes this is done by shady realtors or someone from their office so they actually CAN show the home by using the master key on the door!  Sometimes the person moves in and discovers it when the house is sold and the new owner’s take possession!

Our company got hit with this, someone was advertising some of our units and when the tenant showed up to move in “The manager will give you the key when you sign the lease” they discover that they lost all their money. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for low income apartments to be leased out of a central office due to the huge amount of paperwork so it doesn’t raise any red flags for the tenant.  That one really ticks me off!   On the plus side for the tenant, these units really were available and we were usually able to help them get them housed. Bad side, they were out the money they paid the scammers.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on October 19, 2012, 04:31:04 PM
With these, they hack into someone's email account and send the email out to the entire address book hoping to catch someone. It happened to a friend of mine - and he had a hell of a time cleaning his email account up after that (they changed his password so he couldn't get back in to block them out of it!)

Ugh, I hate those.  My best friend's hotmail account got hacked, and they sent around emails promoting weight loss meds or something.  Now, thankfully I and DH (who also got an email from her) know that she is VERY against using meds to lose weight (at least the sort that claim that all you have to do is take the meds), and that she's a big believer in Weight Watchers so I emailed her at her gmail account to alert her.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on October 19, 2012, 04:58:53 PM
With these, they hack into someone's email account and send the email out to the entire address book hoping to catch someone. It happened to a friend of mine - and he had a hell of a time cleaning his email account up after that (they changed his password so he couldn't get back in to block them out of it!)

Ugh, I hate those.  My best friend's hotmail account got hacked, and they sent around emails promoting weight loss meds or something.  Now, thankfully I and DH (who also got an email from her) know that she is VERY against using meds to lose weight (at least the sort that claim that all you have to do is take the meds), and that she's a big believer in Weight Watchers so I emailed her at her gmail account to alert her.

One of my ex-school teacher aunts had the same thing on FB.  The language of the email was really not her style and it was chock full of misspellings.  I think she got a whole lot of "Aunt, I think your FB has been hacked..." 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Black Delphinium on October 19, 2012, 05:44:57 PM
I actually just finished a book in which one of the main character's side businesses is writing scam emails...but, in her defense, she's be strong-armed into it by a crime syndicate that is holding her debt over her head.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: SamiHami on October 19, 2012, 11:56:18 PM
Incident #1-My former boss went by his middle name both personally and professionally. Let's say his name was Robert Jonathan and he went by Jon. He was sort of an oversharer so I knew a great deal about his personal life/financial life, etc. On top of that I had a close professional relationship with his wife. All this is to say I very well knew about Jon's personal and professional life.

So one day I get a call from someone with a quite thick accent asking for Robert. I immediately knew that this was not someone who knew Jon; it was a dead giveaway. I asked who was calling and was told "a business associate." I probed for more information and was haughtily told that it was none of my business but that he and Robert were involved in a very lucrative business dealing and that I had better put the call through now or he would certainly see that I was fired. Of course I knew this was a total scam so I told him that "Robert" was out of the office and offered to take his name and phone number. He refused and actually asked for his cell phone number. I terminated the conversation at that point. Jon and I often joked about how I had screwed him out of a "lucrative business deal."

Incident #2: I guess my DH does listen to me sometimes. The phone rings one day and he answers it. I hear from his side of the conversation that it's someone claiming that we have won something. I instantly go on alert, listening to make sure he doesn't start giving out info that he shouldn't. After a few moments, he says, "I'm going to let you talk to my wife about this."  :) He tells me quickly that it's someone claiming we've won a trip to Montreal to go to a concert to see a very popular band perform. Sounds sketchy to me.

I take the phone from him, and fully expect that it's a scammer. The first words out of my mouth are "Whatever you say, I will not be giving you my credit card number." The caller starts laughing and says "I don't want your cc number!" He's a DJ at a local radio station-and I recognized his voice easily-and we really did win the contest. I asked my DH if he remembered entering it and sure enough he did; the radio station had their step-van parked in front of his workplace one day, and as he was walking by they called him over and gave him a hat, a bumper sticker and had him sign up for the contest. He didn't give it any thought afterward.

We did take the trip and it was great, even though the concert got cancelled b/c the lead singer had an injury and couldn't perform. But even that didn't bother us, because we actually had seen that band play, on the same tour, a couple of months before, when they played in our city!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: White Dragon on October 20, 2012, 01:12:18 AM
When I worked for the newspaper we got a lot of scam emails.

The most common one was 'The Puppy Scam.' We usually got this a few times each year.

It always involved purebred puppies of some popular bre*d (pugs and bulldogs were common).
The puppies were usually $300 - pretty cheap for those bre*ds.
The pups always came from 'champion blood lines' and were AKC registered. ???

The ads never had a phone number, only an email address.
The ads were always to run for 30 days and sometimes they even emailed me the CC number. :P

In this scam, it's all done by email and you send a 'deposit' and they will 'hold a puppy for you'.

Aside from the fact that a) there was never any contact information for the seller, b) the cc's were invariably stolen and c) most kennels selling dogs in Canada would almost certainly register the dogs with the *Canadian*  Kennel Club and not the American Kennel Club...well, yeah seems perfectly legit. Not!!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BarensMom on October 20, 2012, 07:49:50 AM
My grandmother got involved with a religious scammer way back when I was a kid.

A preacher by the name of Smith set up church inside a house in her community.  He got my aunt and her husband involved, who then brought Grandma into it.  Grandma then tried to get my mom interested - I remember going to one service and, even at 8 years old, I knew something was off.  I remember asking Mom, "Is Mr. Smith a real preacher or just pretending?"  Grandma started giving money hand over fist to this guy, and even tried to tap Mom for money for this "church."  Mom refused, which caused a rift lasting for months.

To end the story, Smith ran off with my aunt's husband's girlfriend and all the money he collected from the suckers members of his church, leaving his wife to face prosecution.  The police finally caught him pulling the same scam up in Sacramento.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Marisol on November 02, 2012, 03:01:56 PM
Someone tried to scam me through Craigslist.  I was selling a locket and someone from NY wanted to buy it if I would send it to them.  I said sure if they could pay by paypal.  I was emailed a very realistic looking fake payment email "from paypal" with an address to send the locket to Nigeria.  I can see how easily someone might think it was a legitimate payment into paypal.  It wasn't and I did not mail the locket to Nigeria or NY.  But I did get a laugh out of them emailing asking for me to send it right away. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on November 02, 2012, 04:44:07 PM
When I worked at a bank, I answered the phone call of this older man who sold something online and the payment check he received bounced.  It was a cashiers (not personal) check for thousands of dollars so he trusted it and didn't make sure it cleared before mailing the merchandise.  Poor man sounded so devastated.  I sent him to the fraud department, but I don't know what happened after that.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Acadianna on November 02, 2012, 05:28:53 PM
It was a cashiers (not personal) check for thousands of dollars so he trusted it and didn't make sure it cleared before mailing the merchandise.

A cashier's check is a check drawn on the bank itself.  So unless the check was forged, I don't understand how it could "bounce" unless the bank went under -- this is why people pay for cashier's check, for the absolute guarantee that it will be cashed.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on November 02, 2012, 05:32:11 PM
It was a cashiers (not personal) check for thousands of dollars so he trusted it and didn't make sure it cleared before mailing the merchandise.

A cashier's check is a check drawn on the bank itself.  So unless the check was forged, I don't understand how it could "bounce" unless the bank went under -- this is why people pay for cashier's check, for the absolute guarantee that it will be cashed.

It was probably forged. If he didn't cash it at the bank it was drawn on, a good forgery from another bank will probably get accepted by an unsuspecting teller.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeBeret on November 02, 2012, 05:37:15 PM
It was probably forged. I've seen more forged cashiers' checks than Legitimate ones in the last five years.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hawkwatcher on November 02, 2012, 07:31:49 PM
I received an interesting email stating that I was an heir to Princess Diana's fortune. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: twiggy on November 02, 2012, 07:49:06 PM
I received an interesting email stating that I was an heir to Princess Diana's fortune.

hmm, you would think one of her sons would be a more logical heir, but what good luck to you! ;)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on November 02, 2012, 08:33:10 PM
I received an interesting email stating that I was an heir to Princess Diana's fortune.

hmm, you would think one of her sons would be a more logical heir, but what good luck to you! ;)

Then you will share with all of your eHell friends, I'm sure. Thank you.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Acadianna on November 02, 2012, 08:42:02 PM
I received an interesting email stating that I was an heir to Princess Diana's fortune.

I'd be thrilled just to inherit her wardrobe -- though her clothes would be a few sizes too small for me.  Even so, the hats and shoes would be worth having!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JoW on November 02, 2012, 09:58:35 PM
A chap turned up at my door one afternoon syhaing he had been told to meet someone in my street re: getting a shipping order to send a car to Nigeria. He had been given the street name but no number of house, and a mobile phone number which rang out. Did I know anyone form Nigeria living on the street? I said no. Were there any persons of colour who did? Yes, but not from Nigeria. I told him to contact the police, and shut my door. I did an internet check, and it was a scam, pay me the money, and I'll arrange shipment. I wonder why he diid it, you can surely buy a car in Africa?
The way that scam works, the scammer pays for the car with a cashier's check.  The check includes a large amount for shipping the car.  The seller deposits the check and wires the shipping fee to the shipper.  The shipper never shows up.  The cashier's check is a well-made forgery.  It bounces, but not for several weeks.  The victim has to repay the bank for the bad check plus a bounced-check fee.  The scammer and his friend the shipper split the shipping fee.   
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: VorFemme on November 02, 2012, 10:51:27 PM
Someone tried to scam me through Craigslist.  I was selling a locket and someone from NY wanted to buy it if I would send it to them.  I said sure if they could pay by paypal.  I was emailed a very realistic looking fake payment email "from paypal" with an address to send the locket to Nigeria.  I can see how easily someone might think it was a legitimate payment into paypal.  It wasn't and I did not mail the locket to Nigeria or NY.  But I did get a laugh out of them emailing asking for me to send it right away. 

I got that same fake email from someone wanting a laptop computer mailed to Nigeria - PayPal was not amused when I forwarded it to them.

Over the next few days, I got more email from someone asking about the same laptop - but she couldn't keep straight if it was for her husband, son, or brother...I didn't respond to those except to say that I would meet someone for cash - I would not ship it to a Craigslist buyer.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Sirius on November 03, 2012, 11:02:22 AM
Two or three years ago my sister legally changed her name to something not even close to her birth name.  Then, American Express either was hacked or robbed by persons unknown who got a bunch of client information, and my brother-in-law was affected. 

Then, about six months later, Sis got a call from a store in New York state (she's in Texas) asking for her under her former name.  Apparently, someone was using her former identity to try to buy a bunch of high-priced gift cards, and the store was double-checking.  She told them, "Call the police.  They're trying to scam you.  I haven't used that name in over a year after changing it legally, and I changed it on all my credit cards."  I don't know if the person was arrested, but she said she didn't tell them what she changed her name to and said they didn't ask, so it doesn't sound like phishing.

I also got one of those "We can't find you to deliver a package.  Use this link to go to our website to update your information" type of e-mails, but I wasn't expecting anything and the poor spelling and grammar made it obvious that this was a phishing expedition.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Starchasm on November 03, 2012, 04:00:35 PM
Here's a facebook note I wrote up after a scammer hacked my friend's e-mail account:

"I received this e-mail today from Amy:

"Hello,

   Am sorry for this odd request because it might get to you too urgent but it is because of the situation of things right now, I am stuck in Wales,United Kingdom right now, i came down here on a vacation, i got robbed, everything was going fine until last night when i got mugged on my way back to the hotel,all cash,phones and credit card were stolen off me but luckily for me i still have my passports with me, i have been to the Embassy and the Police here but they're not helping issues at all they asked me to wait for 3weeks but i can't wait till then and my flight leaves in few hours from now but i am having problems settling the hotel bills and the hotel manager won't let me leave until i settle the hotel bills please i need you to loan me some money, will refund you as soon as i am back home.

Thanks.

Amy"

Now, I knew she wasn't in friggin' Wales but I e-mailed her husband just in case.  Nope, not in Wales.

Most people would have left it alone at that point, but...I'm a jerk.  So I wrote back.

"Honey of course I'll help!  Let me know what you need.  If you give me the hotel's number I'll call and get the room taken care of.

Star"

It's like a scammer's mating call. "I have money!  And I am willing to part with it!"

I was intrigued.  I had just offered money paid directly to the hotel - which was the problem the scammer claimed to have.  How would they sidestep that offer so they could get cash?

The next e-mail came within seconds:

"I am glad to hear from you, i am in a tight situation over here i just really need your financial assistants with getting on a plane back home, $1,650 is all i need more,you can get the money to me here using a western union, you need just my name as written on my passport and the location here, i can get on a plane in the next 3hrs if i can get the money, Its not just safe here, i am really freaking out.

Here's the details :

Name:Amy Winder

Location: 164 Malpas Road NP20 5PP Newport , United Kingdom

Amount: $1,650 Dollar

Kindly reply me with the confirmation number as soon as you are done with the transfer.  Thanks alot, i am really glad you can help and will surely get the money back to you as soon as i get back home.

Thanks alot

 Amy"

Yes.  You are horribly unsafe in the untamed wilds of WALES.  Girl, we live in New Orleans.  Sometimes Haiti is safer. (well...Amy defected to Jefferson Parish, but still).  I'm not impressed. 

Professor Google tells me you want me to wire money to a hotel while there is a bank with Western Union capability not far away.  Lets use this information.

I posted to Amy's husband's FB asking for fake Western Union numbers and he came up with pi.  I thought that was brilliant, so I sent this back:

"Sure, go to the Lloyds at: 42 Commercial Street in Newport .  The Western Union number is 314159265.

Are you flying out of Cardiff ?"

I don't give a crap where the scammer pretends to fly out of, but I did want to see what interesting lie they could concoct about the "flight in a few hours" when they were in a city with no airport.  Sadly, they sidestepped the question.

 The reply came back:

"Thanks, do reconfirm the mtcn number, it is nine digit instead of ten.

~Amy"

I was thinking that pi would be a dead giveaway, but apparently not.  You'd think an even BIGGER giveaway would be that I had no idea how many numbers were in a Western Union MTCN.  I was wondering if they were trying to trick me up, but again Professor Google confirmed there were 10 numbers in a Western Union MTCN (which I learned stands for Money Transfer Control Number).  So I looked up the 10th digit of pi and sent the following:

"Whoops!  Sorry, when I typed it in I left off the 3.  The MTCN is 3141592653."

At that point I had to go to lunch.  I sent the above at 9:04.  At 11:39 they sent:

"ii was unable to confirm the money from the western union outlet, can you send me the payment scanned receipt.

Thanks

~Amy"


They then sent the exact same e-mail at 12:02.  Since they had been responding pretty quickly before then and there was a two and a half hour gap I am PRAYING that they actually went to the dang bank to try to pick up the money.  Amy's gotten in touch with g-mail now so they probably wouldn't get any responses, but I hope I made some jerk's day a little darker."
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on November 03, 2012, 04:22:37 PM
I like your style, Starchasm.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on November 03, 2012, 04:36:24 PM
A side note. One you have a WU number, you can pick up the money at any WU office. You can also verify that the money is available by going ot the WU web site.

There are a number of websites devoted to baiting 419 scammers, which is where i learned this about WU. One of my favorite is the guy who was conned into making an obscene phone call to Buckingham Palace.

On a travel web site where I hang out, in the last year we've had two people innocently asking about how to get US dollars to someone who needs a "Basic Travel Allowance" to leave an African Country. There is no such thing. The victims were both victims of a sweetheart scam and thought they were assisting a long-distance lover to come to the US.

If you ever get a PM out of the blue on a web forum from someone who has seen your profile and just knows you are destined ot be soul mates--they are trying to lure you into this one, or other 419 versions.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Iris on November 03, 2012, 05:33:28 PM
A side note. One you have a WU number, you can pick up the money at any WU office. You can also verify that the money is available by going ot the WU web site.

There are a number of websites devoted to baiting 419 scammers, which is where i learned this about WU. One of my favorite is the guy who was conned into making an obscene phone call to Buckingham Palace.

On a travel web site where I hang out, in the last year we've had two people innocently asking about how to get US dollars to someone who needs a "Basic Travel Allowance" to leave an African Country. There is no such thing. The victims were both victims of a sweetheart scam and thought they were assisting a long-distance lover to come to the US.

If you ever get a PM out of the blue on a web forum from someone who has seen your profile and just knows you are destined ot be soul mates--they are trying to lure you into this one, or other 419 versions.

My favourite was the guy who scammed the scammer into *getting a tattoo* for a fake church... Definitely retaliatory rudeness and GoodIris agrees that it was a bit OTT but sometimes EvilIris needs her chuckles.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JenJay on November 03, 2012, 05:52:47 PM
A side note. One you have a WU number, you can pick up the money at any WU office. You can also verify that the money is available by going ot the WU web site.

There are a number of websites devoted to baiting 419 scammers, which is where i learned this about WU. One of my favorite is the guy who was conned into making an obscene phone call to Buckingham Palace.

On a travel web site where I hang out, in the last year we've had two people innocently asking about how to get US dollars to someone who needs a "Basic Travel Allowance" to leave an African Country. There is no such thing. The victims were both victims of a sweetheart scam and thought they were assisting a long-distance lover to come to the US.

If you ever get a PM out of the blue on a web forum from someone who has seen your profile and just knows you are destined ot be soul mates--they are trying to lure you into this one, or other 419 versions.

My favourite was the guy who scammed the scammer into *getting a tattoo* for a fake church... Definitely retaliatory rudeness and GoodIris agrees that it was a bit OTT but sometimes EvilIris needs her chuckles.

No way! Do you have a link? I need to read that!  >:D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Iris on November 03, 2012, 06:12:37 PM
A side note. One you have a WU number, you can pick up the money at any WU office. You can also verify that the money is available by going ot the WU web site.

There are a number of websites devoted to baiting 419 scammers, which is where i learned this about WU. One of my favorite is the guy who was conned into making an obscene phone call to Buckingham Palace.

On a travel web site where I hang out, in the last year we've had two people innocently asking about how to get US dollars to someone who needs a "Basic Travel Allowance" to leave an African Country. There is no such thing. The victims were both victims of a sweetheart scam and thought they were assisting a long-distance lover to come to the US.

If you ever get a PM out of the blue on a web forum from someone who has seen your profile and just knows you are destined ot be soul mates--they are trying to lure you into this one, or other 419 versions.

My favourite was the guy who scammed the scammer into *getting a tattoo* for a fake church... Definitely retaliatory rudeness and GoodIris agrees that it was a bit OTT but sometimes EvilIris needs her chuckles.

No way! Do you have a link? I need to read that!  >:D

http://419eater.com/html/okorie.htm (http://419eater.com/html/okorie.htm)

Warning: There were a few times when even EvilIris was squirming and thinking "Dude. Let it go, you've done enough"
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: NyaChan on November 03, 2012, 06:45:35 PM
 :o Wow.  That was masterful.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on November 03, 2012, 07:45:19 PM
The obscene phone call to Buckingham Palace. THE MR T EXPERIENCE (http://www.scamorama.com/mista-t.html). Since it was an obscene phone call, there is some indelicate language. But it is interesting to watch a scammer who genuinely thinks he's working with Mr. T.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hawkwatcher on November 03, 2012, 10:19:17 PM
I received an interesting email stating that I was an heir to Princess Diana's fortune.

hmm, you would think one of her sons would be a more logical heir, but what good luck to you! ;)

Then you will share with all of your eHell friends, I'm sure. Thank you.

Of course.  I'd be happy to share everything I got from Princess Di's estate.   >:D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: sunnygirl on November 04, 2012, 06:09:08 AM
I had a fun one recently. I don't even know what this woman was doing because her story was all over the place.

I was walking home from the station one evening, on the very busy main road I live on and a woman approached me because her car, which was stopped in a very quiet side road about 20ft from the main road, had "run out of petrol (gas)." There is a petrol station almost directly opposite the side road. She told me she needed to buy some petrol to get home, but the nasty people in the station wouldn't sell it to her as she'd taken her own container to be filled with petrol and they'd said it was a safety hazard, and that they would only agree to sell her a sealed container of petrol. So that's a Sweet monkey fritters! right to start with - her car was only a few feet away and could easily have been pushed to the petrol station if she only wanted to put a tiny amount in. Plus this petrol station is a supermarket with petrol pumps outside, not a proper like service station, and I don't think they sell sealed containers of petrol.

So it's this big story about how she tried and was willing to buy a small amount of petrol, but they'll only allow her to buy a big container and she doesn't have enough money for that, and can she please borrow some money because the eviiiiiil Tesco Express employees are forcing her to buy the more expensive item.

I very kindly offer to help push her car to the petrol station so she can fill it directly from the pump and thus put only a very small amount in it, without needing to buy an entire container. But oh noes!! She can't do that because she forgot her wallet at home. Oh but I thought you did have enough money for the small amount you originally tried to buy? Hmm forgetting your wallet and to fill up your car, bad luck!

I ask her where she lives, she says Putney (5 mins drive away). I ask where in Putney as I know it well, she says just off the high street. I tell her there are buses that go from the bus stop practically next to us to the high street, and that I'll wait with her for a bus and use my Oyster card (like a debit card for public transport) to put her on the bus so she can pop home to get her wallet.

For some extraordinary reason she prefers to decline my very generous and helpful offer and seek assistance elsewhere.  >:D



Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 25wishes on November 04, 2012, 09:22:31 AM
I do a lot with Craigslist (I put ads on for neighbors who do not have the internet). I NEVER enable email responses. If they are not offering you extra money for shipping (even on a $20 item!) they are harvesting your email address for spam.

 I once put an ad on looking for a seasonal rental and the scam I got was, rent my fabulous house for a low price PLUS have a part time job "processing" payments for the owner who is out of the country. No thanks.

I did once offer a free, very old printer on Freecycle and was contacted by someone about 1000 miles away who offered to pay me for shipping it to him. He did, I shipped it, it was legit. Still can't believe someone wanted it. Apparently he was using some MS-DOS program and this printer would work with it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: VorFemme on November 04, 2012, 09:49:00 AM
I do a lot with Craigslist (I put ads on for neighbors who do not have the internet). I NEVER enable email responses. If they are not offering you extra money for shipping (even on a $20 item!) they are harvesting your email address for spam.

 I once put an ad on looking for a seasonal rental and the scam I got was, rent my fabulous house for a low price PLUS have a part time job "processing" payments for the owner who is out of the country. No thanks.

I did once offer a free, very old printer on Freecycle and was contacted by someone about 1000 miles away who offered to pay me for shipping it to him. He did, I shipped it, it was legit. Still can't believe someone wanted it. Apparently he was using some MS-DOS program and this printer would work with it.

I had someone who needed that OLD printer and laptop for the 3.5" floppy drive - they were going to set it up to copy their 3.5" floppies to CDs and print off what they needed from the old files to the old printer.  They just hoped that the old equipment would hang on long enough to finish the job.

Their old legacy software was still working with their old legacy computer system - but it turned out that there was no way to export their old files to their new system (apparently someone finally got the boss to admit that a system older than 15 years needed to be updated because computers had gotten enough faster that they would make MORE money if the computers allowed them to be more productive). 

But the old data base had to be transferred somehow......
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Snooks on November 06, 2012, 02:48:07 PM
I thought this fitted quite well here
(https://i.chzbgr.com/completestore/12/5/27/D2I7-pDEIkyLK2te-299yg2.jpg)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Sirius on November 06, 2012, 04:26:44 PM
As an aside, I've got a computer that still has a floppy drive (not the one I'm currently typing on.)  I've still got a lot of stories I wrote in years past that are on floppies, so I need to get busy and transfer them to memory sticks or some other type of archive device. 

Back to the beggars, moochers, and scammers.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: mbbored on November 06, 2012, 07:24:55 PM
Hey guys! I just got a voicemail saying I won an 8 day Caribbean cruise for two AND 7 nights at a resort for six!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Adelaide on November 06, 2012, 08:01:50 PM
I know one guy (I eventually gave him the Cut Direct) who was a pathological liar. His parents were slightly well off, but that was because they had one child and both worked long, grueling hours. However, this guy bent over backwards to convince everyone around him that he was part of the leisure class. He was constantly trying to get freebies everywhere when he wasn't trying to convince people that he was rich. Examples include:

-I joined a gym that we were both looking at and he demanded that I open the door for him when he wanted to sneak in, so he wouldn't have to pay for a membership. (A registered key fob was the only thing that could open the door.)

-When we were out at a bar, he buttered up a professor (complementing his clothes/taste) and convinced the professor to buy him shots of ultra-premium tequila.

-He was constantly saying that he "didn't carry cash, only platinum" and so when we were somewhere and he had "maxed his card for the month" he would get a free meal out of one of his fraternity brothers. 

-Between paydays, he would run low on funds and so if I suggested a pricier restaurant (even ones that were normal for us to go to) he would say "Sure, if you pay for it" and then whine about how I shouldn't have suggested it. His rationale was always "But you have plenty of money!"

-Stuffing his pockets with free food whenever it was offered in the hallways at school

Examples of him trying to impress people:

-Telling everyone that his dad had an iPad two months before they came out. Of course, he really shouldn't have told me that his dad was technologically deficient immediately beforehand and only had a Blackberry.  ::)

-Buying his fraternity brothers pizzas. Apparently, when he pulled out his credit card and bought 10 $5 pizzas, this was all the proof they needed to see that he was "loaded".  Of course for months after he would ask for free drinks/food and bring up "That time I bought you all pizza".

-Griping about things like public transportation and whatever smartphone he had. (He broke smartphones like no one's business and would spend hours and hours hashing the details out with a sales rep until he could convince her/him that he deserved a new free one.

As you can see, he was bizarrely driven by what people thought of him, yet he was extremely cheep and obsessed with conning/mooching his way through college.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on November 07, 2012, 01:53:41 PM
  -Griping about things like public transportation and whatever smartphone he had. (He broke smartphones like no one's business and would spend hours and hours hashing the details out with a sales rep until he could convince her/him that he deserved a new free one.

As you can see, he was bizarrely driven by what people thought of him, yet he was extremely cheep and obsessed with conning/mooching his way through college.

That sounds like my late, great (to the company at least) CW Useless. He was forever trying to angle freebies, or refuse to pay for something, saying this wasn't done right, or that and so on.  He spent more time doing that than actually working so I'm really not surprised he isn't with us anymore.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on November 09, 2012, 11:55:32 PM
My friend got a really good one the other day.  An email from a 'concerned party', warning her about all of the email scams out there, so if she just sent them her information, they'd make sure she didn't get scammed by those other guys.

We were laughing so hard we almost wet ourselves.
I got one from the secretary of the "Nigerian prince" -- "My boss is really trying to scam you! But I think you're such a nice person, I really want to see you get your money."
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: mechtilde on November 10, 2012, 07:25:47 AM
Or the hotel touts hanging around outside a particular international railway stations who were sooo concerned for us, especially that we needed a nice safe hotel where we wouldn't get ripped off- unlike the hotels being offered by all the other touts. Yeah. Right.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Iris on November 10, 2012, 04:06:53 PM
Hey guys! I just got a voicemail saying I won an 8 day Caribbean cruise for two AND 7 nights at a resort for six!

Someone rang yesterday to let me know that my husband had won an all expenses paid vacation for TWO WEEKS!!

What a lucky bunch we are on Ehell!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: KB on November 10, 2012, 05:47:05 PM
A book was serialised on the radio last year chronicling the emails of someone who pretended to fall for a scam. It was one where you had to send your bank details and he spun the scammer out for ages, asking naive questions. I wish I could remember what it was called, as it was very funny as the scammer got more and more exasperated with him.

Not sure if your book was fact or fiction, but if you like this kind of thing, I highly recommend "Greetings in Jesus Name!: The Scambaiter Letters" by Mike Berry. They are the same stories told on http://www.419eater.com/ (http://www.419eater.com/) but with more detail.

Most people would have left it alone at that point, but...I'm a jerk.  So I wrote back.

I hate to sound like a nag, but that's really not a good idea. They have your name, your email address - and if they ever manage to hack your account, probably a lot more. If you want to play the scambaiting game, check the details on the 419eater forum and follow them to the letter. That includes getting a separate email address, only using it for scambaiting, making sure none of your real details are included, etc.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on November 10, 2012, 10:53:09 PM
I've won the Irish Sweepstakes 5 times. I guess my late ancestors have been playing for me and I keep forgetting to collect.

I figure that if we all collected all this money and gave it to Uncle Sam, we could abolish all taxes forever.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Starchasm on November 10, 2012, 11:04:09 PM

Most people would have left it alone at that point, but...I'm a jerk.  So I wrote back.

I hate to sound like a nag, but that's really not a good idea. They have your name, your email address - and if they ever manage to hack your account, probably a lot more. If you want to play the scambaiting game, check the details on the 419eater forum and follow them to the letter. That includes getting a separate email address, only using it for scambaiting, making sure none of your real details are included, etc.

They had my first name and my recreational hotmail account.  If they hacked that account I'd get another (and no, no possibility of getting any details from that account).  I don't do a lot of scambaiting, but I DO spend a lot of time online  ;)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: HoneyBee42 on November 11, 2012, 09:29:24 AM
Coworker of mine got one, but I'm not sure if she believed me.

Back in my relay days, we dealt with lots of people using the internet-based relay system for scams (yet oddly, no one seemed to want to go for confirming that one actually was deaf, hearing-impaired or speech disabled as a way of weeding this stuff out ... 99% of the internet calls were scams or stupid people who thought they were clever by trying to get the relay operators to read nasty perverted stuff).  Anyway, we did have criteria we could use to weed out the scams, and if you hit four markers, we could get the call terminated.  So she got this email that hit three markers right off the bat.

My coworker also does a sideline business of those 'have a selling party in your home' variety (not the only way to get the merchandise, but primary).  She gets an email from someone who has no credit cards and wants to send her a cashier's check for three of the most expensive item that she has in her catalog (that is, three identical items).  She kept corresponding with him, I don't know what she ended up doing ... but I did warn her that it smelled like scam and explained how the cashier's check could burn her.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: zyrs on November 11, 2012, 11:36:03 PM
My favorite scams and frauds website is Quatloos (http://quatloosia.blogspot.com/).
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MissRose on November 12, 2012, 07:00:41 AM
We have procedures for our sales queue if someone comes in using the relay system as some of them are using fraudulent details to sign up services.  Some of my co-workers have politely declined callers using that system as the communication works a certain way back and forth between the caller, the operator and the sales person. 


Coworker of mine got one, but I'm not sure if she believed me.

Back in my relay days, we dealt with lots of people using the internet-based relay system for scams (yet oddly, no one seemed to want to go for confirming that one actually was deaf, hearing-impaired or speech disabled as a way of weeding this stuff out ... 99% of the internet calls were scams or stupid people who thought they were clever by trying to get the relay operators to read nasty perverted stuff).  Anyway, we did have criteria we could use to weed out the scams, and if you hit four markers, we could get the call terminated.  So she got this email that hit three markers right off the bat.

My coworker also does a sideline business of those 'have a selling party in your home' variety (not the only way to get the merchandise, but primary).  She gets an email from someone who has no credit cards and wants to send her a cashier's check for three of the most expensive item that she has in her catalog (that is, three identical items).  She kept corresponding with him, I don't know what she ended up doing ... but I did warn her that it smelled like scam and explained how the cashier's check could burn her.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: sevenday on November 12, 2012, 01:25:16 PM
On a quick aside regarding relay services. I would be very careful about when/how you decline relay calls.  If the call starts and your criteria for 'scam' are being met, then yes by all means politely hang up.  But if you hang up before the caller even states what they want, it's really rather rude and you're shorting the company a chance to satisfy a customer.  Most relay services now require users to register with personal information before they can make calls.  This has cut down on scams - not entirely, but it has.  If a complaint is made to Sprint relay service for example, they can be compelled via police action to provide the registration information connected to the account that made the scam call.  I acknowledge some scams are still attempted, but I submit to you that many of those calls probably would have been scamming calls even if the caller wasn't using relay.

As a deaf person who uses relay, I cannot tell you how frustrated and angry I become when people simply hang up as soon as they hear 'relay' even though the registration system has been in place for years.  I honestly blame bad company training for this, because companies should be training customers in how to handle incoming relay calls, especially in medical-related fields like pharmacies and labs.  (I had a phone operator for a blood-draw lab actually start yelling at my operator about how relay calls were "NOT PERMITTED" and I "CANNOT CALL THERE AGAIN." caps hers.  I did complain but nothing came of it.)   
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: SheltieMom on November 12, 2012, 02:14:38 PM
Wasn't sure whether to post this here or in Special Snowflakes, but it seems to fit here best. I was at Walmart this morning, and trying to get everything unloaded into my car when 2 women approached me. I don't usually mind giving someone a couple of bucks, but her exact words were, "Can you spare a couple of dollars? I'm trying to get home and my Cadillac is out of gas." Yes, her Cadillac! I politely said no, and they went on. When I left the parking lot, I pulled into the drive through of a McDonald's, and they were in front of me, in a brand new Cadillac. I watched as they gave the guy at the window a fist full of $1.00 bills, and then, while they were waiting for their food, they dumped trash out of their car all over the drive through pavement.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Morticia on November 12, 2012, 02:36:57 PM
^ I'm tempted to say the Gross Out thread might be good for that one.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: v33ly on November 12, 2012, 04:06:23 PM
Wasn't sure whether to post this here or in Special Snowflakes, but it seems to fit here best. I was at Walmart this morning, and trying to get everything unloaded into my car when 2 women approached me. I don't usually mind giving someone a couple of bucks, but her exact words were, "Can you spare a couple of dollars? I'm trying to get home and my Cadillac is out of gas." Yes, her Cadillac! I politely said no, and they went on. When I left the parking lot, I pulled into the drive through of a McDonald's, and they were in front of me, in a brand new Cadillac. I watched as they gave the guy at the window a fist full of $1.00 bills, and then, while they were waiting for their food, they dumped trash out of their car all over the drive through pavement.

I won't deny anyone money based on driving a Cadillac.  A friend of mine had one that was a hand-me-down from a relative.  It sucked money for repairs worse than a junker. 

The rest of the behaviour?   :o
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on November 12, 2012, 09:01:34 PM
Back from a medical, hedge induced hiatus, but does anyone have any experience with randoms trying to add you on skype? My Dad has a very persistent one from Haiti. What is that about?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JenJay on November 12, 2012, 09:15:17 PM
Back from a medical, hedge induced hiatus, but does anyone have any experience with randoms trying to add you on skype? My Dad has a very persistent one from Haiti. What is that about?

Boobs, probably. And links to webcams that offer even more. For a fee, of course!  ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on November 12, 2012, 10:16:19 PM
Back from a medical, hedge induced hiatus, but does anyone have any experience with randoms trying to add you on skype? My Dad has a very persistent one from Haiti. What is that about?

Boobs, probably. And links to webcams that offer even more. For a fee, of course!  ;D

I will tell him that. My Mother may not be to impressed though.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on November 13, 2012, 01:02:09 AM
Back from a medical, hedge induced hiatus, but does anyone have any experience with randoms trying to add you on skype? My Dad has a very persistent one from Haiti. What is that about?

Boobs, probably. And links to webcams that offer even more. For a fee, of course!  ;D

Either that or confusion. Long ago I used to get guys on another chat client trying to add me, seemingly for dating purposes. They wanted girls in Alexandria, which I was... Virginia, that is. They were in Alexandria, Egypt. Bit too much long distance for me. :-)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: SDG31000 on November 13, 2012, 03:21:40 AM
I was scammed by someone that lives on the same street last year.  Her daughter was in the same class as my DS1 so I vaguely knew her and she gave me a sob story about her husband being away and her bank card being eaten by an ATM and of course it was an online bank and it had no branches she could get money from, and she had no food in the house as she had just defrosted her freezer...and so on.
So I gave her £50 I had in the house so that her children could eat. 
Then a mutual friend told me that she was due in court for sentencing after stealing thousands of pounds from an elderly neighbour, that she was known for "borrowing" money and never paying it back, and that her husband was at home.  Queue me being boiling mad and ashamed of myself for letting her con me.  I was so upset. 
She avoided me for weeks and in the end I managed to talk to her husband about the money and he gave it me back.  I have to say that anyone giving me the same story now would be given a bag of food and no cash at all.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Wulfie on November 13, 2012, 09:11:28 AM
Our news had a warning today about an active scam going on in our area.

http://www.king5.com/news/local/Online-scammers-target-179034711.html (http://www.king5.com/news/local/Online-scammers-target-179034711.html)

In short: Local soldiers are having their pictures stolen off the internet and being used in a dating scam.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hillia on November 13, 2012, 09:37:56 AM
Our news had a warning today about an active scam going on in our area.

http://www.king5.com/news/local/Online-scammers-target-179034711.html (http://www.king5.com/news/local/Online-scammers-target-179034711.html)

In short: Local soldiers are having their pictures stolen off the internet and being used in a dating scam.

Nothing new under the sun...there's an old 1960's era episode of Dragnet, where the scammers would get the names of deceased soldiers from the newspaper, then go to their parents/girlfriends with a story about how 'Bob' had asked them to deliver this special gift for them, only it had cost them so much to bring it back from overseas, and they had spent all their money...blah blah blah.  Sickening to think of people using the names of military men and women in this way.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shea on November 13, 2012, 06:15:53 PM
A scam that has been going around in my neck of the woods is teenagers/young adults calling elderly folks and saying 'Hi, Grandma(pa).  I'm stuck in (whatever) town and need money to fix my car.  Can you wire it to me?'  Then Grandma(pa) says, 'Is that you, Billy?' and the scammer now has a name to latch onto and manages to get the money sent.

Exactly that happened to my grandma. Some woman called pretending to be me, saying she was stuck in Alabama and needed money to get home. Grandma has dementia and does not remember where I live (which is nowhere near Alabama; not even the same country, in fact), but fortunately when she started lose it she signed control of her finances over to my father, who is an attorney. So when she called him to tell him I had called her from Alabama needing money, Dad obviously knew it was a scam. The most difficult part was calming Grandma down, since she really thought I was in trouble.

Right, try to steal money from an 86-year-old lady with dementia. Stay classy, scammers >:(.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on November 13, 2012, 08:01:35 PM
Not sure if this is the right thread, but just heard of the two brothers who scammed a guy out of his winning lottery ticket.  When I first heard the story about how one of the brothers waited 5 years to cash in the ticket to make sure his girlfriend is not staying for his money, I thought it was weird.  Who the heck would wait 5 years to be a millionaire?  So I'm both surprised, and not surprised by the update.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/13/andy-and-nayel-ashkar-lottery-scam_n_2123886.html
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: girlysprite on November 15, 2012, 03:18:45 AM
Last night me, my brother, his girlfriend and another friend were walking in the city to a restaurant. A thin and unkept guy approached us with the words 'Can I ask something? I'm not going to ask for money!'. We slowed down our pace. He explained that he was stuck here, and his wives backpack with their passports and creditcards are stolen (we rolled our eyes in unison) and my brother interrupted him and he said 'so you ARE going to ask for money!'. No no, the scammer explained - he had a few British pounds that he wanted to exchange with us so he could get to the embassy. brother's girlfriend suddenly recognized the guy and asked out loud 'but didn't you ask the same four months ago?'. My brother suddenly lights up and says 'Oh yeah, that was at the theatre, it was the exact same story!'. The scammer got really angry, stepped towards my  brother and yelled 'I'm going to break your nose!' And then he turned around and walked away. We were all kind of startled and flabbergasted.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: iridaceae on November 15, 2012, 06:11:10 AM
When I worked fast food we had scammers left and right. "Oh you forgot my tacos /burritos /nachos ". No we didn't.  We had one scammer who came in every day and said "I ordered a taco with extra meat yesterday but you forgot to put it on so put it on today. "  She apparently decided we were too stupid to remember or compare notes.

We eventually banned her for thus as well as one ir two other reasons ans she immediately went to aa acquaintance that happened to be a new hire and whined wh6yyyyyyyyy were we being mean. We were more than happy to explain.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on November 15, 2012, 08:39:29 AM
That reminds me of the time I was at a seafood fast food place and a woman stormed in saying they forgot her large order of hush puppies.  Nothing unusual about that except she looked at the rest of us customers very smugly and smirking.  There's no proof since I don't work there, but I sensed a scam.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Bexx27 on November 15, 2012, 09:25:13 AM
There is a woman who panhandles outside upscale grocery stores in my area. She has a baby in a bjorn and a binder full of pictures of her older daughter, whom she claims has a brain tumor. A year or two ago someone posted a thread about her on a local parenting board asking if anyone knew whether it was a scam. She and her husband started posting in the thread! Most of it was the sort of incoherent rambling you'd expect from someone suffering from psychosis. The gist was that we're all brainwashed by the government and the only people living genuine lives are those like them who go "off the grid." (I put that in quotation marks because posting on internet forums and maintaining a facebook page and a donation website strike me as activities for which "the grid" is required.  ::)) In order to live (their version of) off the grid, they can't have jobs or a permanent residence because that would make them slaves to convention or something. Instead it's the brainwashed masses' duty to support their family of 5 living in a hotel for $3000/month.  :o The husband still resurrects the thread every few months to post more incoherent ramblings.

To the extent that panhandling is a profession, this is also a candidate for the Professional Darwinism thread. No one who's read the nonsense they spout would ever give them money.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jules1980 on November 15, 2012, 10:56:37 AM
That reminds me of the time I was at a seafood fast food place and a woman stormed in saying they forgot her large order of hush puppies.  Nothing unusual about that except she looked at the rest of us customers very smugly and smirking.  There's no proof since I don't work there, but I sensed a scam.

When I was pregnant with BabyJ, I was working with 2 empolyees one night.  A young man and a woman about my age.

The young man volunteered to do the food run for us which was unusual since he was using his mother's car and only had permission to go to work and right back, since he apparently never had money to put gas in it.  But, hey, whatever.  We figured he needed a break since he'd been having a rough night.  So we gave him our money, and in her case, her debit card.  (We trusted him.  He'd never misused anyone's card before.)  And sent him off with a list to Taco Bell.  Well, it seemed take him an extra long time to get back. 

When he did come back, we opened our meals and he had an exact same item as each of us.  Right down to the add-ons and no onions.  Other co-worker noticed and made a joke that 'working with the pregnant woman was finally getting to him' since my order was rather bland to avoid heartburn. 

He just grinned and said, "Nope.  I don't have any money till payday and since ya'll order together, I figured I could go in with you two's receipts and tell them they forgot part of your orders and they'd give it to me for free. It worked."

We were flabbergasted.  Not that he'd actually done that.  He was forever bumming cigarettes and free food at work.  But he was proud of what he'd done!  And you know it wasn't the first time he'd done that or he wouldn't have thought it would work.  SMH.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MissRose on November 15, 2012, 01:44:24 PM
I remember one guy kept calling my grandmother in a nursing home, keep in mind she is in her 80's.  It is possible he was going to ask her for sensitive details to scam her in some way.  My mother and my aunt (her daughters) have her power of attorney over her financial assets due to age and health.

Guy: We can refinance your home and mortgage... going and on and on... (and Grandma cannot get a word in)

Grandma: I have no home, I live in a nursing home but you can pay for that instead for me.

Guy: *hangs up*

Grandma has said he hasn't called back since.  She has no idea how he got her number in the first place.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on November 15, 2012, 02:12:42 PM
Not scamming to get money, but:

First time teenage drivers complete a driver's ed course, and are given a completion card, and told to bring it into the local DMV to be issued an official permit.  Despite the fact that the card has red lettering on both sides: This is NOT a Driver's license or permit!; we periodically have the teenager who faithfully drives for at least 6 months (the minimum to move onto the next level) only to have the road test examiner inform them that they are not eligible.

Cue the frantic visit to the DMV: But I have been driving for 6 months!  You have to give me credit for that!  I can prove I logged my practice driving!  I have been driving!

That is when I have to explain that the central DMV's position is that if you have been driving on your completion card, you were doing so illegally, and they will not give you credit for breaking the law.  It can be crushing for a 16 year old to be told this, and I try to be gentle, even as I point out the fact that everything in the teen's hand that they received from the driving school warned them to go first to the DMV.

End BG, and enter my little scammer.  She happened to get a clerk who had just been written up for being rude to customers.  Rude Clerk was bending over backwards to help her.  Scammer had lost her original DMV permit, and needed to replace it in order to take her road test.  Rude Clerk had scoured the computer records, but could not find her.  We tried misspellings of her name, and transpositions of her birthdate.  No record. 

I am trying to figure out what happened, and I am going through the audit trail.  Mom is begging me: There must be some way to back date it.  No.  The only way, and the absolute ONLY WAY is to prove she received her permit 6 months ago.  I keep questioning the girl: "You absolutely did get it?"  Oh, yes.  Then mom would blurt in: "But if you can't find her, then there is some way to back date it?"  NO.

Mom is desperate, and Scammer is smirking at me, so I start asking different questions:  What color ink was the stamp that we placed on your permit?  Smirk: Black.  (We do not place a stamp on the permit).  I ask a few more trick questions, and Scammer proudly lies while her mom begs for backdating.

I had offered several times to issue her permit for the first time, but they both refuse,  I slide her paperwork back to her: You're lying.  Get out. 

There is a moment of silence while they look at me, and I smirk (not my finest hour, I concede).  Mom and Scammer crumple and leave.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Barney girl on November 15, 2012, 03:14:40 PM
Not sure if this is the right thread, but just heard of the two brothers who scammed a guy out of his winning lottery ticket.  When I first heard the story about how one of the brothers waited 5 years to cash in the ticket to make sure his girlfriend is not staying for his money, I thought it was weird.  Who the heck would wait 5 years to be a millionaire?  So I'm both surprised, and not surprised by the update.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/13/andy-and-nayel-ashkar-lottery-scam_n_2123886.html

As they've not been convicted and are pleading not guilty, wouldn't it be as we'll to drop an "allegedly" in there?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: squeakers on November 15, 2012, 03:34:07 PM
Not scamming to get money, but:

First time teenage drivers complete a driver's ed course, and are given a completion card, and told to bring it into the local DMV to be issued an official permit.  Despite the fact that the card has red lettering on both sides: This is NOT a Driver's license or permit!; we periodically have the teenager who faithfully drives for at least 6 months (the minimum to move onto the next level) only to have the road test examiner inform them that they are not eligible.

That is so weird because in my state you have to have the permit _before_ taking the course.  Once the course is finished if they are under 16 they have to have 6 months supervised driving time (parents) and then they get their full license.  (Unless they are 14 1/2: then they are stuck on the permit until age 16.)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on November 15, 2012, 03:51:18 PM
Oh, I tell you: the variation between states is enough to make me weep!  I do feel sorry for the customers.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: hjaye on November 16, 2012, 09:53:52 AM
A scam that has been going around in my neck of the woods is teenagers/young adults calling elderly folks and saying 'Hi, Grandma(pa).  I'm stuck in (whatever) town and need money to fix my car.  Can you wire it to me?'  Then Grandma(pa) says, 'Is that you, Billy?' and the scammer now has a name to latch onto and manages to get the money sent.

My mom got caught in that scam, or one similar in nature.  I didn't find out until about two years after the fact, but she got a call supposedly from my son (her grandson) that he was in Canada and had been arrested and needed money for bail.  She sent it and of course my son was no where near Canada nor was he in any jail.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on November 16, 2012, 12:21:55 PM
A scam that has been going around in my neck of the woods is teenagers/young adults calling elderly folks and saying 'Hi, Grandma(pa).  I'm stuck in (whatever) town and need money to fix my car.  Can you wire it to me?'  Then Grandma(pa) says, 'Is that you, Billy?' and the scammer now has a name to latch onto and manages to get the money sent.

My mom got caught in that scam, or one similar in nature.  I didn't find out until about two years after the fact, but she got a call supposedly from my son (her grandson) that he was in Canada and had been arrested and needed money for bail.  She sent it and of course my son was no where near Canada nor was he in any jail.

I like to think that my mother probably wouldn't go for anything like that, because if she got that call she'd immediately call me and say "WHY DIDN'T YOU TELL ME [CHILD] WAS IN A FOREIGN COUNTRY?"  :D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on November 16, 2012, 12:46:24 PM
A scam that has been going around in my neck of the woods is teenagers/young adults calling elderly folks and saying 'Hi, Grandma(pa).  I'm stuck in (whatever) town and need money to fix my car.  Can you wire it to me?'  Then Grandma(pa) says, 'Is that you, Billy?' and the scammer now has a name to latch onto and manages to get the money sent.

My mom got caught in that scam, or one similar in nature.  I didn't find out until about two years after the fact, but she got a call supposedly from my son (her grandson) that he was in Canada and had been arrested and needed money for bail.  She sent it and of course my son was no where near Canada nor was he in any jail.

I like to think that my mother probably wouldn't go for anything like that, because if she got that call she'd immediately call me and say "WHY DIDN'T YOU TELL ME [CHILD] WAS IN A FOREIGN COUNTRY?"  :D
One of my grandparents would probably say "Well, if you're in jail you probably broke a law. Deal with it."
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: wolfie on November 16, 2012, 12:58:27 PM
If my grandmother got a call like that she would be like "WHAT??? I CAN"T HEAR YOU! SPEAK UP!!!" and then eventually hang up because she forgot to turn up her hearing aid.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on November 16, 2012, 02:40:15 PM
When I had my business not a day would go by without someone requesting a donation or product for fundraising. I got heartily sick of it but would always be polite in declining their request. I wold have gone broke if I had given even close to the outrageous amounts some people thought would be reasonable. Some people used to get very snippy with me. A woman came in one day and basically demanded I contribute a gift basket for a raffle as part of their school fundraising night. I told her that wouldn't be possible and she became very unpleasant about it. After she left I rang the Principal of the school she said she was from to tell them I did not appreciate her attitude only to be advised they were not doing any fundraising.

Oh and I kicked out my useless housemates last week who seemed to think paying rent was an optional exercise and thought that getting a new gaming console pack and planning a holiday to Thailand was a higher priority than ensuring they had a roof over their heads. Yeah it doesn't work like that. Goodbye Moochers.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Outdoor Girl on November 16, 2012, 02:43:40 PM
Oh and I kicked out my useless housemates last week who seemed to think paying rent was an optional exercise and thought that getting a new gaming console pack and planning a holiday to Thailand was a higher priority than ensuring they had a roof over their heads. Yeah it doesn't work like that. Goodbye Moochers.

Glad to hear you are no longer a 'soft touch'!  Passing over some polish for that new stainless steel spine...
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on November 16, 2012, 02:46:20 PM
Oh and I kicked out my useless housemates last week who seemed to think paying rent was an optional exercise and thought that getting a new gaming console pack and planning a holiday to Thailand was a higher priority than ensuring they had a roof over their heads. Yeah it doesn't work like that. Goodbye Moochers.

Which housemate is this?  Is it one that you posted about before?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Pippen on November 16, 2012, 02:58:46 PM
Oh and I kicked out my useless housemates last week who seemed to think paying rent was an optional exercise and thought that getting a new gaming console pack and planning a holiday to Thailand was a higher priority than ensuring they had a roof over their heads. Yeah it doesn't work like that. Goodbye Moochers.

Glad to hear you are no longer a 'soft touch'!  Passing over some polish for that new stainless steel spine...

Not proud of myself as I kind of lost it. The red mist descended on me. I don't ask a lot of people and what I do ask is reasonable and not particularly onerous. Consistently failing to meet even the most basic requests or requirements when I go out of my way to help them makes me a bit punchy.  Heck the husbands "useless, wayward loser"(as they described him) younger brother came to stay for 4 days and during that time he did more helpful things around here than they had in 4 months. Thoroughly nice young man.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: snowflake on November 16, 2012, 03:12:23 PM
My grandmother's issues are more along the lines of her seeing a "miracle cure" and springing for it no matter what the cost.  She is nearly 100 and has many health issues making her miserable even though she is still mentally sharp and interested in life.  She will do anything to even have the body she had at 80.  Sadly, she's at the point where legitimate practitioners (both mainstream and alternative medicine) cannot help her as much as they would like to.

So she spends large amounts of money on snake oil.  We don't find out about it until her apartment calls one of her children to say that she can't pay her rent.  But she is still competent so our only alternative would be to just let her live with her actions and get evicted. As much as it is "her fault" we aren't about to let our elderly, infirm grandmother sleep under a bridge.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on November 16, 2012, 03:41:49 PM
I don't think I've told about this part of the story here yet....
bg/ One of my brothers is a Beggar, Moocher and Scammer. He is currently serving prison time for stealing prescription meds, using and selling them, stealing electronics and then threatening my sister's life when she turned him in. The family was hell-bent on giving him another chance, especially when he "married" his girlfriend (turned out to be a scam, she couldn't remarry because she was already married and hadn't bothered getting divorced) and they had a baby.  /end bg

Some time after he walked out on Baby Mama and their baby, he was on probation and he called my dad, frantic, because he was in Vegas and needed a ride home for an upcoming meeting with his PO. By this point in time Dad had wised up and curtly informed him that as he was breaking his parole, he could probably walk to any local police cruiser and request a free ride home. Apparently he did because he had to serve a little county jail time for breaking parole.

Did he learn? NO. After he'd been out for a month (if that) he messaged me on FB that he was stuck in Salt Lake City, he had no food or place to stay, he was cold and needed money and someone stole his phone. I messaged him I didn't have any money (I didn't, Boo Bear was an expensive little bundle). He asked again and I logged out, wondering how he was on FB if he was sleeping on the streets without a phone. He then called our grandparents, who had always been a soft touch, but they too were at the end of their rope where he was concerned; they offered to buy a one way bus ticket home, non transferable, in his name. When he found out "non transferable" meant he couldn't trade the ticket to someone for cash he angrily turned down the offer.

More recently, from prison, he wrote my SIL that he needed cash, when it wasn't deposited immediately he called her demanding to know where it was. He also wrote a letter to our grandparents on his birthday giving them details on how they could deposit his birthday gift money into his prison account.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: tjika on November 17, 2012, 11:04:16 AM
Just remembered a situation that happened when I was 17 (14 years ago) while reading this thread.

During the summer I temped at several jobs. One was at a food booth at a trucker festival. It was very busy. There was one guy who came back after finishing his food and said he had paid with $100 and I had shortchanged him. I remembered he had used a large bill, but I was positive I had not shortchanged him. This is what I told him. He insisted for a few minutes and then left.

Only looking back did I realize this was most likely a scam. If he had been serious he would have asked to speak to my boss and made much more of a fuss, because of the amount he claimed he did not get.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on November 17, 2012, 01:57:40 PM
...   Anyway, we did have criteria we could use to weed out the scams, and if you hit four markers, we could get the call terminated.  ...

When I first read this I thought it said " ... we could get the caller terminated ..." . 

I thought "Well, that's a little harsh maybe," but it did kind of get my hopes up there for a second or two.   ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: FauxFoodist on November 18, 2012, 12:00:10 AM
When I was 17-18 years old, I worked for a men's clothing store chain and happened to be helping out one day in a store where I didn't usually work (but it was in a nice area).  I also, up until I was about 39 years old, always looked younger than my years so, at that time, probably looked about 14 years old and an innocent/naive 14 years old.

Anyway, some guy walks in and heads directly for the pay counter at the back of the store (where I was).  Asks me to give him a $20 bill for a ten and two fives.  I thought was really odd (since people always ask for change, not a bigger bill, in my experience) so I involuntarily looked at the $20 bill an additional time before I handed it to him.

His hand took the bill, immediately went to his back pocket with it and, without missing a beat, pulls out a bill and says, "You gave me a $1 bill" (and he's holding this one dollar bill in front of me).  I know I hadn't and realized this guy was trying to scam me.  I looked him in the eye and said, "No, I didn't" and continue to meet his gaze (and he was a scruffy-looking guy who seemed like he was in late 20s to 30s).  He right away realized I wasn't going to budge, said sorry and high-tailed it out of there.  I did call the grocery store next door, I believe, to let them know some guy in the strip mall was trying to pull a scam, but that was as far as it got (and I never saw him again).  Stupid guy; I still wonder if he really thought I looked that stupid.

Don't circumvent the word filter please.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: otterwoman on November 18, 2012, 11:40:58 AM
In the late 1990's I used to manage a camera shop with a photo finishing lab. The lab staff would process the film, price the order based on the number of photos printed (so a roll of 24 pictures would cost less than a roll of 25 pictures) and box up the order.

We had a customer who was continuously missing pictures from her order. She would come back the next day complaining she was missing photos from her roll. (This is before digital.) We would apologize, then print off the missing photos and give them to her. After a few rounds of this, I conferred with the lab staff. It seemed that the missing photos were always nice shots of family or friends. Plus, missing random pics from a roll is very odd, you just print a pic, move the negative over one space and print the next. It would be more effort to skip negatives.

So we figured she was giving away the nice photos, then coming back the next day to scam some free reprints.

The next time she came to pick up her photos, I had her order marked for the sales staff to come get me. I approached her and explained that since she seemed to always be missing some photos, and I understood how annoying it was for her to have to drive back and wait for those missing photos to be made, that I was going to count each and every photo for her. Right now. In front of her.

I pulled out her negatives and counted them. I then pulled out the ticket to see it had the same number of prints. I then counted each photo printed out (while wearing my white cotton gloves, so I left no fingerprints). All matched in number.

I then told her that, see now you can be sure you have all your photos, and I'm so sorry about the problems in the past. Don't worry, we'll just count out everything from now on. This won't happen again.

And it never did.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Minmom3 on November 18, 2012, 07:27:42 PM
Brilliant!  and Polite, too!   8)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on December 17, 2012, 09:26:16 AM
We are not certain what is going on here, but it is odd.

BG: DMV in Michigan here.  We regularly get FEDEX and UPS delivery opf documents: car titles for vehicles purchased out of state.  Sometimes, checks are included.  The customer paid the out of state dealership everything, and the dealership cuts a check for our fees and includes it with the paperwork.  End BG.

The week after Thanksgiving, one of my clerks asked me if I knew anything about a check that she had run across in the drawer where we keep mailed in paperwork.  It was a check for about $5000, made out to an individual.  The check was from a pharmaceutical company in Massachusetts, and the individual's address (typed on the check) was in Georgia.  We assumed that the check had become detached from the paperwork, but we could not find any accompanying paperwork.  I set it to one side, intending to mail it back to the issuing company.

Not one hour later, I receive a UPS mailer.  Inside is only a check, made payable to an individual in Michigan for $4500, from a condo complex in Las Vegas.  The check form itself is identical to the one I already have, but they are drawn on two different banks.  I puzzle over this until I realize that this newest check was returned to us by UPS for being undeliverable (no such address).

This is weird.  It is our address, but the name is not us.  And since it is handwritten,  it is difficult to figure out the name.  I call UPS and talk to a rep, who says that they picked up the pachages at our office, but that these 2 were undeliverable.  No, you did not pick up the packages here, that I know.  I would have seen UPS picking up stuff.  I did ask if she could tell me the customer name, since I couldn't read it.  She starts to answer, and then puts me on hold for about 5 minutes.  When she comes back, she says they are sending a UPS guy to pick up what I have. 

Fortunately, when he shows up the next day, it is my regular UPS guy, just back from vacation.  He shows me that he has a third returned package, and he says, "What is going on here?  You never send anything out."  I show him what I have, and he picks them up to turn into UPS investigations.

Then we start receiving bills for all these UPS services.  It's obvious from the bills that UPS doesn't know the customer name either.  It is two words, and the second one could be: Hay, Hwy, Huy, Hug, Hey.  The bills total just under $1000.

And, as of last Wednesday, the bills keep coming, although now I just mark them refused - unknown at this address. 

So either the scam is a simple one: how to get UPS services for free.  But based on the identical checks from all over, I wonder if there is even more to this.  I'll probably never find out.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on December 17, 2012, 03:07:25 PM
This'll drive me crazy, pierrelunaire0! What is the scam here? Can we figure it out?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeBeret on December 17, 2012, 03:22:45 PM
It's probably the check scam.

Scammer contacts someone who's selling an item and says he'll send a check, asks seller to western union the difference.

Scammer uses a fake UPS number to send the check, and uses the return address of a real business. UPS tries to bill the fake number and it fails, so they bill the return address instead. Some packages are probably being sent to bad addresses, which is why pierrot is getting these checks.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on December 17, 2012, 04:09:11 PM
That has got to be the answer.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MissRose on December 18, 2012, 05:58:48 AM
A priest I follow on FB had to put out a message on his wall telling us that a fake page was put up using his name for fundraising purposes for an orphanage.  He said the page is reported, and that he would not put any fundraising requests on FB at all.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on December 18, 2012, 10:55:09 AM
I keep getting e-mails supposedly from the Royal Bank of Canada saying that my account has been compromised, and "please fill out your account details below so that we can verify them."   Nice try - I don't have an account there. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Outdoor Girl on December 18, 2012, 01:25:23 PM
^I get the same thing for CIBC or Scotia or TD.  I laugh and hit 'delete'.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: magician5 on December 18, 2012, 03:24:37 PM
"Your Paypal account has been limited..."

I get this message once a week or so.

Funny part? I have a dozen email accounts and get the same message in several of them, they all have internal links (like I'm going to click on a link in a message like that), and when I cursor over the link the little message at lower left says the link goes to some other site.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Winterlight on December 18, 2012, 03:49:14 PM
Unfortunately, the Mayan calendar hoax is in full swing right now. We're getting multiple calls a day from people who are terrified that the world is going to end on Friday. We do our best to reassure people, but when it comes to scaring kids, I get really ticked off.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Winterlight on December 19, 2012, 09:20:00 AM
A chap turned up at my door one afternoon syhaing he had been told to meet someone in my street re: getting a shipping order to send a car to Nigeria. He had been given the street name but no number of house, and a mobile phone number which rang out. Did I know anyone form Nigeria living on the street? I said no. Were there any persons of colour who did? Yes, but not from Nigeria. I told him to contact the police, and shut my door. I did an internet check, and it was a scam, pay me the money, and I'll arrange shipment. I wonder why he diid it, you can surely buy a car in Africa?

Depending on where it's going and what kind of car, it may well be cheaper to buy one and ship it there.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on December 19, 2012, 09:24:22 AM
I got a rather pathetic phishing e-mail this morning. It went on about how "you need to confirm your account" by clicking on a link. However, nowhere in the e-mail did it say what the account was supposedly for. Apparently, I'm just supposed to click in a pavlovian response.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on December 19, 2012, 03:16:26 PM
I got one that still has me scratching my head.  This person in a foreign country was going to be traveling a lot in my country and wanted me to make travel arrangements for him.  ??? ???
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: doodlemor on December 19, 2012, 04:27:20 PM
I was behind someone in the line at our small post office yesterday who was either a scammer or was caught in a scam, I think.  [Small town, small post office, those in line hear pretty much everything that is happening at the window.]

The employee at the window told the guy in front of me that the post master wanted to talk with him.  A few seconds later the man presumed to be the postmaster appeared with a large stack of mailing envelopes that had official looking address stickers on them.

The postmaster asked the man why some of the envelopes had different return addresses.  I'm not sure why that was important.  The man ahead of me said that these mailings were all from his new work-at-home job.  Then the postmaster told him that some of the supposedly prepaid address labels were genuine, and some were copies.  The man told the post master that all of the materials had been supplied to him by his job.

At that point the person behind me asked me a question, and I didn't hear the rest of the exchange.  I can understand the scam of counterfeit prepaid address labels, but I wonder why the return address was important.  I've heard that some of these work from home jobs are a scam in themselves, but I'm not sure why. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hijinks on December 19, 2012, 04:35:25 PM
I worked as a security guard in college.  Apparently on the phone system, if you dialed a specific combination of 2 numbers and then the pound sign (I forget what it was, so I will say 12#), it will transfer the call to an outside line and that caller can then dial whatever they like.

Someone had figured out that if they called the front desk and told the security guard that they were AT&T and were testing the lines, the guard would fall for it and they could get him/her to dial an outside line.  They were calling Kenya and talking for 20-30 minutes at a pop.

Finally I got them and told them that the jig was up and they hung up on me.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on December 19, 2012, 04:41:05 PM
I've heard that some of these work from home jobs are a scam in themselves, but I'm not sure why.

I saw a story about a woman who got scammed by one of those jobs.  Putting packages together and mailing them off.  She found out she was lucky they didn't arrest her even though she's a victim.  Packages were coming from her address.  I don't really understand the details of the scam either.

Oh!  I think there was also something about her paychecks being deposited electronically and that is part of the scam.  I don't remember much details though.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on December 19, 2012, 04:55:28 PM
I think the scam part of many of those work-at-home jobs is that the person must first pay the "employer" for all kinds of material or training upfront before they can make any money. Once the fees are paid they either never hear back from the company nor get paid for any work they do.

For the package lady, some of the items she was given to send might be illegal or controlled items but labelled as say vitamins or herbal supplements.

For the postal one: a valid return address would be important because when the fake prepaid label was discovered, the post office wants to collect and/or prosecute the offending party. They want to trace it back to who did it. I've heard of postal scams where the person writes the address of where they want it to go in the return address space then drops it into the post without any/enough postage -- the post office then "returns" the mail to that address marked "postage due".
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on December 19, 2012, 05:43:51 PM
Quote
I saw a story about a woman who got scammed by one of those jobs.  Putting packages together and mailing them off.  She found out she was lucky they didn't arrest her even though she's a victim.  Packages were coming from her address.  I don't really understand the details of the scam either.
People have begun to be wary of sending goods to some places like West Africa. So, let's say you are a 419 scammer. You order a case of bibles from an unsuspecting shop. (Bibles are very marketable in West Africa). Or, maybe it's iPads. You plan to pay with a bogus certified check. You don't want to give the seller a West African address, because the seller might be suspicious. You need a US or European address.

So, you recruit others with a work at home scheme. You come up with a convincing story about how you need people in the US to receive packages and resend them to your African/Asian/Antarctican address. The victim happily receives the packages & resends them. The scammer gets the goods before the seller discover that the check is phony. The mailer discovers that their paycheck is equally phone.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on December 22, 2012, 04:59:05 PM
Great news, everybody! I won last month's $1000 Target gift card sweepstakes that I didn't enter! They notified me by text, but I'm sure that's normal. Off to text the number they gave me to collect my winnings!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: SCAJAfamily on December 22, 2012, 11:05:00 PM
O good grief.  I was with my SIL last month when she received that text.  And was excited and convinced she won.  I warned her was probably too good to be true.  DOn't know if she listened...
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on December 23, 2012, 11:43:08 AM
Be sure to have your credit card in hand, ica171. They'll need it, you know, for um verification purposes. (And if you could have a zero balance on it they would very much appreciate that.)   >:D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Carotte on December 23, 2012, 03:38:04 PM
I've received a bunch of mails from our electricity supplier, telling me that my automatic payment didn't proceed, and a few from my bank telling me that there was a payment problem.
Little detail: I don't pay the electricity bill, my father does. That's not my bank... (and of course the grammar errors and all).
I've also received 4 or 5 "there was a problem with your account at bankX.com", for bank A,B,C and D, none of which are actually my bank  ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Seven Ate Nine on December 23, 2012, 04:42:10 PM
I have been getting some really fun ones lately (I'm on one of the public distributions at work... they're not coming directly to me, but to a public address that gets routed to me and a few other people).  Checking my spam box is the highlight of my day.  Apparently, Nigeria is paying repirations to those who have been scammed.  They have 5.6 billion dollars set aside for this action.  I can get about 2.7 million dollars out of it, but someone has filed a counter on my claim.  To collect my funds I only have to send all of my information, including all of my banking information.  Sounds legit, right?   >:D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on December 23, 2012, 04:58:04 PM
You know, I kind of long for those Nigerian "millions of dollars are yours" emails again. The current trend of bedbug assistance grosses me out.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: selkiewoman on December 23, 2012, 08:46:22 PM
And nobody seems to care about my erectile disfunction any more.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on December 23, 2012, 08:59:59 PM
Yep.  I still see a few, but not many.  The in thing now seems to be a "FedEx delivery" that was returned to the post office because their courier/postrider(!) couldn't deliver it.  ::)   There were 6 or 7 in my spam folder just now.

Oh, and sexy Russian girls who want to marry me.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on December 24, 2012, 09:54:13 AM
I frequent a forum that has tens of thousands of registered users. Every so often, some scammer runs a bot that sends a private message to every user who is logged on--which is usually hundreds of users. It's a sweetheart version of the 419 scam that happens on a lot of large message boards.

The PMs are from a lovely young lady who "saw your profile and knew that we were destined to be soul mates."  She asks to be contacted by email. The bot doesn't scan the profiles, so everyone gets the message, regardless of gender and whether or not the person even set up a profile.

People who have baited the scammers have found that the lovely lady usually has a relative who died and left a ton of money somewhere. She needs help getting the cash and will give a large percentage if you can help her.

Either that, or she really falls in love, but is massively unlucky. She lost her job and will be evicted if she can't pay her rent. Her mother needs an expensive operation. Her brother was arrested for speaking the truth about the corrupt government and needs a good lawyer.

If all goes well, she promises to come visit you. You'd be amazed at how much plane fare is, and there is some reason you have to send her the money instead of just buying the ticket. And there are horrendous fees for getting a visa--payable by bank transfer to a travel agency, not an embassy. She also has ot prove she has at least US$2,000 in her bank account. And so on.


Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: hjaye on December 24, 2012, 02:46:40 PM
I'm not sure what the scam was in regards to a phone call I got the other day, but I knew the person I was talking to was lying. 

I have two cell phones, one is personal, the other is my work cell phone.  I don't even know the number to my work cell phone.  I keep the phone at my desk at work set to forward all calls to my work cell phone.  My email signature has my desk phone and my work cell phone number in it, but I never ever use that number for anything.

I got a call on my work cell phone, the person said they were responding to a survey I filled out and it had something to do with a free job search site.  I answered a few of his questions mainly because I was curious to see if I could figure out what the scam was.

I tried to ask him exactly where he got the phone number from since I knew I had not filled out any surveys, and I most certainly would not have put my work cell phone down for any kind of contact.

He ignored me and just kept on asking me questions so I just hung up on him.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BB-VA on December 24, 2012, 04:28:37 PM
And nobody seems to care about my erectile disfunction any more.

Or the size of my naughty bits.

The ones I don't have because I'm a girl.

eta clarification
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Dr. F. on December 24, 2012, 06:55:27 PM
  Apparently, Nigeria is paying repirations to those who have been scammed.  They have 5.6 billion dollars set aside for this action.  I can get about 2.7 million dollars out of it, but someone has filed a counter on my claim.  To collect my funds I only have to send all of my information, including all of my banking information.  Sounds legit, right?   >:D

Good grief! It's meta-scamming!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: zyrs on December 24, 2012, 11:58:41 PM
I'm not sure what the scam was in regards to a phone call I got the other day, but I knew the person I was talking to was lying. 

I have two cell phones, one is personal, the other is my work cell phone.  I don't even know the number to my work cell phone.  I keep the phone at my desk at work set to forward all calls to my work cell phone.  My email signature has my desk phone and my work cell phone number in it, but I never ever use that number for anything.

I got a call on my work cell phone, the person said they were responding to a survey I filled out and it had something to do with a free job search site.  I answered a few of his questions mainly because I was curious to see if I could figure out what the scam was.

I tried to ask him exactly where he got the phone number from since I knew I had not filled out any surveys, and I most certainly would not have put my work cell phone down for any kind of contact.

He ignored me and just kept on asking me questions so I just hung up on him.

Pretty soon the questions you answered would have zero's him in on a perfect job for you that paid a huge salary.  You would have needed to send them a refundable fee to show that you were serious in applying.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hillia on December 25, 2012, 12:29:51 AM
i'm deep into Craigslist rental scams now.  We're moving very soon and I'm checking Craigslist for rentals; lots of property management places use it.  The scammers will steal pictures from a legitimate listing, then put up their own listing using those pics but with a ridiculously low rent.  If you contact them, you'll get an email telling you how they don't live in the city any more (usually they're building houses for orphans or something similar) but they can tell you are a wonderful, honest person - so they'll send you the keys and you can move in as soon as you send them the rent and deposit.

They get reported and removed pretty quickly  but it's still aggravating; this finding a rental business is very stressful and this doesn't help at all.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Otterpop on December 25, 2012, 01:05:25 AM
I was just contacted by a seller from Ebay.  Seems my immediate payment through Paypal was not good enough to get the item sent "quickly."  He needs money "now" in order to send it.  He wants me to send him my e-mail so he can give payment instructions.  He explained he did refund my payment and gave me good feedback as a gesture of good faith (I verified both)  But, ummm...I'm not leaving the protection of Paypal to wire money to some island to a seller with no feedback...

Transaction will be cancelled and he's going to get reported instead. >:(
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on December 25, 2012, 01:34:47 PM
O good grief.  I was with my SIL last month when she received that text.  And was excited and convinced she won.  I warned her was probably too good to be true.  DOn't know if she listened...

Yeah, I have to imagine if I did win something they probably wouldn't notify me via text. We only have the cell phone so I try not to give the number out, but it can't always be avoided. We don't get much spam usually, but the day after I got the Target message I got a message that I'd won a $1000 Best Buy gift card. I must be super lucky!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BabylonSister on December 28, 2012, 02:40:14 PM
Here's the latest (to me):


I've put an ad on Craigslist to sell a keyboard.  Previously when I had put ads I would get the "Is it still available?" email with an email address that did not even match the mail header and was probably meant to get my email address to spam me until the end of all eternity. Lately, I've been receiving "date" emails, usually with pictures of very attractive young women, and the email says "I'm a girl and I think you're hot." Oh yeah, sure, you do. I guess selling a keyboard must put me in the male category.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on December 28, 2012, 03:05:30 PM
I believe I handled this moocher very well (according to e-Hell standards).

I am known in my Freecycle group as a very generous giver, mostly of books and most of those new. (I run a literary website and am also a book design judge.) Well, yesterday I decided to go through my personal library and really clean out books that I know I won't read again or probably will never read at all. I ended up with forty of them. So I posted the list on Freecycle and also added some caveats:

Quote
I have a *lot* of books to give away in this post so I am going to ask that you read this before asking for any.

First, be absolutely committed to coming when you say you will. If you miss your appointment time I will go on to the next person on the list—and mark you as unreliable—without another thought.

Second, ask for no more than two books. I plan to spread these as far and wide as I can. What is left over, if any, will then be put into a second post a few days hence.

Third, I plan to allow sufficient time for everyone to see this post so expect a bit of a wait before you hear from me.

Fourth, because I am going to take some time in responding, I encourage you to look up the book(s) online to see if the story/subject really appeals to you. This will save everyone’s time.

Fifth, I live near the ___ and ___ intersection so plan accordingly.

And now, without further ado, here we go. There is a mix of hardcover and paperback, of fiction and nonfiction, of new and used. I will try to note them in my post. The books are listed in no particular order except for six I have reserved exclusively for public school teachers at the end. 

For some reason the post has not gone live yet but it has obviously gone out somehow (subscription?) because I got two emails. One of them is from a man, a retired lawyer and certainly better, far better situated financially than I am, who has gotten numerous books from me over the past several years. This time, he again jumped right on it:

Quote
Now:  I am interested most in the photo books,
YUBA SEASONS: IMAGES FRO THE WILD & SCENIC SOUTH YUBA RIVER
A THE LEWIS & CLARK TRAILS (AMERICAN LANDSCAPES)

I am most interested in the Lewis and Clark, as I have always been amazed and enamored by the adventure of those people.  I am reading the journals, albeit slowly and love the idea that traces of the trails still exist. 
If I were to get the YUBA book I will stare at it a while and then give it to my sister-in-law who is a very talented landscape and animal photographer.

The AKULE is pretty fascinating, too.  As is the FDR. 
Stop me, please.

So I am reading this and feeling myself growing angrier by the word. I cannot believe how selfish he is--and it seems to be getting worse. I fumed and fretted for a few hours while I ran errands, and when I came home I read it again. It still made me angry. So I debated what to do, then decided to make myself and e-Hell proud. I sent this:

Quote
I am going to be honest with you and tell you that I feel I have already given you more than I am comfortable with. Almost every time I post things you are first to contact me. This latest email is also over the top. Plus, I never see you give anything away, though I might have missed things.

I am not well financially, and I know you are. That's fine. You undoubtedly worked hard for what you have. But I would rather not give you any more things for a long time to come.

He has not yet responded and may not. I hope not actually. But even if he does I will not reply. I am (very) relieved and happy I stood up for myself in a polite yet firm way that let him know what I thought of his continued selfishness. And I feel good about it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Morrigan on December 28, 2012, 03:13:14 PM
I believe I handled this moocher very well (according to e-Hell standards).

I am known in my Freecycle group as a very generous giver, mostly of books and most of those new. (I run a literary website and am also a book design judge.) Well, yesterday I decided to go through my personal library and really clean out books that I know I won't read again or probably will never read at all. I ended up with forty of them. So I posted the list on Freecycle and also added some caveats:

Quote
I have a *lot* of books to give away in this post so I am going to ask that you read this before asking for any.

First, be absolutely committed to coming when you say you will. If you miss your appointment time I will go on to the next person on the list—and mark you as unreliable—without another thought.

Second, ask for no more than two books. I plan to spread these as far and wide as I can. What is left over, if any, will then be put into a second post a few days hence.

Third, I plan to allow sufficient time for everyone to see this post so expect a bit of a wait before you hear from me.

Fourth, because I am going to take some time in responding, I encourage you to look up the book(s) online to see if the story/subject really appeals to you. This will save everyone’s time.

Fifth, I live near the ___ and ___ intersection so plan accordingly.

And now, without further ado, here we go. There is a mix of hardcover and paperback, of fiction and nonfiction, of new and used. I will try to note them in my post. The books are listed in no particular order except for six I have reserved exclusively for public school teachers at the end. 

For some reason the post has not gone live yet but it has obviously gone out somehow (subscription?) because I got two emails. One of them is from a man, a retired lawyer and certainly better, far better situated financially than I am, who has gotten numerous books from me over the past several years. This time, he again jumped right on it:

Quote
Now:  I am interested most in the photo books,
YUBA SEASONS: IMAGES FRO THE WILD & SCENIC SOUTH YUBA RIVER
A THE LEWIS & CLARK TRAILS (AMERICAN LANDSCAPES)

I am most interested in the Lewis and Clark, as I have always been amazed and enamored by the adventure of those people.  I am reading the journals, albeit slowly and love the idea that traces of the trails still exist. 
If I were to get the YUBA book I will stare at it a while and then give it to my sister-in-law who is a very talented landscape and animal photographer.

The AKULE is pretty fascinating, too.  As is the FDR. 
Stop me, please.

So I am reading this and feeling myself growing angrier by the word. I cannot believe how selfish he is--and it seems to be getting worse. I fumed and fretted for a few hours while I ran errands, and when I came home I read it again. It still made me angry. So I debated what to do, then decided to make myself and e-Hell proud. I sent this:

Quote
I am going to be honest with you and tell you that I feel I have already given you more than I am comfortable with. Almost every time I post things you are first to contact me. This latest email is also over the top. Plus, I never see you give anything away, though I might have missed things.

I am not well financially, and I know you are. That's fine. You undoubtedly worked hard for what you have. But I would rather not give you any more things for a long time to come.

He has not yet responded and may not. I hope not actually. But even if he does I will not reply. I am (very) relieved and happy I stood up for myself in a polite yet firm way that let him know what I thought of his continued selfishness. And I feel good about it.

Sorry, but I don't see a problem with what he sent.   ???  If you're giving them away, posted to a list, there's nothing wrong with him asking for them according to the rules you sent - which he did.  I see nothing OTT with what he said to you.

The only problem I see is if he hasn't given away anything yet on the freecycle.  Otherwise, what's wrong with what he's doing?

I think that your message to him was rude, actually.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on December 28, 2012, 03:13:35 PM
I think I must be missing something important here, although I've read every word of your post twice.

Do you think he's selfish because he never gives away anything himself and that's why you are so angry with him?  Do you object that he's nearly always the first or one of the first to respond?  Or have you met him in "real life" and just find him to be sort of a jack donkey type guy and you just don't like him on general principles?

It honestly sounded to me like he was just letting you know that he was really especially interested in a few of the available books and wanted you to know he was genuinely enthusiastic about them. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on December 28, 2012, 03:17:11 PM
One of the things I requested was that no one ask for more than two books. He did. He's been out to my place several times. I know him. He thinks little of making comments about liking all the stuff I give away and he'll be happy to take all of it any time.

I don't see how I was rude to him. What am I missing? He has no consideration that others want books too.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on December 28, 2012, 03:29:50 PM
Quote
I've put an ad on Craigslist to sell a keyboard.  Previously when I had put ads I would get the "Is it still available?" email with an email address that did not even match the mail header and was probably meant to get my email address to spam me until the end of all eternity. Lately, I've been receiving "date" emails, usually with pictures of very attractive young women, and the email says "I'm a girl and I think you're hot." Oh yeah, sure, you do. I guess selling a keyboard must put me in the male category.
Just this morning I stumbled across a very technical article written by a Microsoft engineer.  Why Do Nigerian Scammers Say They are  from Nigeria? (http://research.microsoft.com/pubs/167719/whyfromnigeria.pdf)

His premise is that scam messages are deliberately written so that only the super gullible will reply. Since there really aren't that many gullible people in the pool of the zillion who receive the message, the scammers want the replies to be mostly valuable. The engineer says in his abstract
Quote
...the attacker faces a seemingly intractable Catch-22: unless he can distinguish viable from non-viable users with great accuracy the attacker cannot find enough victims to be profitable...
...Far-fetched tales of West African riches strike most as comical. Our analysis suggests that is an advantage to the attacker, not a disadvantage. Since his attack has a low density of victims the Nigerian scammer has an over-riding need to reduce false positives. By sending an email that repels all but the most gullible the scammer gets the most promising marks to self-select, and tilts the true to false positive ratio in his favor.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: hobish on December 28, 2012, 03:35:22 PM
One of the things I requested was that no one ask for more than two books. He did. He's been out to my place several times. I know him. He thinks little of making comments about liking all the stuff I give away and he'll be happy to take all of it any time.

I don't see how I was rude to him. What am I missing? He has no consideration that others want books too.

He asked for two books, and then said he likes a few more, with a humorous quip of "Stop me, please." I really don't know why you went off on him, and for having money ???  No one is required to give things away on Freecycle, though it may offend your sense of duty (?) His note really just sounded like he was being friendly, and you blasted him. I think i am missing something, too, still. I don't get it.


Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RingTailedLemur on December 28, 2012, 03:42:04 PM
Amara

I must be missing something too.

I can't see where his message was "selfish" or why you got so incredibly angry about it.  He only asked for two books, and very nicely too.

I am also surprised that you claim you cannot see where you were rude.  You had a go at him for asking for books you had offered, and you told him off for having more money than you.

I'm really confused.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on December 28, 2012, 03:48:03 PM
One of the things I requested was that no one ask for more than two books. He did. ...

Actually he did ask for just two books. 

Then he named a couple more as alternates, just in case someone else had already requested/taken his original choices.  His "Stop me .." phrase was just a joking way of letting you know that he thought you had some really good stuff in your list.  I'm pretty sure he meant it as a compliment.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on December 28, 2012, 04:12:10 PM
Okay, I accept that I was wrong. It's hard to hear but it's good to learn to see this situation as it really is rather than through my filters (which need a hard whack, I suspect).  :P  I'll fix it with him, and throw in an apology.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on December 28, 2012, 05:49:57 PM
We're always happy to help you re-calibrate those filters!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BabylonSister on December 28, 2012, 06:08:11 PM
Amara, maybe in the future you can add to your rules: "if you already got X number of books from me, please let other people have these."


And bless you for giving away books! What a lovely thing to do.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on December 28, 2012, 06:51:41 PM
Amara ~~  I also think that you're willingness to give away books is awesome!!  Most people would hoard them, even if they knew they'd never read them again, or they'd try to sell them and make a little profit. 

What a great treasure you're providing for others who love books as much as you do.  You are basically giving away joy, excitement, journeys, and sheer unadulterated pleasure ~~ and that's quite a gift!

It's possible that you misinterpreted this particular person's intentions and attitude.  (It's also possible that we did.  You've met him after all.  We have not.)  But even if you did, that doesn't make you any less amazing for what you're doing for others.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Winterlight on December 28, 2012, 07:04:01 PM
i'm deep into Craigslist rental scams now.  We're moving very soon and I'm checking Craigslist for rentals; lots of property management places use it.  The scammers will steal pictures from a legitimate listing, then put up their own listing using those pics but with a ridiculously low rent.  If you contact them, you'll get an email telling you how they don't live in the city any more (usually they're building houses for orphans or something similar) but they can tell you are a wonderful, honest person - so they'll send you the keys and you can move in as soon as you send them the rent and deposit.

They get reported and removed pretty quickly  but it's still aggravating; this finding a rental business is very stressful and this doesn't help at all.

I almost got stung that way. I was all ready to send the deposit/1st month's rent by Western Union (I know, I know) when my boss (who is an absolute darling) told me to go check the location out. Right now. Yes, I know we're at work- I'll give you leave. Go!

So I went, and I arrived at the location- to find a hotel, which does long-term stays, and a manager who told me in weary tones that someone had pulled pics of the hotel rooms off their site and was using them in their con. I gave him the emails, so they had a paper trail of his attempted victims.

I bought my boss lunch when I got back to the office. It was much cheaper than the $1600 I'd have lost.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on December 28, 2012, 08:30:31 PM
Quote
We're always happy to help you re-calibrate those filters!

Well, thank you. That's why I am here. My filters apparently need a lot of re-calibrating.  :P


Quote
Amara, maybe in the future you can add to your rules: "if you already got X number of books from me, please let other people have these."

And bless you for giving away books! What a lovely thing to do.

Thank you! I like your idea very much and think I will use it in the future.


Quote
Amara ~~  I also think that you're willingness to give away books is awesome!!  Most people would hoard them, even if they knew they'd never read them again, or they'd try to sell them and make a little profit. 

What a great treasure you're providing for others who love books as much as you do.  You are basically giving away joy, excitement, journeys, and sheer unadulterated pleasure ~~ and that's quite a gift!

It's possible that you misinterpreted this particular person's intentions and attitude.  (It's also possible that we did.  You've met him after all.  We have not.)  But even if you did, that doesn't make you any less amazing for what you're doing for others.

*blush* You're too kind. Thank you. All three of you have helped me not only reset my filters but my sense of right too. And that is very much appreciated.


Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on December 28, 2012, 11:32:38 PM
Amara, I can kind of understand where you're coming from. When I give stuff away on Freecycle, although it's supposed to just be to keep stuff out of the landfill I want things to go to people who need them before they go to people who can buy them but don't want to for selfish reasons. (There are unselfish reasons, such as the aforementioned keeping stuff out of the landfill or asking for a friend who can't or won't ask themselves--selfish reasons would just be not wanting to spend the money even if you can afford it when someone else can't.) I'd rather my old baby clothes go to someone who's going to use them to clothe their children, not sell them at the consignment store or on eBay. It seems that you want these books to go to people who couldn't otherwise afford to buy them, not someone that you perceive as seeing you as a way to get stuff for free. I have a feeling that if you knew this guy was a lawyer and this was the first or even second time he'd asked you wouldn't have been as upset.

Personally I wouldn't have sent the response email. I would have just skipped his name and then added the "please only ask if you've gotten fewer than X books from me" bit to the next email.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: AustenFan on December 28, 2012, 11:46:28 PM
I learned something from this thread, I thought Freecycle was an offer/accept site, I had no idea enough information was exchanged that one could judge another's finances, motivations and life to determine whether or not they deserve a persons castoffs.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on December 28, 2012, 11:50:52 PM
I learned something from this thread, I thought Freecycle was an offer/accept site, I had no idea enough information was exchanged that one could judge another's finances, motivations and life to determine whether or not they deserve a persons castoffs.

Stick around a Freecycle group with a moderator that lets sob stories and off-topic posts through. Be a member long enough and you can find out a lot.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hillia on December 29, 2012, 02:03:09 AM
I learned something from this thread, I thought Freecycle was an offer/accept site, I had no idea enough information was exchanged that one could judge another's finances, motivations and life to determine whether or not they deserve a persons castoffs.

Stick around a Freecycle group with a moderator that lets sob stories and off-topic posts through. Be a member long enough and you can find out a lot.

Also, Amara mentioned that she has dealt with this person numerous times, and he appears to be a chatty sort, even based  on the one email (we now know one of his sister's hobbies, for example).  So I can easily see how she would have gathered a lot of info about him during normal dealings.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: squeakers on December 29, 2012, 02:21:21 AM
I learned something from this thread, I thought Freecycle was an offer/accept site, I had no idea enough information was exchanged that one could judge another's finances, motivations and life to determine whether or not they deserve a persons castoffs.

Stick around a Freecycle group with a moderator that lets sob stories and off-topic posts through. Be a member long enough and you can find out a lot.

Also, Amara mentioned that she has dealt with this person numerous times, and he appears to be a chatty sort, even based  on the one email (we now know one of his sister's hobbies, for example).  So I can easily see how she would have gathered a lot of info about him during normal dealings.

That shouldn't matter a whit.  "Our mission is to build a worldwide gifting movement that reduces waste, saves precious resources & eases the burden on our landfills while enabling our members to benefit from the strength of a larger community."

That says nothing about whether one can afford an item or not.  The idea is to keep things from just being thrown away.

Now Amara can mentally/pc-ally block anyone she chooses from getting her stuff for whatever reason she chooses. And that is fine.  But she should make that determination on more than whether someone can afford said throwaways.

Because I can afford to buy a lot of crap.  But I prefer to buy stuff on sale, for free, or from friends. To recycle, reuse and reduce the amount of waste from my household and my community. Which is what Freecycle is all about.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Giggity on December 29, 2012, 08:20:27 AM
You judged his worth based on the amount of money you think he makes? I'm not comfortable with that.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Giggity on December 29, 2012, 08:24:03 AM
Amara, I can kind of understand where you're coming from. When I give stuff away on Freecycle, although it's supposed to just be to keep stuff out of the landfill I want things to go to people who need them before they go to people who can buy them but don't want to for selfish reasons. (There are unselfish reasons, such as the aforementioned keeping stuff out of the landfill or asking for a friend who can't or won't ask themselves--selfish reasons would just be not wanting to spend the money even if you can afford it when someone else can't.)

Freecycle is the exact opposite of how to go about ensuring that you like where your stuff ends up. If you want it to go to someone who doesn't have much, target that demographic: give your stuff to a shelter or similar.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Ticia on December 29, 2012, 10:01:18 AM
Let's move on from the freecycle debate, please. Amara has already acknowledged her mistake.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: bloo on December 31, 2012, 07:23:35 PM
One time we went to a McDonald's drive-thru to pick up some eats. The guy at the window had a very extroverted personality but I just got a feeling of hostility or condescension from him. My DH was driving and paid the guy with a $100 bill. Window guy counted out our change but had to go and get more change. He was gone several minutes. So my DH waited with his hand out in the exact same position as when Window guy gave the short-change. When Window guy came back he had our bags and tried to hand them to DH and say, "Have a good one!"

DH said, "You owe me another $20" and gestured with his hand that we were still waiting for our change.

Window Guy said, "Oh" and pulled a $20 out of his pocket and handed it to DH!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: mbbored on December 31, 2012, 07:37:10 PM
One time we went to a McDonald's drive-thru to pick up some eats. The guy at the window had a very extroverted personality but I just got a feeling of hostility or condescension from him. My DH was driving and paid the guy with a $100 bill. Window guy counted out our change but had to go and get more change. He was gone several minutes. So my DH waited with his hand out in the exact same position as when Window guy gave the short-change. When Window guy came back he had our bags and tried to hand them to DH and say, "Have a good one!"

DH said, "You owe me another $20" and gestured with his hand that we were still waiting for our change.

Window Guy said, "Oh" and pulled a $20 out of his pocket and handed it to DH!

Please tell me you then went in and told a manager.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Sirius on December 31, 2012, 08:16:15 PM
i'm deep into Craigslist rental scams now.  We're moving very soon and I'm checking Craigslist for rentals; lots of property management places use it.  The scammers will steal pictures from a legitimate listing, then put up their own listing using those pics but with a ridiculously low rent.  If you contact them, you'll get an email telling you how they don't live in the city any more (usually they're building houses for orphans or something similar) but they can tell you are a wonderful, honest person - so they'll send you the keys and you can move in as soon as you send them the rent and deposit.

They get reported and removed pretty quickly  but it's still aggravating; this finding a rental business is very stressful and this doesn't help at all.

Since we just bought this house I'm wondering if someone is going to show up and claim it's theirs.  Not that it's likely - we dealt with a very reputable real estate agent.  But who knows.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: bloo on December 31, 2012, 09:30:39 PM
One time we went to a McDonald's drive-thru to pick up some eats. The guy at the window had a very extroverted personality but I just got a feeling of hostility or condescension from him. My DH was driving and paid the guy with a $100 bill. Window guy counted out our change but had to go and get more change. He was gone several minutes. So my DH waited with his hand out in the exact same position as when Window guy gave the short-change. When Window guy came back he had our bags and tried to hand them to DH and say, "Have a good one!"

DH said, "You owe me another $20" and gestured with his hand that we were still waiting for our change.

Window Guy said, "Oh" and pulled a $20 out of his pocket and handed it to DH!

Please tell me you then went in and told a manager.

We were exhausted from a long drive. This place was in the middle of a loooong drive and our blood sugars had collectively tanked. But we've often regretted not telling the manager.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Margo on January 02, 2013, 08:48:17 AM
My most memorable scammer was one I had a few years back. I'm in the UK, and at the time (still now, although it's not as bad) there was a a problem with various gs and electricty companies 'switching' customers without their knowledge. The salesperson would call, ask about your gas / electricity bills and, under the guise of getting details in order to be able to send you offers, or details of how they would be a far better supplier, would get enough details to switch you to their company.

I had been doing some research and had decided to switch my supplier, to get my gas & electricty from one provider (many do a 'dual fuel' discount, so it is cheaper than having one gas and one electricty supplier). I'd decided which company, and which tarif, I wanted, but I hadn't got around to calling them to set up the switch. At the time, I was getting door-to-door salesmen several times a week, so I wasn't particularly surprised to open the door one evening to find a salesman from the company I'd already decided to switch to. I decided (after checking his ID) to let him in to hear what he had to say.

He took details of my enregy usage and told me that he would be able to get my costs lower (which I already knew) but didn't realise I could see that the numbers he was entering into his computer were lower than the ones I was giving him, so the result would be artificially low.

He then went into his speil about needing my details to let me have the full details and comparisons, and specifically told me that he was NOT switching me. I noticed how he had set up his clipboard so the clip covered the words ' contract for supply'. I signed, however, as I had already decided to go with this company on this tarif, before he ever knocked on the door.

At which point, as he got up to go, he asked me, chattily, what I did for a living. "I'm a lawyer" I explained "That's why I read what I signed" The conversation then went like this:
Him: "Oh"
"Er, perhaps there are one or two things I should mention"
Me: "Is one of them the fact you just got me to sign a contract, while telling me explicitly it wasn't a contract, and was for information only?"
Him : "Um. yes"
Me " And perhaps another was the bit about how the figures you gave me wen't based on the consumption details I gave you"
Him "Er, yes, that too"
Me: "Anything Else"
Him "um. no"

(Yes, I did call both the company, and local trading standards. Since I had the copy of the contract  I had, and was able to give them,  all his details.  I received a fulsome apology from the company, and they agreed to honour the (unrealistically low) figures he's given me, for the first year of my contract. I don't know whether he was fired or not, although I'm fairly sure that at that time it was something which all of the energy companies were actively encouraging their salesmen to do)

It made me better realize how people are caught out. I was 99% sure before he started that he was going to try to switch me, AND I have always been very cautious about signing anything, but he was VERY convincing .
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: kherbert05 on January 02, 2013, 08:58:48 AM
Got a voice mail saying there was a problem with my insurance payment and to call specific number with 12 hours or I would be cancelled.They made it sound I had to call that number not my agent. My payments are automatic. I called my agent. They checked there was no problem. Now I just need to find out how to report the fraud to the state.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: weeblewobble on January 02, 2013, 09:44:36 AM
One time we went to a McDonald's drive-thru to pick up some eats. The guy at the window had a very extroverted personality but I just got a feeling of hostility or condescension from him. My DH was driving and paid the guy with a $100 bill. Window guy counted out our change but had to go and get more change. He was gone several minutes. So my DH waited with his hand out in the exact same position as when Window guy gave the short-change. When Window guy came back he had our bags and tried to hand them to DH and say, "Have a good one!"

DH said, "You owe me another $20" and gestured with his hand that we were still waiting for our change.

Window Guy said, "Oh" and pulled a $20 out of his pocket and handed it to DH!

I posted a few weeks ago about one of the worst fast food drive-thru experiences I've had in a while.  The "highlight" was when I was owed $3.94 in change from paying with a $10.  The cashier, who I'd already had arguments with over what the menu actually said, gave me 94 cents in change, and then turned her back on me to talk to another employee.  When she turned back around to give me my drink, I reminded her that I was still owed $3 in change.  She acted put out and said, "Well, I've already closed my register." Meanwhile, her coworker was scrambling to hand her the register key to open it.

When she realized the coworker (and, I realized later, her manager) were watching, she started laughing hysterically and said, ""Yeah, I took her $3.  She caught me.  I'm trying to steal a whopping $3 from her." as if I was unreasonable for wanting me measly bit of money back. 

Overall, my experience was so bad, I am not going to write a complaint.  The manager and another coworker saw what happened.  I'm going to vote with my dollars and just not go back.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on January 02, 2013, 10:55:05 AM
My MIL doesn't use email much but she was initiated into the world of scams last week. 

BG: My ILs live with us.  We have an arrangement where I pay the utilities and they pay for food so we both put out about the same amount of money each month and aren't cut each other checks every month.  One of the utilities is our internet bill.  This particular bill is paid automatically each month and is current.  I have paid the bill forever and as far as I know, they don't even know my MIL exists, much less have her email address (it's one of the basic free ones...like yahoo, etc.).

One day last week, she was checking her email and came across one from our "internet provider," stating her bill was past due.  So she came to me and asked me if I forgot to pay the bill because she got that email and that I needed to give her my credit card info right away so she can make it right. 

It took some time to explain to her that it was a scam, it wasn't really coming from our provider and scammers were trying to get her credit card info. "But I don't even pay that bill!"  Uh, yeah, that's why all signs are pointing to phishing.

She was totally scandalized and had never heard of anyone doing that before.  DH had to make her promise to show him any other emails demanding payment before she filled out any forms because any legit request is not going to her yahoo account, it would come in the mail to our address.   I think I hit the point home when I told her about all of Yahoo emails I received for the alleged speeding tickets I got in upstate NY when I was really tucked safely into bed in IL. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: otterwoman on January 02, 2013, 11:16:32 AM
The NYS Thruway was the worst on trying to rip me off, but I couldn't avoid them! The toll booth workers were not expecting me to actually look at and count the change they gave me, even slipping in Canadian change. Fools! I can hear Canadian change when it hits my hand! Nice try! I always made them give me the correct change. (At the time, Canadian money was worth about 65 cents on the dollar, and they would discount Canadian when you gave it to them.)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on January 02, 2013, 11:29:20 AM
This may not technically be a scam, but I can't say it's honest.  I went to Target this weekend and saw a huge end-self full of "product" with large and small labels priced $2.50, yet the small print shows that price is for a different size which is nowhere to be found. 

There was also a label for $2.00 covering the regular price for potato chips.  But that price is for baked potato chips, yet the label is covering the price of the regular non-baked chips.

This happens frequently at this store and I have learned to read the labels and do self-scan before going to the checkout.  But it's really deceiving and I'm sure there are people who trust the sign or who can't read English.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on January 02, 2013, 12:43:19 PM
i'm deep into Craigslist rental scams now.  We're moving very soon and I'm checking Craigslist for rentals; lots of property management places use it.  The scammers will steal pictures from a legitimate listing, then put up their own listing using those pics but with a ridiculously low rent.  If you contact them, you'll get an email telling you how they don't live in the city any more (usually they're building houses for orphans or something similar) but they can tell you are a wonderful, honest person - so they'll send you the keys and you can move in as soon as you send them the rent and deposit.

They get reported and removed pretty quickly  but it's still aggravating; this finding a rental business is very stressful and this doesn't help at all.

Since we just bought this house I'm wondering if someone is going to show up and claim it's theirs.  Not that it's likely - we dealt with a very reputable real estate agent.  But who knows.

From what I have heard of this scam, it is not the real estate agent who pulls it, but some disinterested 3rd party.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on January 02, 2013, 12:58:54 PM
i'm deep into Craigslist rental scams now.  We're moving very soon and I'm checking Craigslist for rentals; lots of property management places use it.  The scammers will steal pictures from a legitimate listing, then put up their own listing using those pics but with a ridiculously low rent.  If you contact them, you'll get an email telling you how they don't live in the city any more (usually they're building houses for orphans or something similar) but they can tell you are a wonderful, honest person - so they'll send you the keys and you can move in as soon as you send them the rent and deposit.

They get reported and removed pretty quickly  but it's still aggravating; this finding a rental business is very stressful and this doesn't help at all.

Since we just bought this house I'm wondering if someone is going to show up and claim it's theirs.  Not that it's likely - we dealt with a very reputable real estate agent.  But who knows.

From what I have heard of this scam, it is not the real estate agent who pulls it, but some disinterested 3rd party.

Exactly - they pull pictures off of legit real estate listings, advertise it, take the deposit long-distance, and are in the wind by the time the renter discovers the scam.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Wulfie on January 02, 2013, 01:14:12 PM
Usually it is a 3rd party but sometimes it is the RE agent or someone in their office.

We have been hit before by a no-name RE agent who rented out one of our apartments for us and wanted us to pay a commission to them. Never mind that we do not use RE agents and they had no right or permission to rent out our units. They also rented it to someone with a HUGE criminal record who was not happy with us when they found out they could not live here.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on January 02, 2013, 02:39:19 PM
When she realized the coworker (and, I realized later, her manager) were watching, she started laughing hysterically and said, ""Yeah, I took her $3.  She caught me.  I'm trying to steal a whopping $3 from her." as if I was unreasonable for wanting me measly bit of money back.
Yeah, but you shortchange every customer who comes through your till, and it can add up to quite a bit at the end of the week... ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on January 02, 2013, 02:51:27 PM
This may not technically be a scam, but I can't say it's honest.  I went to Target this weekend and saw a huge end-self full of "product" with large and small labels priced $2.50, yet the small print shows that price is for a different size which is nowhere to be found. 

There was also a label for $2.00 covering the regular price for potato chips.  But that price is for baked potato chips, yet the label is covering the price of the regular non-baked chips.

This happens frequently at this store and I have learned to read the labels and do self-scan before going to the checkout.  But it's really deceiving and I'm sure there are people who trust the sign or who can't read English.

Hobby Lobby does this, too. They'll have a product on sale, and the product comes in multiple sizes or varieties. So they'll set up an endcap with a big sign that says "Product 50% off" and in tiny little print "does not include variety X." Nine times out of ten the endcap behind the sign is filled with variety X, even though there are multiple other varieties that are on sale that could have been placed there. I've seen this with multiple things, which is why I'm saying "product" instead of whatever. I notice it most with candles. I've told the employees that I find that practice misleading, but nothing changed.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Slartibartfast on January 02, 2013, 03:54:29 PM
This may not technically be a scam, but I can't say it's honest.  I went to Target this weekend and saw a huge end-self full of "product" with large and small labels priced $2.50, yet the small print shows that price is for a different size which is nowhere to be found. 

There was also a label for $2.00 covering the regular price for potato chips.  But that price is for baked potato chips, yet the label is covering the price of the regular non-baked chips.

This happens frequently at this store and I have learned to read the labels and do self-scan before going to the checkout.  But it's really deceiving and I'm sure there are people who trust the sign or who can't read English.

Hobby Lobby does this, too. They'll have a product on sale, and the product comes in multiple sizes or varieties. So they'll set up an endcap with a big sign that says "Product 50% off" and in tiny little print "does not include variety X." Nine times out of ten the endcap behind the sign is filled with variety X, even though there are multiple other varieties that are on sale that could have been placed there. I've seen this with multiple things, which is why I'm saying "product" instead of whatever. I notice it most with candles. I've told the employees that I find that practice misleading, but nothing changed.

I've had to argue with the Hobby Lobby cashier on more than one occasion over what is covered by the sale prices, too.  The sale will say "All [brand] beads and pendants" and the sign will be over a display of something that's reasonably interpreted as such (shaped metal beads, or pendant blanks) and the employee will try to tell me those items aren't covered by the sale.  One of several reasons I don't shop there anymore - it's just not worth the trouble.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on January 02, 2013, 04:26:29 PM
Usually it is a 3rd party but sometimes it is the RE agent or someone in their office.

We have been hit before by a no-name RE agent who rented out one of our apartments for us and wanted us to pay a commission to them. Never mind that we do not use RE agents and they had no right or permission to rent out our units. They also rented it to someone with a HUGE criminal record who was not happy with us when they found out they could not live here.

How on earth does the RE person expect that to actually work???
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: laud_shy_girl on January 02, 2013, 04:35:00 PM
Usually it is a 3rd party but sometimes it is the RE agent or someone in their office.

We have been hit before by a no-name RE agent who rented out one of our apartments for us and wanted us to pay a commission to them. Never mind that we do not use RE agents and they had no right or permission to rent out our units. They also rented it to someone with a HUGE criminal record who was not happy with us when they found out they could not live here.

How on earth does the RE person expect that to actually work???

They will have taken a non refundable processing fee from the potential tenant. So if they do get you to hand over the cash great, if not they are still making money. Very underhanded.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: weeblewobble on January 02, 2013, 07:19:27 PM
When she realized the coworker (and, I realized later, her manager) were watching, she started laughing hysterically and said, ""Yeah, I took her $3.  She caught me.  I'm trying to steal a whopping $3 from her." as if I was unreasonable for wanting me measly bit of money back.
Yeah, but you shortchange every customer who comes through your till, and it can add up to quite a bit at the end of the week... ::)

The "measly" was perceived on my part.  She made a few comments about I "must need a few bucks pretty bad" to make such a fuss over it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 02, 2013, 07:21:52 PM
We just got a Hobby Lobby in the area and so far I love it, and I like to look at the sign at the front of the stores to see what's on sale that week in the jewelry section so I know what to peruse.  When I went there this past Saturday, I was tickled to see that what I was there for (seed beads!) were 50% off, along with silver beads.  :)

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: bloo on January 02, 2013, 07:26:57 PM
When she realized the coworker (and, I realized later, her manager) were watching, she started laughing hysterically and said, ""Yeah, I took her $3.  She caught me.  I'm trying to steal a whopping $3 from her." as if I was unreasonable for wanting me measly bit of money back.
Yeah, but you shortchange every customer who comes through your till, and it can add up to quite a bit at the end of the week... ::)

The "measly" was perceived on my part.  She made a few comments about I "must need a few bucks pretty bad" to make such a fuss over it.

Off topic, but I remember being annoyed once when a cashier didn't give me back my penny.

A penny.

I've come to realize in my last few postings I'm somewhat territorial.

I've determined that if I was a dog, this is the type of dog I would be:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWPNKI24LFs

Back to your regularly scheduled thread.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Iris on January 02, 2013, 10:44:55 PM
When she realized the coworker (and, I realized later, her manager) were watching, she started laughing hysterically and said, ""Yeah, I took her $3.  She caught me.  I'm trying to steal a whopping $3 from her." as if I was unreasonable for wanting me measly bit of money back.
Yeah, but you shortchange every customer who comes through your till, and it can add up to quite a bit at the end of the week... ::)

The "measly" was perceived on my part.  She made a few comments about I "must need a few bucks pretty bad" to make such a fuss over it.

You know, I've never understood the stories you hear about customers demanding that workers be fired. I have always thought that they were massive overreactions. Not anymore. I am not so much amazed by her behaviour as by the fact that she continued to be rude in FRONT of her manager and the manager said nothing!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: weeblewobble on January 03, 2013, 09:43:25 AM
When she realized the coworker (and, I realized later, her manager) were watching, she started laughing hysterically and said, ""Yeah, I took her $3.  She caught me.  I'm trying to steal a whopping $3 from her." as if I was unreasonable for wanting me measly bit of money back.
Yeah, but you shortchange every customer who comes through your till, and it can add up to quite a bit at the end of the week... ::)

The "measly" was perceived on my part.  She made a few comments about I "must need a few bucks pretty bad" to make such a fuss over it.

You know, I've never understood the stories you hear about customers demanding that workers be fired. I have always thought that they were massive overreactions. Not anymore. I am not so much amazed by her behaviour as by the fact that she continued to be rude in FRONT of her manager and the manager said nothing!

It was such a downward spiraling meltdown that I don't think either of the other people in the drive-thru area knew HOW to react.  The change debacle, which ended in the rude attendant's coworker scrambling to open the drawer to hand me my change, was followed by Rude Attendant handing me my bag of food.  I checked the bag and saw my sandwich, so I pulled away, only to hear, "WAIT!"   Rude Attendant had put my sandwich on top of items that belonged in an order the other employee was putting together.  I had to hand my bag back to Rude Attendant so she could straighten it out. 

Rude Attendant shoved the bag toward me. I took it, without checking it (my fault), because I just wanted to get out of there.  The person, who I later realized was the manager, had this shocked, deer in headlights look on his face. Like he couldn't believe what he was seeing.  And when I got home, I realized that  Rude Attendant still ended up giving me the wrong bag.  I ended up with my sandwich, another sandwich, missing side items from my order, but with side items remaining from the other person's order. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: EMuir on January 07, 2013, 11:35:03 AM
Moochers of the year 2012: my brother and his family.  They are continually claiming to be poor because they spend their money on things for themselves (constant ordering out because they don't want to cook, for instance).  None of them are able to hold a job for very long, partially because they all think they're the best thing since sliced bread and the world should fall and worship at their feet.

My mother gives them very nice Christmas gifts (usually cash actually).  They actually gave her a Christmas gift this year too... one of those cards that, if you use your store credit card, you get $10 per $100 spent put back on this gift card.  But you have to use it in a certain week and I'm sure you have to buy a minimum amount. But my brother is at least supposed to take Mom to the store to do this shopping.  We'll see. So it means they spent $200 at this department store on themselves and got her gift for free(that doesn't sell ANYTHING they couldn't have gotten way cheaper at Walmart).

Mom's birthday is near Christmas, and she decided to take brother and family out for dinner.  They suggested a steakhouse.  She assumed they'd all order appetizers to share (poor naive mom).  Brother and family all ordered steak and lobster.

And they didn't give Mom anything for her birthday.  Not a card even.

If I was still talking to my brother he'd get an earful.  As it is I am glad I was there to hug Mom when she cried afterwards.





Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Emmy on January 07, 2013, 02:24:31 PM
When she realized the coworker (and, I realized later, her manager) were watching, she started laughing hysterically and said, ""Yeah, I took her $3.  She caught me.  I'm trying to steal a whopping $3 from her." as if I was unreasonable for wanting me measly bit of money back.
Yeah, but you shortchange every customer who comes through your till, and it can add up to quite a bit at the end of the week... ::)

The "measly" was perceived on my part.  She made a few comments about I "must need a few bucks pretty bad" to make such a fuss over it.

You want back the 'measly' $3 which is rightfully yours.  She is trying to steal the same 'measly' $3. 

I think she steals relatively small amounts from drive through customers because many of them take the money quickly and don't check it or they are in a rush and figure that amount of money won't break them so she can often get away with it.  It takes some nerve to act indignant that a customer would want their money back, no matter what the amount.  If she didn't get fired for that, I think it would be impossible to get fired from that restaurant.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: paige =^..^= on January 07, 2013, 03:14:47 PM
This may not technically be a scam, but I can't say it's honest.  I went to Target this weekend and saw a huge end-self full of "product" with large and small labels priced $2.50, yet the small print shows that price is for a different size which is nowhere to be found. 

There was also a label for $2.00 covering the regular price for potato chips.  But that price is for baked potato chips, yet the label is covering the price of the regular non-baked chips.

This happens frequently at this store and I have learned to read the labels and do self-scan before going to the checkout.  But it's really deceiving and I'm sure there are people who trust the sign or who can't read English.

Hobby Lobby does this, too. They'll have a product on sale, and the product comes in multiple sizes or varieties. So they'll set up an endcap with a big sign that says "Product 50% off" and in tiny little print "does not include variety X." Nine times out of ten the endcap behind the sign is filled with variety X, even though there are multiple other varieties that are on sale that could have been placed there. I've seen this with multiple things, which is why I'm saying "product" instead of whatever. I notice it most with candles. I've told the employees that I find that practice misleading, but nothing changed.

Yup! We went to Hobby Lobby for clear glass ornaments to decorate.  There was a huge display with a 50% off sign, and we grabbed 8 boxes.  When we finally got to the cashier, she leaned over to us and half-whispered that *these* glass ornaments were not the ones on sale.  The blue boxes were on sale, not these silver ones.  Not only were the silver ones not on sale, they were more expensive than the regular price of the blue ones. 

We decided not to buy them, and the cashier just nodded and mumbled something about them using both blue and silver boxes to make a pretty display, even though the sign didn't technically apply to both products.  I can only imagine the other customers' confusion, let alone the SS meltdowns the poor cashier must have seen that week.  Can't blame her at all for warning people about the price differences; the store's being sneaky and she's on the front line taking all the abuse.   :-X 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on January 07, 2013, 07:03:39 PM
My fantastic luck continues, you guys! Today DH and I got a letter that we've won two airline tickets anywhere in the continental US, up to $1300! The website of the company in the letter doesn't actually work or have any information, and if I google the number I find out that they want me to attend some sort of seminar, but I'm sure it's legit.

I'm pretty sure this is the first scam letter we've received via snail mail. I was surprised that scammers still sent letters, but then I realized that people are probably catching on to email scams or getting them filtered out, so my guess is this way has a better chance of snaring someone even if you do have to pony up for postage.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 07, 2013, 08:32:36 PM
I got the famous Windows virus scam over the weekend.  So I said 'I don't have a Windows computer.  Please take me off your calling list and stop trying to scam me.  Thank you so much.' Click.

Anybody else getting these 'Air Duct Cleaning' calls?  I got 3 or 4 calls in one day a while back.  I asked for a supervisor and got told 'My supervisor is dead.'  Really?  Take me off your flipping calling list.  I got one of those calls this weekend, too.  As soon as they identified themselves, I just hung up.  I'm done being polite.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on January 07, 2013, 08:51:28 PM
"Your company wants to clean my air ducts?  Honey, I'll pay you $5000 for every air duct in my house that you clean."  >:D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeEater on January 07, 2013, 09:16:00 PM
Moochers of the year 2012: my brother and his family.  They are continually claiming to be poor because they spend their money on things for themselves (constant ordering out because they don't want to cook, for instance).  None of them are able to hold a job for very long, partially because they all think they're the best thing since sliced bread and the world should fall and worship at their feet.

My mother gives them very nice Christmas gifts (usually cash actually).  They actually gave her a Christmas gift this year too... one of those cards that, if you use your store credit card, you get $10 per $100 spent put back on this gift card.  But you have to use it in a certain week and I'm sure you have to buy a minimum amount. But my brother is at least supposed to take Mom to the store to do this shopping.  We'll see. So it means they spent $200 at this department store on themselves and got her gift for free(that doesn't sell ANYTHING they couldn't have gotten way cheaper at Walmart).

Mom's birthday is near Christmas, and she decided to take brother and family out for dinner.  They suggested a steakhouse.  She assumed they'd all order appetizers to share (poor naive mom).  Brother and family all ordered steak and lobster.

And they didn't give Mom anything for her birthday.  Not a card even.

If I was still talking to my brother he'd get an earful.  As it is I am glad I was there to hug Mom when she cried afterwards.

Ohh, give her an extra hug from me. :(

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: DaisyG on January 08, 2013, 04:38:00 AM
I got the famous Windows virus scam over the weekend.  So I said 'I don't have a Windows computer.  Please take me off your calling list and stop trying to scam me.  Thank you so much.' Click.

My computer runs Ubuntu Linux. Someone phoned trying the Windows virus scam and told me off as they said all PCs run Windows underneath everything and I must not know what I was talking about.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: cicero on January 08, 2013, 06:10:23 AM
just heard this one the other day -  a co worker and i were kvetching about our aging parents etc and he said how you have to be so careful that they don't fall for scams. he told me that his sister works in an assisted living place with full 24/7 nurse coverage and emergency buttons in each unit that connected to their own medical team.

one day, she noticed that one of the clients had an added service - emergency buttons that called out to a "X service" (well known outside service). she asked the client why they had that and client said that the salesperson kept calling him and calling him and he didnt' know how to get rid of him so he got the service that he didn't need because he already had the same kind of service.

thankfully , this person was in a facility so my co worker's sister immediately contacted the client's son who not only got the father off the service but made them reimburse him.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on January 08, 2013, 09:24:11 AM
In the '90s, my dad was conned into paying extra for digital cable service when he only had an analog TV and the signals were all analog anyway. He paid for the cable company to convert the original signal to digital, send it to his house and then had a converter to change it back to analog. (I know 'digital' is the correct term, but not sure about 'analog'. Now, of course, digital has taken over, so this wouldn't happen.)

Then, Reader's Digest sent him extra notices about my subscription's being ready to expire even after he had renewed it, so for a year I got two issues. Fortunately, my name got misspelled from 'Luci' to 'Lucy' so I knew which it was. I never told him because I didn't want to embarrass him over a few bucks and knew his time was coming to an end. (That was 8 years ago, and I still get ads for 'Lucy' sometimes, so I know Reader's Digest has sold my name and address.) Reader's Digest also kept sending him stuff he ordered to get the free item and then forget to cancel. Once I just packed it all up, mailed it back to to them and told them what I thought of that practice. He did NOT get charged for those items, so I have to give them kudos for that! He never opened anything that came without asking me again so at least I didn't have to pay for the postage after that.

There was a lady who was renting a Princess Phone from a phone company since the '50s. When she died in the '90s, she still had the phone but was paying $2.50 a month for all those years. (That was a news story - I can't site the source.)

We noticed we were paying repair insurance on our phone lines through our phone bill every month, so I stopped it after about 2 years. Then 30 years later, we had a problem. The service representative was rather stern with me when pointing out that if the problem was in the home, we would have to pay for the service call, but if we had been paying this free repair item it would be no charge. I pointed out how long ago we had stopped the fee and that we never had a problem. so paying for the service call would still be money ahead. I simply said, "You do the math." His answer was, "Oh." ( I do realize that if we had, for example, a mouse probem, the fee would have been worth it.)

We were also paying for 'free' light bulbs through the electric company. My father-in-law was, too, and he loaded up on the allowed 'free' bulbs (which had had paid for, of course) he got occasionally and passed them on to us. I stopped that fee, and after he passed away, I started buying light bulds as needed. We were money ahead by the time the service was discontinued, even on our own.

These are all little things in the great scheme of preying on people, but they really do add up, and it really burns me. I often wonder what little things I'm missing now. Not all these are scams, but they really feel like it sometimes. Read the fine print!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on January 08, 2013, 10:17:59 AM
The Reader's Digest story remind me.  There was a series of magazines called True Story, True Confessions, etc.  One day, the magazine stopped coming.  Googling the title led to a forum where it happened to many people.  The company apparently went of of business or something, but they kept cashing checks for subscriptions right till the end.  There were no notices or warnings or refunds (some pre-paid for several years ahead).  They just disappeared off the face of the planet.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ACBNYC on January 08, 2013, 10:25:34 AM
I love Reader's Digest, but they send URGENT RENEWAL NOTICES constantly. Since I didn't remember when I had originally subscribed, I would occasionally write a check without looking at prior payments. I'm now paid up through 2016, as I wasn't renewing so much as extending!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on January 08, 2013, 10:35:55 AM
just heard this one the other day -  a co worker and i were kvetching about our aging parents etc and he said how you have to be so careful that they don't fall for scams. he told me that his sister works in an assisted living place with full 24/7 nurse coverage and emergency buttons in each unit that connected to their own medical team.
My parents are in such a facility.  The emergency calls are pullchains, hanging on the wall.  If a resident falls and breaks a hip or some such other emergency, they may not be able to reach the emergency signal. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 08, 2013, 10:38:38 AM
I love Reader's Digest, but they send URGENT RENEWAL NOTICES constantly. Since I didn't remember when I had originally subscribed, I would occasionally write a check without looking at prior payments. I'm now paid up through 2016, as I wasn't renewing so much as extending!

They all do this, and it drives me batty. I subscribed to Vanity Fair, last Jan, for 2 years. so my subscription is good through Jan 2014. Yet not three months after I first sent my payment in, I was getting these urgent notices taht my subscription was about to expire, blah, blah, blah,and I must take advantage of this fabulous deal. I've found that each notice, even though its in small print and you have to hunt for it, will tell you exactly when your subscription will expire.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Thipu1 on January 08, 2013, 10:43:21 AM
I love Reader's Digest, but they send URGENT RENEWAL NOTICES constantly. Since I didn't remember when I had originally subscribed, I would occasionally write a check without looking at prior payments. I'm now paid up through 2016, as I wasn't renewing so much as extending!

Ah yes, the LAST ISSUE or FINAL NOTICE notifications.  We get those all the time.

  It's humorous because these are services and publications to which we have never subscribed.  We know we are not being charged for them and we have never even heard of some of these things. 

MIL gets the Reader's Digest URGENT RENEWAL NOTICES on a regular basis.  this is odd because she was given a life-time subscription about 40 years ago.  They may be getting desperate.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on January 08, 2013, 11:28:26 AM
I love Reader's Digest, but they send URGENT RENEWAL NOTICES constantly. Since I didn't remember when I had originally subscribed, I would occasionally write a check without looking at prior payments. I'm now paid up through 2016, as I wasn't renewing so much as extending!

They all do this, and it drives me batty. I subscribed to Vanity Fair, last Jan, for 2 years. so my subscription is good through Jan 2014. Yet not three months after I first sent my payment in, I was getting these urgent notices taht my subscription was about to expire, blah, blah, blah,and I must take advantage of this fabulous deal. I've found that each notice, even though its in small print and you have to hunt for it, will tell you exactly when your subscription will expire.

I've also found that it's usually somewhere in the address block of both the notices and the magazines themselves. I always look at that now, and toss out any renewal notices that come before the last month of my subscription. :-)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on January 08, 2013, 11:35:07 AM
I can't remember which magazine it was now, but I remember getting an "urgent renewal notice" before I had even received the first issue of the magazine. It was paid at the time I subscribed so it wasn't like they were asking for the first payment, they wanted me to renew.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ACBNYC on January 08, 2013, 11:41:18 AM
I love Reader's Digest, but they send URGENT RENEWAL NOTICES constantly. Since I didn't remember when I had originally subscribed, I would occasionally write a check without looking at prior payments. I'm now paid up through 2016, as I wasn't renewing so much as extending!

They all do this, and it drives me batty. I subscribed to Vanity Fair, last Jan, for 2 years. so my subscription is good through Jan 2014. Yet not three months after I first sent my payment in, I was getting these urgent notices taht my subscription was about to expire, blah, blah, blah,and I must take advantage of this fabulous deal. I've found that each notice, even though its in small print and you have to hunt for it, will tell you exactly when your subscription will expire.

I've also found that it's usually somewhere in the address block of both the notices and the magazines themselves. I always look at that now, and toss out any renewal notices that come before the last month of my subscription. :-)

I learn something every day. :-) I'll have to look at the next issue. I'm only a bit peevish about it, since I would renew anyway. And I will say they were very nice when my mom passed away in September--I had subscribed for her every year as a Christmas gift--by transferring her unused dollars to my account.

I've also had the recent phenomenon of getting magazines to which I haven't subscribed and of course they want payment. Rolling Stone finally stopped sending me issues; I still get Sports Illustrated, Men's Health, and Women's Health.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on January 08, 2013, 12:01:01 PM
I had that with my Real Simple magazine subscription. Kept getting renewal notice letters about every week for the entire year subscription. I remembered when I subscribed so I knew right away that these were fake notices. I was so annoyed by it that I decided not to renew when the time came even though I do generally like the magazine.

It's like when I donated blood to the Red Cross a few years ago and then immediately (like the next week) kept getting pleas to come back and give more; both calls and emails about 1-2 times a week for a year. It took a month of me asking them to remove my phone and email addresses from their lists. Now, I still donate blood...to any organization except the Red Cross.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on January 08, 2013, 02:43:54 PM
Those people who call and say they are from Reader's Digest, and you have to resubscribe NOW because the price is going up to $60 a year -- they aren't from RD, they're a subscription service.  And the price of a subscription is still nowhere near $60.

I've also stopped taking magazines that try to trick me into extending my subscription.  One of them was Quilter's Newsletter Magazine, which I really liked.  But when they sent me a notice marked on the outside with OVERDUE:  SUSPENSION OF SERVICE NOTICE in order to trick me into opening the envelope in a panic, wondering what vital bill I'd neglected to pay, well, THAT is not something I will put up with.  I called the handy number and not only did NOT extend my subscription, I cancelled the remainder of the current subscription and demanded a rebate for the unused months.  I then bundled up the whole thing and sent it to the company CEO, asking if he was aware that whoever was handling subscriptions was pulling this kind of shenanigans?  I never got an answer.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hillia on January 08, 2013, 04:59:11 PM
Wejust bought a used car, and we've gotten several very official notices telling us that our warranty is about to expire, and just call this number to keep that from happening.  Of course the number is to a shady 3rd party warranty company that wants to sell you an overpriced, worthless contract.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 08, 2013, 05:13:02 PM
I get a lot of stuff, due to my large credit card debt, that LOOKS official, but really are from shady companies who want to try and get you to sign up with them, adn they can magically make a big chunk of your debt disappear! and they'll lower your monthly payments, yada, yada, yada.  Sorry, but I'm not falling for that. I'm just plugging away, paying it down every month....
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: hobish on January 08, 2013, 06:20:38 PM
Moochers of the year 2012: my brother and his family.  They are continually claiming to be poor because they spend their money on things for themselves (constant ordering out because they don't want to cook, for instance).  None of them are able to hold a job for very long, partially because they all think they're the best thing since sliced bread and the world should fall and worship at their feet.

My mother gives them very nice Christmas gifts (usually cash actually).  They actually gave her a Christmas gift this year too... one of those cards that, if you use your store credit card, you get $10 per $100 spent put back on this gift card.  But you have to use it in a certain week and I'm sure you have to buy a minimum amount. But my brother is at least supposed to take Mom to the store to do this shopping.  We'll see. So it means they spent $200 at this department store on themselves and got her gift for free(that doesn't sell ANYTHING they couldn't have gotten way cheaper at Walmart).

Mom's birthday is near Christmas, and she decided to take brother and family out for dinner.  They suggested a steakhouse.  She assumed they'd all order appetizers to share (poor naive mom).  Brother and family all ordered steak and lobster.

And they didn't give Mom anything for her birthday.  Not a card even.

If I was still talking to my brother he'd get an earful.  As it is I am glad I was there to hug Mom when she cried afterwards.

Ohh, give her an extra hug from me. :(

Me, too. That actually teared me up a little. Your poor Mom  :'(
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Otterpop on January 08, 2013, 08:43:23 PM
Moochers of the year 2012: my brother and his family.  They are continually claiming to be poor because they spend their money on things for themselves (constant ordering out because they don't want to cook, for instance).  None of them are able to hold a job for very long, partially because they all think they're the best thing since sliced bread and the world should fall and worship at their feet.

My mother gives them very nice Christmas gifts (usually cash actually).  They actually gave her a Christmas gift this year too... one of those cards that, if you use your store credit card, you get $10 per $100 spent put back on this gift card.  But you have to use it in a certain week and I'm sure you have to buy a minimum amount. But my brother is at least supposed to take Mom to the store to do this shopping.  We'll see. So it means they spent $200 at this department store on themselves and got her gift for free(that doesn't sell ANYTHING they couldn't have gotten way cheaper at Walmart).

Mom's birthday is near Christmas, and she decided to take brother and family out for dinner.  They suggested a steakhouse.  She assumed they'd all order appetizers to share (poor naive mom).  Brother and family all ordered steak and lobster.

And they didn't give Mom anything for her birthday.  Not a card even.

If I was still talking to my brother he'd get an earful.  As it is I am glad I was there to hug Mom when she cried afterwards.

Ohh, give her an extra hug from me. :(

Me, too. That actually teared me up a little. Your poor Mom  :'(

I think steam came out of my ears.  (My mom is deceased.  :'(  Treat her nicely while you can).
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Ida on January 08, 2013, 10:47:14 PM
We've been getting "renew NOW cheaper" notices regarding at least three of the magazines we subscribe to -- and we don't get all that many. We both thought the renewal prices looked high, and DH keeps an Excel spreadsheet of subscriptions* and due dates besides, so we don't take anybody's word on due dates.

Then our mags started running notices that there are fake subscription services that send these. The services seem to change their names often, but the mailings themselves look oddly similar.

Protip: DO NOT pay anybody but the magazines or their own services for subscriptions. You can find the relevant addresses and names on the mastheads along with those of all the senior dogwalkers' and poobahs emeritus, usually on one of the first few pages near the table of contents.


*Some are tax write-offs.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: AuntieA on January 08, 2013, 11:18:20 PM
I had a problem in the past with both Reader's Digest  and RN magazine (which I had taken on a 3-month trial basis) automatically renewing my subscription. I was then dunned to pay for said auto-renewed subscription. Unfortunately for both publications, in the province where I live (Alberta) *"negative notification renewals" are illegal. I was able to convey this to both publications and never heard from either again. I did have to threaten RN that I would direct my complaint to the U.S. Postmaster General about this, but it worked.

*"negative notification renewal" = if you don't tell the publisher you no longer want to subscribe, they will automatically renew your subscription.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Thipu1 on January 09, 2013, 07:52:21 AM
On the other side, Harper's Magazine prints a prominent 'Subscriber Alert' notice in each issue.  The notice warns subscribers against solicitation from unauthorized subscription services. 

Also, Harper's does not send out renewal alerts until the subscription really is about to expire in a month or two.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MissRose on January 09, 2013, 10:13:20 AM
Wejust bought a used car, and we've gotten several very official notices telling us that our warranty is about to expire, and just call this number to keep that from happening.  Of course the number is to a shady 3rd party warranty company that wants to sell you an overpriced, worthless contract.

I've gotten several 'warranty about to expire' notices about a car that has been dead for 10 years!
Yeah, like anyone would buy a warrenty for a 1990 car!

I have reason to believe those places are complete scams that send stuff out of the blue & word things in a way to scare people.  I got my extended warranty on my car the day of purchase and if there is any issue with it, I will visit the dealer first not reply to a mail to a place that may not be reputable.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on January 09, 2013, 10:14:02 AM
Some car dealers are just about as bad. "We need more used cars on our lot! We’ll buy yours from you for a good price!" trying to get you to buy a new one from them. I started getting those notices within months of buying my car.

The kicker was when I continued to receive ones that mentioned my exact car—two years after I had turned it in to that dealership at the end of the SmartBuy! (A thing GM did for a while that worked a lot like a lease, and you could relinquish the car at the end, but you technically owned it and could instead keep it and refi the remaining balance after the 3 or 4 years).
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: learningtofly on January 09, 2013, 10:17:25 AM
Newsweek sent renewal notices every few months for years.  I would buy two or three years at a time, so I'd check the expiration date and toss the notice.  They were still sending them, and I was considering renewing, when it was announced they were no longer printing.  I'll read it online for the time I have left, but I really like holding a magazine.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Kaymyth on January 09, 2013, 10:27:25 AM
I got the famous Windows virus scam over the weekend.  So I said 'I don't have a Windows computer.  Please take me off your calling list and stop trying to scam me.  Thank you so much.' Click.

My computer runs Ubuntu Linux. Someone phoned trying the Windows virus scam and told me off as they said all PCs run Windows underneath everything and I must not know what I was talking about.

I would've just started laughing hysterically.  Man, I would be the wrong person for them to target.  My husband is a Linux sys admin.   ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on January 09, 2013, 12:41:24 PM
A friend of mine got targeted by that Windows scam. She had a wonderful story:

The guy told her to sign on to her computer, hit this key, look at that screen, etc. etc.  She pretended to do everything he was telling her to do (she was actually sweeping the floor).  Finally, he asked "What do you see on the screen?"  She said "Huh - a warning message just popped up."  He was obviously not expecting that and asked "Really?  What does it say?"

"WARNING:  THE A****** ON THE PHONE IS TRYING TO RIP YOU OFF."

There was a brief pause followed by a very rude exclamation, then he hung up.   ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RebeccainGA on January 09, 2013, 12:52:34 PM
A friend of mine got targeted by that Windows scam. She had a wonderful story:

The guy told her to sign on to her computer, hit this key, look at that screen, etc. etc.  She pretended to do everything he was telling her to do (she was actually sweeping the floor).  Finally, he asked "What do you see on the screen?"  She said "Huh - a warning message just popped up."  He was obviously not expecting that and asked "Really?  What does it say?"

"WARNING:  THE A****** ON THE PHONE IS TRYING TO RIP YOU OFF."

There was a brief pause followed by a very rude exclamation, then he hung up.   ;D

Where's the LOVE button for this post? Language aside, this is the best way to handle these sort of scammers - takes away their time to harass others, and gives them no money.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: FauxFoodist on January 09, 2013, 01:07:57 PM
We noticed we were paying repair insurance on our phone lines through our phone bill every month, so I stopped it after about 2 years. Then 30 years later, we had a problem. The service representative was rather stern with me when pointing out that if the problem was in the home, we would have to pay for the service call, but if we had been paying this free repair item it would be no charge. I pointed out how long ago we had stopped the fee and that we never had a problem. so paying for the service call would still be money ahead. I simply said, "You do the math." His answer was, "Oh." ( I do realize that if we had, for example, a mouse probem, the fee would have been worth it.)

A few weeks ago, the heater in the house stopped working so DF called a repair company.  The rep got there early and since I was still at my house 25 minutes away, when I arrived at the house, rather than get there before the rep arrived, I got there just as the rep was doing paperwork with DF.

I walked into the house, and DF says, "I'm signing us up for a maintenance agreement that'll be $XX.XX every month, and it can be canceled at any time so it's not a contract."  Service guy (notice the change in words) "confirms," "Yes, the service agreement can be CHANGED at any time and, with this service agreement, you get two air vent cleanings 'free' twice a year and a XX% discount on repairs when your heater gives out, which it will be 'cause it's so old and dirty." :o  >:(

Red flags immediately went off in my head since I'd heard about scams when I lived in SD from someone whose elderly mother was talked into paying $XXX to have her vents cleaned when they didn't need to be (and weren't).  I looked at DF and said, "We need to discuss it first."

DF's face fell, and the rep offered, "I could go outside while you discuss it."  I said no and asked if we could fax the agreement to them should we change our minds.  The rep (I really was amazed he said this) then said, "No, if you fax it, then it just creates additional work for HR." (how HR was involved in this is beyond me so I figured he was a dumb-bunny who was pulling tales out of his butt -- anything to make the sale).  He also went through this whole spiel about how to return to pick up the agreement would cost the company extra money so it was in THEIR best interest for us to sign the agreement right then (again, couldn't believe someone trying to sell us something would think I would care that THEY would be "inconvenienced" to have to close the sale).

I stood my ground and, as soon as the rep left, asked DF to call his brother (who would know whether or not a maintenance agreement would be necessary).  I explained to DF that that is why I wanted to wait; I simply wanted him to check with FBIL and get his expert opinion.

FBIL said it wouldn't be a bad idea so DF called the service guy immediately and said we'd sign the agreement.  Fortunately (for us), the guy wasn't interested in coming back and said to go ahead and mail it in.  Well, upon closer reading of this agreement, I discovered that this was a CONTRACT and that there was a penalty for terminating earlier than one year (I pointed out that while DF said "cancel," the service guy said "change" -- he KNEW it was a contract and deliberately didn't correct DF's notion that there was no time commitment).  I'd also pointed out that those cleanings wouldn't be "free" as we would be paying for them every month.  I pointed out a lot of things wrong with the whole mess.  DF realized the next day that I was right and thanked me for not letting him proceed with the agreement.

The service guy really screwed his company out of future business because we'll never go back to them.
 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: hjaye on January 09, 2013, 11:26:23 PM
Talking about the service contracts made me think of these two things that are legitimate, but I think a little on the shady side the way the companies promote them like they are doing you such a great big favor:
Rental car companies, prepaying for the gas you will use so you don't have to worry about filling up the car when you bring it back, just bring it back empty.  They will tell you it's such a great deal because they are charging you a cheaper rate per gallon of gas.  They will point out how a gallon of gas in the local area will cost x.xx per gallon, and their price is x-20cents.xx per gallon, what a great deal!!!!
However, if it's a twenty gallon gas tank, they are charging you for twenty gallons of gas.  So say a gallon of gas costs 3.20cents, and they charge you for a full tank at 3.00 per gallon they will charge you 60.00 dollars.
However, very few people are going to be able to bring the car back with it just sucking gas fumes to get back.  More likely than not there will be a few gallons of gas in the tank.  So if you filled it yourself , and it took 18 gallons at 3.20 per gallon, that's 57.60 to fill the tank.  If you just have a gallon then it will cost you  60.80 so it cost you an extra .80 cents.  Personally I think there is a better chance of having two or more gallons left in the tank than bringing it back bone dry, and in the scheme of things five dollars, or ten dollars or even twenty dollars is not that big a deal, but it bugs me when they try to convince me about what a great deal they're offering.  Actually it's not, so even though most of travel is business related, and the company pays for it, and it would be a convenience for me to prepay, I refuse to do it.

The other one is the service contract for my cable or satellite TV service.  For just an additional 6.00 a month I can get a service contract so if there is any problem with the equipment, a service call will only cost me twenty dollars, other wise I have to pay the full price of 85.00.  I told one person who tried to sell me on this that the problem they had is that I knew how to do simple math.
6.00 a month was 72.00 dollars a year, a service call would cost me 20.00 so the first service call would actually cost me 92.00, as opposed to the 85.00 I would have to pay if I did not have the contract.  I would need to have two service calls in one year before it would be beneficial, I never take them up on it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on January 09, 2013, 11:34:27 PM
There was a lady who was renting a Princess Phone from a phone company since the '50s. When she died in the '90s, she still had the phone but was paying $2.50 a month for all those years. (That was a news story - I can't site the source.)
If she had been renting a phone in the 50's, then she was about the age of my MIL. She may have thought that she didn't have a choice, that phones were still hardwired into the wall. 

MIL was absolutely LIVID when we told her that she'd save money by buying her own phone instead of renting one from the phone company.  "Why would I want to buy a phone and pay them to install it, only to leave it behind when we move?"  We explained that she didn't have to pay installation or leave it behind. She blew up at us again for "lying to her", and I had enough.  "You walk over to the phone like *this*, you reach down and unplug it like *this*, you wrap the cord around it like *this* to hold the handset in place, you put it in a box and you take it with you."  And I unwrapped the cord, plugged it back in, and sat down again.  Took the wind right out of her sails!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 10, 2013, 08:48:41 AM
However, very few people are going to be able to bring the car back with it just sucking gas fumes to get back.

I managed it.  We got lost on the way back to the rental agency.  The low fuel light came on before we got lost.  When we dropped it off, I let them know that if their gas pump wasn't really close by, they might need a jerry can to put some gas in to get it there.   ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Just Lori on January 10, 2013, 09:27:11 AM
I just received a call from a heavily accented man who said his name was Bryan and he was calling from Windows Computers.  I've had a call like that before when the caller said there was a problem with my computer and they would need me to boot it up for them.  When I said I wanted to call my ISP, they hung up.  Anyhow, I didn't even give Bryan the chance to tell me about my computer problems.  Even if it weren't a scam, I wouldn't trust a stranger who told me to boot up my computer and give them access.

http://www.informationweek.com/security/management/microsoft-windows-support-call-scams-7-f/240005023
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Julian on January 10, 2013, 04:05:03 PM
My home number gets a lot of those 'you have a computer problem' calls, so both me and Housemate are well clued in to how to respond.  But a call I got a few months ago totally flummoxed me.

It was a lady with a very heavy accent, and the line was a bit crackly, so I did have some trouble understanding her.  It started off as a 'survey'.

L: "what do you think is best - breast or bottle feeding"  (well, I think that's what she said...  hard to understand her)
J:  "Umm...  the first?"
L:  "OK, now, if you chop down a tree with a kookaburra in it, will the bird die?"
J:   :o :o :o :o  "What?!"
L:  "If you chop down a tree with a kookaburra in it, will the bird die?"
J:  "No, of course not, the bird will fly away."
L:  "But what if it's wings had been chopped off?"
J:  "Seriously, what a silly question.  Is this some sort of prank?  Who are you?"
L:  "Just answer the question."
J:  "No, it is a very silly question and I don't want to answer any more questions.  I'm going to hang up now."
L:  <loud yelling of abuse>
J: hangs up.

Then the phone rang again.  Same woman.

L:  "How rude of you to hang up on me!!!  argle blargle blah blah more abuse"
J:  "Really?  And you're yelling at me like that to tell me I'm rude??  Don't call me again."  <hang up>

After the second call I was shaking and angry.  It takes a lot to get me to that stage, but this woman managed it.  I still have no idea what the point was.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Garden Goblin on January 10, 2013, 08:59:56 PM
After the second call I was shaking and angry.  It takes a lot to get me to that stage, but this woman managed it.  I still have no idea what the point was.

Probably to get you to say certain phrases, so they could make an edit tape of you agreeing to whatever service they had in mind to start charging you for.

For a while, dealing with a particular set of callers, I'd inform them at the beginning of the call that I was recording them and if they had a problem with that, they were welcome to have all correspondence be in writing.  It was amazing how quickly they'd hang up on me and yet nothing ever came in the mail.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on January 10, 2013, 10:41:48 PM
The other one is the service contract for my cable or satellite TV service.  For just an additional 6.00 a month I can get a service contract so if there is any problem with the equipment, a service call will only cost me twenty dollars, other wise I have to pay the full price of 85.00.  I told one person who tried to sell me on this that the problem they had is that I knew how to do simple math.
6.00 a month was 72.00 dollars a year, a service call would cost me 20.00 so the first service call would actually cost me 92.00, as opposed to the 85.00 I would have to pay if I did not have the contract.  I would need to have two service calls in one year before it would be beneficial, I never take them up on it.

Of course, if you suddenly develop, say, a mouse problem that makes it likely you'll need those service calls to fix nibbled wiring until you get rid of the mice, you can add it on until the mice have been relocated, then take if off again when you're back to not needing it. I actually had a CSR from my local service company suggest that once when we were having trouble and couldn't yet tell if it was at the street, or in the house. They suggested adding the plan right then, getting the service call, and if the problem were at our end, we'd be covered. If it was at their end, we'd only be out $2 for the month, and could cancel the coverage the next month.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 11, 2013, 11:51:41 AM
I just thought of this one, not so much a scam, but defintiely designed to take advantage of folks who might not realize it isn't really such a good deal after all.

A handfull of years ago, a certain car manufacturer was running a deal, no money down, and no payments for a year. At first glance, wow, great deal, right? Nope. Said brand of car didn't hold their value, so let's say you bought a car costing $20K, and put nothing down. And didn't have gap insurance.  You drive it for a year, make no payments, yay, but at the end of that year, car is now only worth, let's say $12-13K. But your loan is for 20. Something happens to it, insurance will pay you the value of the car, NOT what you owe.

I had a friend who just oculdn't understand why this was such a bad deal, as it, according to her "allowed you to get a car with no monies" well yes, but the better alternative might be to buy one that costs less, and fits your budget better.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: doodlemor on January 11, 2013, 12:55:24 PM
Regarding the gas rip off scheme........

A few years back I answered the phone to a telemarketer offering some sort of a gas card "bargain."  I told her quite truthfully that.....

"I never buy gas in the US, and I always pay cash."

The telemarketer got off the phone after that strange statement. 

This was true, and still is.  We buy our gas on the lands of the Seneca Nation.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: phred246 on January 11, 2013, 01:34:24 PM
In August (2012), I bought DD2 a laptop for her use as a college freshman.  I set it up for her in her dorm room.  She called me up after a week because the keys were not working right. I told her to call tech support, she did, all they told her was that she had to buy a software maintenance contract, on a week old system, under warranty! I went to her dorm (60 miles round trip), determined that the keyboard was bad, and that it was a known h/w issue with that particular brand! I drove back to the store I bought it from and requested a different brand  with the same features, even if I had to pay a bit more! I got a different brand, same price, took it back up to her, and set it up. It has been working just fine, so when I buy a new one, I will buy that same brand.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: FauxFoodist on January 11, 2013, 02:15:21 PM
I don't know if I could call this a scam, but the manager definitely tried to pull one over on me.

I used to live in north San Diego and would drive to visit a friend in northern CA.  I didn't have a car so I would rent one to visit him.  I usually went to the car rental agency near my work because a) they ALWAYS provided excellent service and b) it was more convenient to take care of the car pick-up and return during my lunch hour.

One day, I decided to do use the location near my apartment since it was just down the street and I was off from work the day I was to leave.  That company usually offered a rental special for the weekend for compact cars -- if you rented for Fri/Sat/Sun returning Monday, then the rate was $9.99/day with unlimited mileage.  With insurance (also $9.99/day for the compact), this was a great deal for me, and I didn't mind driving long distances so-o-o-o-o I rented the car to make a quick trip to northern CA to see my friend...about a 1,000-mile round-trip.

When I brought the car back, the employee checking in the car, I think, freaked out a little at the number of miles and referred my transaction to the manager.  This is where this location forever lost my business and became scammers -- the manager tried to convince me that the employee who checked the car out to me had made an error and gave me the wrong rate.  Yeah, right.  He tried saying this to me about 2-3 times.  I pointed out that it was a rental CONTRACT I signed and that the employee had provided it to me with the authorization of the company and said nothing more (the contract mention making it very clear to him that I knew EXACTLY what he was trying to pull, which was charge me at a higher rate or for the # of miles I drove the car).  Manager backed off, and I only paid my $60+tax that I owed them.

I never went back to that location, and I think I submitted a complaint on the company's website praising the location near my work and condemning the location near my apartment for what they just tried to do.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: snowflake on January 11, 2013, 02:19:08 PM
Regarding the gas rip off scheme........

A few years back I answered the phone to a telemarketer offering some sort of a gas card "bargain."  I told her quite truthfully that.....

"I never buy gas in the US, and I always pay cash."

The telemarketer got off the phone after that strange statement. 

This was true, and still is.  We buy our gas on the lands of the Seneca Nation.

About 20 years ago I was targeted by an car insurance sales company. I told them that I didn't have a car (I was in grad school and lived in a large city with good public transit.) They kept telling me that it was common for people without cars to buy the insurance first and I was being a negligent human by not paying for it.  At that point I figured it was a scam.

One day they called me up and offered me $50 of free gas if I bought their insurance.  I said, "I don't own a car and don't plan to buy one!  I don't want your insurance so please stop calling me!"

The woman said, "Well don't you want the gas certificate to fill up your riding lawn mower?"

The sheer inanity of that made me laugh for a good ten minutes.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on January 11, 2013, 02:47:55 PM

About 20 years ago I was targeted by an car insurance sales company. I told them that I didn't have a car (I was in grad school and lived in a large city with good public transit.) They kept telling me that it was common for people without cars to buy the insurance first and I was being a negligent human by not paying for it.  At that point I figured it was a scam.

One day they called me up and offered me $50 of free gas if I bought their insurance.  I said, "I don't own a car and don't plan to buy one!  I don't want your insurance so please stop calling me!"

The woman said, "Well don't you want the gas certificate to fill up your riding lawn mower?"

The sheer inanity of that made me laugh for a good ten minutes.

Wait.  WHAT?  That doesn't even make sense on so many levels! (And I know you know that but...WHAT?)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on January 11, 2013, 02:57:03 PM

About 20 years ago I was targeted by an car insurance sales company. I told them that I didn't have a car (I was in grad school and lived in a large city with good public transit.) They kept telling me that it was common for people without cars to buy the insurance first and I was being a negligent human by not paying for it.  At that point I figured it was a scam.

One day they called me up and offered me $50 of free gas if I bought their insurance.  I said, "I don't own a car and don't plan to buy one!  I don't want your insurance so please stop calling me!"

The woman said, "Well don't you want the gas certificate to fill up your riding lawn mower?"

The sheer inanity of that made me laugh for a good ten minutes.

Wait.  WHAT?  That doesn't even make sense on so many levels! (And I know you know that but...WHAT?)

I think that in California at least, a car dealership can't legally sell a car to someone without proof of minimum insurance coverage...so yes, those in the market to buy a car would set up the insurance first, buy the car and then drive it off the lot...sort of like needing the drivers license first, then buying the car. But it is ridiculous that she kept it up after you indicated that you were not intending to buy a car at all.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on January 11, 2013, 04:09:38 PM
Speaking of car rental places ... my family and I visited Orlando in March 2012.  Due to some flight delays, we arrived at the Orlando airport a few hours later than expected.  We were tired and hungry, and we just wanted to get the rental car we'd booked, find the house we'd rented, and get some food. 

The lineup at Hertz was very long.  When we finally reached a clerk, we found out why it was so long - he immediately tried to upsell us to a bigger car.

Him:  You only requested a compact.  That won't be enough room for all four of you and your luggage.
Us:  We'll make do. 
Him:  Wouldn't you like to have a bigger car?  We've got some really nice ones.
Us:   That depends - will you upgrade us for free?
Him:  Well, no.  It'll cost you an extra $x per day.
Us:  Then no, thank you.  We'll take the car we requested, please.
Him:  Are you sure?  The Blah car will be much more comfortable.

This went on for a good five minutes, despite us saying "no" over and over as politely as possible.  Meanwhile, we could feel the angry stares of everyone in the line behind us.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on January 11, 2013, 04:31:39 PM

About 20 years ago I was targeted by an car insurance sales company. I told them that I didn't have a car (I was in grad school and lived in a large city with good public transit.) They kept telling me that it was common for people without cars to buy the insurance first and I was being a negligent human by not paying for it.  At that point I figured it was a scam.

One day they called me up and offered me $50 of free gas if I bought their insurance.  I said, "I don't own a car and don't plan to buy one!  I don't want your insurance so please stop calling me!"

The woman said, "Well don't you want the gas certificate to fill up your riding lawn mower?"

The sheer inanity of that made me laugh for a good ten minutes.

Wait.  WHAT?  That doesn't even make sense on so many levels! (And I know you know that but...WHAT?)

I think that in California at least, a car dealership can't legally sell a car to someone without proof of minimum insurance coverage...so yes, those in the market to buy a car would set up the insurance first, buy the car and then drive it off the lot...sort of like needing the drivers license first, then buying the car. But it is ridiculous that she kept it up after you indicated that you were not intending to buy a car at all.

Oh, it's like that here in IL too but at least you're in the market for a car, have a make and model to work with and are usually thisclose to signing off on everything.  And you usually contact the insurance company to initiate the policy.  I can't believe they think anyone would fall for the "Well, I might have a car someday, so I really should just get insurance now." line.  I wonder how many did.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on January 11, 2013, 04:38:38 PM
During a vacation in Cancun, there were people at the airport in official looking booths selling tours at a discount.  When we got to the hotel for the welcome meeting, they warned guests those are scams and if anyone brought a tour to see them.  Luckily I talked my companions out of listening because we were late for the bus to the hotel.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: magician5 on January 11, 2013, 09:47:10 PM
Sitting at my desk today, not a care in the world. Phone rings. It's a robot. "This is our LAST ATTEMPT to contact you regarding your winning entry to win a BRAND NEW SUV" ... I hung up.

[pause ... pause...] I started to think "HOW BLEEDIN' STUPID DO THEY THINK..." and then my brain broke. Really, broke right in two.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: mumma to KMC on January 12, 2013, 09:25:43 PM
Mooch: My in-laws bought a house to use as a rental for BIL1 (convicted felon, couldn't live in certain areas due to his conviction). BIL1 ended up back in jail and BIL2 had just been evicted from his rental and moved in. Neither of them paid rent the entire time they were living there. BIL2 ended up getting married and his wife moved in with their daughter (long story) and they ended up having two more children before BIL1 was released from jail. BIL2 and his wife were asked to move out (after not paying rent for 3 years) so that BIL1 could move back in. SIL got upset and phoned the police, making up a parole violation about BIL1, so that they could keep living there rent free. (This whole thing was fun to watch from afar, I will assure you that.)

Beggars/scammer: BIL1, prior to being sent to jail in the first place, called my dh's (then DF) phone at midnight to inform him that their father wanted the money lent to my dh back. (DH was fresh out of school and had a small car repair that needed to be done between paydays and didn't want to put it on his credit card, so he asked his dad for a loan of $150 to cover for a few days.) How BIL1 knew about the loan in the first place is beyond me, and FIL had no idea why the heck BIL1 would be making that call, at midnight, no less. I think that BIL1 heard the exchange between FIL and my dh and was upset that FIL would not lend him any money, so while in an "altered state" placed the call.

Scammers: When we first bought our house, we needed to have a landline to have internet, so we had one installed and plugged a phone in, for ER use only. (It cost $.10 a minute to call out on it; incoming calls were free.) From time to time, my dh would call the house line, mainly to get a hold of me, b/c I wasn't answering my cell (because I didn't hear it), but mainly the calls were for a certain family who had a hard time paying their bills. The calls would come in not daily, but weekly from bill collectors and were fairly annoying and I usually let them go to the answering machine. I suspected they were still giving out our # as theirs when we started getting new calls from different collection agencies, a year after we moved in.   I managed to confirm this with an insurance agent, who said that they were just given the number a few weeks back and with the bail bondsman who said that it was the number given when they signed the bond form.  We switched ISP over the summer, so who knows who is getting these calls now. :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: heartmug on January 14, 2013, 12:23:46 PM
Scamming SIL has struck again.  Just when we think she can't think up a new one......

This morning she has a facebook invite "Come see off my parents before their big trip and say hi to my brother" was basicially the title of the invite.  This is a big deal anniversary trip for his parents that they have been talking about forever and finally get to take.  DH will  happen to be in town next month for business and decided to spend the weekend with them and then take them to the airport.  So SIL takes it upon herself to throw a party that Sunday at a place where everyone will pay for themselves and when you open the invitiation, oh by the way, it will be just a few days before her daughter's birthday so they will be celebrating that too.  She is the queen at hinting for gifts.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on January 14, 2013, 12:34:45 PM
^^^  My, wouldn't it be just so sad if no one shows up is able to come to her party?   ::)

Is there any way you can persuade your DH to take them to the airport early or something so they won't be there?   >:D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: heartmug on January 14, 2013, 03:23:24 PM
^^^  My, wouldn't it be just so sad if no one shows up is able to come to her party?   ::)

Is there any way you can persuade your DH to take them to the airport early or something so they won't be there?   >:D

I like your idea.  Maybe.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on January 14, 2013, 03:29:40 PM
Just out of curiosity, what do your parents in law think of this SIL's party plan?

I would think the very last thing I'd want to do the night before venturing on my "trip of a lifetime" would be to attend a party, even if it was in my honor!   Maybe especially if!  I'd just want to double check to be sure I'd packed everything, have my ID and passport ready and where I can't forget it, have arranged for my mail to be held or delivered elsewhere during my absence, etc. 

I would not want to be around of bunch of other people keeping me up too late so that I couldn't start the day refreshed!  :(
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: snowflake on January 14, 2013, 05:54:03 PM

About 20 years ago I was targeted by an car insurance sales company. I told them that I didn't have a car (I was in grad school and lived in a large city with good public transit.) They kept telling me that it was common for people without cars to buy the insurance first and I was being a negligent human by not paying for it.  At that point I figured it was a scam.

One day they called me up and offered me $50 of free gas if I bought their insurance.  I said, "I don't own a car and don't plan to buy one!  I don't want your insurance so please stop calling me!"

The woman said, "Well don't you want the gas certificate to fill up your riding lawn mower?"

The sheer inanity of that made me laugh for a good ten minutes.

Wait.  WHAT?  That doesn't even make sense on so many levels! (And I know you know that but...WHAT?)

I think that in California at least, a car dealership can't legally sell a car to someone without proof of minimum insurance coverage...so yes, those in the market to buy a car would set up the insurance first, buy the car and then drive it off the lot...sort of like needing the drivers license first, then buying the car. But it is ridiculous that she kept it up after you indicated that you were not intending to buy a car at all.

That's true where I live too.   But real insurance agencies ask for the information of the car and driver and how much driving will be done.  They don't randomly offer car insurance for any make/model/driving history.  I'm pretty sure people without cars cannot just buy a generic insurance that covers everything.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on January 14, 2013, 06:18:04 PM

About 20 years ago I was targeted by an car insurance sales company. I told them that I didn't have a car (I was in grad school and lived in a large city with good public transit.) They kept telling me that it was common for people without cars to buy the insurance first and I was being a negligent human by not paying for it.  At that point I figured it was a scam.

One day they called me up and offered me $50 of free gas if I bought their insurance.  I said, "I don't own a car and don't plan to buy one!  I don't want your insurance so please stop calling me!"

The woman said, "Well don't you want the gas certificate to fill up your riding lawn mower?"

The sheer inanity of that made me laugh for a good ten minutes.

Wait.  WHAT?  That doesn't even make sense on so many levels! (And I know you know that but...WHAT?)

I think that in California at least, a car dealership can't legally sell a car to someone without proof of minimum insurance coverage...so yes, those in the market to buy a car would set up the insurance first, buy the car and then drive it off the lot...sort of like needing the drivers license first, then buying the car. But it is ridiculous that she kept it up after you indicated that you were not intending to buy a car at all.

That's true where I live too.   But real insurance agencies ask for the information of the car and driver and how much driving will be done.  They don't randomly offer car insurance for any make/model/driving history.  I'm pretty sure people without cars cannot just buy a generic insurance that covers everything.
Liability insurance (minimum required by law in California) covers only the damage I do to another car or driver so doesn't require any information about what car I drive, my record, or how much I drive. I've had liability insurance without having a car so that I'm covered if I rent or borrow a car. When I purchased a car, then I called up the agent and set up the rest.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: weeblewobble on January 14, 2013, 06:39:46 PM
During a vacation in Cancun, there were people at the airport in official looking booths selling tours at a discount.  When we got to the hotel for the welcome meeting, they warned guests those are scams and if anyone brought a tour to see them.  Luckily I talked my companions out of listening because we were late for the bus to the hotel.

We went to a resort in the Caribbean and when we landed at the island airport there was a big sign that had all of the different major resort chain names on it. "Resort A, Resort B, Resort C, Resort D - Visitor Orientation Here!"  right by the baggage claim. So if you were a guest at these resorts, you would naturally assume that you were supposed to stop there and do your orientation.  And if you didn't assume that, there were "travel agents" posted at the entrance to tell you to come into the session.

Fortunately, we'd been warned ahead of time by friends who had traveled to the resort before, and said "No thanks."  The "travel agents" were insistent that we had to come in and we got pretty firm with them in order to get through to the area where the resort buses were loading up.

We were told that once you went into this session, the travel agents started giving a time-share presentation for a resort that was in no way attached to the resorts advertised on the sign.  So you were staying at one resort and a completely different resort was trying to suck you into buying future vacations with them. If you tried to leave the presentation, two travel agents posted at the entrance would steer you back into the meeting room. It was very high pressure and unless you were willing to get downright hateful with the travel agents and making a scene, you were stuck.

To add insult to injury, when the tourists emerged from this hour-long sales pitch, the buses that were supposed to take them to their respective resorts had already left. And wouldn't you know it, the time share salesmen had a bus available but it was $35 to $50 a head, depending on where you resort was.

So it was a sort of double-scam. If they couldn't get you for the time-share, they'd get you for the bus fare.

We got to our resort unscathed, but that night at dinner, we heard several complaining about the strong arm tactics used.  Our waiter explained that the resorts had tried to stop this time-share company from doing this, but the time-share company kept finding legal loopholes to get away with it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Julian on January 14, 2013, 11:31:24 PM
Weeblewobble's airport scammer story above brought to mind an incident that happened several years ago.

My exGF and I used to fly very regularly out of Home City all over Australia.  During the early days we'd catch a taxi to the airport, it was around $20-22 depending on time of day and traffic.

One day, on return, a limo driver was in the baggage collection area touting for business (which I believe is illegal).  Anyway, he saw us getting our luggage and offered to take us home for the same price as a regular cab.

Woohoo!  Great deal.  He put the bags in the boot, we got buckled up, and off we went.  Halfway home, he said 'So, what's a cab usually cost you?  $50?  $60?"  No, we replied in unison, usually around about $21.  I could see his face fall in the rear view mirror!

Anyway, he made the deal, hoped for a scam, and got beaten.  Scammer Fail!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BabylonSister on January 15, 2013, 11:49:15 AM
I just got this in my inbox:


Good day,We have found your resume at a job board website and thought you as a prospective candidate.We have available employment opportunities at this moment that might suit you.In case of your interest we kindly ask you to reply us back at [email retracted] and i'll provide you with detailed information!Best Regards,[name retracted]


Oh yes, sure. "A" job board website.  No company name.  No job title specified.  A yahoo email contact. That sounds so legit.




(I am, in fact, looking for a job and registered with job boards.  I would expect an email from a potential employer to look a little more professional.)[/email]
[/color]
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on January 15, 2013, 11:55:57 AM
I just got this in my inbox:


Good day,We have found your resume at a job board website and thought you as a prospective candidate.We have available employment opportunities at this moment that might suit you.In case of your interest we kindly ask you to reply us back at [email retracted] and i'll provide you with detailed information!Best Regards,[name retracted]


Oh yes, sure. "A" job board website.  No company name.  No job title specified.  A yahoo email contact. That sounds so legit.




(I am, in fact, looking for a job and registered with job boards.  I would expect an email from a potential employer to look a little more professional.)[/email]
[/color]

I get those too and I'm not registered with any job boards or looking for a job.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on January 15, 2013, 11:58:27 AM
Julian, something like that happened to my husband and me once, only we were lucky - it wasn't a scam, or an attempt at a scam.  The limo driver saw that we were trying to flag down a cab and asked how much we'd normally pay for a taxi ride home from the airport.  We answered "$25.00."   Without hesitation, he said "I'll drive you for the same price."  We immediately took him up on it, and that's how much we paid.  At the time, smoking was still allowed in taxis, so it was heavenly to ride home in a comfortable non-smoky limo!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on January 15, 2013, 12:05:13 PM
I wouldn't necessarily think the limo was a scam either. A $25 fare is still better than a $0 fare as far as the driver is concerned. His face fell because he was hoping for more, but it wasn't like he grabbed your bags and held them hostage until you paid up.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Julian on January 15, 2013, 05:46:12 PM
I suspected he thought we were tourists rather than locals, so he could pad the bill.

There's a few fairly shonky limo and cab drivers back in old Home City, so that may have coloured our perception of him.  But I'm prepared to accept that I may be mistaken!   :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Katana_Geldar on January 15, 2013, 06:31:15 PM
I really don't like beggars who lie down in the middle of the main oath.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: amandaelizabeth on January 16, 2013, 01:13:42 PM
And what about the ones who do it in the lesser curse!

(Cheeky grin)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: oz diva on January 16, 2013, 04:51:30 PM
Had an encounter with a moocher the other day. A friend is coming to stay from another state. I don't see her very often. She texted me last night to say that she had bumped into a friend on the plane and this friend didn't have the money for accommodation, even at a backpackers hostel. Did I have any ideas? I replied that I didn't, sorry.

But really, either this friend is an idiot or a liar. Who travels to another city by plane without money for accommodation? IMO she could afford it, but didn't want to. She didn't know she would bump into my friend so she couldn't rely on that. But having done so, she figured she could mooch on a third party. I'm sure I was expected to offer my spare bed, which I absolutely was not going to do.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nuit93 on January 16, 2013, 05:39:48 PM
I just got this in my inbox:


Good day,We have found your resume at a job board website and thought you as a prospective candidate.We have available employment opportunities at this moment that might suit you.In case of your interest we kindly ask you to reply us back at [email retracted] and i'll provide you with detailed information!Best Regards,[name retracted]


Oh yes, sure. "A" job board website.  No company name.  No job title specified.  A yahoo email contact. That sounds so legit.




(I am, in fact, looking for a job and registered with job boards.  I would expect an email from a potential employer to look a little more professional.)[/email]
[/color]

I used to get tons of those when I was job-hunting.  Very, very few of which were legitimate.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BabylonSister on January 16, 2013, 05:45:32 PM
I just got this in my inbox:


Good day,We have found your resume at a job board website and thought you as a prospective candidate.We have available employment opportunities at this moment that might suit you.In case of your interest we kindly ask you to reply us back at [email retracted] and i'll provide you with detailed information!Best Regards,[name retracted]


Oh yes, sure. "A" job board website.  No company name.  No job title specified.  A yahoo email contact. That sounds so legit.




(I am, in fact, looking for a job and registered with job boards.  I would expect an email from a potential employer to look a little more professional.)[/email]
[/color]

I used to get tons of those when I was job-hunting.  Very, very few of which were legitimate.


What got me very suspicious is the complete lack of information in the email.  I'd at least expect "this is So-and-so from This Business, we're contacting you about X position."  Also, I expect a business who is striving enough to hire new workers to have its own email.  My ex has a very small one-person, home-based business and he has his own domain name with an attached email.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: faithlessone on January 16, 2013, 05:57:05 PM
Also, I expect a business who is striving enough to hire new workers to have its own email.  My ex has a very small one-person, home-based business and he has his own domain name with an attached email.

It depends what sort of business, I think. I work for a building contractors, and we have a lot of subcontractors, including some small companies as well as individuals. More than one of these small companies (between 5 and 10 employees) has a hotmail "official" email address. One company we deal with (who are very professional in all other accounts), uses the personal email of the boss - which happens to be a very "frat boy" nickname, at AOL.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: snowflake on January 17, 2013, 03:37:11 PM
So what would you think of someone who was scamming in a "victimless" way?

I say this because I was reading the story of "Valerie" on the ehelldame's blog.  It touched a nerve for me because I know someone who has an obsession scamming people on the internet.  She doesn't accept donations, she keeps her stories sane and is pretty much never caught. 

Scammer is extremely intelligent and graduated summa cum laude from an Ivy League institution before getting her PhD at another top 10 university.  She has some social phobias and does contract work from home but spends maybe 1-4 hours a day working and the rest is spent on fake blogs (sometimes multiple) and message boards.  She creates stories that are heart wrenching, but not over-the-top.  She has always fantasized about being popular but her social phobias make it impossible. So she finds caring communities online and uses her way with words and written charm to become the center of attention.  But she knows when to stop (unlike some trolls I have known.) 

I caught her at this about 12 years ago.  She had taken a traumatic experience that had happened to a family member and blogged about it like it had happened to her.  I stumbled across it when a friend shared an "inspiring post."  I read the rest of the blog and recognized the writing style of Scammer plus some pictures she used.  I confronted her about it.  Scammer said that I didn't understand her deep needs and that she wasn't hurting anyone (in fact she was providing support to others.)  I informed the real victim of this blog and Real Victim chewed her out in the comments.  Scammer closed that blog and told her followers that a "blast from her past" who had never, never, believed her was bothering her and calling her a liar.  (Note: Scammer called Real Victim a liar initially when the trauma happened.)  Of course that brought on more support for Scammer.  Scammer did a clean job of overnight deleting and told her parents that Victim was making things up to be mean.  Currently Victim will not speak to Scammer and Scammer is acting like Victim is causing trouble for doing so.

For awhile it was a stupid fascination of mine.  Scammer has a distinctive writing style and uses some key phrases original to herself.  I would google those and was always uncovering a treasure trove of fake stories she was telling online.  She is a master at sucking people in.  She retold Victim's story but this time she was Victim's savior who got her therapy and medical attention while her whole family scoffed at her.  She told a story about how she was divorced after her husband beat her. (No husband.)  She joined a marathon training group where she was bouncing back after a bout with pneumonia (She never exercises and gets out of breath from walking a mile.)  She claimed to be a social worker who was the hero to countless families (she recycled a few of MY stories for this one which really made me mad.)  She pretended to be an ex-model who was taking on the fashion industry.  She also started blogging about the sexism in my family which is real, but most of the incidents recounted were absolutely wrong.  There are lots and lots of stories in which the males in my family have been discouraging to women who want an education and/or career.  BUT she didn't tell a single real story.  It was all about how her father had fully funded her brothers' education (not true) while telling her to get married instead (When she was engaged to some pond scum he was talking her out of it and telling her to finish school.) 

After a couple of years of trying to follow her, I quit because it's not like anyone would have listened to me about this and it was just making me bitter.  But from some comments on Facebook, it occurred to me that she is friends with some breast cancer survivors who seem to think she had it too.  WHAT????

She's not doing anything to them, right?  I'm not sure what it would do to call her out.  Calling her out IRL didn't change a thing.  But there is this little thing in the back of my head that worries that she MIGHT take it too far and start hurting vulnerable people.  Also, her income is not steady and she gets into fights with her employers so what if she decides to go pro?

I guess I shouldn't worry about it since I can't do a thing but part of me feels guilty that I'm just sitting back and letting it happen.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: yokozbornak on January 17, 2013, 03:50:56 PM
Snowflake, I have always chosen to look at the internet as for "entertainment purposes only".  The only time I try to say anything is if I think someone is trying to scam people for money (I actually posted a thread about this a few weeks ago).  One of my former favorite forums had so many incidents of scammers that I always try to be on my guard. 

There was the person who faked his wife and children's death in a car accident (definitely wanting money), those who faked illnesses, those who faked glamorous lifestyles (one going so far as to arrange a huge meet-up with many of her forum buddies at a very expensive location and then never showing up), those who faked generosity and kindess (like the one who pretended to be a foster parent to many troubled teens), and so forth and so on.  They are all looking for something whether it's cash or validation.  I even think some of them are just flexing their creative writing muscles. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hillia on January 17, 2013, 03:57:44 PM
Had an encounter with a moocher the other day. A friend is coming to stay from another state. I don't see her very often. She texted me last night to say that she had bumped into a friend on the plane and this friend didn't have the money for accommodation, even at a backpackers hostel. Did I have any ideas? I replied that I didn't, sorry.

But really, either this friend is an idiot or a liar. Who travels to another city by plane without money for accommodation? IMO she could afford it, but didn't want to. She didn't know she would bump into my friend so she couldn't rely on that. But having done so, she figured she could mooch on a third party. I'm sure I was expected to offer my spare bed, which I absolutely was not going to do.

who does this?  DH's cousin.  He met a very sweet, somewhat naive and sheltered girl online and invited himself to stay with her family (she lived with her parents) for two weeks over Christmas.  He showed up with about 10 dollars and took total advantage of the family's unwillingness to throw him out on the street 1500 miles from home.  And he still doesn't understand that he did anything wrong.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Otterpop on January 17, 2013, 04:21:28 PM
My DH was adopted by his aunt when he was an infant.  He has one bio-sister still alive that we know of.

I connected with her at their grandfather's funeral and gave her my home number.  DH, who didn't know her at all (very secretive family) cautioned me and said "No address."  We met her once at a park and exchanged pictures, family health information, who's related to whom etc.

After that, I'd get a call once a month with some tale of woe about how she was being evicted from her apartment, couldn't pay the light bill, needed money for her kids teeth and on and on.  I just kept referring her to the social programs I know about (worked in the industry) that might be able to help her.

The last call she out and out asked me to pay a bill for her because "I was rich." ::)  Not really.  I said I was unemployed (self-employed really), DH is sole provider, we are raising 2 kids, and I don't loan out money.  Then I stopped answering her phone calls and let them pile up on our answering machine.  Don't know when this will end.  I was warned...

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Kaora on January 19, 2013, 01:00:52 AM
I've noticed a stark increase in panhandlers lately, but I don't know why.  The BRAC actually increased jobs available on our Base, so shouldn't there be less sob stories?

Particularly, we have, my BF and I, gotten petitioned five times over the past year by the same guy, who is always looking for a burger or a dollar for gas, etc.  Each time we've turned him down and he's still there when we've gone out.  I also know, from checking police logs, he gets around town.  I saw him around Christmas, three days in a row, in the logs.  Once at both Wal of Mart and Albert's Sons, which are next to each other here, and the other two?  Still at McDonalds.

We also have a guy who sits on the turn out from one of the strip malls, who has been constantly holding a Will Work Money sign.  I feel bad for him, he's never been actively panhandling of any of us, but he's at such a spot I'm afraid someone won't see him and he'll get hit.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: sunnygirl on January 19, 2013, 10:20:53 AM
So what would you think of someone who was scamming in a "victimless" way?

I say this because I was reading the story of "Valerie" on the ehelldame's blog.  It touched a nerve for me because I know someone who has an obsession scamming people on the internet.  She doesn't accept donations, she keeps her stories sane and is pretty much never caught. 
Not trying to play Internet Doctor or anything, but I did a research project a couple of years ago on Munchhausen by Internet disorder - it's very interesting. Lots of people online do this kind of thing, and there are several websites devoted to exposing 'pseucides.' Not that everyone who fakes stuff online has MbI, but it is an interesting phenomenon.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on January 19, 2013, 10:58:51 AM
Quote
I've noticed a stark increase in panhandlers lately, but I don't know why.

If your place is anything like my town it's because their panhandling is successful. I will never forget one story in a local newspaper several years ago when a young woman was interviewed. She told the story of getting a $20 bill one day from someone at the freeway off-ramp where she sat every day seeking handouts by using a sign and a story that she was saving up to get off the streets and get an apartment. But she never did. She just continued to beg until forced to move on.

And now our downtown streets are filled with them sitting around, lying around and begging. Many of the locals won't even go downtown any more. I feel for the tourists who must think our town consists only of chain stores and beggars.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Julian on January 19, 2013, 03:06:58 PM
Quote
I've noticed a stark increase in panhandlers lately, but I don't know why.

If your place is anything like my town it's because their panhandling is successful. I will never forget one story in a local newspaper several years ago when a young woman was interviewed. She told the story of getting a $20 bill one day from someone at the freeway off-ramp where she sat every day seeking handouts by using a sign and a story that she was saving up to get off the streets and get an apartment. But she never did. She just continued to beg until forced to move on.

And now our downtown streets are filled with them sitting around, lying around and begging. Many of the locals won't even go downtown any more. I feel for the tourists who must think our town consists only of chain stores and beggars.

A reporter at one of the major Australian networks did a story on panhandlers etc a couple of years back.  He basically went out on the street begging.  He managed to get several hundred dollars a day.   :o 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on January 19, 2013, 05:29:00 PM
I just got an email from a nice Russian lady who needs some help with a trunk full of $10,000,000 worth of US bank notes. I can have 45% once the money is safe.

The Subject line (which is the original, not added by a spam filter) was "[Spam-Mail]Please are you interested?"
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on January 19, 2013, 07:04:08 PM


...   The Subject line (which is the original, not added by a spam filter) was "[Spam-Mail]Please are you interested?"

 :o :D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Kaora on January 19, 2013, 11:26:33 PM
Quote
I've noticed a stark increase in panhandlers lately, but I don't know why.

If your place is anything like my town it's because their panhandling is successful. I will never forget one story in a local newspaper several years ago when a young woman was interviewed. She told the story of getting a $20 bill one day from someone at the freeway off-ramp where she sat every day seeking handouts by using a sign and a story that she was saving up to get off the streets and get an apartment. But she never did. She just continued to beg until forced to move on.

And now our downtown streets are filled with them sitting around, lying around and begging. Many of the locals won't even go downtown any more. I feel for the tourists who must think our town consists only of chain stores and beggars.

A reporter at one of the major Australian networks did a story on panhandlers etc a couple of years back.  He basically went out on the street begging.  He managed to get several hundred dollars a day.   :o

 :o

BF told me seat of the county has been sending down more welfare people to this town recently.  I don't mean that condescendingly, there are those who need it.  But I've also met the 90 percent or so, spoken in hyperbole, who seem to be on it just to abuse it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: shadowfox79 on January 20, 2013, 07:56:53 AM
I just got an email from a nice Russian lady who needs some help with a trunk full of $10,000,000 worth of US bank notes. I can have 45% once the money is safe.

The Subject line (which is the original, not added by a spam filter) was "[Spam-Mail]Please are you interested?"

Sounds like an Indian student of mine who was caught cheating on an essay - he had copied and pasted from a website.

His apology email included the line "I am very sorry and will never do [such-and-such thing] again."

I'd love to know where he copypasted that from.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MommyPenguin on January 20, 2013, 08:12:50 AM
There was a panhandler profiled in College Park, MD, who made a living off it.  He actually had an apartment and everything, entirely paid for by the proceeds of his begging.  It was in the campus newspaper.  I always wondered if the newspaper article destroyed his "career."
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on January 20, 2013, 11:07:25 AM
It seems to me that if you're making a nice living off of begging and don't intend to stop, you should probably avoid newspaper articles and profiles of yourself.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Iris on January 20, 2013, 03:12:00 PM
l also can't help feeling that those who really need to beg - the mentally ill who are untreated, the substance abusers sleeping in the gutter without access to hygeine facilities, those that have fallen through society's cracks - are much, much less likely to make hundreds of dollars a day than a young man with the skills and charisma to get and keep a job in the media. I once read an article by a different reporter who dressed as various types of people (rich, pregnant,'ordinary', homeless etc) People were much happier to hand over their cash to someone they related to and who looked like they didn't really need it THAT badly.

Back on topic, I've just come back from a short trip to Melbourne. I found it refreshing that so many  of the beggars there now simply say "Can I have some money please?" without throwing in the insultingly lame story.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Mad Goat Woman on January 20, 2013, 03:22:52 PM
In Canberra city (aka Civic), there's a few regular people who are always asking for bus money. It's become so annoying, because they always target me thinking I'll give them some money. I've since tried to avoid civic's panhandlers, which is a lot easier than it once was. But it gets really annoying to be asked for money nearly every time I leave the bus interchange. There was one Indigenous woman who used to ask me every.dingdangity.day when I was working in a pharmacy in civic for money, and I used to tell her she'd asked me before, and that my answer wouldn't change.

Canberra has a lot of beggars, which is ridiculous considering it's the nation's capital.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Giggity on January 20, 2013, 10:17:20 PM
Canberra has a lot of beggars, which is ridiculous considering it's the nation's capital.

I'm not sure I understand why being the capital would make a difference.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: geekette on January 21, 2013, 03:38:33 AM
Canberra has a lot of beggars, which is ridiculous considering it's the nation's capital.

I'm not sure I understand why being the capital would make a difference.

Actually, it makes even more sense for them to be here. Canberra's entire economy is based around the public service. If we didn't have the majority of government workers, there would barely be a town here. That also means we have more high level and managerial staff, and as we're the nation's capital we are expected to set the best example to the rest of the country to what goverment workers are like.
Which means that a good 90% or so (accounting for hyperbole) are going to have to follow the government's code of conduct, even after hours. We have to play nice with the beggers, and even when they get aggressive with us for ignoring them we can't really get aggressive back. So Canberra would be a very 'safe' place to beg.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: WolfWay on January 22, 2013, 04:53:50 AM
So what would you think of someone who was scamming in a "victimless" way?

After a couple of years of trying to follow her, I quit because it's not like anyone would have listened to me about this and it was just making me bitter.  But from some comments on Facebook, it occurred to me that she is friends with some breast cancer survivors who seem to think she had it too.  WHAT????

She's not doing anything to them, right?  I'm not sure what it would do to call her out.  Calling her out IRL didn't change a thing.  But there is this little thing in the back of my head that worries that she MIGHT take it too far and start hurting vulnerable people.  Also, her income is not steady and she gets into fights with her employers so what if she decides to go pro?

I guess I shouldn't worry about it since I can't do a thing but part of me feels guilty that I'm just sitting back and letting it happen.
Here's the other side of the story, from a cancer survivor who got caught up in the web of lies with someone who fakes illness on her blog for months on end. It's is not victimless, it hurts the people they fool.

www.thestranger.com/seattle/the-lying-disease/Content?oid=15337239
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Emmy on January 22, 2013, 05:14:49 AM
Had an encounter with a moocher the other day. A friend is coming to stay from another state. I don't see her very often. She texted me last night to say that she had bumped into a friend on the plane and this friend didn't have the money for accommodation, even at a backpackers hostel. Did I have any ideas? I replied that I didn't, sorry.

But really, either this friend is an idiot or a liar. Who travels to another city by plane without money for accommodation? IMO she could afford it, but didn't want to. She didn't know she would bump into my friend so she couldn't rely on that. But having done so, she figured she could mooch on a third party. I'm sure I was expected to offer my spare bed, which I absolutely was not going to do.

who does this?  DH's cousin.  He met a very sweet, somewhat naive and sheltered girl online and invited himself to stay with her family (she lived with her parents) for two weeks over Christmas.  He showed up with about 10 dollars and took total advantage of the family's unwillingness to throw him out on the street 1500 miles from home.  And he still doesn't understand that he did anything wrong.

Several years ago, one of my friends met somebody online and started a long distance relationship.  He flew to come meet her with no money and a sob story.  He was with her a month before she got rid of him.

I am more of a country girl so while in a major city, I broke one of the rules of the city and gave a woman with a sob story about needing food some money.  It was probably $2 worth of change.  Instead of saying 'thank you' and hitting up the next person like a 'respectable' beggar would do, she looks at the money and says "this isn't enough for a meal".  I turned away in disgust.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on January 22, 2013, 04:02:27 PM
Regarding blog/community scammers, I used to get sucked into some of the more dramatic stories but I've been burned a few times (just emotions, no money, thankfully).  Now I also view the internet as entertainment.  There's one community in particular that deals with people who have difficult relatives.  I think most of the stories are legit but the more dramatic it is, the more I regard it as a fun story.  Especially when the story starts out with the OP complaining that a relative never calls first before they drop by and ends four days later with the OP's relative being arrested, convicted and sentenced on attempted murder charges because the relative just couldn't stand to be told they had to call first. 

Okay, that might be simplifying it but the red flags to me usually include rapid escalation of the situation, posting at times I wouldn't even be thinking about getting online ("Great Googley Mooley, Relative is right outside my door and trying to break in!  They have an AXE!!!") and just general sensationalism.  More often than not, the stories are greatly embellished if not made up all together.  And they always get busted.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on January 22, 2013, 04:17:02 PM
Regarding blog/community scammers, I used to get sucked into some of the more dramatic stories but I've been burned a few times (just emotions, no money, thankfully).  Now I also view the internet as entertainment.  There's one community in particular that deals with people who have difficult relatives.  I think most of the stories are legit but the more dramatic it is, the more I regard it as a fun story.  Especially when the story starts out with the OP complaining that a relative never calls first before they drop by and ends four days later with the OP's relative being arrested, convicted and sentenced on attempted murder charges because the relative just couldn't stand to be told they had to call first. 

Okay, that might be simplifying it but the red flags to me usually include rapid escalation of the situation, posting at times I wouldn't even be thinking about getting online ("Great Googley Mooley, Relative is right outside my door and trying to break in!  They have an AXE!!!") and just general sensationalism.  More often than not, the stories are greatly embellished if not made up all together.  And they always get busted.

Pretty sure I know what forum you're talking about. Those are the best stories--they have a beginning, middle and an end, even if it's all fake. You're not going to be wondering months or years down the road what happened to so-and-so and their crazy aunt.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on January 22, 2013, 06:09:58 PM
Many, many years ago, I participated in an online community for fibromyalgics.  I no longer do so because of people like the one in this story.

I'll call her "Mary."  Now, all of us were affected by fibromyalgia, some worse than others.  But Mary was always sicker than anyone else.  If someone posted that she couldn't drag herself out of bed until 10am, Mary said she had to stay in bed all day.  My hands hurt like someone had bashed them with a baseball bat.  Mary said she hurt all over like that.  You get the picture.

And then Mary started reporting that her mean old parents were talking about throwing her out.  They were "tired of waiting on her hand and foot." No one else in her family and friends would take her in.  Mary said "I know that my friends here on the list will take me in.  I'll be willing to pay for the gas to get me and my stuff to your house."

Now, consider.  Mary wanted people who were already ill, some of them already disabled, to provide her with food, housing, entertainment, transportation, housekeeping, etc.  She did  not offer to pay a penny in rent or anything else.  Not surprisingly, no one volunteered.

After a day or two, Mary pitched a hissy fit online.  We were terrible people who LIED about caring about each other, because a REAL friend wouldn't let her be homeless.  She was just going to take all of her pills at once!  So there!  That would teach us a lesson!

And the list started to flap their collective wings and run in panicked circles.   Did anyone have RL contact information for her, could they call 911 in that area and report it, and on and on, worryworryworry.

A day or so later, the list owner came on and said that there had been nothing to worry about.  Someone DID have RL contact information for Mary, and showed up on her doorstep unannounced.  The person who answered the door was Mary's mother. Mary -- poor, sick, disabled Mary who had to stay in bed all day -- was at work.  No, she didn't have fibro, or anything else.  She had a good, well-paying job. She paid rent to her parents; they were not on the verge of kicking her out.

That was when I left the list.  I didn't need that kind of stress on top of my own personal stresses. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Army Mom on January 22, 2013, 09:39:02 PM
So what would you think of someone who was scamming in a "victimless" way?

After a couple of years of trying to follow her, I quit because it's not like anyone would have listened to me about this and it was just making me bitter.  But from some comments on Facebook, it occurred to me that she is friends with some breast cancer survivors who seem to think she had it too.  WHAT????

She's not doing anything to them, right?  I'm not sure what it would do to call her out.  Calling her out IRL didn't change a thing.  But there is this little thing in the back of my head that worries that she MIGHT take it too far and start hurting vulnerable people.  Also, her income is not steady and she gets into fights with her employers so what if she decides to go pro?

I guess I shouldn't worry about it since I can't do a thing but part of me feels guilty that I'm just sitting back and letting it happen.
Here's the other side of the story, from a cancer survivor who got caught up in the web of lies with someone who fakes illness on her blog for months on end. It's is not victimless, it hurts the people they fool.

www.thestranger.com/seattle/the-lying-disease/Content?oid=15337239

That is an incredible article!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: WolfWay on January 22, 2013, 10:58:28 PM
So what would you think of someone who was scamming in a "victimless" way?

After a couple of years of trying to follow her, I quit because it's not like anyone would have listened to me about this and it was just making me bitter.  But from some comments on Facebook, it occurred to me that she is friends with some breast cancer survivors who seem to think she had it too.  WHAT????

She's not doing anything to them, right?  I'm not sure what it would do to call her out.  Calling her out IRL didn't change a thing.  But there is this little thing in the back of my head that worries that she MIGHT take it too far and start hurting vulnerable people.  Also, her income is not steady and she gets into fights with her employers so what if she decides to go pro?

I guess I shouldn't worry about it since I can't do a thing but part of me feels guilty that I'm just sitting back and letting it happen.
Here's the other side of the story, from a cancer survivor who got caught up in the web of lies with someone who fakes illness on her blog for months on end. It's is not victimless, it hurts the people they fool.

www.thestranger.com/seattle/the-lying-disease/Content?oid=15337239

That is an incredible article!
Longform.org is my friend (it's a huuuuuuuuuuuuge collection of long, extremely well written articles, including the one above that I linked to).
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Louie_LI on January 24, 2013, 01:47:10 PM
just heard this one the other day -  a co worker and i were kvetching about our aging parents etc and he said how you have to be so careful that they don't fall for scams. he told me that his sister works in an assisted living place with full 24/7 nurse coverage and emergency buttons in each unit that connected to their own medical team.
My parents are in such a facility.  The emergency calls are pullchains, hanging on the wall.  If a resident falls and breaks a hip or some such other emergency, they may not be able to reach the emergency signal.

I was very impressed with arrangements I saw once (Italy, I think). In the handicapped bathroom, the emergency cord went down the wall, to just above the floor level, then all away around the room. If you fell in there and couldn't get up, you would always be able to reach the emergency alarm cord.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: asb8 on January 28, 2013, 09:25:18 AM
Can someone tell me if this sounds like a scam?  I'm legitamately asking.

I posted an ad on craig's list as part of my quest to find some babysitting jobs to supplement my income.  I've been emailing a family that moving to my area next month and everything seemed okay until now.

The father mentioned that he wants to send me certified check to pay for some furniture he has ordered and to compensate me for my time running the errand.  I would have to cash the check at my bank.

My hinky-meter just went off big time.  Does this sound like I'm about to get scammed?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RingTailedLemur on January 28, 2013, 09:30:31 AM
YES!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: artk2002 on January 28, 2013, 09:40:29 AM
ASB8: Yes, that's a classic scam.   http://central-westernma.bbb.org/scam-source/top-types/check-cashing-and-money-order/ (http://central-westernma.bbb.org/scam-source/top-types/check-cashing-and-money-order/)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: asb8 on January 28, 2013, 09:57:03 AM
Thank you both very much.  I'll delete the emails and block his address.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: VorFemme on January 28, 2013, 09:58:40 AM
Can someone tell me if this sounds like a scam?  I'm legitamately asking.

I posted an ad on craig's list as part of my quest to find some babysitting jobs to supplement my income.  I've been emailing a family that moving to my area next month and everything seemed okay until now.

The father mentioned that he wants to send me certified check to pay for some furniture he has ordered and to compensate me for my time running the errand.  I would have to cash the check at my bank.

My hinky-meter just went off big time.  Does this sound like I'm about to get scammed?

I don't ship anything that I offer for sale on Craigslist - cash only and local delivery or meet them in person.  Because even PayPal transfers have been "spoofed" when I've been asked if I would do that....and PayPal shut them down every time I've reported the spoofs to them (they don't like it when people fake things from them).

I don't take money orders or checks, either.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on January 28, 2013, 10:27:38 AM
Thank you both very much.  I'll delete the emails and block his address.

Smart move!! 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BabyMama on January 28, 2013, 11:37:56 AM
I admin a hobby-specific sale/trade page on Facebook, and have noticed a huge increase in scammers since hitting the 1,000+ member mark. Most of them post very obvious scam sites for shoes. Do people actually click on these??
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: zyrs on January 28, 2013, 10:44:38 PM
Can someone tell me if this sounds like a scam?  I'm legitamately asking.

I posted an ad on craig's list as part of my quest to find some babysitting jobs to supplement my income.  I've been emailing a family that moving to my area next month and everything seemed okay until now.

The father mentioned that he wants to send me certified check to pay for some furniture he has ordered and to compensate me for my time running the errand.  I would have to cash the check at my bank.

My hinky-meter just went off big time.  Does this sound like I'm about to get scammed?

It's a scam. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Otterpop on January 29, 2013, 10:28:33 AM
Can someone tell me if this sounds like a scam?  I'm legitamately asking.

I posted an ad on craig's list as part of my quest to find some babysitting jobs to supplement my income.  I've been emailing a family that moving to my area next month and everything seemed okay until now.

The father mentioned that he wants to send me certified check to pay for some furniture he has ordered and to compensate me for my time running the errand.  I would have to cash the check at my bank.

My hinky-meter just went off big time.  Does this sound like I'm about to get scammed?

It's a scam.

Yes, the certified check will turn out to be fake, and you will be on the hook for any money paid out of your account. 

I was recently e-mailed by an overseas "doctor" who is relocating and wants to rent our vacant, advertised condo.  He said he'd send a certified check for several months rent + deposit and also an overage for some furniture to be delivered.  I looked up "rental scams" on Google and it said several people have been cheated out of money when the "doctor" backs out of the deal.  It takes 21 days for the bank to clear the check or find out it is fake.  If you spend anything, you have to give the bank back that amount.  Meanwhile the contact and the refund disappears into the wind.  (I told the "doctor" I only deal in cash with people I can meet, and I'd need a credit check)

Don't fall for it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: athersgeo on January 29, 2013, 10:49:18 AM
I remember the first time I saw a phishing email (which was probably before the term phishing had actually been coined). The whole office (five or six of us) all crowded round my screen to look at this email. All of us going "Does anyone here actually bank with SomeBankName? No? Why are they sending us an email?" We came the conclusion it was a scam and I deleted it, but for the rest of the afternoon we were all a bit perplexed.

Then a few more of the darn things turned up and phishing was coined and things suddenly started making sense again!

I've never had the Windows scam, but my mother's copped for the phone call a few times. The last time of which, the caller was saying "I'm looking at your computer and you have a virus" to which my mother's response was "That's impressive; my computer's unplugged at the moment..."

Lastly, here's a new one for the thread: "I'm ringing you about your car accident."
I've had two or three of these, where someone opens the conversation with those words. My immediate response is generally, "What car accident?" So far, I've yet to have anyone argue the point with me so I'm still not entirely sure what the scam is, but it's all rather strange...
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on January 29, 2013, 11:18:02 AM
Our company once got tangentially involved in a VERY poorly done scam.

We started getting phone calls from Australia, from people who had been sent letters they had won a house, and just needed to make "arrangements" to get the title. The number given to call had a Canadian area code, but it didn't exist. Based on the name of the company supposedly running the giveaway, Information would send the people to us. Some of them were very disappointed to learn that no, no house available.

What idiots come up with a scam like that, and can't even remember to put down the right telephone number? At least, we saved some people a lot of money, I'm sure.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: squashedfrog on January 29, 2013, 11:43:13 AM
I've had the ringing about your car accident call quite a few times. And one time the guy did argue with me for some time about whether or not I'd been in a car accident as "his records clearly showed I had been and was entitled to compensation". I realised his company must have bought my details from my insurance firm, after id backed out of a car park space at two miles an hour and accidently dented the wheel arch of the empty car in the next booth. For some reason he was trying to tell me I could sue the other driver (?) for my injuries (?). Wow. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on January 29, 2013, 12:21:14 PM
The "your car accident" reminds me of this one.

My driveway is very narrow. One day I wasn't paying enough attention and I hit a fence post and wound up with a dented & scraped front fender. About a week later, I found a note on my windshield.

It said something like this:
My grandmother's car was parked in your neighborhood and was seriously damaged by a hit and un driver. I've been looking all over and I saw your car. The damage on your car is obviously from hitting my grandmother's car. I took a paint scraping from grandmother's car to a car dealer who said it's from [my make,model, and color.]

[Rant and rabble about how only a low life would do a hit & run]. If you don't call me by such & such a date, I'm going to notify the police.

I called my insurance agent right away, who told me that it was a pure scam. Maybe I did hit another car and maybe it was a hit & run. Naturally, I'll pay "grandma" rather than have the police brought in.

I decided to explore it, just for the heck of it. I called the number and got a very sleepy guy. When I told him that he needed to call my insurance agent and put in a claim, he made some scrabble-ish suggestions and hung up.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on January 29, 2013, 12:55:09 PM
I've gotten phone calls, supposedly from a bank, "because we are very concerned about the amount of interest you have on your credit card balance."  Good trick, considering that we don't pay interest and haven't done so in years.  (We USED to - oh, did we - but that's another story.)  I'm guessing that scam usually works - kind of like calling ten random people and saying "All has been discovered; you must flee the country!"  At least one of them will have a guilty conscience and start packing his/her bags.  :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on January 29, 2013, 01:23:53 PM
I've gotten phone calls, supposedly from a bank, "because we are very concerned about the amount of interest you have on your credit card balance."  ...

LOL!  Maybe that's the problem!  You don't have ANY interest on your credit card balance and gosh darn it!!  They want you to have some  -- not just "some", but LOTS.  They're not making any money off of you!   ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Thipu1 on January 29, 2013, 03:06:49 PM
I've gotten phone calls, supposedly from a bank, "because we are very concerned about the amount of interest you have on your credit card balance."  ...

LOL!  Maybe that's the problem!  You don't have ANY interest on your credit card balance and gosh darn it!!  They want you to have some  -- not just "some", but LOTS.  They're not making any money off of you!   ;D

I've had an attempted scam from my credit card company based on that. 

I've never carried a balance and never had to pay interest or late fees.  Credit card companies consider people like me 'dead-beats' because the few charges I make are paid when due and paid in full.

I changed my card when I received a phone call from someone who seemed very concerned.  The company feared that my identity had been stolen.  There were 'suspicious' charges on my card.  The suspicious charges were :

1) A $250 contribution to a public television station.
2) A $14 bottle of wine from a neighborhood store.
3) $8 for a used book bought on-line. 

I said that those purchases were ones I had made and paid for in full when the statement arrived.  After all, if someone is going to steal your identity, they'll be having a bit more fun with it than a charitable contribution, a bottle of wine and a used book. 

Regardless,   I was informed that, for 'for my safety', my card would be voided and a new card issued. The new card had a higher interest rate and a lower credit limit. That's when I went shopping for a new credit card company.



       
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on January 29, 2013, 03:15:55 PM
Our nephew had his credit card number stolen 5 years ago.

The thieves tested it by making a small credit - in this case to the opposite political party.

He said that made him angrier than the theft and the subsequent large purchases.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: VorFemme on January 29, 2013, 04:36:17 PM
I used to work at an insurance company, setting up claims from the internet during the day.  Someone else took care of them at night - I kept a paper log of all attempts to file a claim as they were just getting this function set up and the programmers wanted details.

Someone abandoned an attempt to file a water damage claim where they were parked in a low lying area in "Famous City" (that is below sea level in the USA).  I logged it the next morning and then found a second report on the same policy, vehicle, and damages - but with the addition of four passengers who got hurt getting out of the vehicle when it slid into a drainage ditch....

Night person hadn't seen the earlier "incomplete" report.  I was the only person who "saw" both due to that paper log.  The company had lawyers in that state who shut down the attempt at fraud (medical claims) and I'm pretty sure denied the claim for the water damage, due to the attempted fraud (legal phrasing in contract made that the penalty for attempting to defraud the insurance company). 

In training, we heard stories of attempts to do worse....such as trying to file a claim for something that burned up in a house fire that the person never owned (high end computer) or the whole house (inventory records had some incriminating information included). 

The old commercial phrased it as "it's not nice to fool Mother Nature" - but your insurance company can not only get you into legal trouble - you'll be in financial trouble due to not being PAID for the damages, under those circumstances.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on January 29, 2013, 04:41:03 PM
Quote
LOL!  Maybe that's the problem! 

Hee hee!  That reminds me of that bit in Friends:

Monica:  Rachel, your bank called.  There's been some suspicious activity on your credit card.
Rachel:  What?!?  There can't be!  I haven't used it in months!
Monica:  THAT'S the suspicious activity.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: snowflake on January 29, 2013, 04:45:06 PM
Many, many years ago, I participated in an online community for fibromyalgics.  I no longer do so because of people like the one in this story.
<snip>

I confess I was banned from an infertility forum for calling out a scammer.  It was set up with different sections for different types of infertility.  Because my husband and I have very FUN reproductive systems, our problems actually overlapped many different causes.

That was why I discovered one screen name posting a different story in different areas.  On on section she had unexplained ovarian issues and ovulated twice a year.  On another, she had horrible endometriosis and had monthly surgeries for it.  On yet another, her husband had a zero sperm count.  At first I just let it go and figured she was some attention-seeker.  Besides, wasn't I looking like some fake poster with every infertility diagnosis under the sun?  But then on every single section, she had a "miracle" pregnancy and claimed it was due to one over-priced device that you could buy on a shady website.  Keep in mind, that with fertility treatments running easily in the tens of thousands of dollars, a $500 miracle treatment looks pretty dandy.

So she posted on one of my threads, I responded with links to all her other threads and said, "I know what you are doing, please don't insult my intelligence."  I'll admit to being angry and hormonal from fertility drugs.  While many private messages told me that I was being pretty reasonable, I'm pretty sure my tone was on the crabby side.

I got banned for "not keeping in the supportive tone of our boards."    I figured that with moderators like those, who needed trolls? 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: athersgeo on January 29, 2013, 05:43:54 PM
I've had the ringing about your car accident call quite a few times. And one time the guy did argue with me for some time about whether or not I'd been in a car accident as "his records clearly showed I had been and was entitled to compensation". I realised his company must have bought my details from my insurance firm, after id backed out of a car park space at two miles an hour and accidently dented the wheel arch of the empty car in the next booth. For some reason he was trying to tell me I could sue the other driver (?) for my injuries (?). Wow.

which would explain it, except for one minor detail: I haven't made an insurance claim because I've not had an accident with anything other than my own gatepost... (yes; I have just touched wood)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on January 29, 2013, 09:21:14 PM
Lastly, here's a new one for the thread: "I'm ringing you about your car accident."
I've had two or three of these, where someone opens the conversation with those words. My immediate response is generally, "What car accident?" So far, I've yet to have anyone argue the point with me so I'm still not entirely sure what the scam is, but it's all rather strange...
We had a rather weird one the other day, and the best that we can come up with is that the insurance agent thought that we were part of a scam.

DH witnessed a minor traffic accident; someone in a pickup truck cut off another driver, so close that the other driver hit him.  Pickup didn't even slow down, but took off at a dangerously high speed. We stopped to give the other driver our contact information; while we were there, a cop pulled up, took the driver's statement, took DH's information, then told us that someone else had witnessed the accident and got a plate number from the pickup.

Some days later a person who said that she was from an insurance company called. 
Insurance Lady: "I'm asking about the accident that you witnessed on December 31st on X road."
DH: "I did witness an accident on that date, but it was on Y Highway."
IL: "Oh.  Is that in Smalltown, Maryland?"
DH: "No, it's in Major Suburb."
IL: "I see.  And it was a single lane in each direction?"
DH (by now very confused): "No, it's two lanes in each direction, plus left turn lanes."
IL: "Okay, I think I have all I need.  Thank you!" And she hung up.

 ??? ??? ???
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: asb8 on January 29, 2013, 09:37:29 PM
To me that sound like she was checking your husband's statement and seeing if he told the same story (as in narrative, I'm not accusing him of lying) when asked again.  When I supervised a large fleet of vehicles, I used a similar tactic whenever I had to (in-house) investigate an accident.  You'd be amazed how many drivers would nod and smile when I asked then to verify completely different details in an attempt to evade being written up. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Miss Tickle on January 29, 2013, 09:56:49 PM
A few years ago I got a call from a girl wanting to open a bank account.  Not something I do, but before I could transfer her she told me WHY she needed the account.

Seems she was advertising on Craigslist for nanny/babysitting jobs, and a "Dr. Oz" from England wanted to hire her! He'd pay her 2000 per month for picking up the kids from school and looking after them until his sister got off work two hours later. The rest of the time she was free to go to school or whatever. But she needed an account from our bank for him to deposit her pay.

I asked all sorts of questions (pretty sure it was a scam) and she kept repeating "But if it's true…, But if it's not a scam…" I asked if she'd done the math?  No, but it seems like a great deal." (Yeah 35+ dollars an hour for babysitting sounds AWESOME. Duh.)

I asked if she'd trust someone with her kids she'd never met and hired off the net?

Well, I don't know, but if it's true….?

I suggested she verify her information from this doctor before she did anything. And not send any money anywhere for him.

She called back. I couldn't believe it! She called again and again. More rounds of "But, if it's true...", and "he seems so sincere, and it's a lot of money".

I explained exactly what I thought would happen. He'd send her a check for payment, and ask that she forward some money to his "sister" or similar.  I asked if he'd suggested that yet, but she demurred.  She made a couple more comments about how "real" he was, he even told her where he works (a clinic with no directory) and finally mentioned his name again.

Except this time it wasn't the same name she gave me the first time. The first call she called him "Dr. Oz", this time he was "Dr. Phil". I pointed out that most legitimate doctors can remember their own names for more than a couple weeks at a time.

She said "Oh." and hung up. 

I don't know if she was trying to scam me, or he was trying to scam her, but I learned something.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: shadowfox79 on January 30, 2013, 02:19:10 AM
Our nephew had his credit card number stolen 5 years ago.

The thieves tested it by making a small credit - in this case to the opposite political party.

He said that made him angrier than the theft and the subsequent large purchases.

I had similar feelings when someone stole my credit card and used it to fly Ryanair.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: otterwoman on January 30, 2013, 03:48:01 PM
This would be listed under Scammer Fail:

Right before Christmas, a package was delivered to me at home. From Apple. My DH was there and asked if I had ordered anything. Nope. So, I opened it up. It was a Mac Book Pro laptop. I was confused, DH wondered aloud if it was a gift from my stepmom (she gave DD an iPad last Christams). I said I wasn't that good this year, besides all our computers are Windows. The packing slip didn't indicate who paid for it.

So, I called Apple, and asked them. They said MyName ordered it. Umm, no I didn't. How was it paid for? With this credit card, and he read off my credit card number! Ack! He had my name and address, but a different email address. The Apple CSR and I discussed the situation. He recommended that I call my credit card company, then the police, then back to Apple.

I called the CC company, they cancelled the transaction and my card. They sent a new card the next business day. The police came and took a report. I gave the trooper a copy of the pack list and the print out showing the cost of the item. He told me not to hold my breath on him finding the person.

Then back to Apple to return the laptop. They emailed me a return shipping label.

What kind of idiot steals a credit card, goes shopping, and then has the stuff shipped to the real CC holder's house?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: magicdomino on January 30, 2013, 04:30:58 PM
This would be listed under Scammer Fail:

Right before Christmas, a package was delivered to me at home. From Apple. My DH was there and asked if I had ordered anything. Nope. So, I opened it up. It was a Mac Book Pro laptop. I was confused, DH wondered aloud if it was a gift from my stepmom (she gave DD an iPad last Christams). I said I wasn't that good this year, besides all our computers are Windows. The packing slip didn't indicate who paid for it.

So, I called Apple, and asked them. They said MyName ordered it. Umm, no I didn't. How was it paid for? With this credit card, and he read off my credit card number! Ack! He had my name and address, but a different email address. The Apple CSR and I discussed the situation. He recommended that I call my credit card company, then the police, then back to Apple.

I called the CC company, they cancelled the transaction and my card. They sent a new card the next business day. The police came and took a report. I gave the trooper a copy of the pack list and the print out showing the cost of the item. He told me not to hold my breath on him finding the person.

Then back to Apple to return the laptop. They emailed me a return shipping label.

What kind of idiot steals a credit card, goes shopping, and then has the stuff shipped to the real CC holder's house?

An idiot who didn't notice that the billing address had automatically filled in the sending address.  The question is, how did he get your address in the first place?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Slartibartfast on January 30, 2013, 04:33:27 PM
My guess is that he got into your Amazon.com account, but didn't have your credit card number.  Amazon makes you re-enter the number if you ship anywhere you haven't shipped before, but it stores your card number (without displaying it) and lets you ship to your home without needing to put anything in again.  It's still helpful from a scammer standpoint, but my guess is that the scammer had intentions of getting free stuff from your card and didn't realize until checkout that he couldn't make it ship anywhere he could get it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: otterwoman on January 30, 2013, 04:34:34 PM
This would be listed under Scammer Fail:

Right before Christmas, a package was delivered to me at home. From Apple. My DH was there and asked if I had ordered anything. Nope. So, I opened it up. It was a Mac Book Pro laptop. I was confused, DH wondered aloud if it was a gift from my stepmom (she gave DD an iPad last Christams). I said I wasn't that good this year, besides all our computers are Windows. The packing slip didn't indicate who paid for it.

So, I called Apple, and asked them. They said MyName ordered it. Umm, no I didn't. How was it paid for? With this credit card, and he read off my credit card number! Ack! He had my name and address, but a different email address. The Apple CSR and I discussed the situation. He recommended that I call my credit card company, then the police, then back to Apple.

I called the CC company, they cancelled the transaction and my card. They sent a new card the next business day. The police came and took a report. I gave the trooper a copy of the pack list and the print out showing the cost of the item. He told me not to hold my breath on him finding the person.

Then back to Apple to return the laptop. They emailed me a return shipping label.

What kind of idiot steals a credit card, goes shopping, and then has the stuff shipped to the real CC holder's house?

An idiot who didn't notice that the billing address had automatically filled in the sending address.  The question is, how did he get your address in the first place?

The best guess I have is an employee at an online store swiped the info when I ordered something. I don't get mailings from that CC company, everything is online with them.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: otterwoman on January 30, 2013, 04:35:40 PM
My guess is that he got into your Amazon.com account, but didn't have your credit card number.  Amazon makes you re-enter the number if you ship anywhere you haven't shipped before, but it stores your card number (without displaying it) and lets you ship to your home without needing to put anything in again.  It's still helpful from a scammer standpoint, but my guess is that the scammer had intentions of getting free stuff from your card and didn't realize until checkout that he couldn't make it ship anywhere he could get it.

But, I've never ordered from Apple.com.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MommyPenguin on January 30, 2013, 04:41:13 PM
It's possible that the scammer sent it to your home address to avoid setting off any credit alerts, and planned to stop by your house and grab the package off your porch.  But then you picked it up before he could get there.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Slartibartfast on January 30, 2013, 04:47:46 PM
My guess is that he got into your Amazon.com account, but didn't have your credit card number.  Amazon makes you re-enter the number if you ship anywhere you haven't shipped before, but it stores your card number (without displaying it) and lets you ship to your home without needing to put anything in again.  It's still helpful from a scammer standpoint, but my guess is that the scammer had intentions of getting free stuff from your card and didn't realize until checkout that he couldn't make it ship anywhere he could get it.

But, I've never ordered from Apple.com.

Bah, I read Apple as Amazon.  Never mind!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Acadianna on January 30, 2013, 09:31:30 PM
After all, if someone is going to steal your identity, they'll be having a bit more fun with it than a charitable contribution, a bottle of wine and a used book. 

I had a similar reaction when my own bank froze my debit card AND my credit card, for "suspicious activity" -- which consisted of $50 worth of t-shirts purchased at Death Valley.

Because, of course, the first thing one does after stealing a card number is run to Death Valley and buy t-shirts!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Julian on January 30, 2013, 11:31:12 PM
I've had my bank call me when I've been overseas due to the cards being used there.  Yeah, by me!   :D

These days I call them before I go away.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Iris on January 31, 2013, 02:41:58 AM
After all, if someone is going to steal your identity, they'll be having a bit more fun with it than a charitable contribution, a bottle of wine and a used book. 

I had a similar reaction when my own bank froze my debit card AND my credit card, for "suspicious activity" -- which consisted of $50 worth of t-shirts purchased at Death Valley.

Because, of course, the first thing one does after stealing a card number is run to Death Valley and buy t-shirts!

Our CC company picked up a scam based on a round of drinks -in another country. According to the nice lady who stopped the nasty thieves, scammers often make a small test purchase with the card before they go for the big stuff.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: athersgeo on January 31, 2013, 04:54:11 AM
After all, if someone is going to steal your identity, they'll be having a bit more fun with it than a charitable contribution, a bottle of wine and a used book. 

I had a similar reaction when my own bank froze my debit card AND my credit card, for "suspicious activity" -- which consisted of $50 worth of t-shirts purchased at Death Valley.

Because, of course, the first thing one does after stealing a card number is run to Death Valley and buy t-shirts!

I can actually beat both of those. My CC number got ripped off by someone in (I think) New Hampshire (or it might have been Vermont...somewhere up there, anyway). My bank didn't catch it, I did - when I (apparently) bought $20 worth of...

*drumroll please*

...toothpaste.

Yup.

My credit card was stolen to buy toothpaste.

(I am aware that what they were doing was doing a small transaction to test the card before launching into something bigger, but still, toothpaste?!)

I will say that it gave the girl in my bank's fraud department a good giggle to start her week with, though!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: o_gal on January 31, 2013, 06:47:12 AM
I've had my bank call me when I've been overseas due to the cards being used there.  Yeah, by me!   :D

These days I call them before I go away.

I posted this in the brain hurt thread - sometimes it doesn't help to call them before hand.

We went to France for vacation in 2010. Before going, I called my credit card companies and told them I would be in France between A and B dates and would be using the credit cards. Then I reserved hotel rooms in Paris for dates A through X, and then we would be out in the countryside, then again for date B. No problems reserving.

We go on vacation, have an awesome time, fly back to US, then 2 days later I try to use 1 of the credit cards and it's denied. I call them up and have this conversation.

Me: Hi, my credit card was denied, can you tell me why?
Rep: We show that you used the card out of the country.
Me: Yes, that's why I called you before to let you know and note it in my file.
Rep: We attempted to contact you to confirm the transaction (note: they flagged the second hotel stay as suspicious)
Me: But you called my home number.
Rep: Yes, that's what we have on file.
Me: So let me get this straight. I call you to tell you I will be in France on these dates, and I will be using the credit card - in France. You supposedly note this in my file. Then when I do use the card in France, you don't look at the notes and instead call me at home, in the US, to confirm a transaction, when I am *in France*, as I told you I would be.
Rep: Oh.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MommyPenguin on January 31, 2013, 08:08:30 AM
The time our credit card number was stolen, it was used to buy a $1k airplane ticket on United Emirates Airline, or something like that.  Usually mine is really good about calling us for stuff that *does* sound weird... buying thousands of dollars of LEGOs, for instance.  (We're collectors.)  We've also had *them* lose our number a few times, when they had a security breech, so we've gotten new numbers a bunch of times.  It's always annoying to have to memorize a new number.  I also triggered it once by buying a baby pool.  I went to a grocery store that is sort of like a super Walmart, sells tons of other stuff besides groceries.  I wanted to buy the kids a plastic baby pool, which was under $10.  I didn't want to have to carry it around the store, or try to manage it plus a full cart of groceries, so I bought it first, took it out to the car, then bought the groceries.  But the small charge of $7 and then the big $200 charge of groceries at the same store set off the trigger.   Bah.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on January 31, 2013, 08:11:37 AM

I can actually beat both of those. My CC number got ripped off by someone in (I think) New Hampshire (or it might have been Vermont...somewhere up there, anyway). My bank didn't catch it, I did - when I (apparently) bought $20 worth of...

...toothpaste.


How do you know what it was spent on? My statement always just gives the date of purchase, date of posting, and store or billing agent. Charitable donations are obvious.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BabyMama on January 31, 2013, 09:54:23 AM
I've had my card numbers stolen twice. Neither time had large transactions run up. The first time, they bought, among a couple other small purchases, a subscription to Ebony Magazine.  ??? The second time it was something like three smallish transactions to Walgreens. (It was somewhere around $60-80 total.) My credit card company covered it, but I've always wondered if someone was desperate for medicine and they stole my card to pay for it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: athersgeo on January 31, 2013, 10:15:03 AM

I can actually beat both of those. My CC number got ripped off by someone in (I think) New Hampshire (or it might have been Vermont...somewhere up there, anyway). My bank didn't catch it, I did - when I (apparently) bought $20 worth of...

...toothpaste.


How do you know what it was spent on? My statement always just gives the date of purchase, date of posting, and store or billing agent. Charitable donations are obvious.

The merchant was a Dental Practice. I can't imagine there's all that much you can get at a dentist for $20 other than toothpaste, mouthwash and brushes (and if American dentistry IS that cheap, I'm emigrating immediately!)

It was bizarre.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jane7166 on January 31, 2013, 10:33:33 AM
DH and I have had our CC numbers stolen twice.  Once it was used in Japan while we were at home in the US and once DH used his at a Lowe's and 20 minutes later, it was declined at a Kroger.  Seems it was used at a Walmart 1000 miles away in between those 2 purchases. 

Nothing was more annoying than having DH's corporate Amex denied at a restaurant.  I had a MasterCard so I paid.  We got home and DH called the Amex rep the next day.  Seems that, when DH had called them a few days earlier to alert them that we were making a big purchase on the Amex (around $7,000) the clerk helpfully canceled the card. 

Yes, it was a corporate card but DH was allowed to put personal purchases on the card at that time, as long as they were paid off each month, as we did.  That policy did change because other employees didn't pay off their stuff. 

We wondered what was the point of warning them we were going to use the card if that would be the response. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Giggity on January 31, 2013, 10:58:48 AM

I can actually beat both of those. My CC number got ripped off by someone in (I think) New Hampshire (or it might have been Vermont...somewhere up there, anyway). My bank didn't catch it, I did - when I (apparently) bought $20 worth of...

...toothpaste.

How do you know what it was spent on? My statement always just gives the date of purchase, date of posting, and store or billing agent. Charitable donations are obvious.

The merchant was a Dental Practice. I can't imagine there's all that much you can get at a dentist for $20 other than toothpaste, mouthwash and brushes (and if American dentistry IS that cheap, I'm emigrating immediately!)

It was bizarre.

In America, $20 is the general co-pay for an appointment. That's what the patient pays up front. So your credit card helped someone have nice teeth.

For what that's worth, the jerk. (Mine got stolen last week and used to buy perfume. Not even nice perfume.)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on January 31, 2013, 12:38:35 PM
I've had issues with my Bank of Montreal Mastercard at least five times over the last three years.  For a couple of those times, my number was stolen and someone tried to buy stuff.  Okay, that happens.  For the other times, though, there's been a "security breach" and "for your safety, we're sending you another card."   That's super annoying because of all the various automatic payments I've got set up with the old, now-useless card number. 

But wait, it gets better.  I got a call from them just before Christmas, once again with the "security breach" "new card" stuff.  I waited for the new card to arrive, and it never did.  I called the bank, and they said "Well, it's only been two weeks.  Give it another week."  I did - in fact, it's been more like a month.  No new card.  (Fortunately, I watch my statement like a hawk, and I haven't seen any unauthorized transactions.)   All I can think is that someone stole the new card, but without the ability to authorize it from my home phone, they've got a piece of plastic that's good for a bookmark and nothing else.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: wheeitsme on January 31, 2013, 01:05:52 PM
I check my ccard on online regularly, and I encourage others to, as well.

Especially since the $5 for water at a Macy's in Texas, then later that day a slice of pizza in NY city, then later over $200 worth of groceries in the Philippines. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on January 31, 2013, 01:18:00 PM
As my old card was expiring, Discover sent me a new card - same #, new expiration date. I got the new card and activated it. A week or so later, I notice an odd charge on my account - turns out to be a movie theater in Texas (I'm in Colorado, and haven't been to Texas since the 1990s, and never to the town in question). So I call Discover, who suggests I call the theater - I do, leave a message, get a call back a day later - manager is able to pull up the transaction based on my CC number, and found it had been used online to buy a kid's ticket, and another wholly different number had been used to do the same thing within moments of the transaction on my card - and they'd used my old card, with the old expiration date (which I still have in my pocket, actually - need to go use the office shredder on that one).

The theater manager issued a refund, and there's been no other odd activity on my account. A bit odd.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on January 31, 2013, 01:20:02 PM
I've had issues with my Bank of Montreal Mastercard at least five times over the last three years.  For a couple of those times, my number was stolen and someone tried to buy stuff.  Okay, that happens.  For the other times, though, there's been a "security breach" and "for your safety, we're sending you another card."   That's super annoying because of all the various automatic payments I've got set up with the old, now-useless card number. 

But wait, it gets better.  I got a call from them just before Christmas, once again with the "security breach" "new card" stuff.  I waited for the new card to arrive, and it never did.  I called the bank, and they said "Well, it's only been two weeks.  Give it another week."  I did - in fact, it's been more like a month.  No new card.  (Fortunately, I watch my statement like a hawk, and I haven't seen any unauthorized transactions.)   All I can think is that someone stole the new card, but without the ability to authorize it from my home phone, they've got a piece of plastic that's good for a bookmark and nothing else.

Are you planning to change credit cards soon? I keep three - one for most purchases that we get free gasoline with, #2 with the same company as a backup in case some goes wonky with the first one (like lost or stolen or it's stopped for some other reason), and #3 for online purchases only with a different company. It works quite well.

I did drop a card serveral years ago because there were constant issues, such as you describe and not always making any sense to me.

Also, old credit cards a good for scaping dishes  :) (Of course I know they must be destroyed!)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on January 31, 2013, 01:29:49 PM
A little over a year ago I was checking my account and noticed something odd; a set-up charge for a dating service on my credit card number, dated the same day I was checking my account, so only a couple hours old.

I went to a bank with a printout of the transaction and asked them to reverse it, stated it was fraudulent. Several bored female tellers gave me the "Oh, honey," look, and I had to point out that my husband had a different card number from me and I should know if I was re-entering the dating world. It was reversed and a new card issued. Nothing more happened.

Constant vigilance! Not just for wizards.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Spring Water on Sundays on January 31, 2013, 01:51:21 PM
Once a guy called me to talk to me about extending the warranty on my Honda.

Me: You have the wrong number, I don't have a Honda.
Him: Oh, what kind of car do you have now? I'll just update your records!
Me: I've never owned a Honda. I'm sorry, you have the wrong number. *click*

Chances are good if he kept calling different phone numbers, he'd get *someone* who had a Honda that was running out of warranty!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: pixel dust on January 31, 2013, 02:10:52 PM
My husband (who's out of the country on business) keeps getting call to our home number (which we never use) from a mortgage place. We rent. We've always rented. We've never owned a home, ever.

Twice now I've answered and told them we rent and twice they mumbled something about being "taken off a list".

 ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: magicdomino on January 31, 2013, 02:44:52 PM
Also, old credit cards a good for scaping dishes  :) (Of course I know they must be destroyed!)

Old credit cards are also good for scraping ice off of a windshield.  New credit cards work too, but you may have to retire them to Internet purchases only.  Apparently, scraping ice doesn't do the magnetic strip a lot of good.   :-\

I've had mystery charges on credit cards twice.  One was definitely fraudulent, as someone bought a cell phone in another city.  The other was a company in England.  I do a fair amount of Internet business, and sometimes the name on the bill is different from the company that I ordered from.  The England charge might have been legitimate.  I challenged it with the credit card company, and cancelled the card anyway.  Since no one complained, I guess it was fraudulent after all.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ica171 on January 31, 2013, 02:54:22 PM
We've had our debit card stolen once and our debit card number stolen once. First time, the actual physical card was stolen. DH had taken the kids trick or treating and drove them to the other end of our neighborhood in the van. The battery was going dead on our remote and when he clicked the button, the door didn't lock. My purse was in the front seat and someone helped themselves to the card. Thankfully they missed the envelopes full of cash.

The second time, we were traveling and stopped to buy some snacks. Card wouldn't go through. YDS is autistic and did not understand that he had to wait for his Lunchable and was having a meltdown. We called the bank and they told us that they'd frozen our account because there had been about $300 of charges at overseas stores. I can't remember exactly what they were for, but it was something like sporting goods, stereo speakers and custom shoes. Thankfully they realized it was fraudulent (although they forgot to reverse the international fees, so DH had to go in and get those done in person, but it was easy) and we had our money back right away.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: NyaChan on January 31, 2013, 03:13:15 PM
I stopped to get gas in the "bad" part of town  ::) back home and dropped my card without noticing.  I made it home when I received a phone call from a police officer letting me know that a little boy had picked it up, gone into the station and tried to buy candy with it.  The store worker took the card and then questioned the boy, who ran off & then called the cops to turn it in.  The very nice police officer met me by the library to return my credit card & and I was very very grateful that I didn't have to tell my dad that all of our Discover cards needed to be tossed.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Thipu1 on January 31, 2013, 05:10:11 PM
A woman with whom we had lunch on a ship had a great story. 

She lived in California.  On her way to work, she used a corporate credit card to buy gas.  This was fine with her employer. 

When she got to work she found a voice mail from the credit card company and immediately responded. 

At 7:30 did she purchase fuel from X service station in Y California?  Yes, she did.

At 8:00 did she purchase $2000 of goodies from Z shop in Tokyo?  No, she most certainly did not. 

Sometimes, credit card companies do get things right.  Neither she nor her employer were charged.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Julian on January 31, 2013, 05:17:40 PM
Nyachan's story reminded me of one a few years back. 

We had a thief at work.  Never did find out who it was.

The thief got into a junior doctor's locker and took his wallet.  Doc was in operating theatre working, so he was unaware of the theft, till he got a phone call from Sgt So-and-so from Local Police Station.  His wallet had been found, intact, and was at the station waiting for collection.  Phew, lucky, hey?  No need to cancel cards now, huh?

So junior doc trundles off to the local police station, where there was no Sgt So-and-so and no wallet.  Thief, meanwhile, had a fabulous time maxxing out his cards.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on January 31, 2013, 07:03:07 PM
Oh that is just evil!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Minmom3 on January 31, 2013, 11:13:48 PM
A long time ago, somebody stole a check from my checkbook at Costco.  They wrote it for about $1300 worth of stuff, using a special business code that only an employee would know to use to get it OK'd without a manager's signature.  The only reason we didn't get dinged for it was we had less than that in the account, and it bounced.  When we disputed it (since I KNEW I'd only spent $150 that day, let alone we didn't have a business account), the bank talked to Costco and put it in their hands.  We had to close the account and call everybody and tell them that we'd be writing them a new check, and why, and I don't know if Costco ever found out which employee did the deed and bought a lot of high end sports equipment on our check...  We ended up not being out a penny, so that worked out well, aside from the huge nuisance of it all.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jules1980 on February 01, 2013, 12:17:54 AM
A woman with whom we had lunch on a ship had a great story. 

She lived in California.  On her way to work, she used a corporate credit card to buy gas.  This was fine with her employer. 

When she got to work she found a voice mail from the credit card company and immediately responded. 

At 7:30 did she purchase fuel from X service station in Y California?  Yes, she did.

At 8:00 did she purchase $2000 of goodies from Z shop in Tokyo?  No, she most certainly did not. 

Sometimes, credit card companies do get things right.  Neither she nor her employer were charged.

When my ex was overseas in the military, I would get lots of calls like this because the PX and other 'shops' would run his debit card and the charges would show up as whereever the store's homebase was. 

So I might get a call because I bought gas in Louisiana, then later that day (but not long enough to travel any real distance) our account would ping for Dallas, Texas (PX) then 20 minutes later in New York City (commisary), then ten minutes later in California (some fast food place).  I must have explained it a million times, but I was still glad they did it just on the off chance that one of our cards was stolen.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ACBNYC on February 01, 2013, 07:41:21 AM
A long time ago, somebody stole a check from my checkbook at Costco.  They wrote it for about $1300 worth of stuff, using a special business code that only an employee would know to use to get it OK'd without a manager's signature.  The only reason we didn't get dinged for it was we had less than that in the account, and it bounced.  When we disputed it (since I KNEW I'd only spent $150 that day, let alone we didn't have a business account), the bank talked to Costco and put it in their hands.  We had to close the account and call everybody and tell them that we'd be writing them a new check, and why, and I don't know if Costco ever found out which employee did the deed and bought a lot of high end sports equipment on our check...  We ended up not being out a penny, so that worked out well, aside from the huge nuisance of it all.

I had a purse stolen, oh, probably twelve years ago now. They took my checkbook and wrote a bunch of checks--KMart and Best Buy are the two I remember--for thousands. They also used one of my credit cards but for much smaller purchases at a gas station and Macy's. I didn't have to pay anything. Even better, one of the retailers sent a collection agency after me (and I'd already shown them the notarized bank letter stating that I was not responsible for payment). The demand letter contained a threat, which is illegal under the Fair Debt Collections Act. My best friend was a consumer rights lawyer. He contacted the collection agency, and the guy called him and settled immediately. So I ended up *making* money---over $1,000--from the whole thing. That was the great part, but it was still an unbelievable hassle to clear my name.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on February 01, 2013, 08:19:11 AM
I got a phone call from my credit card company one Saturday afternoon, asking me if I'd just ordered $15,000 of diamond jewelry online from Macy's.  :o

They weren't the brightest candles in the bunch. Since it was an online order, Macy's didn't ship the goods until they'd confirmed it with my credit card company. Buying some smaller stuff in person would have been better.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Carotte on February 01, 2013, 08:28:53 AM

I had a purse stolen, oh, probably twelve years ago now. They took my checkbook and wrote a bunch of checks--KMart and Best Buy are the two I remember--for thousands.

Don't retailers require ID for such large sums? Here you have to show something like two proof of ID for a check over 100€ (something like 140$°
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Kiara on February 01, 2013, 08:33:11 AM
They do, but they don't look real well at the ID most times.  For several years, I didn't look at all like my ID picture - I had lost 200 pounds and cut and dyed my hair.  ONE person commented.  For two years, the address on my ID didn't match the address on my checks - I'd moved, and instead of getting a new license, I got the paper change of address add on.  No one ever commented or asked for that second form.

So it was kind of eye opening on how little having an ID check matters.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ACBNYC on February 01, 2013, 08:45:32 AM
Either they weren't looking--my wallet had my ID in it, so they had an ID that matched the name--, they didn't look at all, or they the retail cashiers were friends of theirs who would put fraudulent transactions through.  >:(
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Harriet Jones on February 01, 2013, 09:35:42 AM
I had just opened a checking account and was waiting on the first box of checks to be delivered.   I discovered that someone had stolen the box of checks when I checked the balance over the phone.  They only had written a few checks, one for a magazine that was subsequently delivered to my house.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Thipu1 on February 01, 2013, 10:25:58 AM
Credit card companies do get it right sometimes. 

For a while, a CW was living in NYC, interviewing for a job in the UK and visiting inlaws in Scandanavia for several weeks at a time.  this resulted in a number of charges that could legitimately be regarded as 'suspicious'. 

She was overseas at the time the call came to our office but I was able to explain the situation to the lady from the credit card company.   
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 01, 2013, 10:32:48 AM
My dad had one of his cc's used frauduletnly, shortly after he and my mom moved from NJ to VA.  They used to have one gas cc, and paid it off every month.  my dad was meticulous about paying bills, and had everything in spreadsheets. So one day he realizes he hasn’t seen a bill from said gas company. So he calls. They tell him, oh, Mr. Siamesecat, we sent the bill to the NEW address, the one in Brooklyn you changed your account to, when you added a third card to the account!

He was none too pleased since he hadn’t done that, nor had added a third card, but he was especially displeased that they couldn’t say exactly how or why an additional card had been added to the account!  This was about 8 years ago, when gas prices were just starting to rise, and there was already several hundred dollars in unauthorized charges. Since they couldn’t explain to his satisfaction, he cancelled the account then and there. And later on, there were more charges for the stuff you can buy off the bill inserts. He wasn’t responsible for any of the charges, but he also wasn’t happy with their lax security when it came to customer accounts.

My guess is it was an inside job, or someone copied his card # when he bought gas, and was able to use that to add the extra card.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on February 01, 2013, 10:36:36 AM
I forget how it happened, but my next door neighbor had her wallet stolen without her knowledge. She found out an hour or so later when she got a call from a store. A man & a woman were trying to buy something with her credit card. The woman presented my neighbor's drivers license as ID.

The store clerk didn't have much trouble noticing that the person presenting the credit card didn't look anything like the person in the drivers license photo. Different hair color, eye color, height, face, and, oh yes, one had very dark skin; the other was extremely pale. Apparently the thief hadn't bothered to see if she could get away with the license, or perhaps thought the clerk wouldn't notice.

The store called the police, but also called my neighbor. The store was able to stall the thieves until the police showed up.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: lilfox on February 01, 2013, 12:49:16 PM
This wasn't a scam, but I'm not sure what was going on - a reverse scam?

I got a call from a company, I think it was Macy's, following up about an expensive purchase and asking me to confirm it was legit.  The call was to my home number, asking for me by name, but the credit card number being used wasn't one of mine.  (The rep read the type of card and last 4 digits and I knew it didn't match any of my cards)  The only thing I could think was that someone tried to order me a surprise gift but given the expense, type of item, and time of year, that was very, very unlikely.

I had them cancel the transaction.  I figured whoever really ordered it wouldn't receive it anyway, so might as well save them (and me) the trouble of following up on a lost delivery.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on February 01, 2013, 01:24:45 PM
This wasn't a scam, but I'm not sure what was going on - a reverse scam?

I got a call from a company, I think it was Macy's, following up about an expensive purchase and asking me to confirm it was legit.  The call was to my home number, asking for me by name, but the credit card number being used wasn't one of mine.  (The rep read the type of card and last 4 digits and I knew it didn't match any of my cards)  The only thing I could think was that someone tried to order me a surprise gift but given the expense, type of item, and time of year, that was very, very unlikely.

I had them cancel the transaction.  I figured whoever really ordered it wouldn't receive it anyway, so might as well save them (and me) the trouble of following up on a lost delivery.

I would check your credit report if I were you to make sure that no one has opened a new credit card in your name.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Yvaine on February 01, 2013, 01:25:53 PM
This wasn't a scam, but I'm not sure what was going on - a reverse scam?

I got a call from a company, I think it was Macy's, following up about an expensive purchase and asking me to confirm it was legit.  The call was to my home number, asking for me by name, but the credit card number being used wasn't one of mine.  (The rep read the type of card and last 4 digits and I knew it didn't match any of my cards)  The only thing I could think was that someone tried to order me a surprise gift but given the expense, type of item, and time of year, that was very, very unlikely.

I had them cancel the transaction.  I figured whoever really ordered it wouldn't receive it anyway, so might as well save them (and me) the trouble of following up on a lost delivery.

I would check your credit report if I were you to make sure that no one has opened a new credit card in your name.

I'm also curious whether they have another customer with the exact same name and have gotten their wires crossed.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on February 01, 2013, 01:45:24 PM
This wasn't a scam, but I'm not sure what was going on - a reverse scam?

I got a call from a company, I think it was Macy's, following up about an expensive purchase and asking me to confirm it was legit.  The call was to my home number, asking for me by name, but the credit card number being used wasn't one of mine.  (The rep read the type of card and last 4 digits and I knew it didn't match any of my cards)  The only thing I could think was that someone tried to order me a surprise gift but given the expense, type of item, and time of year, that was very, very unlikely.

I had them cancel the transaction.  I figured whoever really ordered it wouldn't receive it anyway, so might as well save them (and me) the trouble of following up on a lost delivery.

I would check your credit report if I were you to make sure that no one has opened a new credit card in your name.

I'm also curious whether they have another customer with the exact same name and have gotten their wires crossed.

Or contact info - my parents used to have a Discover card (but cancelled it a while ago), as I currently do, and for some time, every time Discover wanted to talk to me about something, they called my parents home number. This was in 2009-ish, and I hadn't lived with Mom & Dad since about 1997. Took several tries to get that sorted out.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on February 01, 2013, 02:01:48 PM
Credit card companies do get it right sometimes. 

For a while, a CW was living in NYC, interviewing for a job in the UK and visiting inlaws in Scandanavia for several weeks at a time.  this resulted in a number of charges that could legitimately be regarded as 'suspicious'. 

She was overseas at the time the call came to our office but I was able to explain the situation to the lady from the credit card company.
And how did the credit card lady know that it wasn't YOU playing fast and loose with CW's credit card?  We know that you weren't, but Credit Card Lady taking the word of a co-worker doesn't seem quite kosher.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: starry diadem on February 01, 2013, 02:12:54 PM
Credit card companies do get it right sometimes. 

For a while, a CW was living in NYC, interviewing for a job in the UK and visiting inlaws in Scandanavia for several weeks at a time.  this resulted in a number of charges that could legitimately be regarded as 'suspicious'. 

She was overseas at the time the call came to our office but I was able to explain the situation to the lady from the credit card company.


They talked to you about your co-worker's account?  Wow.  Not a cc company I'd want to do business with, no matter that it worked to her advantage that time.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: VorFemme on February 01, 2013, 03:10:45 PM
Credit card companies do get it right sometimes. 

For a while, a CW was living in NYC, interviewing for a job in the UK and visiting inlaws in Scandanavia for several weeks at a time.  this resulted in a number of charges that could legitimately be regarded as 'suspicious'. 

She was overseas at the time the call came to our office but I was able to explain the situation to the lady from the credit card company.


They talked to you about your co-worker's account?  Wow.  Not a cc company I'd want to do business with, no matter that it worked to her advantage that time.

I'm wondering if it might have been a business card that could ALSO be used for personal expenses, as long as the employee paid all the personal charges every billing period (so that the business didn't have to pay any interest). 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: snowfire on February 01, 2013, 04:03:53 PM
If the phone call about the suspicious CC activity came to Thipu1's office, it probably was a company card.  Phone number on a personal card would have gone to a home phone.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: sunnygirl on February 01, 2013, 05:01:10 PM
I once received a piece of mail to my address, but some random name, thanking me for my purchase of a mobile phone and welcoming me to that particular network (I didn't open it, it was one of those things where the papers are encased in clear plastic). I never got any bills, so I have no idea why someone would buy a phone and give a fake address. I kept getting statements from the phone company so obviously they were paying the bill.

On the other hand, once when I was very sick I did something extremely stupid and left a cc in the card reader in a shop in Heathrow airport, on my way to Iceland. Didn't manage to cancel it till the next day, yet it was never used. Guess I got very lucky. Then later that day I discovered one of my other ccs had been blocked by the bank after the first time I used it there. Which is fine, except I'd used it in China, India and some African countries without it being blocked. So me swanning all over Asia and Africa making in some cases some quite large purchases doesn't set off any warnings, but buying a single pizza in Reykjavik does??
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: HoneyBee42 on February 01, 2013, 05:42:55 PM
I've had my bank call me when I've been overseas due to the cards being used there.  Yeah, by me!   :D

These days I call them before I go away.
My parents once had trouble w/ their cards getting declined.  They (being happily married for 40+ years) are both users on the same cc acct.  My mother was visiting me while I was living in Syracuse, NY while my father was here in southern IL (where I live now--I was being held up by my ex fighting everything along the way in the divorce--I ended up getting everything that I had asked for and he got everything I had originally offered him in the opt-out ... but the car was impounded when he was arrested and he also got a felony conviction which wasn't part of my original opt-out offer).  So, they were about 850 miles apart and both using their cards until suddenly they couldn't.  Fortunately, a call to the card company got it straightened out for them.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on February 02, 2013, 01:26:21 PM
So me swanning all over Asia and Africa making in some cases some quite large purchases doesn't set off any warnings, but buying a single pizza in Reykjavik does??

I don't know - how expensive is an Icelandic pizza?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Thipu1 on February 02, 2013, 01:36:16 PM
If the phone call about the suspicious CC activity came to Thipu1's office, it probably was a company card.  Phone number on a personal card would have gone to a home phone.


You know, this never bothered me until I mentioned it here, but it does seem odd.  This was also around 2000 when practices were a little different than they are now. 

It wasn't a company card.  The museum didn't use those. 

The lady didn't mention any specific purchases. She just mentioned the pattern of charges coming from three countries on a fairly regular basis.   I think she believed me because I told her t CW was expected back to work on X date and she might want to call at that time. 
   
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Yarnspinner on February 02, 2013, 04:50:01 PM
My neighbor, Emily Gale, age 93, is the target of dozens and dozens of what are probably fairly legit scams, but they smack of scam nonetheless.  In the past few months she has asked me to explain a number of pieces of mail she has received and in most cases, I have said "Tear it up."

They usually take one of the following two forms:

1) "Emily Gale!  You are responsible for the watermain at (street address of the condominium we live in) and it could cost you thousands!  You need to send $XXX now!"  All of it is in large font.  Below in tiny letters it reads "Don't let this happen to you, send $XX dollars today to get your Home Water Insurance!
I told her (again, last week) that her common charges PAY FOR THIS and she should toss this one in the trash.

2) Same deal.  This time sent to HR Director Emily Gale, asking if she has put up the appropriate posters about new IRS practices for her employees.  If not, "You may be fined thousands of dollars".  It was sent in a very authentic looking IRS peel apart envelope with the very authentic lettering the IRS uses.  And I explained again that the company sending it (tiny tiny letters spelling out "Personal Concepts Inc."--I am betting they meant "Personnel") was just trying to get money out of her.

And then because we live in a city where there is really only ONE political party, though the other one always runs a mayoral candidate just for chuckles, she received dozens of begging letters from Majority Party soliciting funds to defeat the minority party, complete with tales of the evil minority party would do to senior citizens if ever they managed to get their hot little paws on the mayoralty.  What really confuddled her was the fact that most of these were addressed to Henry Gale, her husband of fifty years....who has been DEAD for twenty years.  I suggested she write the party a letter telling them that, as his name was taken off the voter's registrar years ago (her kids saw to it) that she should send the letters back, directing the people in charge to send the letters to the cemetary where Henry is buried.

It's bad enough when "businesses" try to scam seniors, but when the political clout that claims to protect the same folks tries the same sort of stunts, I really want to go slap people until their heads spin on their necks like Linda Blair's.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: twilight on February 02, 2013, 06:09:29 PM
When I was in New Orleans, I was sorely tempted to try the cup-and-ball game. Not because I thought it was possible to win anything, but I was interested in watching the way the scam went down. If I hadn't been on my own, I would have tried, but I was worried about making myself a target for something worse if I drew attention to myself as a mark.

When I was 4 my parents let me play the cup and ball game at a carnival and I won on my first try!!  The guy manning the booth was astonished (his mouth literally dropped open)  and tried to claim I cheated and would not give me the prize.  My dad made a big stink and the crowd that saw me win fair and square started getting angry so he finally relented but refused to let me throw my 2 remaining balls.  According to the rules I could pick any prize so I of course wanted the monstrously huge pink teddy bear that was hanging from the very top of the booth.  The guy tried to talk me into taking some little dinky trinket but my heart was set on the bear.  It took him and another guy ten minutes to get it down.  He told us that in the five years he had been working there no one had ever won before and they never had to get one of the big prizes down.  The bear was quite dusty but I loved it.

edited to add:
I just realized you are refering to a totally different ball and cup game that my parents would most definately not allowed me to play, especially at the age of 4. :D
LOL!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: sunnygirl on February 02, 2013, 07:54:52 PM
So me swanning all over Asia and Africa making in some cases some quite large purchases doesn't set off any warnings, but buying a single pizza in Reykjavik does??

I don't know - how expensive is an Icelandic pizza?
Cheaper than basically everything else in Iceland, hence why I ended up eating it about five times in six days.  ;)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: kherbert05 on February 03, 2013, 07:21:01 AM
I was house sitting for my parents and got a phone call from their CC company. We went around and around because of privacy rules. Finally I said They are currently driving from San Angelo to Houston. They will probably stop in either Kerrville at the Exxon and BBQ place or at Franks in Schulenburg. They will get to Houston about X time and I'll leave a message for them to call you.


Turned out that an employee from a company that marketed stuff in Time magazines had stolen a bunch of CC numbers and gone to Las Vegas. My parents were told the cops had to let him go before they had returned the call and it was to late to press charges. That didn't make sense. It had only been a couple of hours - so no way the statue of limitations had run out.  >:D 


Mom let Dad have it with both barrels. He had taken to filling out all those "free trial" offers that came in the magazines getting the "prize" then cancelling. That is were the guy got the CC number from.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Tea Drinker on February 03, 2013, 09:08:48 AM
Most likely, the "time limit" was when a specific police officer's shift ended, and they weren't going to pay overtime for him to wait for someone whose card had been stolen to call back. That sounds like the relevant police department doesn't want to take a lot of trouble about a non-violent crime whose victims are in another state and thus unlikely to call and complain. (There are rules about how long a suspect can be held without charges, but it seems unlikely that they had taken long enough to call your parents for that to take effect.)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on February 03, 2013, 09:56:59 AM
I was loading groceries into my car yesterday when a woman came up and started talking non stop about how she would never, ever ask for money, but this is terrible, her bank goof ed and all her money was stolen and her kids are starving, and the rent is due, and I don't know what all. I tuned her out and kept loading groceries. Even though I was rather clearly ignoring her, she went on and on. When I was done, I looked at her and said, "sorry, but no" and got in my car.

She might have been more convincing had she not been taking swigs out of a beer bottle.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hillia on February 03, 2013, 12:39:50 PM
My brother's first wife called my mom when he was overseas in Kuwait and told her that she was pregnant and that the Army had messed up his paycheck and she was broke.  My mom sent her money for 'bills' and several care packages of maternity clothes, baby stuff, etc.  Turns out that his paycheck was being deposited just fine, and while she was pregnant, it wasn't with Bro's baby.  She disappeared with all the money from their checking and savings accounts, plus maxed out the cash advances on their credit cards, then resurfaced in New Orleans with her baby daddy.  After he dumped her, she and her parents asked my brother if he would claim paternity so she could have the baby in an Army hospital.  He declined.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Morrigan on February 03, 2013, 03:07:43 PM
I just got these two scams in my (works) inbox within 4 hours of each other.  Names changed, but all else is what I got. 

Hello,
 
Sorry to bother you with this. Am presently in Belgium with my cousin who is suffering from a kidney disease and must undergo a Kidney Transplant. I am deeply sorry for not writing or calling you before leaving, the news of her illness  arrived to me as an emergency and she needs family support to keep her going, I hope you understand my plight and pardon  me.
Kidney Transplant is expensive here, I want her to have the surgery at home, Am  wondering if you can help me. I need $2,500 to make necessary arrangements; I traveled with little money due to the short time I had to prepare for this trip and never expected things to be the way it is right now. I'll  pay you back once I get home, I need to get her home ASAP because she is going through a lot of pain at the moment and the doctor advised that she has to be operated on time to avoid any complications. I will really appreciate  whatever amount you can come up with. Let me know, please get back to me asap.
 
Thanks
 
Love Marcy  xx

Hello,
 
Sorry to bother you with this. Am presently in Belgium with my cousin who is suffering from a kidney disease and must undergo a Kidney Transplant. I am deeply sorry for not writing or calling you before leaving, the news of her illness  arrived to me as an emergency and she needs family support to keep her going, I hope you understand my plight and pardon  me.
Kidney Transplant is expensive here, I want her to have the surgery at home, Am  wondering if you can help me. I need $2,500 to make necessary arrangements; I traveled with little money due to the short time I had to prepare for this trip and never expected things to be the way it is right now. I'll  pay you back once I get home, I need to get her home ASAP because she is going through a lot of pain at the moment and the doctor advised that she has to be operated on time to avoid any complications. I will really appreciate  whatever amount you can come up with. Let me know, please get back to me asap.
 
Sincerely
Carl
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on February 03, 2013, 03:15:06 PM
^^^  Multiple personalities?   ;D

Well, either that or the one woman has a whole bunch of caring cousins who took that trip to Belgium with her!   :-\
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: PastryGoddess on February 03, 2013, 03:15:16 PM
You should email them both back and ask them who is worthier to receive your money.  :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Margo on February 05, 2013, 08:48:17 AM
Heh! I got one very similar, recently, purporting to be from a client of mine.

Except that it was my client's father who was seriously ill in Belgium and needing a Kidney Transplant, and he urgently needed us to let him have £1,500.

Which seemed odd, for a man who is a multi-millionaire. Party as a result of inheriting his late father's very substantial estate. .

Poor man's e-mail account had been hacked and the message sent to all of his contacts. it was pretty sophisticated as the mail came from his address and was signed in his name
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Carotte on February 05, 2013, 09:51:38 AM
Heh! I got one very similar, recently, purporting to be from a client of mine.

Except that it was my client's father who was seriously ill in Belgium and needing a Kidney Transplant, and he urgently needed us to let him have £1,500.

Which seemed odd, for a man who is a multi-millionaire. Party as a result of inheriting his late father's very substantial estate. .

Poor man's e-mail account had been hacked and the message sent to all of his contacts. it was pretty sophisticated as the mail came from his address and was signed in his name

I don't remember the details and technicalities but I don't think your email account has to be actually hacked for someone to send mail 'coming' from your adress. Altho if it was signed with the same name then maybe it was, I don't think bots are clever enough or take the time to do that, I should ask a friend who works in IT security.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Yvaine on February 05, 2013, 10:02:04 AM
Heh! I got one very similar, recently, purporting to be from a client of mine.

Except that it was my client's father who was seriously ill in Belgium and needing a Kidney Transplant, and he urgently needed us to let him have £1,500.

Which seemed odd, for a man who is a multi-millionaire. Party as a result of inheriting his late father's very substantial estate. .

Poor man's e-mail account had been hacked and the message sent to all of his contacts. it was pretty sophisticated as the mail came from his address and was signed in his name

I don't remember the details and technicalities but I don't think your email account has to be actually hacked for someone to send mail 'coming' from your adress. Altho if it was signed with the same name then maybe it was, I don't think bots are clever enough or take the time to do that, I should ask a friend who works in IT security.

Yes, this. There's some way that the address can come from another person's address book, so the person who was actually hacked might not be the one who's "sending" it. The hacker might hack Bob and the email yoinks Sue's name out of Bob's address book, and then everybody gets a spam email from Sue even though her actual account is fine.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Yarnspinner on February 05, 2013, 10:24:24 AM
Here's one for which I am completely stymied:

Sweet elderly male patron calls me to his computer where he is having trouble getting the site to work properly.  After I get the thing working (and he praises me highly) I get a quick look at what he is doing:

He's advertising "an oopurtiny too get in on ground floor OF GREAT INVEsTMENT VenTURE CAPiol GhaNA CORP."  All investors have to do is send him a minimum of $200,000.

I wonder if he even knows what he's doing is illegal.  I DO know from experience that telling him won't work. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on February 05, 2013, 11:45:43 AM
^^^^^^^  You have got to get me the email address!  I am always looking for an oopurnity to make money. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on February 05, 2013, 11:51:32 AM
^^^^^^^  You have got to get me the email address!  I am always looking for an oopurnity to make money.

Yeah, and we all need  suggestions as to what we can do with that spare $200,000 we have just lying around!   ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on February 05, 2013, 12:00:00 PM
Heh! I got one very similar, recently, purporting to be from a client of mine.

Except that it was my client's father who was seriously ill in Belgium and needing a Kidney Transplant, and he urgently needed us to let him have £1,500.

Which seemed odd, for a man who is a multi-millionaire. Party as a result of inheriting his late father's very substantial estate. .

Poor man's e-mail account had been hacked and the message sent to all of his contacts. it was pretty sophisticated as the mail came from his address and was signed in his name

I don't remember the details and technicalities but I don't think your email account has to be actually hacked for someone to send mail 'coming' from your adress. Altho if it was signed with the same name then maybe it was, I don't think bots are clever enough or take the time to do that, I should ask a friend who works in IT security.

Yes, this. There's some way that the address can come from another person's address book, so the person who was actually hacked might not be the one who's "sending" it. The hacker might hack Bob and the email yoinks Sue's name out of Bob's address book, and then everybody gets a spam email from Sue even though her actual account is fine.

I'm trying to figure out this one... Mom gets an email with a link to some random sales site that says it comes from me, but isn't from my address. Think a sender line like "From: marysmith@domain.com (JediKaiti)". It's like they got my Mom's address, used my name, but didn't bother spoofing the sender address?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on February 05, 2013, 12:18:48 PM
I enter a lot of contests, and I've actually won a couple of small prizes (an iPod one year, and an iPad the next).  Therefore, when I got an e-mail purportedly from Coca-Cola saying that I'd won a large sum of money, I was very excited ...

... until I realized that the currency in question was British pounds.  I never enter anything but Canadian contests.  One quick Google search later confirmed that this was the Big Scam-ola. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: WillyNilly on February 05, 2013, 12:22:00 PM
Heh! I got one very similar, recently, purporting to be from a client of mine.

Except that it was my client's father who was seriously ill in Belgium and needing a Kidney Transplant, and he urgently needed us to let him have £1,500.

Which seemed odd, for a man who is a multi-millionaire. Party as a result of inheriting his late father's very substantial estate. .

Poor man's e-mail account had been hacked and the message sent to all of his contacts. it was pretty sophisticated as the mail came from his address and was signed in his name

I don't remember the details and technicalities but I don't think your email account has to be actually hacked for someone to send mail 'coming' from your adress. Altho if it was signed with the same name then maybe it was, I don't think bots are clever enough or take the time to do that, I should ask a friend who works in IT security.

Yes, this. There's some way that the address can come from another person's address book, so the person who was actually hacked might not be the one who's "sending" it. The hacker might hack Bob and the email yoinks Sue's name out of Bob's address book, and then everybody gets a spam email from Sue even though her actual account is fine.

I'm trying to figure out this one... Mom gets an email with a link to some random sales site that says it comes from me, but isn't from my address. Think a sender line like "From: marysmith@domain.com (JediKaiti)". It's like they got my Mom's address, used my name, but didn't bother spoofing the sender address?

My favorite is when I get one's from myself (when I check the email details its not my email address, but at quick glance to my inbox that's the sender name that come up).
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Carotte on February 05, 2013, 12:35:35 PM
I guess it can be usefull here:

At least with gmail you can enter your address ( youradress@gmail.com) as youradress+something@gmail.com. Say you enter a contest or join a maillinglist, you can put youradress+bbc@gmail.com. That way you can track any mail that seems suspicious, if you receive a 'lottery winner!' from youradress+bbc@gmail.com, then you know it's a fake (and that the bbc sold your adress).
Sadly some website think there's an error and doesn't accept the +something as part of a real email, but it makes it easier to redirect spam if you flag the entire address.
If you're not with gmail (or even then) you can try it by sending yourself a test mail.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on February 05, 2013, 01:11:10 PM
OOOOOOhhhh, I did not know that - thanks!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on February 05, 2013, 01:19:34 PM
So long as the form developer followed the actual email address specs and not some made up permitted characters test.

A lot of times, poorly created forms will claim that an email containing a '+' is invalid.

 /end rant about people who do poorly in my own profession
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: magicdomino on February 05, 2013, 01:29:00 PM
If someone calls claming to be a U.S. Marshal from the Federal Crime Division, about paying your student loan Right Now, and threatens to arrest you if you don't call back within 25 minutes with money, it is a scam.

If you are the "U.S. Marshal" doing the calling, do not call a young woman who will ask her mother for advice.  You will receive a call back within 25 minutes, but it will be from Mama Bear who has (1) called the United States Marshals Service to verify that you are full of it, and (2) Googled "Federal Crime Division."  I don't know what the result was, but I'm sure it wasn't etiquette-approved.  :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 05, 2013, 05:34:04 PM
Haha - I just got one. I answered even though the name on my caller id was gibberish and i didn't recognize the number. It was some guy, who could barely speak English, calling about my "microsoft windows computer" nice try since they don't really make computers, and I know its a scam. I just said, hey, I know this is a scam, goodbye and hung up. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BabylonSister on February 05, 2013, 07:19:45 PM
Yesterday I got a call saying "Your credit card company has allowed us to call you to offer you a lower rate."


Erm... I don't have a credit card.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: WolfWay on February 06, 2013, 05:00:28 AM
Incidentally, it's pretty easy to spoof a "from" email address if you compose the email inside code. You can put anything you want inside the "from" field when you create it inside code.

We had a practical joker developer at work who spoofed a goofy email from a coworker to tease her. It was easy for everyone in the office to know it didn't come from her pc since she had been standing at the other end of the office from her locked PC.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on February 06, 2013, 08:37:32 AM
Haha - I just got one. I answered even though the name on my caller id was gibberish and i didn't recognize the number. It was some guy, who could barely speak English, calling about my "microsoft windows computer" nice try since they don't really make computers, and I know its a scam. I just said, hey, I know this is a scam, goodbye and hung up.

This is a common scam, and one that, as you point out, doesn't make much sense. Presumably there are enough people out there who believe that Microsoft can see into your computer, and wants to help you, though.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Girlie on February 06, 2013, 09:14:20 AM
Can I just tell you how much I ADORE the phone calls I've recieved ever since buying tickets to a local (but supposedly professional) orchestra? Apparently, they sell phone numbers, and then victims - er, customers - will have the privilege of recieving dozens of phone calls about buying "cheap" tickets to see them again (yeah, right).
The phone numbers are ALWAYS unlisted, and they NEVER leave voicemail. The only way I know what's going is because I've looked the phone numbers up on Google and others have related their experiences.

I will NEVER buy tickets for this orchestra again. I do not appreciate having my information sold.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Thipu1 on February 06, 2013, 09:18:27 AM
Have you contacted the orchestra about this?  There's a possibility that the organization doesn't know about this. 

There have been instances in which a low-level employee has stolen information and is using it for personal gain. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 06, 2013, 09:42:41 AM
Haha - I just got one. I answered even though the name on my caller id was gibberish and i didn't recognize the number. It was some guy, who could barely speak English, calling about my "microsoft windows computer" nice try since they don't really make computers, and I know its a scam. I just said, hey, I know this is a scam, goodbye and hung up.

This is a common scam, and one that, as you point out, doesn't make much sense. Presumably there are enough people out there who believe that Microsoft can see into your computer, and wants to help you, though.

Oh I know. Sadly, a lot of people get taken in scams like this. My mom, who is close to 80, is not, however, one of them. She is quite spry, and totally with it. She has, however, sent me emails or asked me about certain emails she's received, either from spammers or friends sending her stuff that isn't quite true.

But she's like me, VERY suspicoius, and wont' fall for anything.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: weeblewobble on February 06, 2013, 10:02:19 AM
Can I just tell you how much I ADORE the phone calls I've recieved ever since buying tickets to a local (but supposedly professional) orchestra? Apparently, they sell phone numbers, and then victims - er, customers - will have the privilege of recieving dozens of phone calls about buying "cheap" tickets to see them again (yeah, right).
The phone numbers are ALWAYS unlisted, and they NEVER leave voicemail. The only way I know what's going is because I've looked the phone numbers up on Google and others have related their experiences.

I will NEVER buy tickets for this orchestra again. I do not appreciate having my information sold.

Have you considered contacting your local news media?  Because if my local orchestra did this, there would be news stories out the wazooo.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elisabunny on February 06, 2013, 11:48:26 AM
Yesterday I got a phone call supposedly about my dental and vision insurance.  "Let's go over your info and then I'll tell you about this super-duper new benefit!"

It may have been legit, but sounded suspicious, so I gave my standard, "Just send me the info in the mail, thanks, gotta go."
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: sunnygirl on February 07, 2013, 10:37:36 PM
I just got a spam/scam email from "The King of Narnia." WOW.

Bet it's Edmund.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on February 07, 2013, 10:42:01 PM
I just got a spam/scam email from "The King of Narnia." WOW.

Bet it's Edmund.

LOL!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: atirial on February 08, 2013, 04:05:21 AM
Haha - I just got one. I answered even though the name on my caller id was gibberish and i didn't recognize the number. It was some guy, who could barely speak English, calling about my "microsoft windows computer" nice try since they don't really make computers, and I know its a scam. I just said, hey, I know this is a scam, goodbye and hung up.
This one really annoys me. I've taken to sounding blank and telling them we don't have PCs. It seems to throw them.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Seven Ate Nine on February 08, 2013, 07:08:52 AM
Haha - I just got one. I answered even though the name on my caller id was gibberish and i didn't recognize the number. It was some guy, who could barely speak English, calling about my "microsoft windows computer" nice try since they don't really make computers, and I know its a scam. I just said, hey, I know this is a scam, goodbye and hung up.
This one really annoys me. I've taken to sounding blank and telling them we don't have PCs. It seems to throw them.

I have heard that telling them you run Linnux typically breaks their script and they'll leave you alone.

My mom clicked on one of those "Make my PC faster" websites.  Got a message that her computer was infected and she'd need to pay $40 a month for 3 years to keep it clean.  She called them up to get the info (she's actually pretty tech savvy, but she's fallen a bit behind).  After a few minutes of the hard sell, she said she'd have to talk to her son in law about it.  The guy on the phone gave her the phone number to call back, then she mentioned that her son in law is the CIO of a company.  The guy on the phone told her that he didn't expect he'd be hearing back from her.  >:D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Yarnspinner on February 08, 2013, 08:16:44 AM
I just got a spam/scam email from "The King of Narnia." WOW.

Bet it's Edmund.

LOL!

Could be the witch, 'cause you never know.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: weeblewobble on February 08, 2013, 10:10:28 AM
I just got a spam/scam email from "The King of Narnia." WOW.

Bet it's Edmund.

LOL!

HIGH KING Edmund.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on February 08, 2013, 11:48:29 AM
Has anyone responded to the message that 3 of your Facebook friends have defriended you?

I won't touch it, of course, but I wonder what the scam is - or unnecessary way to part with my cash, anyway.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jules1980 on February 08, 2013, 11:55:24 AM
I haven't, even if its not a scam I could care less if someone defriends me.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Kiara on February 08, 2013, 11:59:13 AM
It's a scam of SOME sort.  I've gotten that message, and I'm not on Facebook.   ;)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on February 08, 2013, 12:26:21 PM
Has anyone responded to the message that 3 of your Facebook friends have defriended you?

I won't touch it, of course, but I wonder what the scam is - or unnecessary way to part with my cash, anyway.

No, I haven't responded to it, but I have gotten it and find it quite interesting since I am not now nor ever have been on Facebook!   ???

Apparently the whole world has 'defriended' me!   ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on February 08, 2013, 12:29:38 PM
It's a scam of SOME sort.  I've gotten that message, and I'm not on Facebook.   ;)

No, I haven't responded to it, but I have gotten it and find it quite interesting since I am not now nor ever have been on Facebook!   ???

Apparently the whole world has 'defriended' me!   ;D

Those explain a lot right there! Thanks.

We only have 50 friends, most family, so it is pretty easy to see if we have been defriended.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on February 08, 2013, 01:40:02 PM
Has anyone responded to the message that 3 of your Facebook friends have defriended you?

I won't touch it, of course, but I wonder what the scam is - or unnecessary way to part with my cash, anyway.

No, I haven't responded to it, but I have gotten it and find it quite interesting since I am not now nor ever have been on Facebook!   ???

Apparently the whole world has 'defriended' me!   ;D

Presumably, it's bait to make you click on a link, which either tries to plant some sort of malware, or sell you something - "Want to know who they are? Enter your credit card info here, and it's all yours!"
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RingTailedLemur on February 08, 2013, 02:15:12 PM
Has anyone responded to the message that 3 of your Facebook friends have defriended you?

I won't touch it, of course, but I wonder what the scam is - or unnecessary way to part with my cash, anyway.

No, I haven't responded to it, but I have gotten it and find it quite interesting since I am not now nor ever have been on Facebook!   ???

Apparently the whole world has 'defriended' me!   ;D

Presumably, it's bait to make you click on a link, which either tries to plant some sort of malware, or sell you something - "Want to know who they are? Enter your credit card info here, and it's all yours!"

Or "download this piece of software to find out".
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeBeret on February 08, 2013, 02:27:41 PM

I had a purse stolen, oh, probably twelve years ago now. They took my checkbook and wrote a bunch of checks--KMart and Best Buy are the two I remember--for thousands.

Don't retailers require ID for such large sums? Here you have to show something like two proof of ID for a check over 100€ (something like 140$°

When my checkbook was stolen, the thief made a fake ID in my name and used that to pass several thousand dollars' worth of checks.

Thankfully I was not held liable for any of the checks. Unthankfully, one of the checks has been bouncing around different collection agencies for the past three years and is now stuck on my credit report, despite sending all appropriate paperwork to the credit bureaus as well as each collection agency. >:( The credit bureaus and collection agencies consider me liable because a [fake] ID in my name was presented. I've given up fighting it at this point.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeBeret on February 08, 2013, 02:37:53 PM
Haha - I just got one. I answered even though the name on my caller id was gibberish and i didn't recognize the number. It was some guy, who could barely speak English, calling about my "microsoft windows computer" nice try since they don't really make computers, and I know its a scam. I just said, hey, I know this is a scam, goodbye and hung up.
This one really annoys me. I've taken to sounding blank and telling them we don't have PCs. It seems to throw them.

I have never gotten one of these calls. But if I ever do, I plan to say "A computer? No...no...I don't have a computer. I do have a typewriter, though, can you see into that?"
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on February 08, 2013, 02:47:58 PM
I've done that.  At the time it was true because I didn't have a home computer.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 12, 2013, 01:20:38 PM
I am a member of Barnes & Noble book stores. I pay once a year to renew and I do save quite a bit of money over the year. Two years ago, while in a store, I was told my membership was past due, and asked if I wanted to pay. I did and had the cashier add it to my total. I then saw that I was billed on my credit card two days before.

Barnes & Noble would not credit my account, and I ended up going through the credit card issuer to get a refund.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on February 12, 2013, 01:24:29 PM
I just got an email from "Becky" with the subject line telling me that her husband is not home *wink.*  With a heading like that, I'm afraid to open it, but wonder what the scam is.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: zyrs on February 12, 2013, 02:32:00 PM
I just got an email from "Becky" with the subject line telling me that her husband is not home *wink.*  With a heading like that, I'm afraid to open it, but wonder what the scam is.

If it's like the other emails, she wants you to buy a membership to watch her webcam - she gets all your credit card info if you do.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Morticia on February 12, 2013, 02:36:00 PM
I just got an email offering me a share  (18.6 million) of a fund for victims of disaster. The disasters included "internet or email scams".  :o
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 12, 2013, 02:56:56 PM
We moved in August 2011. Before moving, I researched all ISP's available, their rates and whether or not a contract was required.

Through my work, I received a great monthly rate on company C. No contract, no deposit, and we pay $90 for digital cable and their second tier internet per month with no service charges ever.
Company A didn't offer high speed internet or television service at our place, and their slow internet was $100 per month plus a $250 deposit and a two year contract.
Company B offered high speed internet and cable for $150 per month, with a two year contract and a $100 deposit.

I went with company C. I get mail from both companies A & B and satellite television companies offering me great low rates, when they can't beat what I have and require contracts!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LEMon on February 12, 2013, 03:48:11 PM
I just got a spam/scam email from "The King of Narnia." WOW.

Bet it's Edmund.

LOL!

HIGH KING Edmund.
I thought Peter was the High King.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 12, 2013, 04:08:17 PM
This would be listed under Scammer Fail:

Right before Christmas, a package was delivered to me at home. From Apple. My DH was there and asked if I had ordered anything. Nope. So, I opened it up. It was a Mac Book Pro laptop. I was confused, DH wondered aloud if it was a gift from my stepmom (she gave DD an iPad last Christams). I said I wasn't that good this year, besides all our computers are Windows. The packing slip didn't indicate who paid for it.

So, I called Apple, and asked them. They said MyName ordered it. Umm, no I didn't. How was it paid for? With this credit card, and he read off my credit card number! Ack! He had my name and address, but a different email address. The Apple CSR and I discussed the situation. He recommended that I call my credit card company, then the police, then back to Apple.

I called the CC company, they cancelled the transaction and my card. They sent a new card the next business day. The police came and took a report. I gave the trooper a copy of the pack list and the print out showing the cost of the item. He told me not to hold my breath on him finding the person.

Then back to Apple to return the laptop. They emailed me a return shipping label.

What kind of idiot steals a credit card, goes shopping, and then has the stuff shipped to the real CC holder's house?

That happens a lot in my area, the thief usually lies in wait on the delivery day.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: squeakers on February 12, 2013, 04:24:31 PM
I just got a spam/scam email from "The King of Narnia." WOW.

Bet it's Edmund.

LOL!

HIGH KING Edmund.
I thought Peter was the High King.

I think the High King Edmund is from the movie. http://forum.narniaweb.com/viewtopic.php?p=126899
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: otterwoman on February 13, 2013, 07:17:00 AM
This would be listed under Scammer Fail:

Right before Christmas, a package was delivered to me at home. From Apple. My DH was there and asked if I had ordered anything. Nope. So, I opened it up. It was a Mac Book Pro laptop. I was confused, DH wondered aloud if it was a gift from my stepmom (she gave DD an iPad last Christams). I said I wasn't that good this year, besides all our computers are Windows. The packing slip didn't indicate who paid for it.

So, I called Apple, and asked them. They said MyName ordered it. Umm, no I didn't. How was it paid for? With this credit card, and he read off my credit card number! Ack! He had my name and address, but a different email address. The Apple CSR and I discussed the situation. He recommended that I call my credit card company, then the police, then back to Apple.

I called the CC company, they cancelled the transaction and my card. They sent a new card the next business day. The police came and took a report. I gave the trooper a copy of the pack list and the print out showing the cost of the item. He told me not to hold my breath on him finding the person.

Then back to Apple to return the laptop. They emailed me a return shipping label.

What kind of idiot steals a credit card, goes shopping, and then has the stuff shipped to the real CC holder's house?

That happens a lot in my area, the thief usually lies in wait on the delivery day.

Me again, that would not have worked in this case. FedEx had called the day before to make sure that someone would be here to sign for the package. Besides, I live in the woods. The only people who can find us are FedEx, UPS, USPS and the Jehovahs Witness.

Now, if the thief had ordered an iPad, I would have considered it a sign from the gods and kept it. :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shea on February 13, 2013, 08:12:39 AM
Haha - I just got one. I answered even though the name on my caller id was gibberish and i didn't recognize the number. It was some guy, who could barely speak English, calling about my "microsoft windows computer" nice try since they don't really make computers, and I know its a scam. I just said, hey, I know this is a scam, goodbye and hung up.

Yeah, I got that one a couple of weeks ago. I laughed, told him I knew very well he wasn't from Microsoft, and hung up.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 13, 2013, 08:16:32 AM
Got the air duct cleaning one again last night.  I just don't understand why they don't take my name off their list.  Every time they call me, I hang up as soon as they say their name.  So they are just wasting their time (and mine).

(I've tried polite; I know just hanging up is somewhat rude.  With the frequency these people call me, it's a whole lot less rude than what I really want to do.  And it saves on my blood pressure.)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on February 13, 2013, 08:44:44 AM
Anyone get the chimney sweep or just me?  He's nice enough, but he goes on and on and on.  I live in an apartment, no chimney here. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 13, 2013, 09:02:52 AM
We moved in August 2011. Before moving, I researched all ISP's available, their rates and whether or not a contract was required.

Through my work, I received a great monthly rate on company C. No contract, no deposit, and we pay $90 for digital cable and their second tier internet per month with no service charges ever.
Company A didn't offer high speed internet or television service at our place, and their slow internet was $100 per month plus a $250 deposit and a two year contract.
Company B offered high speed internet and cable for $150 per month, with a two year contract and a $100 deposit.

I went with company C. I get mail from both companies A & B and satellite television companies offering me great low rates, when they can't beat what I have and require contracts!
 

Slightly OT, but I have my rental insurance, and had my car insurance with a large, national, company. I was however, able to swtich my car insurance to a company only in my state, and you can only get if your company or you have some "in" with the state small business association. and beacuse they aren't open to everyone, their rates are cheap. way cheaper than any other company, and the coverqage is good. but every time i ahve to call or renew my rental, they ask about auto, and I tell them if you can beat my current co, sure, but as soon as they hear who it is, they say, nope, sorry.

I just wish i  could get my rental from them, but they are selective, and won't insure multi-unit dwellings.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on February 15, 2013, 04:08:12 PM
Internet romance scams - hold your wallet (http://www.sfgate.com/business/article/Internet-romance-scams-hold-your-wallet-4280499.php). From the San Francisco Chronicle. Interesting reading.

This is an interview with "Kim Garner, vice president of global security and investigations for the money transfer company [Money Gram]."

Some interesting statistics:
• In 2011, people were bilked out of $50 million [in the US] - the average victim lost nearly $9,000
• the age of victims ranges from 45 to 65
• 40 percent are men and 60 percent women
• Money Gram has set up a fraud detection system. If it's triggered, the staffer stars talking to the consumer. In the last 2.5 years, using this system, Money Gram has kept $220 million from being sent to scammers.

The most common scam:
Quote
That the person is working overseas as an engineer or on an oil rig and hasn't been paid. So the person asks for a loan. The other one we see is the person who poses as a gemologist and has all his or her money wrapped up in gems and needs a loan to pay customs, or to come for a visit. Sometimes the money is needed to cure a sick child or relative.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Seven Ate Nine on February 15, 2013, 05:06:18 PM

[SNIP]
 The only people who can find us are FedEx, UPS, USPS and the Jehovahs Witness.

That is hilarious.  When we moved, I was sure that the only people who would willingly come down our driveway would be people that we expected (Aside from living in the middle of nowhere, I live on a "flag lot" with a really long driveway).  I was a little surprised (and a bit creeped out) when I came home the other day and found a "Watchtower" shoved halfway through my door.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JenJay on February 18, 2013, 11:35:21 AM
This morning I got a call from my credit union's automated system notifying me that three separate purchases, totaling nearly $1k, had been made to an online toy store and did I authorize that? Um, no.  >:(

Yesterday I bought my son two video games for his birthday through amazon. One was directly from them but the other is through another online retailer and I'm thinking somebody swiped my card number. I tried to call the bank but of course they're closed due to the holiday. We were able to track down the number for reporting fraud so we did that, transactions are refused and the card is canceled. We also tried to call the customer service number of the online toy store to notify them not to ship the orders but they're closed, too. We'll call everyone again first thing in the morning.

I want to ask them for the name and address the items were to be shipped to. Will they tell me? I think I have a right to know, as I was the one charged, but I don't know how that works. I've never been stolen from before. I'd really like to track this jerk down and turn him/her in if possible.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on February 18, 2013, 12:11:51 PM
This morning I got a call from my credit union's automated system notifying me that three separate purchases, totaling nearly $1k, had been made to an online toy store and did I authorize that? Um, no.  >:(

...

Horrifying story, but kudos to your credit union for catching it so quickly.!!

Hope you and Amazon and the online toy store can get this all worked out without any further issues.  And yes, I think retailers should reveal the names of the perpetrators of theft like this, but I'm thinking they won't.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 18, 2013, 12:31:38 PM
This is appropos to the topic, and I know you can use a laugh.

(https://i.chzbgr.com/maxW500/7048009472/h52589790/)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Otterpop on February 18, 2013, 12:41:05 PM
This morning I got a call from my credit union's automated system notifying me that three separate purchases, totaling nearly $1k, had been made to an online toy store and did I authorize that? Um, no.  >:(

Yesterday I bought my son two video games for his birthday through amazon. One was directly from them but the other is through another online retailer and I'm thinking somebody swiped my card number. I tried to call the bank but of course they're closed due to the holiday. We were able to track down the number for reporting fraud so we did that, transactions are refused and the card is canceled. We also tried to call the customer service number of the online toy store to notify them not to ship the orders but they're closed, too. We'll call everyone again first thing in the morning.

I want to ask them for the name and address the items were to be shipped to. Will they tell me? I think I have a right to know, as I was the one charged, but I don't know how that works. I've never been stolen from before. I'd really like to track this jerk down and turn him/her in if possible.

I hope they at least notify the online retailer, pinpoint which employee it was and FIRE their butts (and prosecute...one can hope).  That is alarming.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: kansha on February 18, 2013, 12:50:41 PM
This morning I got a call from my credit union's automated system notifying me that three separate purchases, totaling nearly $1k, had been made to an online toy store and did I authorize that? Um, no.  >:(

Yesterday I bought my son two video games for his birthday through amazon. One was directly from them but the other is through another online retailer and I'm thinking somebody swiped my card number. I tried to call the bank but of course they're closed due to the holiday. We were able to track down the number for reporting fraud so we did that, transactions are refused and the card is canceled. We also tried to call the customer service number of the online toy store to notify them not to ship the orders but they're closed, too. We'll call everyone again first thing in the morning.

I want to ask them for the name and address the items were to be shipped to. Will they tell me? I think I have a right to know, as I was the one charged, but I don't know how that works. I've never been stolen from before. I'd really like to track this jerk down and turn him/her in if possible.
if you're a customer of knit pics or any of the other crafts americana companies, they had CC/debit card info exposed, which they discovered in late DECEMBER.  there was an explosion of knitters on the ravelry site reporting CC fraud a couple of weeks ago.  a ravelry member found the info about the info breach on the CA and VT attorney general sites friday; KP only acknowleged the issue via blogpost (as in, there is still NOTHING on their main site) last night. 

my sister in law's card was hit as she purchased items for me for xmas.  KP's response has been underwhelming (i'm being polite here) =/

tl;dr: if you've purchased from knitpicks in the past, keep an eye on your cc/bank account!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: sunnygirl on February 18, 2013, 01:25:49 PM
Ugh. I bought a Groupon for some yoga classes. The vendor ignored all my emails trying to book, then emailed me after the Groupon expired to say, "Sorry but email me the voucher and you can still use it!", then emailed me right back after I did so to say, "Actually you can't use it because it's expired", then used the info from the voucher to fraudulently tell Groupon I had already used the voucher. Groupon refuses to refund or do anything since according to the vendor I've already taken the classes, even though, you know, I have the emails where the vendor flat out says, "We won't honour the voucher tough luck."

Groupon sucks, seriously. Is there nothing one can do if a vendor refuses to honour the deal then lies that they've already done so?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RebeccainGA on February 18, 2013, 01:35:00 PM
Ugh. I bought a Groupon for some yoga classes. The vendor ignored all my emails trying to book, then emailed me after the Groupon expired to say, "Sorry but email me the voucher and you can still use it!", then emailed me right back after I did so to say, "Actually you can't use it because it's expired", then used the info from the voucher to fraudulently tell Groupon I had already used the voucher. Groupon refuses to refund or do anything since according to the vendor I've already taken the classes, even though, you know, I have the emails where the vendor flat out says, "We won't honour the voucher tough luck."

Groupon sucks, seriously. Is there nothing one can do if a vendor refuses to honour the deal then lies that they've already done so?

Try their Twitter account - and check out Consumerist.org for their executive contact information. As long as you have the e-mails, I'd keep trying - I worry about that kind of thing occasionally, but haven't had it happen so far. Good luck!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on February 18, 2013, 01:39:47 PM
How long since you purchased the Groupon? If it's under 90 days, dispute with your CC and send them copies of the emails. Also, make sure you review them on Yelp and Google. :-)

I am concerned about this happening, too - I bought a mobile car detailing package through WeeklyPlus in January, and have been trying to book since 1/24. Emails and phone calls have gone ignored. I have now tried emailing from a 2nd address, and also tried contacting WeeklyPlus, but they haven't responded, either. UGH!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JenJay on February 18, 2013, 01:41:16 PM
UPDATE

We heard back from the customer service rep at the online toy store. Apparently there were only 2 purchases, the first one was for just under $125 and they used our shipping address. That was at 3am. When it went through they got brave and made another purchase at 9am for $850 but had it sent to their address. That flagged a security check within the retailer's system (ironically only put in to place a couple of months ago for this exact reason!) and they caught it. The store then broke the purchase into the two smaller amounts and tried to run them through simultaneously because they knew it would cause our bank to flag them and ask us to authorize them if it was legit. I'm really impressed!

She did give us the email address the thief used and the physical address they tried to have the items (7 "booster boxes" of Magic cards) sent to. I have no idea if it's related to the video game purchases I just made (that store doesn't sell gaming cards) but I'm going to call the police dept. in their town and see about filing a report. Even if this transaction isn't enough for the police to pursue on its own they may have an ongoing case or be watching the house for some other reason, so maybe it'll help.

Thanks everyone!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on February 18, 2013, 03:23:22 PM
^^^  I must say I'm very impressed!!  It's actually nice to hear stories about things being handled so correctly and expediently!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: turtleIScream on February 18, 2013, 03:30:23 PM
JenJay's story reminded me of a credit card fraud that happened to us. But maybe this should go under the stupid question thread. I purchased some back to school items for my daughter at a consignment shop. One month later, the exact same transaction posted to our credit card, followed by three other fraudulent charges within a week. Is it likely that someone at the consignment shop stole my card info, or was that just a weird coincidence?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on February 18, 2013, 03:33:10 PM
JenJay's story reminded me of a credit card fraud that happened to us. But maybe this should go under the stupid question thread. I purchased some back to school items for my daughter at a consignment shop. One month later, the exact same transaction posted to our credit card, followed by three other fraudulent charges within a week. Is it likely that someone at the consignment shop stole my card info, or was that just a weird coincidence?

Could be just a coincidence, but if you were double charged for the actual purchase I'd certainly be bringing it to the attention of the owners of the consignment shop!  And I'd mention those totally fraudulent charges too.  It could be that they're not related, but chances are they are.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 18, 2013, 04:35:56 PM
Ugh. I bought a Groupon for some yoga classes. The vendor ignored all my emails trying to book, then emailed me after the Groupon expired to say, "Sorry but email me the voucher and you can still use it!", then emailed me right back after I did so to say, "Actually you can't use it because it's expired", then used the info from the voucher to fraudulently tell Groupon I had already used the voucher. Groupon refuses to refund or do anything since according to the vendor I've already taken the classes, even though, you know, I have the emails where the vendor flat out says, "We won't honour the voucher tough luck."

Groupon sucks, seriously. Is there nothing one can do if a vendor refuses to honour the deal then lies that they've already done so?

I'd dispute it with your credit card, if you still can. Or keep bugging Groupon. I've had a couple issues with them, but they've always been resolved quickly.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on February 18, 2013, 11:49:59 PM
Ugh. I bought a Groupon for some yoga classes. The vendor ignored all my emails trying to book, then emailed me after the Groupon expired to say, "Sorry but email me the voucher and you can still use it!", then emailed me right back after I did so to say, "Actually you can't use it because it's expired", then used the info from the voucher to fraudulently tell Groupon I had already used the voucher. Groupon refuses to refund or do anything since according to the vendor I've already taken the classes, even though, you know, I have the emails where the vendor flat out says, "We won't honour the voucher tough luck."

Groupon sucks, seriously. Is there nothing one can do if a vendor refuses to honour the deal then lies that they've already done so?

I'd dispute it with your credit card, if you still can. Or keep bugging Groupon. I've had a couple issues with them, but they've always been resolved quickly.

Also, do your local TV news shows have a tip line or consumer help segment? They'd looooove to see those emails!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Kaora on February 19, 2013, 02:52:31 AM
After all, if someone is going to steal your identity, they'll be having a bit more fun with it than a charitable contribution, a bottle of wine and a used book. 

I had a similar reaction when my own bank froze my debit card AND my credit card, for "suspicious activity" -- which consisted of $50 worth of t-shirts purchased at Death Valley.

Because, of course, the first thing one does after stealing a card number is run to Death Valley and buy t-shirts!

Generally, you buy water, and photo film so you can stand next to the giant thermonitor and take pictures to show your friends! :P

((I tease.  Lots of tourists go to Death Valley through this town, its kind of a one stop food place for ANY tour bus coming through.  I think our McDonalds has secured a deal with some tour company, because its always there, and no other food place in town. ???))

Given, it is a really gorgeous place. :) I go yearly in winter, when it's cool.  Enough hot days here...
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: sunnygirl on February 19, 2013, 09:26:49 AM
Thank you for all your responses. I am emailing them.
I've been doing some searching online and found a lot of info, but alas it seems most of it is US-based (Groupon US were forced to change their policies after the threat of a class action lawsuit) but I am in the UK and it seems most of it does not apply. I'll update if there is anything to update. :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: hjaye on February 19, 2013, 10:21:56 AM
UPDATE

 I'm going to call the police dept. in their town and see about filing a report. Even if this transaction isn't enough for the police to pursue on its own they may have an ongoing case or be watching the house for some other reason, so maybe it'll help.

Thanks everyone!

I had a police officer tell me once that credit card fraud is a felony, and the amount being purchased with the card didn't matter.  He used the example of someone going into a store and stealing a pack of gum.  If you just steal the gum, it's a small misdemeanor.  If you used a credit card fraudulently to purchase the same pack of gum, it would be a felony.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on February 19, 2013, 01:06:58 PM
Good luck - I just got (after what, a week?) an email back from WeeklyPlus that they were contacting the vendor and asking them to contact me directly. We shall see.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JenJay on February 19, 2013, 01:11:25 PM
UPDATE

 I'm going to call the police dept. in their town and see about filing a report. Even if this transaction isn't enough for the police to pursue on its own they may have an ongoing case or be watching the house for some other reason, so maybe it'll help.

Thanks everyone!

I had a police officer tell me once that credit card fraud is a felony, and the amount being purchased with the card didn't matter.  He used the example of someone going into a store and stealing a pack of gum.  If you just steal the gum, it's a small misdemeanor.  If you used a credit card fraudulently to purchase the same pack of gum, it would be a felony.

Yup. We were able to speak with someone at the credit union today and they said stealing credit info is a felony and a federal crime, no matter what. It's funny because my DH is a federal law enforcement officer so he's having a hard time not getting in the car and driving the two hours up to the address they attempted to ship to. Of course he won't, but he's fantasizing about how much fun he could have with it.  :P

The credit union employee advised us that one of the largest identity theft rings in the country is based out of VA (where we are and where the shipping address they used is) so we are taking this very seriously. I just ran a credit check on myself and DH and put the 90-day security alerts on both our social security numbers, then I went to every website where we may have had credit card info stored and deleted it all (fortunately just a couple) and changed the passwords, finally I also changed the passwords to our online banking accounts. A real pain in the butt, but it could have been so much worse!

We heard from the lady at the toy store this morning and can you believe this (these?) idiot(s?) tried to use the card AGAIN? She also verified for us that they had to have not only DH's name and card number but his address and the security code off the back of the card to place the orders. I know if he used the card in person someone could have quickly written down his name, number and the security number before handing it back to him but I don't know if they would be able to obtain our address? That makes it look pretty good for being hacked online and there are only two places he had that info stored - amazon.com and the online services for consumer reports. Needless to say both of those accounts have been deleted and I'm going to contact their customer service departments and give them a heads up.

EDITED to add -
Toy store lady replied to my email and said the thief didn't try to use my card again today, they tried to use someone else's card and reorder the same stuff and have it sent to the same shipping address they'd attempted to use with our card. She also advised us to call the police. This is nuts!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: #borecore on February 19, 2013, 07:46:23 PM
I got a 'free cruise' from "Caribbean Cruise Lines" in the mail today. We really would like to go to the Caribbean on a cruise for our honeymoon (at least if it's free!), so on a whim, I called the redemption line. "Joan" was VERY abrupt with me and would not answer any questions (such as why their cruise line apparently is the only one WITHOUT a Google presence) without my redemption number (which she repeated as 12345678, even though the number was more like 12890453, and she wouldn't answer me when I asked "Why did you just count to 8?"), phone number and first name. Then she says, "OK, Melissa on 123 Blahblahblah Lane..." (NOT my name or address) I had to interrupt her and say goodbye because it was just too much.

I hope no one falls for this one. It would be pretty hard to buy into it.

I think these sorts of things are supposed to be timeshare scams, but I'm not sure how anyone would ever let it get to that point!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: laud_shy_girl on February 20, 2013, 05:42:08 PM
I got a 'free cruise' from "Caribbean Cruise Lines" in the mail today. We really would like to go to the Caribbean on a cruise for our honeymoon (at least if it's free!), so on a whim, I called the redemption line. "Joan" was VERY abrupt with me and would not answer any questions (such as why their cruise line apparently is the only one WITHOUT a Google presence) without my redemption number (which she repeated as 12345678, even though the number was more like 12890453, and she wouldn't answer me when I asked "Why did you just count to 8?"), phone number and first name. Then she says, "OK, Melissa on 123 Blahblahblah Lane..." (NOT my name or address) I had to interrupt her and say goodbye because it was just too much.

I hope no one falls for this one. It would be pretty hard to buy into it.

I think these sorts of things are supposed to be timeshare scams, but I'm not sure how anyone would ever let it get to that point!

That sounds like she is phishing for info.

they say "123 ABC ln"
you replay "No its 987 zyx rd" and bam they have your address.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Deetee on February 20, 2013, 07:49:27 PM
I got a 'free cruise' from "Caribbean Cruise Lines" in the mail today. We really would like to go to the Caribbean on a cruise for our honeymoon (at least if it's free!), so on a whim, I called the redemption line. "Joan" was VERY abrupt with me and would not answer any questions (such as why their cruise line apparently is the only one WITHOUT a Google presence) without my redemption number (which she repeated as 12345678, even though the number was more like 12890453, and she wouldn't answer me when I asked "Why did you just count to 8?"), phone number and first name. Then she says, "OK, Melissa on 123 Blahblahblah Lane..." (NOT my name or address) I had to interrupt her and say goodbye because it was just too much.

I hope no one falls for this one. It would be pretty hard to buy into it.

I think these sorts of things are supposed to be timeshare scams, but I'm not sure how anyone would ever let it get to that point!

That sounds like she is phishing for info.

they say "123 ABC ln"
you replay "No its 987 zyx rd" and bam they have your address.

But it sounds like this was mailed to the person, so they had the address.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: sevenday on February 20, 2013, 08:23:50 PM
In these kinds of things I don't know that the person on the phone when you call the number listed necessarily has your address. All they know is that you're holding a piece of paper with their number on it.  So yes, I can see why they'd be fishing for info, expecting you to automatically provide the correct address. Especially after she just "made up" the number (counting from 1 to 8)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Acadianna on February 20, 2013, 08:52:10 PM
Given, it [Death Valley] is a really gorgeous place. :) I go yearly in winter, when it's cool.  Enough hot days here...

We certainly thought so.  It was fascinating!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on February 21, 2013, 11:44:47 AM
I got a 'free cruise' from "Caribbean Cruise Lines" in the mail today. We really would like to go to the Caribbean on a cruise for our honeymoon (at least if it's free!), so on a whim, I called the redemption line. "Joan" was VERY abrupt with me and would not answer any questions (such as why their cruise line apparently is the only one WITHOUT a Google presence) without my redemption number (which she repeated as 12345678, even though the number was more like 12890453, and she wouldn't answer me when I asked "Why did you just count to 8?"), phone number and first name. Then she says, "OK, Melissa on 123 Blahblahblah Lane..." (NOT my name or address) I had to interrupt her and say goodbye because it was just too much.

I hope no one falls for this one. It would be pretty hard to buy into it.

I think these sorts of things are supposed to be timeshare scams, but I'm not sure how anyone would ever let it get to that point!

That sounds like she is phishing for info.

they say "123 ABC ln"
you replay "No its 987 zyx rd" and bam they have your address.

But it sounds like this was mailed to the person, so they had the address.
Not necessarily. The USPS has a service where advertisers can simple specify a mail route, city, zip code, etc. I think it's called Every Door Direct Mail. They simply deliver to every active address in the area you specify.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Julian on February 21, 2013, 08:24:00 PM
Woot!  Just won a million pounds in a lotto I never entered, according to a text message.  Yay me! 

(wonder how much it would cost me to get it, lol!)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Miss Tickle on February 21, 2013, 11:46:08 PM
We're suffering another rash of fraud at the moment, so I'd like to remind people that if it sounds too good to be true, it is, if you think people you don't know are trusting you with money, they aren't.

It amazes me people won't stop for a second and think, hey, this doesn't make any sense. I promise, no one is going to give you thousands of dollars on the hope that you'll do as they ask. If someone sends you a cheque for thousands more than you were asking for your old toaster, it's not a good idea to try to cash it without running it by your bank first. Better to be in front of it than behind it, and the bank will thank you. Really.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Morticia on February 22, 2013, 08:08:08 AM
I got a "Spam Report" email today that asked me to click a link to confirm the "reported email" was spam... Seriously?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on February 22, 2013, 09:51:23 AM
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JenJay on February 22, 2013, 11:10:15 AM
I don't know anyone who could afford to give a stranger $8k while their spouse was unemployed. Smells like a scam!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JenJay on February 22, 2013, 12:45:19 PM
Okay, last update. I wanted to post this because I'd never even heard of it but the police officer told us it's very common. First, a link he gave us to read up on all the various schemes. I thought it might be helpful for someone.

http://www.ic3.gov/crimeschemes.aspx#item-16

What happened to us is called "reshipping". Basically, someone overseas obtained our credit card info (along with those of many other people). They also advertise "Work from home" opportunities. A person answers the supposed job listing and applies to be a reshipper. The thief uses the stolen card numbers to buy items in bulk and has them sent to the home address of the repackager, who then breaks them up into individual boxes and ships them to the thief. It's a win-win for the thief because if the scheme gets caught, like in our case, it's the repackager who gets busted. Likely their only contact with the thief is an email address and a PO box somewhere overseas. Dead end.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on February 22, 2013, 02:55:43 PM
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.

I agree.  If they need the money so bad, why the ehell was she off buying diamonds from some guy at the mall?    :o  I get that gems can be an investment but that just doesn't seem like a wise expenditure during hard times.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on February 22, 2013, 03:04:16 PM
Here is the news article on the glass diamonds lady.

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=24131698
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on February 22, 2013, 03:24:30 PM
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.

I agree.  If they need the money so bad, why the ehell was she off buying diamonds from some guy at the mall?    :o  I get that gems can be an investment but that just doesn't seem like a wise expenditure during hard times.
Diamonds are a TERRIBLE investment, if you pay jewelry store prices for them.  They're marked up anywhere from 300% to 1000%.  I know a young woman who tried to sell her diamond engagement ring back to the jewelry store after her divorce.  Her XH paid around $2500 for the set.  She was offered $60.  No, I didn't leave off a zero.  Sixty dollars.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: mechtilde on February 22, 2013, 03:56:46 PM
At some point in the 19th century one of my ancestors bought some dodgy and not entirely legal "diamonds"- my parents still have them in a small bone pot with "Live in Hope" on the lid. Whatever they are, they certainly aren't diamonds...

There's nothing new.

I've been approached by someone in the street offering me a "gold" chain. Yeah. Right. That's either going to be stolen, fake or real and about to be switched for a fake.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Zenith on February 23, 2013, 12:45:37 AM
The price of retail diamonds make me laugh, especially when I see larger certified gems/diamonds 2/3 to 1/2 cheaper at a pawn shop.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Kaora on February 24, 2013, 04:36:11 PM
Given, it [Death Valley] is a really gorgeous place. :) I go yearly in winter, when it's cool.  Enough hot days here...

We certainly thought so.  It was fascinating!

I think my favorite places are the Devil's Paintbrush and Badwater. :) Once had lunch at Badwater with my dad and sister, spent the entire time poking fun at the sea level sign. :P

On topic...

I was out yesterday with my BF, and he was going to pickup some medication I needed.  Coming out of the Albertsons, we got stopped AGAIN by the same beggar I mentioned earlier.  We were in the Jeep, and, bam, there's this guy stepping infront of the car and we have to stop.  He comes up and says he needs money until Monday, blahblah, and BF told him truthfully that he didn't have any money; I was the one with it. >:D

We're wondering, if the same guy tries this again, a likely at this point, is it etiquettely okay to start telling him he's tried this on us before, and didn't we just see him last week?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Debbie506 on February 24, 2013, 06:38:49 PM
My boss (a lawyer) got caught in a scam about 10 years ago.  I was on vacation, a temp was filling in secretarial duties.  She got a weird feeling one morning and went into boss's office and found a well-dressed gentleman in there (boss was in court).  Our office set-up is a bit odd (very old building) so it is not completely strange that someone could walk into boss's office without going through secretary - especially if boss left his door unlocked, which he did all the time.  At any rate, she told Mr. X that boss was in court, come back later.

About two weeks later, boss got word  that his bank accounts had been drained.  Apparently, the scam worked as follows:  Mr.X visited my boss's office and another lawyer's office or two (trust accounts, you know!) and stole trust cheques (not from the top of the deck, but in the middle, so the theft wasn't obvious for a week or two).  Then he and his accomplices visited a number of rural mailboxes and stole some check reorders from ordinary citizens.

So, Mr.X lines up in bank, makes deposit to boss's bank account with cheques from lawyer #2 and ordinary citizens (maybe $2,000 or so). Then Mr.X says "holy smokes, I forgot I need $500 for XYZ"...  as the teller just saw him deposit $2,000, she gives him the money.  Rinse and repeat for each account...

My boss is still really bad about leaving his office door unlocked...
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: weeblewobble on February 24, 2013, 09:16:22 PM
Did anyone else catch the Dr. Phil episode last week in which a grown son took his single mother to Dr. Phil for an intervention re: her "boyfriend" Danny, a supposedly British man who supposedly worked in South Africa.  She'd sent him more than $187,000 including money that she'd gained through selling off property, inheritance, and straight up taking from her relatives.  And yet, somehow, he just couldn't manage to make it out of South Africa to meet her in person.  In fact, he needed another $150,000 from her so she could access $6 million of his funds that he had supposedly set aside for her.  The bank required some sort of surety to secure the account, he claimed.  She was just convinced that Dr. Phil was going to help her find a way to get this extra $150,000, because that would mean Danny would come see her and that would make everything ok. 

She adamantly refused to believe him when he told her that a bank wouldn't require her to secure an account with her name on it. She refused to think about the logical questions such as: Why would a man with $6 million need her to send him money so he could travel to see her?  Why didn't he just reduce the money he'd supposedly put in her name by $150,000 and secure the account for her?  Why did Danny change his mind at the last minute re: appearing on the Dr. Phil show and then not answer the phone so Dr. Phil could talk to him on the air?

Every time Dr. Phil posed a perfectly logical question, she would say, "You just don't understand."  It got so frustrating, I had to change the channel.  I felt so sorry for her son.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: White Dragon on February 24, 2013, 10:08:40 PM
I couldn't think of any tales for this thread, and the last week I had *three* in one day!

Scam #1 was someone who said "Someone from our number had called her but she wasn't sure who, but that it was probably our shop foreman."
The first part was understandable, happens a lot since only our main # shows on caller display.
The second part...well, we are strictly an office. No shop foreman here.
"If you can tell me what project this relates to, or what you need to accomplish I can get you to the right person."
A little bit more back and forth and she wants to talk to whoever is in charge of our maintenance.
"Sorry, all maintenance is already comtracted."

She actually sounded surprised that we have a - gasp- maintenance contract! Good bye!

Scam #2 was a FAX asking for my help in releasing 54 million $ in development funds from the "late president of Libya, who is now deceased." (One would think so, as he is the late president. Unless he's chronically tardy?)

So I guess I'm a bad person for not doing more to get those development funds freed up!

Scam #3 was someone from a call center who said they were with (unclearly mumbled company) and were we (not quite our company name). I simply asked them to put us on the do not call list.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on February 25, 2013, 07:56:46 AM
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.

I agree.  If they need the money so bad, why the ehell was she off buying diamonds from some guy at the mall?    :o  I get that gems can be an investment but that just doesn't seem like a wise expenditure during hard times.

She probably wasn't buying them, due to the comment about "collateral". It sounds like what I believe was called the "pigeon drop" at one time. Swindler announces she's found some diamonds. If they're not claimed within X days, she'll be able to keep them. But, alas, she has to rush to a vital appointment or something. Could Woman A hold them until she gets back? As a reward, Swindler will split to proceeds later on. But, just to ensure trust, Woman A should put up some money to Swindler - that's fair, right, since she's holding the valuable diamonds and could abscond with them, leaving Swindler with nothing? Then Swindler walks off with the "deposit", and Woman A is left with some glass chips.

It sounds ridiculous when written out, but a fast talking con artist can do well with it, I've heard.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 25, 2013, 11:03:40 AM
I got an email today that my computer marked as spam.  Somebody's address book got hacked and it was sent to a bunch of people.  But it did give me a bit of a start, since the person it came from is someone I cut off about 5 years ago.  (It was more of a mutual cut, really.)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Slartibartfast on February 25, 2013, 11:41:00 AM
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.

I agree.  If they need the money so bad, why the ehell was she off buying diamonds from some guy at the mall?    :o  I get that gems can be an investment but that just doesn't seem like a wise expenditure during hard times.

She probably wasn't buying them, due to the comment about "collateral". It sounds like what I believe was called the "pigeon drop" at one time. Swindler announces she's found some diamonds. If they're not claimed within X days, she'll be able to keep them. But, alas, she has to rush to a vital appointment or something. Could Woman A hold them until she gets back? As a reward, Swindler will split to proceeds later on. But, just to ensure trust, Woman A should put up some money to Swindler - that's fair, right, since she's holding the valuable diamonds and could abscond with them, leaving Swindler with nothing? Then Swindler walks off with the "deposit", and Woman A is left with some glass chips.

It sounds ridiculous when written out, but a fast talking con artist can do well with it, I've heard.

I hear this is still pretty common in Las Vegas with casino chips - the con artist catches tourists on the sidewalk and says they have this handful of high-value casino chips to cash in, but they're not able to go into the casino themselves for various reasons, so would the tourist be willing to cash them?  And of course to leave their wallet/watch/etc as collateral?  The chips turn out to be counterfeit, the tourist gets stuck for passing counterfeit chips, and the con artist makes off with the tourist's money and valuables.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 25, 2013, 12:35:30 PM
Last week my friend texted me saying "Since when do you play Farmville on Fbook?" I texted back saying I don't, haven't for years cause I got sick and tired of fbook games and how you can do a darned thing unless you invite more friends to play.  Typical pyramid scheme sort of thing only in game form. :P

She said "Well Fbook is saying you just played yesterday!"  I went back online and sure enough, fbook had logged me in as playing that day.  I knew DH had been on my laptop earlier that day but he was signed into his account, not mine. 

I figure it was a scam to try and get people to play by saying "Your friend just played this game, why don't you play too!" even though I hadn't played that game in over 3 years.

Only game I play is "You Don't Know Jack" and just cause it's fun. I don't invite anyone to play.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Wulfie on February 25, 2013, 01:06:54 PM
I am managing two different apartment complexes right now due to another manager being out on leave. I have had this now at each complex so I know scammers are at work on a scam so old it should be drawing Social Security!

They call from a blocked phone number and ask for the model of the copier.  I asked him who he was from, at the first complex he said he was from "your copier supply company" when I said if he really was from them, then he would know the model of our copier already. He then told me to "Shut up you (C word)" the second time he went right to the profanity the second I asked who he was from.  :)  Gotta love the idiots out there.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MrTango on February 25, 2013, 01:18:23 PM
I am managing two different apartment complexes right now due to another manager being out on leave. I have had this now at each complex so I know scammers are at work on a scam so old it should be drawing Social Security!

They call from a blocked phone number and ask for the model of the copier.  I asked him who he was from, at the first complex he said he was from "your copier supply company" when I said if he really was from them, then he would know the model of our copier already. He then told me to "Shut up you (C word)" the second time he went right to the profanity the second I asked who he was from.  :)  Gotta love the idiots out there.

I've gotten that a couple of times.  If I'm in a bad mood, I just get off the phone as quickly as possible.  If I'm in a good mood, I say we have a "Corellian YT-1300 Stock Light" copier with an "Incom T-65" paper tray.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Doll Fiend on February 25, 2013, 07:22:11 PM
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.

I agree.  If they need the money so bad, why the ehell was she off buying diamonds from some guy at the mall?    :o  I get that gems can be an investment but that just doesn't seem like a wise expenditure during hard times.

She probably wasn't buying them, due to the comment about "collateral". It sounds like what I believe was called the "pigeon drop" at one time. Swindler announces she's found some diamonds. If they're not claimed within X days, she'll be able to keep them. But, alas, she has to rush to a vital appointment or something. Could Woman A hold them until she gets back? As a reward, Swindler will split to proceeds later on. But, just to ensure trust, Woman A should put up some money to Swindler - that's fair, right, since she's holding the valuable diamonds and could abscond with them, leaving Swindler with nothing? Then Swindler walks off with the "deposit", and Woman A is left with some glass chips.

It sounds ridiculous when written out, but a fast talking con artist can do well with it, I've heard.

I hear this is still pretty common in Las Vegas with casino chips - the con artist catches tourists on the sidewalk and says they have this handful of high-value casino chips to cash in, but they're not able to go into the casino themselves for various reasons, so would the tourist be willing to cash them?  And of course to leave their wallet/watch/etc as collateral?  The chips turn out to be counterfeit, the tourist gets stuck for passing counterfeit chips, and the con artist makes off with the tourist's money and valuables.

Isn't there a CSI episode about that?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Iris on February 26, 2013, 12:29:05 AM
I am managing two different apartment complexes right now due to another manager being out on leave. I have had this now at each complex so I know scammers are at work on a scam so old it should be drawing Social Security!

They call from a blocked phone number and ask for the model of the copier.  I asked him who he was from, at the first complex he said he was from "your copier supply company" when I said if he really was from them, then he would know the model of our copier already. He then told me to "Shut up you (C word)" the second time he went right to the profanity the second I asked who he was from.  :)  Gotta love the idiots out there.

I've gotten that a couple of times.  If I'm in a bad mood, I just get off the phone as quickly as possible.  If I'm in a good mood, I say we have a "Corellian YT-1300 Stock Light" copier with an "Incom T-65" paper tray.

Maybe I'm being obtuse, but why do they want to know the model of your copier? Is it to get information to set up a future scam?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: blue2000 on February 26, 2013, 02:40:46 AM
I am managing two different apartment complexes right now due to another manager being out on leave. I have had this now at each complex so I know scammers are at work on a scam so old it should be drawing Social Security!

They call from a blocked phone number and ask for the model of the copier.  I asked him who he was from, at the first complex he said he was from "your copier supply company" when I said if he really was from them, then he would know the model of our copier already. He then told me to "Shut up you (C word)" the second time he went right to the profanity the second I asked who he was from.  :)  Gotta love the idiots out there.

I've gotten that a couple of times.  If I'm in a bad mood, I just get off the phone as quickly as possible.  If I'm in a good mood, I say we have a "Corellian YT-1300 Stock Light" copier with an "Incom T-65" paper tray.

Maybe I'm being obtuse, but why do they want to know the model of your copier? Is it to get information to set up a future scam?

If I understand this scam correctly, they send you a shipment of ink for that specific copier and then argue that 'you ordered it' and therefore have to pay their massively inflated invoice. Some companies that don't know or care just pay the money.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: iridaceae on February 26, 2013, 02:45:46 AM
It's to ship you a carton of ink cartridges and they make up the inventory sheet to make it look as if you ordered the (usually) substandard ink cartridges.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Iris on February 26, 2013, 03:32:27 AM
Ah, I see. Thanks guys!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: eltf177 on February 26, 2013, 05:18:28 AM
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.

I agree.  If they need the money so bad, why the ehell was she off buying diamonds from some guy at the mall?    :o  I get that gems can be an investment but that just doesn't seem like a wise expenditure during hard times.

She probably wasn't buying them, due to the comment about "collateral". It sounds like what I believe was called the "pigeon drop" at one time. Swindler announces she's found some diamonds. If they're not claimed within X days, she'll be able to keep them. But, alas, she has to rush to a vital appointment or something. Could Woman A hold them until she gets back? As a reward, Swindler will split to proceeds later on. But, just to ensure trust, Woman A should put up some money to Swindler - that's fair, right, since she's holding the valuable diamonds and could abscond with them, leaving Swindler with nothing? Then Swindler walks off with the "deposit", and Woman A is left with some glass chips.

It sounds ridiculous when written out, but a fast talking con artist can do well with it, I've heard.

I hear this is still pretty common in Las Vegas with casino chips - the con artist catches tourists on the sidewalk and says they have this handful of high-value casino chips to cash in, but they're not able to go into the casino themselves for various reasons, so would the tourist be willing to cash them?  And of course to leave their wallet/watch/etc as collateral?  The chips turn out to be counterfeit, the tourist gets stuck for passing counterfeit chips, and the con artist makes off with the tourist's money and valuables.

Isn't there a CSI episode about that?

Yes, and the "mark's" pay for the counterfit chips with 'funny money'!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: WolfWay on February 26, 2013, 06:29:32 AM
I got a call from a number I later googled as belonging to a call centre that offers loans.

Me: Hello?
Caller: Hi.
<pause>
Me: Can I help you?
Caller: Who is this?
Me: Who are you looking for?
Caller: I'm looking for Doctor.
Me: Doctor? Uh, that's a title, not a name. Do you have a name to go with that title?
Caller: No no, it's not a title, that's his first name.
Me: Nope, nobody here by that name.
Caller: Oh okay. <hangs up>

Now, I do have a PhD, so I am technically a doctor, but that's not my first name. I figure somebody sold my contact information onto the call centre, but put my title as my first name. Bonus points for getting my gender wrong too.

(For the record, I do live in a country where Doctor is a perfectly acceptable first name, e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_Khumalo ).

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on February 26, 2013, 06:40:04 AM
I got a call from a number I later googled as belonging to a call centre that offers loans.

Me: Hello?
Caller: Hi.
<pause>
Me: Can I help you?
Caller: Who is this?
Me: Who are you looking for?
Caller: I'm looking for Doctor.
Me: Doctor? Uh, that's a title, not a name. Do you have a name to go with that title?
Caller: No no, it's not a title, that's his first name.
Me: Nope, nobody here by that name.
Caller: Oh okay. <hangs up>

Now, I do have a PhD, so I am technically a doctor, but that's not my first name. I figure somebody sold my contact information onto the call centre, but put my title as my first name. Bonus points for getting my gender wrong too.

(For the record, I do live in a country where Doctor is a perfectly acceptable first name, e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_Khumalo ).
You haven't had any blue police boxes show up in your yard or living room lately, have you?  ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Margo on February 26, 2013, 08:20:46 AM
I got a call from a number I later googled as belonging to a call centre that offers loans.

Me: Hello?
Caller: Hi.
<pause>
Me: Can I help you?
Caller: Who is this?
Me: Who are you looking for?
Caller: I'm looking for Doctor.
Me: Doctor? Uh, that's a title, not a name. Do you have a name to go with that title?
Caller: No no, it's not a title, that's his first name.
Me: Nope, nobody here by that name.
Caller: Oh okay. <hangs up>

Now, I do have a PhD, so I am technically a doctor, but that's not my first name. I figure somebody sold my contact information onto the call centre, but put my title as my first name. Bonus points for getting my gender wrong too.

(For the record, I do live in a country where Doctor is a perfectly acceptable first name, e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_Khumalo ).
You haven't had any blue police boxes show up in your yard or living room lately, have you?  ;D
I thought that, too. But in that case, the first name would be 'The', wouldn't it?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Miss Misery on February 26, 2013, 12:13:52 PM
Good grief, I could write a novel about the ridiculous amount of scam e-mails I get

* E-mails from the FBI (and sometimes Robert Mueller himself!) about my payment.

* John and Mary Smith won a bazillion dollars in the lottery and want to share it with me!

* Please open the attachment and confirm your Western Union payment.

* Dearest Beloved, I am the widow of an African prince and need help getting money out of the country....

* Hi,i'm heather and saw yourpics!you are sssooo cute!wana chat wit me?

* Earn a doctorate degree online!

* Save 80% on C1al!$ and V1agRa!!!!

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: staceym on February 26, 2013, 01:25:40 PM
I am managing two different apartment complexes right now due to another manager being out on leave. I have had this now at each complex so I know scammers are at work on a scam so old it should be drawing Social Security!

They call from a blocked phone number and ask for the model of the copier.  I asked him who he was from, at the first complex he said he was from "your copier supply company" when I said if he really was from them, then he would know the model of our copier already. He then told me to "Shut up you (C word)" the second time he went right to the profanity the second I asked who he was from.  :)  Gotta love the idiots out there.

 :D I actually had a guy call me back and call me a female dog when I wouldn't play nice and give him the model number

Our faxes come electronically to my email box and I dispurse them; so every once in a while I still see the "I am the desposed King of (name your country)" and need your help and will give you millions in return faxes ;)


and here is sort of one; I can't remember the whole conversation or exact wording; but this happened about two weeks ago.

first of all, I went on line and ordered an "As Seen on TV Item"  :-[ - yeah I know; but I figured it wasn't that expensive and if it doesn't work oh well.  So, anyway about two weeks ago I started getting calls on my cell phone from an 866 number; for two days I didn't answer (and they called 7 times per day  >:( ) so I figured the next day if they call I will answer, but answer angrily like "yeah, what do you want".  So, they do call and that is how I answered; and it is someone from that company thanking me for ordering the thingamajig and to thank you we want to send you a $50 (I think) gift card and some other things..  Now, I don't know why if they want to send it to me; they didn't just send it to me instead of calling, so it sounded off to me; so I told her no thanks and she said oh, but its blah, blah blah..and I said no thanks I don't want it, I only want what I ordered..she got silent and then said "okay, I'll put you down as a no" and I said right and hung up. 

kinda funny, that last week I got an email from the company that my item is on backorder ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MandiC76 on February 26, 2013, 02:17:48 PM
I am managing two different apartment complexes right now due to another manager being out on leave. I have had this now at each complex so I know scammers are at work on a scam so old it should be drawing Social Security!

They call from a blocked phone number and ask for the model of the copier.  I asked him who he was from, at the first complex he said he was from "your copier supply company" when I said if he really was from them, then he would know the model of our copier already. He then told me to "Shut up you (C word)" the second time he went right to the profanity the second I asked who he was from.  :)  Gotta love the idiots out there.

How ironic is it that as I was reading this post, I got one of these calls? (just minus the profanity)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Ms_Cellany on February 26, 2013, 02:24:11 PM
We put a large desk up on Craiglist. I got an email asking if it was still available; I replied that it was, and got this back:

"Thanks for getting back to me, I appreciate it and just to let you
  know I'm okay with the condition, the price and I'm ready for the
  purchase . I would have really loved to come for the inspection but
  due to my work frame it just won't fit in my schedule but more
  pictures will be deeply appreciated. My mode of payment will be by
  Check and it will be send via courier service which will be delivered
  to you between 1-3days. I'll be responsible for the pick-up besides
  the movers/pick up money will be included with your payment so as to
  avoid delay and to enable movers to schedule an appropriate time for
  the pick-up at your location after the check is been cashed as I have
  other properties to be moved alongside yours. Kindly get back to me
  with your full name, mailing address and phone number so as to make
  out the payment to you ASAP. Kind Regards"

After staring at it for a while, I Googled the name and she's in Seattle.  I finally replied that we prefer to deal in person and in cash, thanks for inquiring.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on February 26, 2013, 03:48:42 PM
Gadzooks!  That person must be related to the guy who wanted to buy my wedding china.  He was moving out of province, but he just HAD to have my china (because, as you know, when you're moving to a completely different part of the world, the first item on your agenda is to transport a bunch of breakables).   Alas, he'd already closed her bank accounts, but if I'd give him my banking info, he'd electronically transfer all of my money to me.  Wow!  It must be my lucky day!   ::)

When I said "Sorry, I only deal in cash", he responded indignantly "What's the matter?  Are you afraid I'll rip you off?"  I said "'Afraid'?  No.  I'm POSITIVE that you'll rip me off, given half a chance."  I didn't hear anything more after that.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Miss Misery on February 26, 2013, 03:52:30 PM
I think you all will find this amusing: 10 Great Scam Baiting Operations (http://listverse.com/2010/09/11/10-great-scam-baiting-operations/)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Zen on February 26, 2013, 03:53:25 PM
Quote
"Corellian YT-1300 Stock Light" copier with an "Incom T-65" paper tray.

Does it come with a Wookie? :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MissRose on February 26, 2013, 04:11:30 PM
I giggle a bit to myself when I am working email contacts at work and some of them are the scams & spam.  Why some people fall for them I will never know!!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: kherbert05 on February 26, 2013, 05:13:33 PM
I once had the copier scam people come - while the copier people (who donated the copier and toner) were servicing the machine and a cop was booking a boy scout troop trip to the museum. We had fun with the guy that day.


Someone at the we think the country club sold Dad's information. We suddenly started getting calls and mail for Harry Herbert - they had mistyped Dad's name dropping one letter and changing another.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Miss March on February 26, 2013, 05:17:38 PM
My DH got a phishing email the other day. They did a good job- it looked pretty legit. It was supposedly a receipt from PayPal, showing his recent purchase of a watch. They were banking on him hitting the "Report problem" link at the bottom in a panic, to say he didn't buy that watch, and having him input his correct PayPal information to verify his account.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: WolfWay on February 26, 2013, 10:08:52 PM
I got a call from a number I later googled as belonging to a call centre that offers loans.

Me: Hello?
Caller: Hi.
<pause>
Me: Can I help you?
Caller: Who is this?
Me: Who are you looking for?
Caller: I'm looking for Doctor.
Me: Doctor? Uh, that's a title, not a name. Do you have a name to go with that title?
Caller: No no, it's not a title, that's his first name.
Me: Nope, nobody here by that name.
Caller: Oh okay. <hangs up>

Now, I do have a PhD, so I am technically a doctor, but that's not my first name. I figure somebody sold my contact information onto the call centre, but put my title as my first name. Bonus points for getting my gender wrong too.

(For the record, I do live in a country where Doctor is a perfectly acceptable first name, e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_Khumalo ).
You haven't had any blue police boxes show up in your yard or living room lately, have you?  ;D
I thought that, too. But in that case, the first name would be 'The', wouldn't it?
;D Alas no "The" and no sonic screwdriver (unless that's a type of cocktail).
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on February 26, 2013, 11:13:25 PM
Someone has used babelfish to translate this scam into English.  How could it fail?!?  >:D

Payroll Account Holded by IntuitDirect Deposit Service Informer
 Communicatory Only
 
 We cancelled your payroll on Tue, 26 Feb 2013 12:09:32 +0100.
  Funds are typically left before working banking hours so please make sure you have enough Finances accessible by 12 a.m. on the date Cash are to be seceded.
 
 Intuit must reject your payroll by 4 p.m. Central time, two banking days before your paycheck date or your state would not be paid on time.

Yes. Yes, indeedy. I am TERRIFIED that my paycheck will be procrastinated!

Or I would, if I got a paycheck...
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MrTango on February 27, 2013, 10:41:35 AM
Quote
"Corellian YT-1300 Stock Light" copier with an "Incom T-65" paper tray.

Does it come with a Wookie? :)

Yes, but the R2 unit is sold seperately.

Actually, I like the idea of someone trying to Google that model number and getting a bunch of pictures of the Millenium Falcon.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on February 27, 2013, 11:23:50 AM
I'd forgotten about this one that I fell for many years ago, until I was hit up for a similar deal yesterday. Not outright thievery, but certainly misrepresentation.

A guy rings my doorbell. He points to a van labeled "So and So Fine Meats." They do home delivery of really special gourmet meat and chicken. It seems that a customer was a no-show. The guy called his manager who suggested that instead driving all the way back with the delivery, he should go door-to-door and offer to sell stuff for half price to at least recoup the cost of driving around.

The guy explains that this was a really huge order. He shows a price list and says he has just about everything on the list. The prices are high, but if the meat is a good as he says, half price is a good deal. I bought 4 steaks. It never occurred to me to wonder why, for such a big order, they had not secured it with a credit card, instead of needing to sell it at any price.

The steaks were nothing special. I could have bought the same quality for more or less the same price at a supermarket, so I wasn't too badly ripped off, but it was definitely a con game.

Yesterday, I just told the guy "no thank you, I'm a vegetarian."
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RebeccainGA on February 27, 2013, 11:45:48 AM
A guy rings my doorbell. He points to a van labeled "So and So Fine Meats." They do home delivery of really special gourmet meat and chicken. It seems that a customer was a no-show. The guy called his manager who suggested that instead driving all the way back with the delivery, he should go door-to-door and offer to sell stuff for half price to at least recoup the cost of driving around.

We have one of those guys.... except he's got a chest freezer plugged into a converter in his beater pickup truck, and a mouth full of rotten teeth (with torn clothes to match). At least yours tried to look respectable. He even got a bigger grin when he saw that I am a big girl - I think he thought I'd be an easy mark for meat of unknown provenance sold from a pickup?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: alkira6 on February 27, 2013, 12:05:33 PM
I actually got a really good deal from my Schwan's guy because of someone cancelling a huge order, so it does happen.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on February 27, 2013, 12:06:43 PM
In Michigan, all commercial vehicle plates expire February 28.  For some companies, this can run tens of thousands of dollars, but even for smaller ones, this is a big expense.  Fleets (ten or more renewals) drop their work off, and we call them when they are ready.  A clerk just came to see me.  She had finished a fleet of 30 trucks, and found that the check to pay for it all was unsigned.  She called the office, and was told that the owner (after dropping off his work here) had left for vacation and will not be back until March 11.  I told her to call back and tell them that we would not be able to process anything without payment, and an unsigned check would not cut it.  We would void out all our work, and we could process it on March 11, and oh, yes, of course, late fees of $10 each would also be due.  Gee, they managed to catch him before he got too far north, and he was able to come back and sign the check.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on February 27, 2013, 12:16:28 PM
I'd forgotten about this one that I fell for many years ago, until I was hit up for a similar deal yesterday. Not outright thievery, but certainly misrepresentation.

A guy rings my doorbell. He points to a van labeled "So and So Fine Meats." They do home delivery of really special gourmet meat and chicken. It seems that a customer was a no-show. The guy called his manager who suggested that instead driving all the way back with the delivery, he should go door-to-door and offer to sell stuff for half price to at least recoup the cost of driving around.

The guy explains that this was a really huge order. He shows a price list and says he has just about everything on the list. The prices are high, but if the meat is a good as he says, half price is a good deal. I bought 4 steaks. It never occurred to me to wonder why, for such a big order, they had not secured it with a credit card, instead of needing to sell it at any price.

The steaks were nothing special. I could have bought the same quality for more or less the same price at a supermarket, so I wasn't too badly ripped off, but it was definitely a con game.

Yesterday, I just told the guy "no thank you, I'm a vegetarian."
I disagree. I bet he's stealing from his employer or customer and pocketing the cash. You're not so much the victim of the scam as much as they are. But you are receiving stolen property. With so much product going out the door (or being delivered), the owner doesn't notice a few extra pounds here and there missing and the employee has "extra" to sell on the side.

I've never seen the scam using food, but I've seen it with gardening and construction materials. A legitimate work truck driving through a neighborhood sees a homeowner out in their yard and wouldn't you know they have a few "extra" bags of fertilizer or flats of plants that the customer "didn't need" and they'll sell for cash. The customer probably wasn't counting the number of bags the workers used or noticed a few missing plants but they paid for it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Belle on February 27, 2013, 12:19:41 PM
I had one recently. My husband and I were shopping at an upscale outlet mall in a touristy area. A young couple claimed to have run out of gas and needed just a few dollars to get back home. I declined. If you're that close to home, surely you know people in the area you could call for $5. At that distance, you could even walk home. But instead you're begging in an area likely to be filled with tourists with pockets full 'o cash? No, I don't buy it.

Ten minutes later I wasn't surprised to see them running to a pick-up truck, starting it, and hightailing it out of there. Gee, looks like they had gas after all. I figure one of the stores threatened to call the cops if they didn't leave the property.

In small towns, I'm much more willing to give people the benefit of the doubt. In large towns and tourist areas, I assume I'm being swindled.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: lilfox on February 27, 2013, 12:31:22 PM
Nutrax, I bought the same "deal" you did years ago.  I don't remember what the story was, other than claiming to drum up business, but the guy had a legit looking freezer truck (some brand, not Schwan's though).  The steaks and burgers were nothing special but not too overpriced so I imagine it was more of a "fell off the truck" deal than a price gouging scam.  I lived in that house for three more years and never saw them again.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JenJay on February 27, 2013, 12:37:52 PM
I always figured the "your neighbor canceled their order" frozen food thing was just a selling tactic but not a scam. DH bought some once, it was pretty good meat at an okay price. I don't think we'll do it again but we didn't feel ripped off.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on February 27, 2013, 12:38:04 PM
I once got hit up by a guy trying to sell a leaf blower outside Canadian Tire.  It was still in the box.  He claimed that he'd bought it from CT and they refused to give him a refund, so he was "just trying to recoup (his) losses a bit".  We declined.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: alkira6 on February 27, 2013, 12:39:43 PM
Quote from: LazyDaisy link=topic=121827.msg2896089#msg2896089 date=1361988988
[quote
I've never seen the scam using food, but I've seen it with gardening and construction materials. A legitimate work truck driving through a neighborhood sees a homeowner out in their yard and wouldn't you know they have a few "extra" bags of fertilizer or flats of plants that the customer "didn't need" and they'll sell for cash. The customer probably wasn't counting the number of bags the workers used or noticed a few missing plants but they paid for it.

I got someone to mulch my roses last year (? year before?) that way. I never thought about it being a "fell off the truck" type thing for mulch.  It's the same people coming by 3-4 times every year though, so maybe it's legit.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on February 27, 2013, 12:53:13 PM
Be careful if you ever contract with them to do work. When they say you need x lbs. of mulch to cover your yard, count that they have that much mulch with them, and count the number of used bags after they're finished. Most people just make sure the workers did the job right, not that they actually used all of the product being billed for. Same with tile work, paint, etc. anything that is purchased in bulk and is easy to "lose" a box/bag/gallon here and there. I also require them to leave all extra with me if they over estimated (and they usually do because they don't want to run short). I might need extra down the line for repairs or touch up. Or, if you don't want it, be sure you get a credit back for it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Midge on February 27, 2013, 01:49:51 PM
My DH got a phishing email the other day. They did a good job- it looked pretty legit. It was supposedly a receipt from PayPal, showing his recent purchase of a watch. They were banking on him hitting the "Report problem" link at the bottom in a panic, to say he didn't buy that watch, and having him input his correct PayPal information to verify his account.

I got that one the other day!

My personal hotmail email account is my first name, plus the rest of my initials--for example, midgecdf@blahblah.com. When I looked at the "to" field on that email, it had been sent to midgecdf@blahblah.com, midgemmm@blahblah.com, midgeabc@blahblah.com, etc. They just typed in a first name, a bunch of letters after, and hit send, hoping for the best!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 27, 2013, 01:56:25 PM
When we were on vacation in New Mexico last year, we saw groups of young people at highway exits who had signage that they were stranded. They had beautiful guitars with them, and reminded me of the people in the 60's that hitchhiked across the US. We would see groups of 2-6, some with pets. I just wonder how someone gets stranded in a tiny town in NM, and doesn't either find a job or sell their valuables to get them bus fare.

Makes no sense to me!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on February 27, 2013, 02:13:09 PM
When we were on vacation in New Mexico last year, we saw groups of young people at highway exits who had signage that they were stranded. They had beautiful guitars with them, and reminded me of the people in the 60's that hitchhiked across the US. We would see groups of 2-6, some with pets. I just wonder how someone gets stranded in a tiny town in NM, and doesn't either find a job or sell their valuables to get them bus fare.

Makes no sense to me!
Was the tiny town Cuba, perchance?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 27, 2013, 02:34:03 PM
Raton and Springer is where we saw them.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on February 27, 2013, 04:01:57 PM
Here's one I am wondering about:

My Mom once got a spam that had been spoofed to look like it came from one of my e-mail addys - a rather old one on Yahoo!, actually, that I recently revived for wedding planning. I changed my password and didn't think too much on it.

However, she keeps occasionally getting spam/scam e-mails that say they're from my first & last name (say, Jedi Kaiti), but with a wholly different e-mail address - usually Yahoo! it seems, but I'm not 100% certain on that. The thing is, she is the ONLY person getting these (or at least to have mentioned it to me), and come to find out today, she's gotten some similar ones purporting to be from one of my cousins, as well!

I'm a little baffled - it can't be that someone got my contacts from that account, there are only 2 in there, neither of whom are Mom. Maybe they scraped info out of the sent mail folder, but then why haven't my DF, MOH, or officiant gotten these emails - to say nothing of photographers and other service providers I've been corresponding with.

I'm a little confoosled.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: PastryGoddess on February 27, 2013, 04:14:14 PM
I'd forgotten about this one that I fell for many years ago, until I was hit up for a similar deal yesterday. Not outright thievery, but certainly misrepresentation.

A guy rings my doorbell. He points to a van labeled "So and So Fine Meats." They do home delivery of really special gourmet meat and chicken. It seems that a customer was a no-show. The guy called his manager who suggested that instead driving all the way back with the delivery, he should go door-to-door and offer to sell stuff for half price to at least recoup the cost of driving around.

The guy explains that this was a really huge order. He shows a price list and says he has just about everything on the list. The prices are high, but if the meat is a good as he says, half price is a good deal. I bought 4 steaks. It never occurred to me to wonder why, for such a big order, they had not secured it with a credit card, instead of needing to sell it at any price.

The steaks were nothing special. I could have bought the same quality for more or less the same price at a supermarket, so I wasn't too badly ripped off, but it was definitely a con game.

Yesterday, I just told the guy "no thank you, I'm a vegetarian."

I second Alkira
This isn't a scam at all.  I've gotten some really good meat from guys looking to sell what's left on the truck at the end of the day.  I've gotten meat up to 50% off.  Of course it all depends on the provider, but the companies around here are pretty good.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on February 27, 2013, 04:21:32 PM
I'd forgotten about this one that I fell for many years ago, until I was hit up for a similar deal yesterday. Not outright thievery, but certainly misrepresentation.

A guy rings my doorbell. He points to a van labeled "So and So Fine Meats." They do home delivery of really special gourmet meat and chicken. It seems that a customer was a no-show. The guy called his manager who suggested that instead driving all the way back with the delivery, he should go door-to-door and offer to sell stuff for half price to at least recoup the cost of driving around.

The guy explains that this was a really huge order. He shows a price list and says he has just about everything on the list. The prices are high, but if the meat is a good as he says, half price is a good deal. I bought 4 steaks. It never occurred to me to wonder why, for such a big order, they had not secured it with a credit card, instead of needing to sell it at any price.

The steaks were nothing special. I could have bought the same quality for more or less the same price at a supermarket, so I wasn't too badly ripped off, but it was definitely a con game.

Yesterday, I just told the guy "no thank you, I'm a vegetarian."

I second Alkira
This isn't a scam at all.  I've gotten some really good meat from guys looking to sell what's left on the truck at the end of the day.  I've gotten meat up to 50% off.  Of course it all depends on the provider, but the companies around here are pretty good.

You could always call the company directly and ask them if this sort of thing is authorized.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 27, 2013, 05:32:50 PM
My friend had one yesterday, which could have been scary, but she's no dummy! she said some guy came up to her, asking if he could use her phone, as he may have missed his ride. without missing a beat she told him, sorry, I don't have one, but I bet if you go into one of the nearby stores, they'd let you use theirs. He said no, he was afraid if he did, his ride might leave him!  she then told him she wasn't born yeterday and got in her car!

I told her he was probably hoping she had a nice, expensive phone, and when she handed it over for him to use, he'd take off with it. She then said, well, he'd be pretty disappointed as her phone is not a smartphone, old, and dog chewed!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Darcy on February 27, 2013, 08:35:22 PM
Here's one I am wondering about:

My Mom once got a spam that had been spoofed to look like it came from one of my e-mail addys - a rather old one on Yahoo!, actually, that I recently revived for wedding planning. I changed my password and didn't think too much on it.

However, she keeps occasionally getting spam/scam e-mails that say they're from my first & last name (say, Jedi Kaiti), but with a wholly different e-mail address - usually Yahoo! it seems, but I'm not 100% certain on that. The thing is, she is the ONLY person getting these (or at least to have mentioned it to me), and come to find out today, she's gotten some similar ones purporting to be from one of my cousins, as well!

I'm a little baffled - it can't be that someone got my contacts from that account, there are only 2 in there, neither of whom are Mom. Maybe they scraped info out of the sent mail folder, but then why haven't my DF, MOH, or officiant gotten these emails - to say nothing of photographers and other service providers I've been corresponding with.

I'm a little confoosled.

My mom's gotten two emails recently - one labeled to look like it came from my brother, and one labeled to look like it came from me. Thankfully mom noticed that the emails are different from the ones we use (and why on earth would we email her when we're both in the house with her?).
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on February 28, 2013, 12:10:40 AM
Here's one I am wondering about:

My Mom once got a spam that had been spoofed to look like it came from one of my e-mail addys - a rather old one on Yahoo!, actually, that I recently revived for wedding planning. I changed my password and didn't think too much on it.

However, she keeps occasionally getting spam/scam e-mails that say they're from my first & last name (say, Jedi Kaiti), but with a wholly different e-mail address - usually Yahoo! it seems, but I'm not 100% certain on that. The thing is, she is the ONLY person getting these (or at least to have mentioned it to me), and come to find out today, she's gotten some similar ones purporting to be from one of my cousins, as well!

I'm a little baffled - it can't be that someone got my contacts from that account, there are only 2 in there, neither of whom are Mom. Maybe they scraped info out of the sent mail folder, but then why haven't my DF, MOH, or officiant gotten these emails - to say nothing of photographers and other service providers I've been corresponding with.

I'm a little confoosled.

My mom's gotten two emails recently - one labeled to look like it came from my brother, and one labeled to look like it came from me. Thankfully mom noticed that the emails are different from the ones we use (and why on earth would we email her when we're both in the house with her?).
Last spring I totaled my minivan.  The very next day, I started getting emails on my gmail account offering to BUY said minivan.  I did not give that account address to anybody connected with the tow company, insurance, rental car, hospital, or any other interested party. They appeared to have come from different people.   They tapered off after a couple of weeks, but  I'm utterly baffled how I got them at all -- and why would anyone want to buy a 12-year-old minivan with the front end all squashed in?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Katana_Geldar on February 28, 2013, 01:01:59 AM
Anyone heard of the pet scam? Someone says they are giving away a cute little puppy or kitten to a good home as long as the recipient pays transport fees. And vet fees. And vaccinations. And, and and... You get the picture.

I once had someone on my doorstep with the art student scam. Didn't buy anything but I got the number of a hot French guy.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Kaora on February 28, 2013, 01:43:19 AM
We got a piece of mail quoting life insurance for a MrAndy LastName.

1) That is the email we use on occasion.

2) MrAndy was the nickname for our cat that passed away over a year ago.  It's morbidly funny, selling life insurance for an ex-cat.  Makes me think of the Dead Parrot sketch, actually.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RingTailedLemur on February 28, 2013, 03:24:12 AM
We got a piece of mail quoting life insurance for a MrAndy LastName.

1) That is the email we use on occasion.

2) MrAndy was the nickname for our cat that passed away over a year ago.  It's morbidly funny, selling life insurance for an ex-cat. Makes me think of the Dead Parrot sketch, actually.

I'm glad you said you find it funny, because I did let out a little giggle!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on February 28, 2013, 08:33:47 AM
Here is the news article on the glass diamonds lady.

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=24131698
Glass Diamonds Lady struck again!
And this time she had an accomplice, and they got $5k
http://www.ksl.com/?sid=24228879&nid=960&title=woman-loses-thousands-of-dollars-in-fake-diamond-scam&fm=home_page&s_cid=featured-4

Very lucrative "job" I guess....$12,000 US in two weeks.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: staceym on February 28, 2013, 09:06:59 AM
and here is sort of one; I can't remember the whole conversation or exact wording; but this happened about two weeks ago.

first of all, I went on line and ordered an "As Seen on TV Item"  :-[ - yeah I know; but I figured it wasn't that expensive and if it doesn't work oh well.  So, anyway about two weeks ago I started getting calls on my cell phone from an 866 number; for two days I didn't answer (and they called 7 times per day  >:( ) so I figured the next day if they call I will answer, but answer angrily like "yeah, what do you want".  So, they do call and that is how I answered; and it is someone from that company thanking me for ordering the thingamajig and to thank you we want to send you a $50 (I think) gift card and some other things..  Now, I don't know why if they want to send it to me; they didn't just send it to me instead of calling, so it sounded off to me; so I told her no thanks and she said oh, but its blah, blah blah..and I said no thanks I don't want it, I only want what I ordered..she got silent and then said "okay, I'll put you down as a no" and I said right and hung up. 

kinda funny, that last week I got an email from the company that my item is on backorder ::)

kinda update on this..
I was talking to a coworker this morning and a subject was brought up that made me mention the above..he said the same thing happened to him; and he spouted off the number and I showed him my number in the missed calls log on my phone and he said yup same number..it was a gas card they were giving out along with this product that if you weren't happy with you can return in 14 days.

apparently the "as seen on TV" people (he ordered something too) sell off the phone numbers they get to another company who then try to sell you their product  :o

=============

my parents had their driveway asphalted when a guy came knocking on the door and said they just finished off neighbors driveway and had extra asphalt and wondered if they wanted their drive done too - my dad/mom agreed (since they wanted to have it done anyway) and they did it right then and a pretty good job too
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rose red on February 28, 2013, 09:21:28 AM
Here is the news article on the glass diamonds lady.

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=24131698
Glass Diamonds Lady struck again!
And this time she had an accomplice, and they got $5k
http://www.ksl.com/?sid=24228879&nid=960&title=woman-loses-thousands-of-dollars-in-fake-diamond-scam&fm=home_page&s_cid=featured-4

Very lucrative "job" I guess....$12,000 US in two weeks.

I don't get it.  Why would you buy a diamond off the street?  At least go with the seller to a jewelry store to verity that the diamond is real before forking over thousands of money.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on February 28, 2013, 09:31:27 AM
Here is the news article on the glass diamonds lady.

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=24131698
Glass Diamonds Lady struck again!
And this time she had an accomplice, and they got $5k
http://www.ksl.com/?sid=24228879&nid=960&title=woman-loses-thousands-of-dollars-in-fake-diamond-scam&fm=home_page&s_cid=featured-4

Very lucrative "job" I guess....$12,000 US in two weeks.

I don't get it.  Why would you buy a diamond off the street?  At least go with the seller to a jewelry store to verity that the diamond is real before forking over thousands of money.
That's why so many people accused the first scammed lady of being "in on it," not really scammed but made it look like she was, to prey on the public's goodwill.

Now that a second lady has fallen for the scam, I have to wonder if people are going to accuse this victim of being "in on it" too.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 28, 2013, 01:17:50 PM


my parents had their driveway asphalted when a guy came knocking on the door and said they just finished off neighbors driveway and had extra asphalt and wondered if they wanted their drive done too - my dad/mom agreed (since they wanted to have it done anyway) and they did it right then and a pretty good job too


My in-laws had the same thing happen when their road got re-paved. Only, my in-laws didn't have a permit to have the new driveway installed, and had to scuff it up so it didn't look new.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Kaora on February 28, 2013, 01:27:56 PM
We got a piece of mail quoting life insurance for a MrAndy LastName.

1) That is the email we use on occasion.

2) MrAndy was the nickname for our cat that passed away over a year ago.  It's morbidly funny, selling life insurance for an ex-cat. Makes me think of the Dead Parrot sketch, actually.

I'm glad you said you find it funny, because I did let out a little giggle!

It's been a year, so I don't mind.  Besides, the kitty just wanted people to be happy, I can't imagine he wouldn't find it funny, either.  It sounds weird personifying a cat, but he sure had a lot of personality.  :)

On the diamond scam...

Should diamonds have a natural IOR anyways?  I'd think it'd be pretty easy to compare glass to real diamonds on the basis of light refraction alone. :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Wulfie on February 28, 2013, 02:16:28 PM
The landlord for my studio had the parking lot entrance to his resturant widened and paved by giving the guys working on the road free lunch for a week.  Too bad my tax money paid for it :(  but at least my studio rent didn't go up :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 28, 2013, 03:13:42 PM
In my in-law's case, they had to pay for the road improvement by amount of frontage, so it didn't faze them.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on February 28, 2013, 09:20:33 PM
my parents had their driveway asphalted when a guy came knocking on the door and said they just finished off neighbors driveway and had extra asphalt and wondered if they wanted their drive done too - my dad/mom agreed (since they wanted to have it done anyway) and they did it right then and a pretty good job too
Might work if it was true AND they had a really short driveway.  But when someone showed up at my door with that scam, I said "If you have enough asphalt left over to properly do a 60-foot driveway, then you don't know what you're doing.  Go away."

Staceym, how thick is your parents' driveway?  We did get ours done later, and it's 4-5 inches thick.  If your parents' is much thinner, then they got scammed.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: stargazer on February 28, 2013, 09:47:23 PM
Here's one I am wondering about:

My Mom once got a spam that had been spoofed to look like it came from one of my e-mail addys - a rather old one on Yahoo!, actually, that I recently revived for wedding planning. I changed my password and didn't think too much on it.

However, she keeps occasionally getting spam/scam e-mails that say they're from my first & last name (say, Jedi Kaiti), but with a wholly different e-mail address - usually Yahoo! it seems, but I'm not 100% certain on that. The thing is, she is the ONLY person getting these (or at least to have mentioned it to me), and come to find out today, she's gotten some similar ones purporting to be from one of my cousins, as well!

I'm a little baffled - it can't be that someone got my contacts from that account, there are only 2 in there, neither of whom are Mom. Maybe they scraped info out of the sent mail folder, but then why haven't my DF, MOH, or officiant gotten these emails - to say nothing of photographers and other service providers I've been corresponding with.

I'm a little confoosled.

My mom's gotten two emails recently - one labeled to look like it came from my brother, and one labeled to look like it came from me. Thankfully mom noticed that the emails are different from the ones we use (and why on earth would we email her when we're both in the house with her?).

I've gotten a couple of these recently.  It does worry me a bit - they will be coming "from" my aunt or friend but with the wrong email address.  They ALSO use my first name in the email title.  And this has been to my work email no less.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on February 28, 2013, 09:57:01 PM
Here's one I am wondering about:

My Mom once got a spam that had been spoofed to look like it came from one of my e-mail addys - a rather old one on Yahoo!, actually, that I recently revived for wedding planning. I changed my password and didn't think too much on it.

However, she keeps occasionally getting spam/scam e-mails that say they're from my first & last name (say, Jedi Kaiti), but with a wholly different e-mail address - usually Yahoo! it seems, but I'm not 100% certain on that. The thing is, she is the ONLY person getting these (or at least to have mentioned it to me), and come to find out today, she's gotten some similar ones purporting to be from one of my cousins, as well!

I'm a little baffled - it can't be that someone got my contacts from that account, there are only 2 in there, neither of whom are Mom. Maybe they scraped info out of the sent mail folder, but then why haven't my DF, MOH, or officiant gotten these emails - to say nothing of photographers and other service providers I've been corresponding with.

I'm a little confoosled.

My mom's gotten two emails recently - one labeled to look like it came from my brother, and one labeled to look like it came from me. Thankfully mom noticed that the emails are different from the ones we use (and why on earth would we email her when we're both in the house with her?).

I've gotten a couple of these recently.  It does worry me a bit - they will be coming "from" my aunt or friend but with the wrong email address.  They ALSO use my first name in the email title.  And this has been to my work email no less.

They're even getting the SPELLING of my name right - and it's an odd one!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: rashea on March 01, 2013, 09:08:04 AM
my parents had their driveway asphalted when a guy came knocking on the door and said they just finished off neighbors driveway and had extra asphalt and wondered if they wanted their drive done too - my dad/mom agreed (since they wanted to have it done anyway) and they did it right then and a pretty good job too
Might work if it was true AND they had a really short driveway.  But when someone showed up at my door with that scam, I said "If you have enough asphalt left over to properly do a 60-foot driveway, then you don't know what you're doing.  Go away."

Staceym, how thick is your parents' driveway?  We did get ours done later, and it's 4-5 inches thick.  If your parents' is much thinner, then they got scammed.

Oddly, I've recently been helping a friend who is a paver with his invoices. The cost of the asphalt is really not the primary cost. Usually it's the labor, and the cost of any underlayment that really adds up. So, if they were jsut recoating a drive, that's not too ridiculous.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: magicdomino on March 01, 2013, 10:36:08 AM
my parents had their driveway asphalted when a guy came knocking on the door and said they just finished off neighbors driveway and had extra asphalt and wondered if they wanted their drive done too - my dad/mom agreed (since they wanted to have it done anyway) and they did it right then and a pretty good job too

Something similar happened to my mother.  Sadly, it was a scam.  She paid at least a thousand dollars to have the driveway repaired and refinished by someone who knocked on the door.  The driveway looked pretty for a while, but it was only coated with oil, not asphalt.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: staceym on March 01, 2013, 10:54:46 AM
Staceym, how thick is your parents' driveway?  We did get ours done later, and it's 4-5 inches thick.  If your parents' is much thinner, then they got scammed.

their drive is actually pretty short (enough for 1-1/2-2 cars); but a small additional spot enough for one car - I'm not sure how thick it is; fairly thick and it has been almost two years and has held up under two winters; so I think they are okay.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: helixa on March 02, 2013, 12:59:53 AM
Here is the news article on the glass diamonds lady.

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=24131698
Glass Diamonds Lady struck again!
And this time she had an accomplice, and they got $5k
http://www.ksl.com/?sid=24228879&nid=960&title=woman-loses-thousands-of-dollars-in-fake-diamond-scam&fm=home_page&s_cid=featured-4

Very lucrative "job" I guess....$12,000 US in two weeks.

I don't get it.  Why would you buy a diamond off the street?  At least go with the seller to a jewelry store to verity that the diamond is real before forking over thousands of money.
That's why so many people accused the first scammed lady of being "in on it," not really scammed but made it look like she was, to prey on the public's goodwill.

Now that a second lady has fallen for the scam, I have to wonder if people are going to accuse this victim of being "in on it" too.
I don't think they were buying the diamonds, but the scammer left them as collateral for the loan, or promised more in return in the second scam. They mostly used a sob story to con fellow Hispanic women.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: helixa on March 02, 2013, 01:07:59 AM
Here's one I am wondering about:

My Mom once got a spam that had been spoofed to look like it came from one of my e-mail addys - a rather old one on Yahoo!, actually, that I recently revived for wedding planning. I changed my password and didn't think too much on it.

However, she keeps occasionally getting spam/scam e-mails that say they're from my first & last name (say, Jedi Kaiti), but with a wholly different e-mail address - usually Yahoo! it seems, but I'm not 100% certain on that. The thing is, she is the ONLY person getting these (or at least to have mentioned it to me), and come to find out today, she's gotten some similar ones purporting to be from one of my cousins, as well!

I'm a little baffled - it can't be that someone got my contacts from that account, there are only 2 in there, neither of whom are Mom. Maybe they scraped info out of the sent mail folder, but then why haven't my DF, MOH, or officiant gotten these emails - to say nothing of photographers and other service providers I've been corresponding with.

I'm a little confoosled.

My mom's gotten two emails recently - one labeled to look like it came from my brother, and one labeled to look like it came from me. Thankfully mom noticed that the emails are different from the ones we use (and why on earth would we email her when we're both in the house with her?).

I've gotten a couple of these recently.  It does worry me a bit - they will be coming "from" my aunt or friend but with the wrong email address.  They ALSO use my first name in the email title.  And this has been to my work email no less.

They're even getting the SPELLING of my name right - and it's an odd one!

I've had these exactly! Coming from my DH my BIL and his wife, which has made me wonder if they got the information from a genealogy site, as it's the main common link between all of us electronically.
The name the email is from is correct but the email address itself is wrong (yahoo from memory, I've deleted them all though) and my name is correct. They usually just contain a single link. It could either be for malware, or simply an ad-click scam I guess.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeBeret on March 05, 2013, 12:23:14 PM
I'm trying to figure out what the scam here is.

I bought my car from a dealership a few years ago. Ever since then I've been getting emails, letters, and postcards saying that they are "soooo desperate" for my car and they would love to buy it back for about 50% more than what I owe on it. They always say that they will pay cash, it doesn't have to be a trade-in. Now I'm sure that if I had a limited-edition Maserati it might actually be in such high demand, but I actually have a 2009 Sentra. So I'm sure no one is desperate for it.

I usually say "yeah, sure", roll my eyes, and chuck the mail. But I'm not clear on what they're expecting to happen. Is it all a ploy to lure me to the dealership? Are they going to try and hook me with a new car and then give me a much lower trade-in on my car? I've always wondered what would happen if I walked into the dealership and tried to get the high cash amount they keep offering me, and refused to even look at other vehicles.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: RebeccainGA on March 05, 2013, 12:51:47 PM
I usually say "yeah, sure", roll my eyes, and chuck the mail. But I'm not clear on what they're expecting to happen. Is it all a ploy to lure me to the dealership? Are they going to try and hook me with a new car and then give me a much lower trade-in on my car? I've always wondered what would happen if I walked into the dealership and tried to get the high cash amount they keep offering me, and refused to even look at other vehicles.

Yes, it's a ploy - and if you went in and didn't look at another car, they'd find a reason not to give you the deal. In many areas, used cars are holding their value so well, and are in such demand, that they are worth enough to justify that extra $$ from the dealer. Many folks are preferring used because of the economy, either not wanting to spend the money, not able to get financing, or don't want to drive something flashy when others can't.

I get them ALL THE TIME. Even since we moved. On my 2006 Kia van. If they're that desperate for a car that old, makes me wonder what they'd offer me for my 1997 Camry!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nuit93 on March 05, 2013, 01:02:29 PM
Depends on the vehicle.

My b/f has a Ford Ranger that he's constantly getting requests to buy back, since 1) Ford is discontining that model and 2) they're REALLY popular.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: violinp on March 05, 2013, 01:11:14 PM
I usually say "yeah, sure", roll my eyes, and chuck the mail. But I'm not clear on what they're expecting to happen. Is it all a ploy to lure me to the dealership? Are they going to try and hook me with a new car and then give me a much lower trade-in on my car? I've always wondered what would happen if I walked into the dealership and tried to get the high cash amount they keep offering me, and refused to even look at other vehicles.

Yes, it's a ploy - and if you went in and didn't look at another car, they'd find a reason not to give you the deal. In many areas, used cars are holding their value so well, and are in such demand, that they are worth enough to justify that extra $$ from the dealer. Many folks are preferring used because of the economy, either not wanting to spend the money, not able to get financing, or don't want to drive something flashy when others can't.

I get them ALL THE TIME. Even since we moved. On my 2006 Kia van. If they're that desperate for a car that old, makes me wonder what they'd offer me for my 1997 Camry!

Someone who goes to my church got a Tesla Roadster second - hand for $45,000. No, that was not a typo.  :o It's a fair price, since that's half its selling power, but that seems an awful lot for a used car, even if it is powered by lithium - ion batteries.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on March 06, 2013, 11:01:00 AM
I'm trying to figure out what the scam here is.

I bought my car from a dealership a few years ago. Ever since then I've been getting emails, letters, and postcards saying that they are "soooo desperate" for my car and they would love to buy it back for about 50% more than what I owe on it. They always say that they will pay cash, it doesn't have to be a trade-in. Now I'm sure that if I had a limited-edition Maserati it might actually be in such high demand, but I actually have a 2009 Sentra. So I'm sure no one is desperate for it.

I usually say "yeah, sure", roll my eyes, and chuck the mail. But I'm not clear on what they're expecting to happen. Is it all a ploy to lure me to the dealership? Are they going to try and hook me with a new car and then give me a much lower trade-in on my car? I've always wondered what would happen if I walked into the dealership and tried to get the high cash amount they keep offering me, and refused to even look at other vehicles.

Or the ones who say they will give you x dollars for your trade in, no matter WHAT it is. haven't quite figured that one out yet. 

and the ones who say you owe on your old car, no problem!  And I don't think a lot of people understand that just means they roll what you owe on old car into the new loan, and not that they will forgive your loan.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: magician5 on March 06, 2013, 02:39:16 PM
I've heard that the less reputable used car dealers (the ones who advertise "Bad Credit? No credit? No problem!") attract hapless lower-class buyers (people who have run out of choices) and insist that loans be paid in cash at the dealership. Then when the customer is late with a payment or defaults (as is likely) the vehicle is repossessed and the sad cycle begins all over again. In addition, there are innumerable tricks to make a faulty vehicle look much better than it really is, and sell it at an inflated price.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on March 06, 2013, 02:41:38 PM
Here is the news article on the glass diamonds lady.

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=24131698
Glass Diamonds Lady struck again!
And this time she had an accomplice, and they got $5k
http://www.ksl.com/?sid=24228879&nid=960&title=woman-loses-thousands-of-dollars-in-fake-diamond-scam&fm=home_page&s_cid=featured-4

Very lucrative "job" I guess....$12,000 US in two weeks.

I don't get it.  Why would you buy a diamond off the street?  At least go with the seller to a jewelry store to verity that the diamond is real before forking over thousands of money.
That's why so many people accused the first scammed lady of being "in on it," not really scammed but made it look like she was, to prey on the public's goodwill.

Now that a second lady has fallen for the scam, I have to wonder if people are going to accuse this victim of being "in on it" too.
I don't think they were buying the diamonds, but the scammer left them as collateral for the loan, or promised more in return in the second scam. They mostly used a sob story to con fellow Hispanic women.

They struck again yesterday.  Gullible trusting people.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on March 06, 2013, 03:23:45 PM
I saw that! Ugh!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: KimberlyM on March 07, 2013, 11:27:37 AM
Awesome!  I just won a BMW and $50,000!  How cool is that, I don't even remember entering...

BMW LOTTERY DEPARTMENT
ROCKVIEW, ARKANSAS. 49812
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Dear Winner,

This is to inform you that you have been selected for a prize of a brand new 2012 Model BMW 7 Series Car and a Check of $500,000.00usd from international programs held on the 1st section 2013 in the UNITED STATE OF AMERICA.

The selection process was carried out through random selection in our computerized email selection system (ESS) from a database of over 250,000 email addresses drawn from all the continents of the world which you were selected.

The BMW Lottery is approved by the British Gaming Board and also licensed by the International Association of Gaming Regulators (IAGR). To begin the processing of your prize you are to contact our fiduciary claims department for more information as regards procedures to claim your prize.

Name: Mr. David Burt
Email: david.burt01@outlook.com

Contact him by providing him with your secret pin code Number BMW:2551256003/23. You are also advised to provide him with the
Under listed information as soon as possible:

1. Name in full. 2. Address.
3. Nationality. 4. Age.
5. Occupation. 6. Phone/Fax.
7. Present Country. 8. Email address.
9. pin code Number BMW:2551256003/23

Dr. Darl Servey
THE DIRECTOR PROMOTIONS
BMW LOTTERY DEPARTMENT
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on March 07, 2013, 11:34:26 AM
Wow, how kind of them to be sure to let you know that Arkansas is in the United States and that your check was won from "international programs held on the 1st section 2013." I am sooooooo envious. ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: esteban on March 07, 2013, 11:55:12 AM
You loss posting that here.  I already claimed the car and the cash using that secret PIN.  Don't you know you aren't supposed to share them.  I'll be out driving in style in just a short amount of time (as soon as the check for the taxes clears, for whatever reason they can't take it out of the $50k I have to send it to them)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: snowfire on March 07, 2013, 12:07:24 PM
and the ones who say you owe on your old car, no problem!  And I don't think a lot of people understand that just means they roll what you owe on old car into the new loan, and not that they will forgive your loan.

There was a dealership busted a few years ago in my area who was doing this.  Not only did they not tell people that what they owed on the trade in was being rolled into the new car loan, they were not paying off the loan on the old car.  Poor schmucks were then stuck with the original loan on a car that they no longer had in their possession, but the inflated loan on the new car.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on March 07, 2013, 12:41:14 PM
It says $50,000 in the title and $500,000 in the first paragraph
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on March 07, 2013, 01:18:49 PM
United State?  Hey!   Did we get a whole new state named United and I didn't even hear?   ???
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: KimberlyM on March 07, 2013, 03:06:46 PM
Dang it! I'm just too trusting, I should have blocked out my secret PIN code.  Now I'll have to buy my own BMW when I get the funds from that Nigerian Prince's estate.... ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hillia on March 07, 2013, 03:43:46 PM
I actually knew a woman once who won a car in one of those 'tour our time share' deals.  She did have to pay the taxes, but it was a few hundred dollars on a nice midrange car (a Ford Escort or similar) so it was a very good deal for her.  I also knew someone who actually won a speedboat in a convenience store bingo game - the kind where you have to collect all the pieces to fill in a game board.  He was married with small children and had  no use for a speedboat, so he sold it and bought a nice family-friendly pontoon boat with all the trimmings for fishing trips to the lake.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Where's the Quiet? on March 07, 2013, 04:37:20 PM
I've gotten this email three times so far this week:

"Congratulations! You have been selected to be a contestant on Deal or No Deal."

And then there's a link to confirm my invitation. It's got to be totally legitimate!  ;)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on March 07, 2013, 05:10:57 PM
I've gotten 3 emails in 2 days to my <university>.edu e-mail account about my mailbox approaching storage limit and I need to follow this link to prevent de-activation. Each email has come from a .edu address, but from 3 different schools - and none of them mine!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on March 07, 2013, 06:47:39 PM
I received this message today in my work email:

We are writing to let you know about GradHearts, the dating site for people with graduate degrees.

To become a GradHearts member you must have a graduate degree (Master's or Doctorate).  This means that you will always have something in common with anyone you meet through the site.  It's an automatic 'dating filter'!

You can sign up for free by visiting the site:

http://www.gradhearts.com?i=276157

Plus, sign up before the end of the month and you will receive 3 days of full membership for free.

If you have any questions, please let us know.  We look forward to welcoming you to GradHearts.

Kind regards,

David

Membership Development Coordinator

GradHearts.com - dating for people with graduate degrees


Apparently, they sent it university-wide. I don't have a graduate degree and I am not single, so I must not be in their target demographic.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: baglady on March 07, 2013, 07:18:10 PM
Every so often I get an email allegedly from Earthlink telling me my credit card didn't go through and I need to give them my updated CC information, yada yada ....

I haven't paid my Earthlink bill by credit card since 2005. That's when Earthlink and Time Warner made a deal to make cable Internet available to Earthlink customers. And that's when I started paying Time Warner for my Internet. By check.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on March 07, 2013, 08:42:15 PM
I once came close to ignoring a genuine "you are a winner." I got an email purporting to be from my phone company, saying that I'd won a $100 gift card. Yeah, right. Hit delete.

Then I remembered that I had visited the site of some contest the company was running. To be entered into the drawing for the $10,000 prize, you had to complete a silly fill-in-the-blanks quiz. Things like "XYZ is the b_st phone company on the planet." I did it for the heck of it, figuring nothing would happen.

I looked at that email again. I know how to read headers and everything looked legit. So I went back to the contest page and checked the fine print. There was a secondary contest. A computer had picked 10 random dates & times. The person who entered the contest closest to one of those times would win a $100 gift card.

It bought us a lovely dinner at a nice restaurant.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: JoW on March 07, 2013, 10:51:43 PM
I usually say "yeah, sure", roll my eyes, and chuck the mail. But I'm not clear on what they're expecting to happen. Is it all a ploy to lure me to the dealership? Are they going to try and hook me with a new car and then give me a much lower trade-in on my car? I've always wondered what would happen if I walked into the dealership and tried to get the high cash amount they keep offering me, and refused to even look at other vehicles.

Yes, it's a ploy - and if you went in and didn't look at another car, they'd find a reason not to give you the deal. In many areas, used cars are holding their value so well, and are in such demand, that they are worth enough to justify that extra $$ from the dealer. Many folks are preferring used because of the economy, either not wanting to spend the money, not able to get financing, or don't want to drive something flashy when others can't.

I get them ALL THE TIME. Even since we moved. On my 2006 Kia van. If they're that desperate for a car that old, makes me wonder what they'd offer me for my 1997 Camry!
I got  that letter today.  They want to buy back my 2012 Rav 4.  The one I bought new 33 days ago. The stationary has my dealer's name on it, but the return address is a different state. I suspect it came from a corporate office. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: WestAussieGirl on March 08, 2013, 05:29:13 AM
I've recently joined an Internet dating site. I have been getting at least one message a day from different guys who are all around 19 or 20yo (I'm 40). I've got a reasonably healthy self-image but I really can't imagine I'm suddenly irrisistible to teenage boys. I feel like it must be a scam but I can't figure it out. They aren't especially hot guys or anything, just ordinary looking kids.

Any ideas, or are there really a seemingly endless supply of boys looking for Mrs Robinson?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Outdoor Girl on March 08, 2013, 07:49:55 AM
I've recently joined an Internet dating site. I have been getting at least one message a day from different guys who are all around 19 or 20yo (I'm 40). I've got a reasonably healthy self-image but I really can't imagine I'm suddenly irrisistible to teenage boys. I feel like it must be a scam but I can't figure it out. They aren't especially hot guys or anything, just ordinary looking kids.

Any ideas, or are there really a seemingly endless supply of boys looking for Mrs Robinson?

Boys that age are probably just looking for willing partners and figure an older woman won't have strings.  And they believe that old study saying boys are at their sexual prime at 18-20 and women at 35-40.   :D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: KarenK on March 08, 2013, 01:47:51 PM
I've recently joined an Internet dating site. I have been getting at least one message a day from different guys who are all around 19 or 20yo (I'm 40). I've got a reasonably healthy self-image but I really can't imagine I'm suddenly irrisistible to teenage boys. I feel like it must be a scam but I can't figure it out. They aren't especially hot guys or anything, just ordinary looking kids.

Any ideas, or are there really a seemingly endless supply of boys looking for Mrs Robinson?

Boys that age are probably just looking for willing partners and figure an older woman won't have strings.  And they believe that old study saying boys are at their sexual prime at 18-20 and women at 35-40.   :D

Also, it's well-known that older women are grateful! ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Midge on March 08, 2013, 02:08:41 PM
I've gotten 3 emails in 2 days to my <university>.edu e-mail account about my mailbox approaching storage limit and I need to follow this link to prevent de-activation. Each email has come from a .edu address, but from 3 different schools - and none of them mine!

I get those on my university (I work in marketing for a college) account as well! They usually start out "I am saying that your mailbox is full" blah blah blah "your mailbox will be destroyed." So believable.  ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: TootsNYC on March 08, 2013, 02:15:23 PM
I just got a spam/scam email from "The King of Narnia." WOW.

Bet it's Edmund.

LOL!

HIGH KING Edmund.

No, Peter is the High King. Edmund is just a king.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: VorFemme on March 08, 2013, 02:15:49 PM
I've recently joined an Internet dating site. I have been getting at least one message a day from different guys who are all around 19 or 20yo (I'm 40). I've got a reasonably healthy self-image but I really can't imagine I'm suddenly irrisistible to teenage boys. I feel like it must be a scam but I can't figure it out. They aren't especially hot guys or anything, just ordinary looking kids.

Any ideas, or are there really a seemingly endless supply of boys looking for Mrs Robinson?

Boys that age are probably just looking for willing partners and figure an older woman won't have strings.  And they believe that old study saying boys are at their sexual prime at 18-20 and women at 35-40.   :D

Also, it's well-known that older women are grateful! ;D

After all, Ben Franklin wrote that in his letters.....
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Jones on March 11, 2013, 09:44:19 AM
Apparently my best bud, Jennifer Aniston, can help me lose weight. Also got an email from Katy Perry about dating.
I must be in high demand socially.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Shalamar on March 11, 2013, 10:09:42 AM
Me too!  I seem to be BFFs with Jen, Angelina Jolie, Katy Perry, and Oprah now.  I'm sorry; I won't be able to hang out on these boards anymore - I'm moving up in the world!  :D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: GraceSullivan on March 11, 2013, 11:55:35 AM
I usually say "yeah, sure", roll my eyes, and chuck the mail. But I'm not clear on what they're expecting to happen. Is it all a ploy to lure me to the dealership? Are they going to try and hook me with a new car and then give me a much lower trade-in on my car? I've always wondered what would happen if I walked into the dealership and tried to get the high cash amount they keep offering me, and refused to even look at other vehicles.

Yes, it's a ploy - and if you went in and didn't look at another car, they'd find a reason not to give you the deal. In many areas, used cars are holding their value so well, and are in such demand, that they are worth enough to justify that extra $$ from the dealer. Many folks are preferring used because of the economy, either not wanting to spend the money, not able to get financing, or don't want to drive something flashy when others can't.

I get them ALL THE TIME. Even since we moved. On my 2006 Kia van. If they're that desperate for a car that old, makes me wonder what they'd offer me for my 1997 Camry!
I got  that letter today.  They want to buy back my 2012 Rav 4.  The one I bought new 33 days ago. The stationary has my dealer's name on it, but the return address is a different state. I suspect it came from a corporate office.

Toyota is just great [sarcasm] with those.  Same thing happened when I bought my 4Runner back in 2006--I got them for years.  I don't get them anymore, though.  Apparently my car is now past its prime (but if they only knew about the dog fur and dog slobbery windows, I'm sure they'd want it then!).

I bought a MINI last August, and haven't seen anything similar from BMW--they must know that Miniacs would never sell their babies!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Carotte on March 11, 2013, 01:50:01 PM
Here's a sample of fake 'important' mail that some of you (I never did) might have received:
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/2013/envelopes/ (http://www.evilmadscientist.com/2013/envelopes/)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MommyPenguin on March 11, 2013, 02:21:23 PM
I love the part about "nothing says important like "or current resident.""
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on March 11, 2013, 02:54:09 PM
Here's a sample of fake 'important' mail that some of you (I never did) might have received:
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/2013/envelopes/ (http://www.evilmadscientist.com/2013/envelopes/)

I think we've received a couple of those.  It's usually obvious once you open it that it's junk and not official business.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on March 11, 2013, 05:56:37 PM
I usually say "yeah, sure", roll my eyes, and chuck the mail. But I'm not clear on what they're expecting to happen. Is it all a ploy to lure me to the dealership? Are they going to try and hook me with a new car and then give me a much lower trade-in on my car? I've always wondered what would happen if I walked into the dealership and tried to get the high cash amount they keep offering me, and refused to even look at other vehicles.

Yes, it's a ploy - and if you went in and didn't look at another car, they'd find a reason not to give you the deal. In many areas, used cars are holding their value so well, and are in such demand, that they are worth enough to justify that extra $$ from the dealer. Many folks are preferring used because of the economy, either not wanting to spend the money, not able to get financing, or don't want to drive something flashy when others can't.

I get them ALL THE TIME. Even since we moved. On my 2006 Kia van. If they're that desperate for a car that old, makes me wonder what they'd offer me for my 1997 Camry!
I got  that letter today.  They want to buy back my 2012 Rav 4.  The one I bought new 33 days ago. The stationary has my dealer's name on it, but the return address is a different state. I suspect it came from a corporate office.

Toyota is just great [sarcasm] with those.  Same thing happened when I bought my 4Runner back in 2006--I got them for years.  I don't get them anymore, though.  Apparently my car is now past its prime (but if they only knew about the dog fur and dog slobbery windows, I'm sure they'd want it then!).

I bought a MINI last August, and haven't seen anything similar from BMW--they must know that Miniacs would never sell their babies!

I got a MINI back in 2007, and a few months later, I got a box in the mail "Essential Motoring Nonessentials" - things like a smiling antenna topper, a secret message decoder to use on MINI ads, a mousepad, a really nice pen, and other goodies. I think when BMW bought them, they gave the marketing department a blank check and told them to have fun.

Since then, I've gotten 1 call from the dealership - I think back in 2010? - seeing how the MINI was working for me. I think they were hoping I might trade it in for a new one, but were informed that it was going great and I was hoping to keep it for a few more years. :-)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Iris on March 12, 2013, 01:38:08 AM
Apparently my best bud, Jennifer Aniston, can help me lose weight. Also got an email from Katy Perry about dating.
I must be in high demand socially.

Gee, with her tremendous relationship track record, who WOULDN'T want advice from Katy Perry?  ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on March 12, 2013, 09:25:57 AM
Last night I got a huge flashing red bar across the bottom of my screen inviting me to view my arrest record!!   :o

Uh, I've never been arrested (that I remember anyway) and I can't imagine what that was all about, but it was interesting.  My guess is that they figure people who have been might click on and then in order to show you your 'arrest record' you'd have to supply them with your name, address and other personal information.

Needless to say, I made the difficult decision to pass on that particular opportunity.   ???
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ACBNYC on March 12, 2013, 09:36:25 AM
Here's one I am wondering about:

My Mom once got a spam that had been spoofed to look like it came from one of my e-mail addys - a rather old one on Yahoo!, actually, that I recently revived for wedding planning. I changed my password and didn't think too much on it.

However, she keeps occasionally getting spam/scam e-mails that say they're from my first & last name (say, Jedi Kaiti), but with a wholly different e-mail address - usually Yahoo! it seems, but I'm not 100% certain on that. The thing is, she is the ONLY person getting these (or at least to have mentioned it to me), and come to find out today, she's gotten some similar ones purporting to be from one of my cousins, as well!

I'm a little baffled - it can't be that someone got my contacts from that account, there are only 2 in there, neither of whom are Mom. Maybe they scraped info out of the sent mail folder, but then why haven't my DF, MOH, or officiant gotten these emails - to say nothing of photographers and other service providers I've been corresponding with.

I'm a little confoosled.

My mom's gotten two emails recently - one labeled to look like it came from my brother, and one labeled to look like it came from me. Thankfully mom noticed that the emails are different from the ones we use (and why on earth would we email her when we're both in the house with her?).

I've gotten a couple of these recently.  It does worry me a bit - they will be coming "from" my aunt or friend but with the wrong email address.  They ALSO use my first name in the email title.  And this has been to my work email no less.

I've noticed this recently, too. To Gmail's credit, they are going to spam. But here's the creepy thing. One of my brothers uses Facebook under a modified name--think John Smithers instead of John Smith. One of these spammy emails came from "John Smithers." He uses that name no where else. My Facebook hasn't been hacked but my friends list is public, so I think they're using software to crawl for names and then using the associated Facebook email address.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on March 12, 2013, 09:38:12 AM
^^^  That may be, but I've gotten a couple of emails from my own email address and I am NOT on Facebook (and never have been), so they're getting those addresses somewhere else too.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: wolfie on March 12, 2013, 09:44:46 AM
Apparently my best bud, Jennifer Aniston, can help me lose weight. Also got an email from Katy Perry about dating.
I must be in high demand socially.

Gee, with her tremendous relationship track record, who WOULDN'T want advice from Katy Perry?  ::)

Katy Perry is obviously asking Jones for dating advice!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Where's the Quiet? on March 12, 2013, 10:00:10 AM
I get scammy emails every day but today I got my first threatening charging me with money laundering and "smuggling of currencies." I have three business days to send them my ownership clearance certificate to claim my $10.5 million brought in by a "courier personal." I think my favorite line in the whole thing is this: "...if you forward the Ownership Clearance Certificate then we will release courier lady to come deliver to you your consignment box also gives you every back up on the money."

I'm quaking in my boots!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hillia on March 12, 2013, 10:48:04 AM
I get scammy emails every day but today I got my first threatening charging me with money laundering and "smuggling of currencies." I have three business days to send them my ownership clearance certificate to claim my $10.5 million brought in by a "courier personal." I think my favorite line in the whole thing is this: "...if you forward the Ownership Clearance Certificate then we will release courier lady to come deliver to you your consignment box also gives you every back up on the money."

I'm quaking in my boots!

But don't you want them to release the poor courier lady?

Cry havoc, and release the couriers of spam!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: snowfire on March 12, 2013, 11:13:40 AM
DH just cleaned out a computer for a friend.  He had let his anti-virus lapse and his computer had gotten locked down with one of those fake "FBI" ransomware things where they claim you have been downloading illegal/p0rn/bootleg stuff and you must pay $300 fine immediately to get it unlocked.  That sucker was hard to get rid of.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: GraceSullivan on March 12, 2013, 11:25:43 AM
I usually say "yeah, sure", roll my eyes, and chuck the mail. But I'm not clear on what they're expecting to happen. Is it all a ploy to lure me to the dealership? Are they going to try and hook me with a new car and then give me a much lower trade-in on my car? I've always wondered what would happen if I walked into the dealership and tried to get the high cash amount they keep offering me, and refused to even look at other vehicles.

Yes, it's a ploy - and if you went in and didn't look at another car, they'd find a reason not to give you the deal. In many areas, used cars are holding their value so well, and are in such demand, that they are worth enough to justify that extra $$ from the dealer. Many folks are preferring used because of the economy, either not wanting to spend the money, not able to get financing, or don't want to drive something flashy when others can't.

I get them ALL THE TIME. Even since we moved. On my 2006 Kia van. If they're that desperate for a car that old, makes me wonder what they'd offer me for my 1997 Camry!
I got  that letter today.  They want to buy back my 2012 Rav 4.  The one I bought new 33 days ago. The stationary has my dealer's name on it, but the return address is a different state. I suspect it came from a corporate office.

Toyota is just great [sarcasm] with those.  Same thing happened when I bought my 4Runner back in 2006--I got them for years.  I don't get them anymore, though.  Apparently my car is now past its prime (but if they only knew about the dog fur and dog slobbery windows, I'm sure they'd want it then!).

I bought a MINI last August, and haven't seen anything similar from BMW--they must know that Miniacs would never sell their babies!

I got a MINI back in 2007, and a few months later, I got a box in the mail "Essential Motoring Nonessentials" - things like a smiling antenna topper, a secret message decoder to use on MINI ads, a mousepad, a really nice pen, and other goodies. I think when BMW bought them, they gave the marketing department a blank check and told them to have fun.

Since then, I've gotten 1 call from the dealership - I think back in 2010? - seeing how the MINI was working for me. I think they were hoping I might trade it in for a new one, but were informed that it was going great and I was hoping to keep it for a few more years. :-)

They still do that!  Although I lost my antenna topper  :(
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on March 12, 2013, 01:53:00 PM
DH just cleaned out a computer for a friend.  He had let his anti-virus lapse and his computer had gotten locked down with one of those fake "FBI" ransomware things where they claim you have been downloading illegal/p0rn/bootleg stuff and you must pay $300 fine immediately to get it unlocked.  That sucker was hard to get rid of.
My father has a peculiar sort of tunnel vision that only lets him see what he WANTS to see.  When his anti-virus kept popping up with a notice "It's time to renew!" he completely ignored it for two months, until we came down to visit and he could ask us about it.   ::)   And most of his computer use is stock trading.  It's pure luck that his accounts weren't compromised.   
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Moralia on March 12, 2013, 04:57:59 PM
I usually say "yeah, sure", roll my eyes, and chuck the mail. But I'm not clear on what they're expecting to happen. Is it all a ploy to lure me to the dealership? Are they going to try and hook me with a new car and then give me a much lower trade-in on my car? I've always wondered what would happen if I walked into the dealership and tried to get the high cash amount they keep offering me, and refused to even look at other vehicles.

Yes, it's a ploy - and if you went in and didn't look at another car, they'd find a reason not to give you the deal. In many areas, used cars are holding their value so well, and are in such demand, that they are worth enough to justify that extra $$ from the dealer. Many folks are preferring used because of the economy, either not wanting to spend the money, not able to get financing, or don't want to drive something flashy when others can't.

I get them ALL THE TIME. Even since we moved. On my 2006 Kia van. If they're that desperate for a car that old, makes me wonder what they'd offer me for my 1997 Camry!
I got  that letter today.  They want to buy back my 2012 Rav 4.  The one I bought new 33 days ago. The stationary has my dealer's name on it, but the return address is a different state. I suspect it came from a corporate office.

Toyota is just great [sarcasm] with those.  Same thing happened when I bought my 4Runner back in 2006--I got them for years.  I don't get them anymore, though.  Apparently my car is now past its prime (but if they only knew about the dog fur and dog slobbery windows, I'm sure they'd want it then!).

I bought a MINI last August, and haven't seen anything similar from BMW--they must know that Miniacs would never sell their babies!

I got a MINI back in 2007, and a few months later, I got a box in the mail "Essential Motoring Nonessentials" - things like a smiling antenna topper, a secret message decoder to use on MINI ads, a mousepad, a really nice pen, and other goodies. I think when BMW bought them, they gave the marketing department a blank check and told them to have fun.

Since then, I've gotten 1 call from the dealership - I think back in 2010? - seeing how the MINI was working for me. I think they were hoping I might trade it in for a new one, but were informed that it was going great and I was hoping to keep it for a few more years. :-)

They still do that!  Although I lost my antenna topper  :(
:( I bought my Mini used last year, so I got no such goodies.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Katana_Geldar on March 12, 2013, 05:50:11 PM
G an alert in my gmail that someone in India tried to hack my account. Password has since been changed.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: GraceSullivan on March 13, 2013, 08:35:40 AM
Moralia, did you buy it at a BMW dealership?  If you did, you should have gotten it I believe.  A friend of mine bought a used MINI from the dealership and got the welcome package.  Not sure if you bought it from say Carmax (which is where I almost bought a used MINI).
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: BatCity on March 13, 2013, 09:01:49 AM

Someone who goes to my church got a Tesla Roadster second - hand for $45,000. No, that was not a typo.  :o It's a fair price, since that's half its selling power, but that seems an awful lot for a used car, even if it is powered by lithium - ion batteries.

This doesn't surprise me at all. My brother has been on the Tesla waiting list for over a year, and he's going to pay over $75,000 for the car when it's delivered.. If someone offered him a used one for half that right now, he'd jump on it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Sebastienne on March 13, 2013, 12:38:31 PM
I usually say "yeah, sure", roll my eyes, and chuck the mail. But I'm not clear on what they're expecting to happen. Is it all a ploy to lure me to the dealership? Are they going to try and hook me with a new car and then give me a much lower trade-in on my car? I've always wondered what would happen if I walked into the dealership and tried to get the high cash amount they keep offering me, and refused to even look at other vehicles.

Yes, it's a ploy - and if you went in and didn't look at another car, they'd find a reason not to give you the deal. In many areas, used cars are holding their value so well, and are in such demand, that they are worth enough to justify that extra $$ from the dealer. Many folks are preferring used because of the economy, either not wanting to spend the money, not able to get financing, or don't want to drive something flashy when others can't.

I get them ALL THE TIME. Even since we moved. On my 2006 Kia van. If they're that desperate for a car that old, makes me wonder what they'd offer me for my 1997 Camry!
I got  that letter today.  They want to buy back my 2012 Rav 4.  The one I bought new 33 days ago. The stationary has my dealer's name on it, but the return address is a different state. I suspect it came from a corporate office.

Toyota is just great [sarcasm] with those.  Same thing happened when I bought my 4Runner back in 2006--I got them for years.  I don't get them anymore, though.  Apparently my car is now past its prime (but if they only knew about the dog fur and dog slobbery windows, I'm sure they'd want it then!).

I bought a MINI last August, and haven't seen anything similar from BMW--they must know that Miniacs would never sell their babies!

I got a MINI back in 2007, and a few months later, I got a box in the mail "Essential Motoring Nonessentials" - things like a smiling antenna topper, a secret message decoder to use on MINI ads, a mousepad, a really nice pen, and other goodies. I think when BMW bought them, they gave the marketing department a blank check and told them to have fun.

Since then, I've gotten 1 call from the dealership - I think back in 2010? - seeing how the MINI was working for me. I think they were hoping I might trade it in for a new one, but were informed that it was going great and I was hoping to keep it for a few more years. :-)

They still do that!  Although I lost my antenna topper  :(
:( I bought my Mini used last year, so I got no such goodies.

It's a shame. It's a really, really good pen.

I love my Mini so much. No scams there.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: AfleetAlex on March 13, 2013, 12:49:06 PM
I lease, and I still get letters from a dealership in another city for a car I haven't had for something like six years. I'm thinking that if they want to buy that car back they're going to have to find it first because I have no idea where it is anymore.

And of course I get requests to sell my current car too. That I lease. So that it really isn't even mine.  ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Sapphire23 on March 13, 2013, 03:52:39 PM
Got an automated call yesterday from a bank I don't have an account with saying my debit/credit card has been frozen, and to press 1 to be connected to their security team to reset it..   ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Seven Ate Nine on March 13, 2013, 06:16:42 PM
DH just cleaned out a computer for a friend.  He had let his anti-virus lapse and his computer had gotten locked down with one of those fake "FBI" ransomware things where they claim you have been downloading illegal/p0rn/bootleg stuff and you must pay $300 fine immediately to get it unlocked.  That sucker was hard to get rid of.
My father has a peculiar sort of tunnel vision that only lets him see what he WANTS to see.  When his anti-virus kept popping up with a notice "It's time to renew!" he completely ignored it for two months, until we came down to visit and he could ask us about it.   ::)   And most of his computer use is stock trading.  It's pure luck that his accounts weren't compromised.   

As long as his browsing habits are fairly "clean" (ie, no downloads, he doesn't click on random links in email, doesn't visit certain types of sites) his risk of infection are actually pretty low.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Moralia on March 13, 2013, 07:17:37 PM
Moralia, did you buy it at a BMW dealership?  If you did, you should have gotten it I believe.  A friend of mine bought a used MINI from the dealership and got the welcome package.  Not sure if you bought it from say Carmax (which is where I almost bought a used MINI).

It was from a non-BMW dealership.  I can't complain, though...even needing a new clutch, I paid a VERY reasonable price. I take it to the local Mini dealership for service, though, so when I eventually go to get a new or 'new' one, I'll probably go there. Their customer service is really excellent.

Also, they give me a pen each time.  :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Zenith on March 13, 2013, 10:13:40 PM
^^^  That may be, but I've gotten a couple of emails from my own email address and I am NOT on Facebook (and never have been), so they're getting those addresses somewhere else too.

I was recently cleaning out my very (6+ years) old personalised ISP email address and noticed a catalogue from an American clothing store 4 years ago. Standard ad but what got me was this email address is only used by me very selectively and it was addressed to my flatmates sister who is in no way linked to this email address at all. No way at all. I think my ISP sold my email which is why I switched my primary email to somewhere else a long time ago.

It's kinda scary how advertisers can make links and get my email address for someone else across the atlantic. I asked the intended recipient about it and she has never even gone on that American clothing website but used a sister site of theirs. It may have been a stab in the dark but wow they have some good programs to track people.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Zenith on March 13, 2013, 10:24:06 PM
DH just cleaned out a computer for a friend.  He had let his anti-virus lapse and his computer had gotten locked down with one of those fake "FBI" ransomware things where they claim you have been downloading illegal/p0rn/bootleg stuff and you must pay $300 fine immediately to get it unlocked.  That sucker was hard to get rid of.

I got pron virus bombed by an infected flashdrive. Took out everything and my system had to be wiped and reinstalled. 4 days to get everything back to before. That's the only time anything got through my defences and boy was I pissed at the person who gave me the flashdrive. Nothing like nude gifs of stripping ladies doing their thang on your screen while it disassembles your HD. This flashdrive came from a student at the local high school too who denied he put it on there. It turned out he got it from the school computers/infrastructure :O. That was a really nasty  virus. That is why I never transferred stuff between school and home at school. Even the school was unaware it was loose in their system but it had been contained but not wiped. Apparently someONE wasn't doing the software updates so it couldn't activate on the main system but anything plugged in was at risk. Naughty naughty.

I upgraded my firewall asap after that. I didn't know I was vulnerable in that aspect so it did have a good point.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on March 13, 2013, 10:44:48 PM
^^^  That may be, but I've gotten a couple of emails from my own email address and I am NOT on Facebook (and never have been), so they're getting those addresses somewhere else too.

I was recently cleaning out my very (6+ years) old personalised ISP email address and noticed a catalogue from an American clothing store 4 years ago. Standard ad but what got me was this email address is only used by me very selectively and it was addressed to my flatmates sister who is in no way linked to this email address at all. No way at all. I think my ISP sold my email which is why I switched my primary email to somewhere else a long time ago.

It's kinda scary how advertisers can make links and get my email address for someone else across the atlantic. I asked the intended recipient about it and she has never even gone on that American clothing website but used a sister site of theirs. It may have been a stab in the dark but wow they have some good programs to track people.

Data mining can be scarily effective: This is a 2012 Forbes article about Target's data mining, how they figured out a teenager was pregnant before her Dad did, and how they have to put a few wholly irrelevant coupons in their mailers so as not to freak out their customers: http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2012/02/16/how-target-figured-out-a-teen-girl-was-pregnant-before-her-father-did/ (http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2012/02/16/how-target-figured-out-a-teen-girl-was-pregnant-before-her-father-did/)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on March 13, 2013, 11:46:00 PM
^^^  That may be, but I've gotten a couple of emails from my own email address and I am NOT on Facebook (and never have been), so they're getting those addresses somewhere else too.

I was recently cleaning out my very (6+ years) old personalised ISP email address and noticed a catalogue from an American clothing store 4 years ago. Standard ad but what got me was this email address is only used by me very selectively and it was addressed to my flatmates sister who is in no way linked to this email address at all. No way at all. I think my ISP sold my email which is why I switched my primary email to somewhere else a long time ago.

It's kinda scary how advertisers can make links and get my email address for someone else across the atlantic. I asked the intended recipient about it and she has never even gone on that American clothing website but used a sister site of theirs. It may have been a stab in the dark but wow they have some good programs to track people.

Data mining can be scarily effective: This is a 2012 Forbes article about Target's data mining, how they figured out a teenager was pregnant before her Dad did, and how they have to put a few wholly irrelevant coupons in their mailers so as not to freak out their customers: http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2012/02/16/how-target-figured-out-a-teen-girl-was-pregnant-before-her-father-did/ (http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2012/02/16/how-target-figured-out-a-teen-girl-was-pregnant-before-her-father-did/)
Oh, yes.  Elfqueen divorced her first husband 10 years ago.  She resumed her maiden name at that time, and when she married her current husband, changed her name again.  Two name changes later, she still gets phone calls and letters from people trying to collect bad debts incurred by her ex-husband's late father. 
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Minmom3 on March 14, 2013, 10:24:23 PM
Wow, that's really reaching!  Does the Ex also get those, or does Elfqueen not know?
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on March 15, 2013, 08:13:23 AM
My son has had his cell phone account for two years. We still get (mostly collections) calls for "Rusty", who is the prior owner.

My boss has had her cell phone for 5+ years and still gets weekly invitations to a baseball game from some group of guys she doesn't know.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Spring Water on Sundays on March 15, 2013, 08:21:25 AM
My son has had his cell phone account for two years. We still get (mostly collections) calls for "Rusty", who is the prior owner.

My boss has had her cell phone for 5+ years and still gets weekly invitations to a baseball game from some group of guys she doesn't know.

I've had my cell phone number for 6+ years now and I still get the occassional collection call for the previous owner. Fortunately, it's only every few months now, as opposed to the 3 or 4 times a week for the first couple of years I had the number.

I was getting daily collection calls for the previous owner of my landline number (she was also constantly late returning movies to Family Video so I was getting those reminder calls as well). I gave it a year and it never slowed down. It was usually a recording, but once I got a real live collector who was kind enough to tell me that this person had used MY number (her old number) on a credit app as recently as the week prior. That's when I called the phone company and got my number changed.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Snooks on March 15, 2013, 06:45:13 PM
I remembered this one from an old job where we ran tests.  We had someone take a test at our centre and when she got her results swore blind we had swapped her test paper with the other person in her test session.  Problem was the other person was taking a different test to her and these tests only ran once a year so the papers were sent straight back to the test providers (we didn't batch them and send them monthly or anything similar).  I think she thought we'd throw our hands up and say "Oh my goodness, you must be given full marks".
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gemma156 on March 15, 2013, 07:37:41 PM
My son has had his cell phone account for two years. We still get (mostly collections) calls for "Rusty", who is the prior owner.

My boss has had her cell phone for 5+ years and still gets weekly invitations to a baseball game from some group of guys she doesn't know.

Your boss should take them up on their offer, be really cheerful and gushing to the guys for inviting her out to the ballgame...considering they don't know her from a bar of soap and keep running commentary up throughout the whole game, complete with asking the guys questions they would have to answer.  I'm sure that will be the last time she'll get an invite to join them.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Raintree on March 17, 2013, 12:07:54 AM
I used to work in a photo lab, back in the pre-digital days, and if someone got a second set of prints at the time of developing, it was 99 cents, much, MUCH  cheaper than ordering a set of reprints later. Also the 99 cents applied only to the second set; third, fourth, and fifth sets cost about $3.

If we forgot to print the extra set and the customer came back to complain, we'd take their word for it and just do it at the 99 cent price. Mistakes happen and we were happy to fix our mistakes.

So one day I got an order back that said "forgot 2nd set - please print at 99 cents." I thought, that's funny, I did these pictures yesterday and I could have sworn I did do the extra set, but oh well. The next day, the order came back again, again claiming a second set was missed. Again, I recognized the photos, but doubted my memory enough to do it again (also in the interests of not arguing with a customer).

A few days later, I was working again, and heard a co-worker say, "Hey, I already did these yesterday." Same photos. It was the 2nd time my coworker had seen them, also. So we told the manager and I believe the customer was told that the lab now remembered doing these same photos about 4-5 times.

I guess they saw a different clerk at the counter and thought they wouldn't be recognized, but failed to realize that the people in the lab see the photos.

Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: sunnygirl on March 18, 2013, 09:09:42 PM
Ugh. I bought a Groupon for some yoga classes. The vendor ignored all my emails trying to book, then emailed me after the Groupon expired to say, "Sorry but email me the voucher and you can still use it!", then emailed me right back after I did so to say, "Actually you can't use it because it's expired", then used the info from the voucher to fraudulently tell Groupon I had already used the voucher. Groupon refuses to refund or do anything since according to the vendor I've already taken the classes, even though, you know, I have the emails where the vendor flat out says, "We won't honour the voucher tough luck."

Groupon sucks, seriously. Is there nothing one can do if a vendor refuses to honour the deal then lies that they've already done so?

Quoting myself to give an update - after many emails, Groupon have now issued a refund (in the form of Groupon credit which I am perfectly happy with). :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on March 18, 2013, 09:27:54 PM
Ugh. I bought a Groupon for some yoga classes. The vendor ignored all my emails trying to book, then emailed me after the Groupon expired to say, "Sorry but email me the voucher and you can still use it!", then emailed me right back after I did so to say, "Actually you can't use it because it's expired", then used the info from the voucher to fraudulently tell Groupon I had already used the voucher. Groupon refuses to refund or do anything since according to the vendor I've already taken the classes, even though, you know, I have the emails where the vendor flat out says, "We won't honour the voucher tough luck."

Groupon sucks, seriously. Is there nothing one can do if a vendor refuses to honour the deal then lies that they've already done so?

Quoting myself to give an update - after many emails, Groupon have now issued a refund (in the form of Groupon credit which I am perfectly happy with). :)

Yay!

So the mobile car detailing outfit that ignored me when I tried to schedule? Now they're offering the same deal on Living Social.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: heartmug on March 19, 2013, 12:27:22 PM
I wondered about those Groupons.  I have never bought one but a friend, who lives in another state did, and had trouble redeeming it too.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: jedikaiti on March 19, 2013, 12:58:48 PM
The mobile detailing is the first I've had trouble with. Every other one has been smooth sailing.

Now LS has a deal for an event bartending service that I'd like to buy, but first I'd like to chat with the company and find out if they can even do my wedding date. So far, they are not returning calls.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: alkira6 on March 19, 2013, 01:07:29 PM
I've only had a couple of issues with Groupon after over 3 years using them. Once a restaraunt went out of business before we could redeem it. They verified that they were truly closed but refunded our money promptly.   The other 2 problems were caused by businesses that were either running a scam or overwhelmed and didn't know how to deal with the volume they got.

Scam(?) 1: Nail place. The Groupon mentioned no scheduling exclusions or restrictions. Bought it and was subjected to a phone that rang out with no ability to take a message and a website where I had previously scheduled appointments that was now constantly down.  After calling on and off for 3 weeks, I finally got through to someone who told me that the Groupon slots were all taken for the next 6 MONTHS and that I could not use it after the expiry date.  Groupon gave me a refund and I have such a bad feeling about how thi place handled it that I have not been back. I had previously been and enjoyed their services. Sadly enough, they might have gotten another loyal customer out of this because I was bringing a friend who had moved near me and she was lookign for a good nail shop. Instead they lost a customer and a potential.  from what I hear they only redeemed a handful of the Groupons that they actually sold (hundreds sold).

Scam (?) 2:  This is pretty firmly a scam.  I was looking for a vet closer to our home and bought a groupon for kenneling at a local vet to scope they place out. They were very nice and detailed what pricing was, what was included, told me about the free bath because our dog was staying longer than 3 nights - until I mentioned the groupon. Then there was this upcharge, this fee, the bath would be $10 additional, and so on. Adding it up, the stay plus the cost of the groupon would have been about $5 more than a regular kennel stay.  Another refund from groupon.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Slartibartfast on March 19, 2013, 03:05:02 PM
I have had a few issues with Groupons in the past, but Groupon (and similar types of sites I've tried) has always been fantastic about refunding my money, even when I wasn't expecting them to:

1) farm co-op had a lousy season and couldn't provide fresh veggies; we all got a refund and a voucher toward a future purchase on the site (although it took a while for the farm co-op to own up to the fact that they couldn't deliver on their promises!)

2) play place closed.  I had bought a Groupon for five passes, but only got to go there once before they went out of business.  Since the owner had already given me my five-visit punchcard in exchange for my Groupon printout, I was hoping to at best get 4/5 of my money back - at worst I was prepared to settle for the difference between the Groupon voucher and a one-day non-discounted pass.  When I told Groupon this place had closed, though, they refunded my whole purchase no questions asked.

3) hair salon which had a pretty high-dollar-value Groupon ($75 or $80).  I intended to get a massage, but was told it only applied to hair.  So I asked if I could pay for multiple cuts at once and schedule two in advance, but apparently the value had to be used on the same day.  So I asked if I could bring in a friend and my daughter and we all get our hair cut - oh, sorry, one person per Groupon.  So essentially it was only useful for one specific thing on their price list (cut + color + something else I forget), which I didn't want - even a basic haircut cost less than I had paid in the first place!  Groupon refunded that one for me as well.

From what I've heard talking to business owners who have done Groupons in the past, it's not really a good deal for them - they have to give at least a 50% discount and they only get half the money Groupon collects, so they're taking at least a 75% cut in income from Groupon users.  They also don't get their money from Groupon right away, so they have to provide a few months' worth of goods or services for Groupon users for free before they get reimbursed.  I can absolutely understand why some businesses (restaurants in particular) go under after doing Groupon, if they were running too close to the line!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: VorFemme on March 19, 2013, 04:10:13 PM
DH just cleaned out a computer for a friend.  He had let his anti-virus lapse and his computer had gotten locked down with one of those fake "FBI" ransomware things where they claim you have been downloading illegal/p0rn/bootleg stuff and you must pay $300 fine immediately to get it unlocked.  That sucker was hard to get rid of.

I got pron virus bombed by an infected flashdrive. Took out everything and my system had to be wiped and reinstalled. 4 days to get everything back to before. That's the only time anything got through my defences and boy was I pissed at the person who gave me the flashdrive. Nothing like nude gifs of stripping ladies doing their thang on your screen while it disassembles your HD. This flashdrive came from a student at the local high school too who denied he put it on there. It turned out he got it from the school computers/infrastructure :O. That was a really nasty  virus. That is why I never transferred stuff between school and home at school. Even the school was unaware it was loose in their system but it had been contained but not wiped. Apparently someONE wasn't doing the software updates so it couldn't activate on the main system but anything plugged in was at risk. Naughty naughty.

I upgraded my firewall asap after that. I didn't know I was vulnerable in that aspect so it did have a good point.

VorSon got that (FBI & the $300 fine) his senior(?) year of high school (I have no idea what he clicked on but he haunts mostly gamer sites) - he backed up what he could to three flash drives and we did a "factory image recovery" with the hard drive being formatted as part of the process.  I installed anti-virus before letting him reinstall his back ups.  No problems since then - but he's been better about doing the download & install of updates BEFORE starting homework, a game, or whatever process that he doesn't want interrupted with a reboot after the updates download & install.

I'm still trying to convince VorGuy that it is worth it to get the updates because they KEEP his computer from being so vulnerable - HE doesn't want the current settings & such to be changed because sometimes "updates break his settings.  I call him my semi-Luddite.  He was happy with XP, didn't like Vista much, was happier with 7 (more like XP), and is dreading having to go to 8 "one of these days" when his current computer quits working.

He refuses to try using my Android tablet at all.....

My mother fell in love with my Linux ereader to the point that I gave her one for her birthday!  (She may have mooched the use while visiting - but it made birthday shopping that year extremely easy......)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: shadowfox79 on March 20, 2013, 02:30:23 AM
I've always found Groupon to be good with refunds, although I've only needed to do that twice.

The first was a salon who had changed location without telling Groupon or updating their website. I arrived to find a closed building and nobody answering their phone.

The second was a company who sent out packs of gourmet meat. They were supposed to email me the day before delivery, so I scheduled it for a week DH had off work. On the Wednesday I called them to find out when it was due, only to be told it had been delivered on the Tuesday. They chased their delivery contractor - they had left it with a neighbour, hadn't left us a card, had no clue which number they had left it at, and had only an illegible signature. All the company could get out of them was that it was a residential area. Gee, really?

We eventually tracked it down a week later, by which time it had been sitting for seven days in somebody's front room. Unsurprisingly, it went in our front door and straight out to the backyard bin.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Girlie on March 29, 2013, 08:08:02 AM
I am SOOOO excited! Now it's MY turn to be rich!
I got an email this morning from a guy with a very official title out of Australia trying to help his poor (erm...rich) friend in Nigeria transfer some money.

'Cause I'm sure if there was some "Nigerian Prince" scam, I'd have heard about it by now, right?  >:D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: blue2000 on March 29, 2013, 10:24:06 AM
I am SOOOO excited! Now it's MY turn to be rich!
I got an email this morning from a guy with a very official title out of Australia trying to help his poor (erm...rich) friend in Nigeria transfer some money.

'Cause I'm sure if there was some "Nigerian Prince" scam, I'd have heard about it by now, right?  >:D

You know, if there are any Nigerian princes or officials that actually need help, they are going to have a heck of a time convincing people...

"Hey, it's me! Gerry! I need to borrow the keys to your private plane! Leave them under the box by the hedge, so no one can see me. I have to get out of the country FAST. I'll totally pay you back when I get out!"

"Oh, come on. This scam is such old news. I'm not giving you a plane."

"Buddy, it's ME. GERRY. You know me!"

"Look. Dude. I don't know who you are, but I'm not falling for this." <click>

(next day)

"Foreign Affairs Minister Gerald Mgumbo Executed By Rebel Troops. Well , what do you know. It WAS Gerry. Oops."
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LazyDaisy on March 29, 2013, 10:35:47 AM
I think the scammers are on to us. They know we know about the "Nigerians" so now they have to choose other countries to be from. My coworker just got the typical "Nigerian" scam email but this poor gentleman says he's from Togo. After all, we know that Nigerians can't be trusted, but the Togolese are fine right?  ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Miss Tickle on March 29, 2013, 10:51:57 AM
The call display showed a strange "number" last night (station 111).  Lucky for us DH answered, because it was Microsoft calling to let us know our windows computer was infected! Since DH doesn't "do" computers he handed me the phone with such a serious expression I was worried something had happened to someone. I had to show him this thread (in between bouts of gleeful laughing - it's my first scam call!) before he calmed down. I admit I wasn't polite to the scammers. I started laughing so hard I couldn't get a word out, so I just hung up.

Oh, and the Nigerian Princes have gone democratic and are now faxing us from the President's office in Ghana.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Figgie on March 31, 2013, 05:30:18 PM
My Dad died in September and the house (which we live next door to) was placed on the market on March 15th.  The house is not certified for rental and couldn't be certified because of the limit to the number of rental units allowed per block in my small town.

So, I've noticed people stopping by the house and walking around the outside of it, but haven't paid much attention since there is a for sale sign in the front yard.  I just assumed they were people who wanted to look at the outside before meeting with a realtor to see the inside.

Yesterday afternoon, a young woman and her daughter knocked on the door and asked us if the house next door was for rent.  I told her that it most definitely was not for rent and in fact couldn't be rented. 

Turns out that someone had posted it on Craigslist as a rental that accepted cats and dogs was available immediately and linked to the picture of the house on the realtor's website.  We told her that it was a scam and she was very, very grateful that she hadn't sent off a money order to pay a damage deposit and first months rent.

I reported the listing to Craigslist, it was removed and has since popped back up two more times with a different email address.  Both of the new listings have been removed as of a couple of hours ago.

I feel so sorry for the young couples who get taken in by this kind of scam and am grateful that they knocked on the door and asked us about the house.  My spouse made up a large sign and put it on the front porch screen, facing the street that states that the house is not for rent.  Hopefully, that will help prevent anyone from getting scammed!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on April 01, 2013, 11:05:35 AM
You know, if there are any Nigerian princes or officials that actually need help, they are going to have a heck of a time convincing people...

"Hey, it's me! Gerry! I need to borrow the keys to your private plane! Leave them under the box by the hedge, so no one can see me. I have to get out of the country FAST. I'll totally pay you back when I get out!"

"Oh, come on. This scam is such old news. I'm not giving you a plane."

"Buddy, it's ME. GERRY. You know me!"

"Look. Dude. I don't know who you are, but I'm not falling for this." <click>

(next day)

"Foreign Affairs Minister Gerald Mgumbo Executed By Rebel Troops. Well , what do you know. It WAS Gerry. Oops."

Brava!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: blue2000 on April 01, 2013, 12:27:00 PM
You know, if there are any Nigerian princes or officials that actually need help, they are going to have a heck of a time convincing people...

"Hey, it's me! Gerry! I need to borrow the keys to your private plane! Leave them under the box by the hedge, so no one can see me. I have to get out of the country FAST. I'll totally pay you back when I get out!"

"Oh, come on. This scam is such old news. I'm not giving you a plane."

"Buddy, it's ME. GERRY. You know me!"

"Look. Dude. I don't know who you are, but I'm not falling for this." <click>

(next day)

"Foreign Affairs Minister Gerald Mgumbo Executed By Rebel Troops. Well , what do you know. It WAS Gerry. Oops."

Brava!

Thanks! ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Thipu1 on April 02, 2013, 07:43:20 PM
Thinking back to the 1990s we had a scammer in the library. 

It started simply.  Five people made appointments in the library for 3 pm.  They all arrived on time and one man seemed to be in charge.  We thought it was just a group of students who wanted to do some research together.  That wasn't unusual. When they left, they made the same appointment for the next week. Again, that wasn't unusual

  When the group met the following week, the man who seemed to be in charge was ordering library staffers to bring a large number of books to the table. Many of the books were of the 'fringe' sort and what he was saying sounded a little 'off' to us.    We had suspicions but couldn't really do anything until we got THE PHONE CALL.

Ms. Y called us to say that she was not feeling well and would not be attending Professor X's Class that day. 

What class?  There were no classes held in the library that were sponsored by the museum.

As it turned out, Professor X had charged these people several hundred dollars each to attend a course of pure bushwah.  He was teaching it in our library and, at that time, access to the library was free. From his point of view, it was the perfect thing.

1) He could say that his course was being held at the W Library in the Z museum. That gave him great credibility among his audience. 

2) When the class was together he could ask library personnel to bring whatever he wanted to the table and we would do it. That increased his credibility and power. In his eyes and in the eyes of his students, we were there to do his bidding.

3) He didn't have to pay any money for class space. He didn't have to pay anything for class materials.  Everything he needed was here for free. 

When we discovered that he was holding a class in the library that the museum did not authorize and for which the museum received no money, the thing was shut down very quickly.   

However, for several years afterwards we'd get phone calls asking when Professor X would be giving his class in the W Library.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: mechtilde on April 13, 2013, 09:12:07 AM
I had a phonecall from Dwight in The Ministry of Finance.

I'm in the UK, we have no Ministry of Finance and I've never met a Brit called Dwight...
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on April 13, 2013, 10:59:28 AM
Thinking back to the 1990s we had a scammer in the library. .............

As it turned out, Professor X had charged these people several hundred dollars each to attend a course of pure bushwah.  He was teaching it in our library and, at that time, access to the library was free. From his point of view, it was the perfect thing.

Wow! That us so ingenious!

I might have actually fallen for that one.

I like to think I wouldn't fall for the others. I will try to let you know in 30 years.[quote author=mechtilde
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: #borecore on April 13, 2013, 05:20:13 PM
I'm not going to say too much, but the documentary "Kumare" (on Netflix Instant right now!) is an amazing exploration of the idea of "scammers" in a religious sense. It is about a man who "pretends" to be an Indian guru.

I thought I would be upset or disappointed in the main person in the film (also the director/idea guy), but it turns into something really wonderful.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Library Dragon on April 13, 2013, 11:09:00 PM
Thipu1 wrote:
Quote
As it turned out, Professor X had charged these people several hundred dollars each to attend a course of pure bushwah.  He was teaching it in our library and, at that time, access to the library was free. From his point of view, it was the perfect thing
.

We had a retired professor set up his "office" in the Library.  He came in every weekday and used the computers, meet with people, etc. we didn't think anything of it until he started giving out our number as his business number.  When it was explained that he didn't work at the library we found he was also telling people he was the executive director vs. just the director.  He was presenting himself as a literary agent/librarian and could get their books good reviews and guaranteed purchases.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 15, 2013, 08:48:05 AM
Last weeks' guest lecturer in my forensics class was a forensic document examiner. He had examples of the checks one would receive if they agree to funnel money for the Nigerian scammers. It was fascinating!

Basically, don't deposit any checks drawn on Bank of Toronto for more than $1000. They start with a legitimate check, then alter the numbers and payee in each subsequent check, but it takes nearly 2 weeks of processing for the fraud to be revealed.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 15, 2013, 11:03:08 AM
I got one in my work email, re: my non-existent paypall account:

We have recently determined that different computers have logged into your account,
and spends a lot of failures were present before the connection.
 *********
please let us know immediately it is important to report it to a nousaider prevent fraudsters from stealing your information.yeah right, if nothing else, the nonsensical grammar gives it away that its a scam.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 15, 2013, 11:09:19 AM
I am looking to buy two more refurbished models of my smart phone and looked at eBay yesterday to see what was available.

One auction looked pretty good until I got to this line "and this phone is totally not stolen at all". I am not sure why anyone bid on it, but it was up to 27 bids!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Twik on April 15, 2013, 11:17:51 AM
One auction looked pretty good until I got to this line "and this phone is totally not stolen at all".
;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: alkira6 on April 15, 2013, 11:21:56 AM
One auction looked pretty good until I got to this line "and this phone is totally not stolen at all".
;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

The problem with stolen electronics and scammers from the buyers end are the reasons why I have 5 old phones stuck in a drawer waiting to be donated to a women's shelter.  Not worh the trouble.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: CakeBeret on April 15, 2013, 11:24:34 AM
I got a rather well-done Paypal scam email the other day. The email address looked believably and it said that my account was frozen due to suspected fraud, and I should log in to un-freeze it. The grammar was good and it looked pretty legit.

It was still a scam, though, and with scam emails that good, no wonder people fall for it.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: alkira6 on April 15, 2013, 11:28:33 AM
I got a rather well-done Paypal scam email the other day. The email address looked believably and it said that my account was frozen due to suspected fraud, and I should log in to un-freeze it. The grammar was good and it looked pretty legit.

It was still a scam, though, and with scam emails that good, no wonder people fall for it.

Even with the most legit looking emails I never click on the link in the email, but go to the page in another tab myself. So far all of these "emergencies" have been fake.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Wulfie on April 15, 2013, 12:14:19 PM
I had a fun 3 page letter from a person who wanted to live at the complex I manage.

He wrote that he was getting out of prison soon for a “bogus” kidnapping charge. He has not gotten in trouble for the last 10 years (gee, wonder if the sentence was at least 10 years). He wants to live in my building because it is in a wonderful area with lots of promise for jobs. Hmm this is a high crime area and in the news at least once a week for some sort of murder/drive-by/major crime and he considers that a wonderful area?  Jobs here like everywhere else in the country are hard to find, and in this community unless you speak one of the African languages, forget it.

He went on to tell me how he was planning on writing fiction books to pay his rent , I am sure many of our writers on here wish they could manage that feat!  But, if that doesn’t’ work, he has a backup plan, writing, directing and producing p0rn movies. Yea, not happening in my building! We have a daycare across the parking lot from us, boys and girls club across the street and a tutoring center in the building not to mention lots of kids in the building.

My last name is a common one for the African American community. He proceeded to go on about how he would be a great star for the above job as well…. In detail. He thinks from my name that I would be very interesting to “get to know” and maybe work with on some films. – I am a fat, white woman and “NO” .

It went on along that vein for about another page and a half.  I had to give him credit for trying but we are unable to help him due to all sorts of reasons. The major one is that our screening criteria does not allow us to house people with convictions less than 5 years old or major crimes (i.e. murder, gang violence, drug trafficking, ect) due to the number of contracts we have with local agencies to house vulnerable adults . All of this is readily available on the same document that he got my name off of.   
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 15, 2013, 12:19:53 PM
Wow, I don't think I want to be in residence management!
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 15, 2013, 12:39:21 PM
I had a fun 3 page letter from a person who wanted to live at the complex I manage.

He wrote that he was getting out of prison soon for a “bogus” kidnapping charge. He has not gotten in trouble for the last 10 years (gee, wonder if the sentence was at least 10 years). He wants to live in my building because it is in a wonderful area with lots of promise for jobs. Hmm this is a high crime area and in the news at least once a week for some sort of murder/drive-by/major crime and he considers that a wonderful area?  Jobs here like everywhere else in the country are hard to find, and in this community unless you speak one of the African languages, forget it.

He went on to tell me how he was planning on writing fiction books to pay his rent , I am sure many of our writers on here wish they could manage that feat!  But, if that doesn’t’ work, he has a backup plan, writing, directing and producing p0rn movies. Yea, not happening in my building! We have a daycare across the parking lot from us, boys and girls club across the street and a tutoring center in the building not to mention lots of kids in the building.

My last name is a common one for the African American community. He proceeded to go on about how he would be a great star for the above job as well…. In detail. He thinks from my name that I would be very interesting to “get to know” and maybe work with on some films. – I am a fat, white woman and “NO” .

It went on along that vein for about another page and a half.  I had to give him credit for trying but we are unable to help him due to all sorts of reasons. The major one is that our screening criteria does not allow us to house people with convictions less than 5 years old or major crimes (i.e. murder, gang violence, drug trafficking, ect) due to the number of contracts we have with local agencies to house vulnerable adults . All of this is readily available on the same document that he got my name off of.

Any possibility that it's somebody playing a joke?  It sounds a little over the top for the guy to think that any of these things would really be pluses in his favor (not doubting you, doubting him).  I'm wondering if somebody thought it would be funny.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Wulfie on April 15, 2013, 01:04:17 PM
The letter was stamped with the notice from the prison that the writer is an inmate and that the contents had not been screened by the prison.  It was also addressed with the return address of prison in Walla Walla where they send the really bad guys like Ridgeway (the Green River Murderer). 

Granted, the prisoner could be playing a joke but the whole tone of the letter was that he felt these were good honest plans and that he would be a great addition to our property.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Amara on April 15, 2013, 01:16:46 PM
Quote
We have recently determined that different computers have logged into your account, and spends a lot of failures were present before the connection.

There just have to be some situations at work where I can use that line.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 16, 2013, 11:18:54 AM
Quote
We have recently determined that different computers have logged into your account, and spends a lot of failures were present before the connection.

There just have to be some situations at work where I can use that line.

I know! and Im betting somewhere, someone, is quite proud of their command of the English language.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: LadyClaire on April 16, 2013, 12:39:34 PM
The letter was stamped with the notice from the prison that the writer is an inmate and that the contents had not been screened by the prison.  It was also addressed with the return address of prison in Walla Walla where they send the really bad guys like Ridgeway (the Green River Murderer). 

Granted, the prisoner could be playing a joke but the whole tone of the letter was that he felt these were good honest plans and that he would be a great addition to our property.

We got a 4 page, front-and-back letter from a prisoner once who wanted to attend our university. A good 75% of the letter was complete and utter gibberish/made zero sense. It was seriously weird and creepy. The letter made the rounds of the various university offices because it was just so completely crazy.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Hillia on April 18, 2013, 11:35:50 AM
My DH got a phishing email the other day. They did a good job- it looked pretty legit. It was supposedly a receipt from PayPal, showing his recent purchase of a watch. They were banking on him hitting the "Report problem" link at the bottom in a panic, to say he didn't buy that watch, and having him input his correct PayPal information to verify his account.

I got that one the other day!

My personal hotmail email account is my first name, plus the rest of my initials--for example, midgecdf@blahblah.com. When I looked at the "to" field on that email, it had been sent to midgecdf@blahblah.com, midgemmm@blahblah.com, midgeabc@blahblah.com, etc. They just typed in a first name, a bunch of letters after, and hit send, hoping for the best!

I just got this one today!  I had just used  my PayPal account for the first time in several months, and a few days after the legitimate transaction, I got this one.  I went to the PayPal site (in a separate browser window, not via any links) to verify that no such transaction had been processed.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Reader on April 18, 2013, 12:18:14 PM
My friend J just posted on Facebook, that a man came to her door yesterday.  Here is her conversation with him - "Weird thing just happened to me. A man came to my door and had cleaning supplies in his hand. This was our conversation:
Me: what's up?
 Man: I'm not selling anything. We're in the neighborhood giving out cleaning supplies to the ladies".
 Me: I don't live here, and we don't need them.
 I unfortunately did not catch the license plate. I did report it, though.
 Anyone have anything like this ever happen? Weird that he wasn't selling anything, but was giving away products to "ladies". What's the catch???"

People chiming in have all said it's a scam to gain entrance to the home for assault, to be robbed or even raped  :o, said she was smart to say she didn't live there, and was giving advice to have her change her routine, and get a dog etc.  She later checked with other houses and neighbors and no one else was approached and said a call to ADT was on the horizon, as she lives alone with her daughter.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on April 18, 2013, 12:24:45 PM
My DH got a phishing email the other day. They did a good job- it looked pretty legit. It was supposedly a receipt from PayPal, showing his recent purchase of a watch. They were banking on him hitting the "Report problem" link at the bottom in a panic, to say he didn't buy that watch, and having him input his correct PayPal information to verify his account.

I got that one the other day!

My personal hotmail email account is my first name, plus the rest of my initials--for example, midgecdf@blahblah.com. When I looked at the "to" field on that email, it had been sent to midgecdf@blahblah.com, midgemmm@blahblah.com, midgeabc@blahblah.com, etc. They just typed in a first name, a bunch of letters after, and hit send, hoping for the best!

I just got this one today!  I had just used  my PayPal account for the first time in several months, and a few days after the legitimate transaction, I got this one.  I went to the PayPal site (in a separate browser window, not via any links) to verify that no such transaction had been processed.

I got a fraud alert from Discover and phoned. The customer service person informed that I could use the link and not have to call. I was too shocked to try to explain it to her.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: bloo on April 18, 2013, 02:46:06 PM
I just posted an ad to Craigslist to sell my bicycle.

When I opened my email a little bit ago and read this response I about fell out my chair laughing:

Quote
Hello i am interested in your bike i was wondering if you would be willing to waive the money if it went to a young couple starting out in our first apartment and bring it to us as we dont drive if so thank you your a lifesaver if not i understand and god bless

Certainly not a scam, but definitely beggy with a little bit of moochy! ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: bloo on April 18, 2013, 04:01:40 PM
Having a weird day.

Just checked my email again (to see if there are any other nuts that want me to take my nice things and deliver them to them) and got a receipt from Walmart.com.

Apparently I decided to buy a $200 e-gift card with my credit card that is maintained on that account. Only of course it's not delivered to my home address (being an E-gift card an all) but it's also not being delivered to the email on the account. It's one I've never heard of.

Because I'm nice like that. Just sending $200 to random strangers.

Called credit card company - cancelled card.
Went into Walmart.com's website and cancelled the order and deleted the two credit cards stored in there.
CSR at Walmart.com agreed that cancelling my Walmart.com account is a good idea and, if I want to set up a new one, said I'd need to use a new email address as using the old one will send up a red flag about fraud.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: ladymaureen on April 18, 2013, 04:03:58 PM
I get a LOT of spam. So the emails from Paypal about my account, notices my direct deposit has been rejected -- click here to update my software, lonesome Nigerians, etc. are par for the course.

I'm noticing a new spam type -- usually a subject line that has to do with a news item and a link to click. Just yesterday and today I got emails offering links to video of the Boston bomb and the video in West, Texas.

Ugh. And I know a lot of unsophisticated people will click on these.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Carotte on April 18, 2013, 04:15:06 PM

Went into Walmart.com's website and cancelled the order and deleted the two credit cards stored in there.

I try to never keep any card on file, it does take me one more minute to order something but at least I'm protected against that.
What bothers me is that for amazon I have to actually register the card to use it, then I have to go and delete it.
I ordered shoes today from a site I've used once before and was pertubed to not having to put my card info, turns out they had registered it and I had to go delete it.

Plus I'm pretty sure not having my card already in hold me up from doing some impulse* shopping.

* Impulse meaning that I've already thought about it for a few weeks, wondering if I need it and all that.. ::)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: bloo on April 18, 2013, 04:54:01 PM

Went into Walmart.com's website and cancelled the order and deleted the two credit cards stored in there.

I try to never keep any card on file, it does take me one more minute to order something but at least I'm protected against that.
What bothers me is that for amazon I have to actually register the card to use it, then I have to go and delete it.
I ordered shoes today from a site I've used once before and was pertubed to not having to put my card info, turns out they had registered it and I had to go delete it.

Plus I'm pretty sure not having my card already in hold me up from doing some impulse* shopping.

* Impulse meaning that I've already thought about it for a few weeks, wondering if I need it and all that.. ::)

Good points. Looks like I'll have to be more cautious. This means no impulse buys through Google Play (sniff, sniff), which is probably a good thing.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Elfmama on April 18, 2013, 08:17:01 PM
My DH got a phishing email the other day. They did a good job- it looked pretty legit. It was supposedly a receipt from PayPal, showing his recent purchase of a watch. They were banking on him hitting the "Report problem" link at the bottom in a panic, to say he didn't buy that watch, and having him input his correct PayPal information to verify his account.

I got that one the other day!

My personal hotmail email account is my first name, plus the rest of my initials--for example, midgecdf@blahblah.com. When I looked at the "to" field on that email, it had been sent to midgecdf@blahblah.com, midgemmm@blahblah.com, midgeabc@blahblah.com, etc. They just typed in a first name, a bunch of letters after, and hit send, hoping for the best!

I just got this one today!  I had just used  my PayPal account for the first time in several months, and a few days after the legitimate transaction, I got this one.  I went to the PayPal site (in a separate browser window, not via any links) to verify that no such transaction had been processed.

I got a fraud alert from Discover and phoned. The customer service person informed that I could use the link and not have to call. I was too shocked to try to explain it to her.
My credit union used to have contests, and to announce these contests, they would send out emails.  "Your chance to win a cruise for 2 to the Bahamas!  Click here to log in and enter!"  The people I spoke to just could not understand why this email for a legitimate contest got calls asking "Is this real, or a scam?"
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: SCAJAfamily on April 18, 2013, 11:01:42 PM
Quote
Weird that he wasn't selling anything

That's
what they all say when they come to the door.  My doorbell just rang at 9 pm and some strange guy who "wasn't selling anything" and who "just lived down the street" was there.  I spoke through my window and told him not interested.  He asked when was a better time to come back and I replied "never" and turned off the porch light.

That is always the first thing out their mouths, but lo and behold they are selling solar energy/alarm systems/bug removal services/religion/magazines.  It is crazy.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Gyburc on April 19, 2013, 06:47:49 AM
I know I posted a while ago about the Big International Bank I used to do business with (basically, terrible service, no accurate information, and when my bank details got hacked in a way that strongly suggested that their online banking systems had been infiltrated, their entire investigation consisted of 'Do you ever use your debit card online? Well, that was probably it then!).

Just before I managed to transfer to another bank, I received an automated telephone call from Big International Bank (BIB), telling me that there had been some questionable activity on my account, and that I should press X number to get in touch. When I pressed X, I was asked to provide my online/telephone ID and PIN. I'm ashamed to say that I actually entered the first number before thinking 'Hang on a minute!'

So I called BIB's helpline, and after much kerfuffle, I got through to an operator. I explained that I'd received a call that was very likely to be fraudulent, and told her the details. 'Oh, no!' she replied. 'That was one of our calls - it's quite genuine! This is how we contact our customers.'

 ::) ::) ::)

It turned out there hadn't been any odd activity on my account after all. I'm so glad to have got away from that company.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: nutraxfornerves on April 19, 2013, 10:06:50 AM
The Information MInister of Ghana wants to help me to become the owner of a gold company and a hotel in Accra. My lifetime dream has always been to run a hotel in West Africa, so I can't wait...

Attention:

I am the Minister for Information Mahama Ayariga.

And as the Information Minister, I got an info that a certain refugee here in our refugee camp named you as the rightful beneficiary of his fund ($40mUSD) before his illness but the funds were never delivered to you properly and then a Banker has used your Millions of Dollars to Buy Gold Company and Hotel here in Accra Ghana South District. In this case, the Banker has been arrested and prosecuted at the High Court of Justice here in Accra Ghana.

The Government has authorized me as the minister for Information to inform you about the present situation, and to also inform you to either Come to Ghana, or we are to make Change of Ownership of the Company and the Hotel to your own Name, to ensure the Company is legally Handed Over to you, or you can inform me on what to do, either to sell the Company and the Hotel so i can Transfer you the Fund through Bank here in Accra Ghana West Africa.

Thanks for your Understanding. Hope to hear from you soon and please i urge you to help out, looking forward to working with you.

--
Mahama Ayariga
Minister for Information & Media Relations
Accra Ghana
+233xxxxxxxx [really is a Ghana number]
E-mail - infomahama@[free email account]
Web - http://www.ghana.gov.gh/index.php/governance/ministers/19545-mahama-ayariga [real government web site]
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: P12663 on April 20, 2013, 10:59:11 PM
*I* never get these kinds of emails!  No Nigerian prince or minister or widow or anybody has told me that I am trustworthy enough to help them steal millions of dollars!  I have never won the Grand Prize in a drawing that I never entered (or one that I did enter, for that matter)!  No one offers to buy my junk and oh yes, will I ship it overseas - here's a check for $20,000, keep half for your trouble and just send me the rest!  I feel, I feel, ignored! 

I'm going off to pout. 

 >:D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: gramma dishes on April 21, 2013, 08:29:47 AM
*I* never get these kinds of emails!  No Nigerian prince or minister or widow or anybody has told me that I am trustworthy enough to help them steal millions of dollars!  I have never won the Grand Prize in a drawing that I never entered (or one that I did enter, for that matter)!  No one offers to buy my junk and oh yes, will I ship it overseas - here's a check for $20,000, keep half for your trouble and just send me the rest!  I feel, I feel, ignored! 

I'm going off to pout. 

 >:D


 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: Luci on April 21, 2013, 10:52:33 AM
*I* never get these kinds of emails!  No Nigerian prince or minister or widow or anybody has told me that I am trustworthy enough to help them steal millions of dollars!  I have never won the Grand Prize in a drawing that I never entered (or one that I did enter, for that matter)!  No one offers to buy my junk and oh yes, will I ship it overseas - here's a check for $20,000, keep half for your trouble and just send me the rest!  I feel, I feel, ignored! 

I'm going off to pout. 

 >:D

 ;D ;D ;D

If you would send me your email address, I willl be glad to forward some to you...........  :)
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: kherbert05 on May 01, 2013, 09:18:26 PM
I just had a potential scammer come by my house. He said his company had put in the sensors for my alarm system (came with the house) and they were recalling them could he come in. Well I don't let people I don't contact myself into the house. If I hadn't been taking the trash out I wouldn't have answered the door.


I called my alarm company.
1. They supplied the sensors
2. there is no recall (they did replace the battery back up a few months ago)


I'm going to file a report with the police about possible scammer. I also warned my neighbors on either side it was a scam.
Title: Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
Post by: mumma to KMC on May 02, 2013, 08:50:50 AM
I'm not sure if this guy was scamming me, but he s