Etiquette Hell

General Etiquette => Life...in general => Holidays => Topic started by: Thipu1 on October 24, 2012, 09:39:36 AM

Title: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Thipu1 on October 24, 2012, 09:39:36 AM
Threads on this topic have surfaced in prior years.  It might be useful to start a new one for 2012.

In the past, actors have reported being hit by visitors and hearing snide remarks about the 'scariness' of the entertainment.

Visitors have reported being annoyed by other visitors or touched     

Halloween Haunted House installations are, by nature, places of high emotion.  What's the line between good fun and too much?
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: RingTailedLemur on October 24, 2012, 09:44:57 AM
I was halfway round a ghost train alone in Canada before I remembered that American (and therefore possibly Canadian) haunted rides often have people leap out and touch riders.  The thought of that really scared me, far more than the ride, as I was afraid of reacting badly to being touched and getting thrown out of the country forever!

I think that if you are likely to be touched by an actor, or even if just there are going to be live actors, there should be a warning sign outside because some people just can't handle it (I almost whacked a Cyberman once...).  Anyone who does freak out and hit an actor should then have to accept any consequences of doing so.

No visitors should ever touch other visitors they do not know.

I think being snide is just mean.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: VorFemme on October 24, 2012, 09:49:39 AM
Threads on this topic have surfaced in prior years.  It might be useful to start a new one for 2012.

In the past, actors have reported being hit by visitors and hearing snide remarks about the 'scariness' of the entertainment.

Visitors have reported being annoyed by other visitors or touched     

Halloween Haunted House installations are, by nature, places of high emotion.  What's the line between good fun and too much?

Being groped around the primary or secondary s3xual characteristics by anyone other than my SO comes to mind as taking the fun out of a situation. 

Being in pain from someone hitting me, pulling my hair to see if its "real", or similar reactions from someone assuming that I am a life sized DOLL dressed up instead of a live person in a costume also come to mind (haven't been in a haunted house - have sat on the steps of my own house in costume and been treated....oddly...by the older TOT or their parents).  I wasn't hurt - but I was startled!  (Two year old wasn't trying to hurt me - just poking the "hippie doll", I think.)
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: FoxPaws on October 24, 2012, 09:52:15 AM
Rule #1 - Know thyself (and thy triggers).

I don't do haunted houses. I am a big ol' scaredy cat and I know I will overreact badly and possible inappropriately to the least little fright, so I keep myself and everyone else out of harm's way. I don't see scary/horror movies in theaters for the same reason. It would be rude of me to ruin everyone else's fun by putting myself in a situation where I'm likely - even unintentionally - to behave poorly.

Rule #1a - Respect your friends. If someone says they aren't into haunted houses, let it go. Don't cajole them into going; don't soft pedal the scare level; don't guilt them into thinking they're a party pooper for waiting outside.

Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Pioneer on October 24, 2012, 09:53:35 AM
A cautionary warning of Too Many Flashy Blinky Lights would be helpful for anyone who has a condition such as epilepsy or migraines.

A cautionary warning of Too Many Confined Spaces would be helpful for anyone who has claustrophobia.

And "Oh, Come On, Sissy-pants.  You'll Love It" should never be the response to anyone who wants to just hang outside waiting for friends to enjoy the thrilling attraction.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Sharnita on October 24, 2012, 09:55:27 AM
I agree with the last two posts
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: sourwolf on October 24, 2012, 10:12:48 AM
I think Rule #1 should be - no one touches anyone else (this applies for both the actors and attendees)
Rule #2 - no one should attempt to coerce someone who doesn't want to go into going to a Haunted House/Haunted Hay ride.  If they say they won't like it, trust them.
Rule #3, like a PP said it would be nice if there was a list of triggers either on the website or when you got there - they do this for flashing (strobe) lights so it wouldn't be hard to add "close spaces" "loud noises" etc. 
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: WillyNilly on October 24, 2012, 10:35:46 AM
I think an important other factor to remember is : its supposed to be scary. And its supposed to be fake.

I've known people who go through haunted houses and then demand a refund "because it looked so fake!" and alternately people who bought admission then their kids got too scared right at the beginning and wanted a refund because they didn't go through the whole thing because "it was too scary!"
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: NyaChan on October 24, 2012, 12:01:19 PM
I don't think people who complain about actors touching them or scaring them have a leg to stand on for the most part.  Every haunted house I have been to has made the boundaries of what will happen clear.  I have always been informed before paying and entering what actors would do, and have even been given the option of going through in a less scary, no touch mode (in fact, one place even recommended it since we had a 10 year old with us).  If a haunted house tells you that actors may jump out at customers or touch customers, getting upset about it after the fact is just silly. 
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: snowdragon on October 24, 2012, 12:12:16 PM
Our Science museum used to have one. Until the year that all the actors went home with injuries ranging from severe bruising to multiple broken ribs.  NONE of the actors were touching anyone, other then the 10 year old who literally jumped onto one of the actors who had been laying down with a glow in the dark skeleton costume on.  ( Hence the broken ribs, he out weighed the 14 year old actor by a good 50 lbs) The woman playing the headless horseman, was hit repeatedly by a child with a sword - she  had 24 bruises that she could count, with out taking off her costume. Others were bitten, kicked, slapped, stomped on and groped. 

  So do everyone a favor, if you can't go to one of these with out assaulting someone - don't go.   If you do go, remember those actors are doing what you asked them to do by walking in the haunted house, and every actor I know, knows not to touch the guests, unless the guest is harming someone. Then we reserve the right to 'escort' said guest out for the safety of all.  Also, it does not matter what the issue is if your child is going to react violently these things, get him the heck out, don't stand at the door as one mother did and watch as your kid repeatedly hits someone and then get mad at the person when they do what you wouldn't and tells the kid to leave.  "He is only having fun" is NOT an excuse to allow assault. No, telling him to stop is neither rude nor child abuse.  Yes, if asking politely the first two times doesn't work ( once to the parent , once to the kid)  we get to raise our voices and tell him to stop, we're people not your kid's punching bag - or stabbing dummy.
 
  Don't take a child to one of these and demand it be toned down for the kid. The rest of the people paid for a certain type of experience, you don't get to steal that from them.

 If this is going to trigger you, for anything, don't go.

 Above all Have FUN!!!
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: RegionMom on October 24, 2012, 12:21:51 PM
I was watching a video of the Ellen show, where she sends one of her reporters to a Haunted House.  The reporter brought what seemed to be a dead pan boring friend along, but within seconds, was in the arms of the reporter, screaming and both were carrying on.

I was debating about taking my teens, since my dad took me when I was a young teen, but unless they specifically ask, I will not mention it to them.  There is no need to scare yourself like that.  Seeing those reactions made me reconsider. 

Plus, my son is a black belt in karate, and just might react without thinking and defend himself if grabbed!  You cannot tell how strong he is by looking.  But he recently broke a car window by palm striking a mosquito in the car.  Yeah, he paid for the replacement!

But, if somehow we did go, I would offer that everyone in our group hold hands, and not let go!!!
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: KimberlyM on October 24, 2012, 12:37:59 PM
When I was in middle school and friend and I went to the local haunted house together.  She walked behind me nearly pushing me through she was so scared.  At one point I noticed there was a guy up a ways who would reach out and grab peoples arms on their way through.  I stopped and warned my obviously freaked out friend.  When we got through the door to that area she immediately stopped and screamed at the top of her lungs "don't you dare touch me! Her dad is a lawyer and I'll make him sue you!".  I just started laughing it was so unexpected...they guy who had been grabbing people just shook his head with a smile on his face (even funnier as he was all done up like a zombie!) and waved us through.  I made fun of her for that for years!  She decided maybe haunted houses weren't for her from then on. 
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: EmmaJ. on October 24, 2012, 12:38:24 PM
My friend's daughter was a volunteer in a "no touch" house.  She jumped into the path of a male customer to frighten him and he cold-cocked her.  Yah, a 30-something-year-old male punched an 18-year-old girl in the face and knocked her unconscious.

I pod the above - know your triggers before entering.  And remember, it's supposed to be scary! 
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: lowspark on October 24, 2012, 01:13:56 PM
I'm not a fan of haunted houses and haven't gone to one in years. They ARE either too fake or too scary (to me), neither of which I find entertaining.

But here are a couple of somewhat related stories.

This dates me but I remember when Astroworld, a Six-Flags* type amusement park, opened in Houston, circa 1968. There was a ride called The Alpine Sleigh Ride which was a sort of mild roller coaster which went through fake mountains. The end of the ride transported you through a cold dark tunnel at the end of which stood an abominable snow man who jumped out just as a strobe light flashed. He didn't touch anyone on the ride, it was just supposed to be a shock to see him there in bright light as you emerged from total darkness.

Well you can guess how long that lasted. That cool feature of the ride was eliminated probably only a couple of months after the park opened. Apparently, once the surprise wore off, people would ride just for the opportunity to throw things at him. I don't know if any abominable snowmen were actually hurt but it couldn't have been pleasant anyway.

As far as knowing your triggers, I agree with that! The Museum of Natural Science here has a Butterfly Exhibit where you are encouraged to allow butterflies to land on you as you walk through the lush vegetation. I have never been. And I will never go. The very idea of an insect, yes, even a beautiful butterfly, lighting on me horrifies me. I am about 99.9% sure I would swat it away at best but more likely I'd swat at it. It would not be something over which I'd have control. It just wouldn't be a good idea for me to go there and I know it.

*It eventually did get bought out by Six Flags but when it first opened, it had nothing to do with that company.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: violinp on October 24, 2012, 01:25:44 PM
Don't terrorize people who tell you they don't want to go.

I was with my church youth group, and they decided to go to a haunted maze. I declined because, while I can deal with movies, I can't deal with being in a live - action horror movie of my own. So, I decided to take a nap in the van, since they were going to be a while.

I woke up to something beating on the car so hard that it was shaking and I heard roaring. I started screaming, because I was still too groggy to comprehend much of anything. Then, the doors of the van opened, and I saw that it was the youth director's sons, who were helplessly laughing at my fear. I'm ashamed to say that the things I yelled at them were non - Ehell - approved  :-[, but their father was about as amused as I was, and gave them the sternest talking to I'd ever seen him give.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: stargazer on October 24, 2012, 01:28:49 PM

Plus, my son is a black belt in karate, and just might react without thinking and defend himself if grabbed!  You cannot tell how strong he is by looking. 

Isn't a big part of karate discipline and self control so exactly that kind of thing would not happen?
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: fountainsoflettuce on October 24, 2012, 01:44:12 PM
Agreed.  If your son would immediately respond with karate moves, he is probably too immature for a haunted house.  How about your daughter?  Could she handle the haunted house?
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: MrTango on October 24, 2012, 01:56:30 PM
I'm a big fan of no-contact rules at haunted houses.  Having an actor startle a patron by grabbing them is a good way for someone to be injured.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: RegionMom on October 24, 2012, 02:13:48 PM
My son would be with his one year younger sister, and if she was upset, he would be tense, and since he has never been in a haunted house, would not necessarily know what was real or fake.  This thread has many stories of actors in houses being hit.  you "know" it is fake, but if feels real. 

When you are in a very tense situation, on full alert, and scared, your first reaction might be to defend yourself if grabbed.
Now, with his training, he can probably control himself.  He has never been in a fight, and would rather use logic and rhetoric than force. 

My statement was that he would defend himself if grabbed, not simply startled. 

What would you do if you were grabbed? 




Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Onyx_TKD on October 24, 2012, 02:30:36 PM

Plus, my son is a black belt in karate, and just might react without thinking and defend himself if grabbed!  You cannot tell how strong he is by looking. 

Isn't a big part of karate discipline and self control so exactly that kind of thing would not happen?

I took Tae Kwon Do, not karate, but this was my experience:
Discipline and self control was definitely emphasized, but it was mostly about control of our actual fighting (i.e. the strikes and blocks themselves, controlled body motions, etc.) and about conflict avoidance. When sparring and practicing, our strikes were supposed to be well controlled--there was no excuse for throwing a strike so hard or fast that you couldn't control where and how it landed, and be able to "pull" a strike that went wrong (either abort or drastically reduce the force before it hit). We were also taught conflict avoidance methods and that in real-life conflicts, getting into a physical fight should be a last resort. However, once someone physically attacked us, it was considered that the physical conflict had already been started and our task shifted to doing whatever we needed to to end that conflict and get away without getting hurt--hurting our attacker was no longer a concern.

IMO, the issue with being grabbed in a haunted house is one of threat assessment, not self control. Looking at it from the outside, we know that a haunted house actor is not a threat because they are not really "attacking" the patron. However, the point of a haunted house is to scare the patrons, and the reason grabbing works to scare is that the patron's brain perceives it as a threat/attack, in an already tense and scary situation*. IME, nothing in a martial artist's "self control" training teaches them not to respond forcefully to a genuine physical attack--quite the opposite. In a real attack situation, your "control" is intended to make sure you can hurt your attacker effectively, so they don't get a chance to hurt you. The issue in a haunted house isn't in how you (general) respond to an attack, it's remembering that you aren't truly being "attacked," despite what all your instincts are telling you.

*Imagine being lightly tapped on the shoulder by a stranger in a well-lit, populated supermarket versus in a dark, deserted alley in the rough part of town--is your brain going to perceive both as equally non-threatening?
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: sourwolf on October 24, 2012, 02:32:19 PM
Regionmom, I was more concerned by this statement:

Quote
Plus, my son is a black belt in karate, and just might react without thinking and defend himself if grabbed!  You cannot tell how strong he is by looking.  But he recently broke a car window by palm striking a mosquito in the car.  Yeah, he paid for the replacement!

To me that suggests he doesn't have the "control" necessary for a haunted house. Good for you for making sure he doesn't go to one.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Moray on October 24, 2012, 02:57:46 PM
My son would be with his one year younger sister, and if she was upset, he would be tense, and since he has never been in a haunted house, would not necessarily know what was real or fake.

*snip*

Wait, he's a Jr. in High School, isn't he? You're concerned that he wouldn't know what is real or fake? If it's a haunted house, everything is fake. The spider webs are fake, the blood is fake, the fog is fake, the mutilated corpses and associated offal are fake. The chainsaws don't have blades and the zombies aren't actually flesh-crazed.

I have no problem with people not enjoying haunted houses, and I'm a big fan of people knowing enough about their own triggers to determine whether or not a given haunt is for them, but the way you describe your son makes me a little concerned.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: MrTango on October 24, 2012, 04:26:42 PM
My son would be with his one year younger sister, and if she was upset, he would be tense, and since he has never been in a haunted house, would not necessarily know what was real or fake.

*snip*

Wait, he's a Jr. in High School, isn't he? You're concerned that he wouldn't know what is real or fake? If it's a haunted house, everything is fake. The spider webs are fake, the blood is fake, the fog is fake, the mutilated corpses and associated offal are fake. The chainsaws don't have blades and the zombies aren't actually flesh-crazed.

I have no problem with people not enjoying haunted houses, and I'm a big fan of people knowing enough about their own triggers to determine whether or not a given haunt is for them, but the way you describe your son makes me a little concerned.

Even if the brain intelectually knows that something's fake and perfectly safe, a big part of the excitement of going to a haunted house is triggering stress reactions (which release endorphines, which feel good).  One of the natual consequences of putting yourself in such situations is that one is more prone to "fight or flight" sorts of reactions, where the brain reacts automatically to stimuli before the conscious mind has a chance to process what's really happening.

Think of what happens when you touch a hot stove.  By the time you realize that your hand hurts (and why), your arm has probably already reacted and pulled your hand back away from the burner.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Moray on October 24, 2012, 04:29:21 PM
My son would be with his one year younger sister, and if she was upset, he would be tense, and since he has never been in a haunted house, would not necessarily know what was real or fake.

*snip*

Wait, he's a Jr. in High School, isn't he? You're concerned that he wouldn't know what is real or fake? If it's a haunted house, everything is fake. The spider webs are fake, the blood is fake, the fog is fake, the mutilated corpses and associated offal are fake. The chainsaws don't have blades and the zombies aren't actually flesh-crazed.

I have no problem with people not enjoying haunted houses, and I'm a big fan of people knowing enough about their own triggers to determine whether or not a given haunt is for them, but the way you describe your son makes me a little concerned.

Even if the brain intelectually knows that something's fake and perfectly safe, a big part of the excitement of going to a haunted house is triggering stress reactions (which release endorphines, which feel good).  One of the natual consequences of putting yourself in such situations is that one is more prone to "fight or flight" sorts of reactions, where the brain reacts automatically to stimuli before the conscious mind has a chance to process what's really happening.

Think of what happens when you touch a hot stove.  By the time you realize that your hand hurts (and why), your arm has probably already reacted and pulled your hand back away from the burner.

Perhaps we're talking semantics. I see "experiencing the desired 'fear' response" at a haunt as very different than "not knowing if something is fake or real."
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: trailgrrl on October 24, 2012, 04:32:27 PM
Last year we took our son's through a haunted corn maze.  My 18 y/o son and my husband had a great time.  I was having a good time as well, but my 13 y/o son was done about half way through.  I asked him if he was sure he couldn't finish but he was well and truly freaked out and I wasn't going to push him to the  point of tears.   So I sent my husband and older son off ahead and the next cast member who leaped out at us I quietly asked for an exit for my son and myself.  There was no one else in the vicinity besides my son and me, so we weren't ruining the experience for anyone else.

The cast member dropped Character immediately and radioed for security, walked us to the to exit to meet security and  went back to her spot.


My husband still tells how awesome part I missed was ::)  That's ok, It wouldn't have been nearly as fun with a freaked out kid.

It's ok to go to a haunted house and figure out you're really not up for it, it is NEVER ok to touch the cast members.  Conversely, the cast members may touch or grab you, it's part of the experience, it is never ok to be touched inappropriately.  Even doing haunted houses as a teenager back in the stone ages, I was never groped.

Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: RegionMom on October 24, 2012, 06:18:12 PM
This is going to be my last post in this thread because some people are going to have their own ideas regardless...

My son teaches younger kids in scouts and karate.  He has helped at special needs camps.  He volunteers in our church nursery with preschoolers.  He is a model student and citizen.  Although he was picked on in grade school, he never got into a fight.  This strong and smart kid is exactly who I would want with me in a dark ally.  I would trust this kid to defend his friends and family in any sort of attack. 

Since we do not watch horror movies, and he has never been to a haunted house, I do not know how that creepy feeling at the back of your neck, and alert!  danger!  signals would work for him if he were grabbed. 

One of his black belt testing fields required him to stand in the middle of a circle and fend off 50 attacks in a row, from any angle and direction, using good form for each, and different techniques each time. 

The other poster explained it well- martial arts are usually to train for defense, and the control comes when once engaged.  Do not engage, and no problem!

So many people said "know your triggers."  I stated that I do not know if my son would be triggered or not, but he can sure land a blow!  I would not want a worker to wind up in a head-lock because they grabbed my son or his sister.  I said we most likely will not go, esp. after I watched the Ellen Show reporter and her friend freak out.

I also said that if I went, we would all hold hands.  All the better to not touch or be touched. 

And that is that. 

Happy Halloween!!

Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: sparksals on October 24, 2012, 06:25:36 PM
I don't think it is realistic to expect not to be touched in a Haunted House.   If one goes to such a venue, they take the risk of unexpected events.  As long as they are in reason and not sexual or inappropriate, a haunted house is fair game.  If one has limitations, best not to go. 
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: kherbert05 on October 24, 2012, 06:35:51 PM
I'm a big fan of no-contact rules at haunted houses.  Having an actor startle a patron by grabbing them is a good way for someone to be injured.
POD - In Elementary school we had a haunted house. It was supposed to be no contact. One of the Dads got a bloody nose when he grabbed me. It wasn't even a trigger in the usual sense. I have a tickle spot on my back. You poke it and I jump and arch my back. He got hit that spot, I jumped and and head butted him. (I have no control over it - it is a reflex like the doctor hitting your knee).
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: AylaM on October 24, 2012, 07:07:01 PM
I've worked at two haunted houses.  One I was mostly behind a wall.  I would peek through windows scream a lot.  The other was a haunted woods and I ran out form under a bridge.

Both had a no touch rule.  As part of the cast I was not permitted to touch the guests.  The guides specifically told all guests that: "Our monsters will not touch you, please do not touch them"

I still got kicked hard on my first day.  If it didn't hurt so much it would have been more amusing that is was the 'tough guy' who freaked and lashed.

I was more careful not to get too close after that.  However, in my opinion, if you are unsure of your ability not to hurt people when you get spooked, you shouldn't be in the haunted houses.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: SiotehCat on October 24, 2012, 07:30:17 PM
I thought the No Touch rule was a universal rule.

Two years ago, I took DS, then 10, to a really scary haunted house aimed for older kids and adults. He was really scared, so I kept telling him that they couldn't touch us. 30 seconds into the haunted house, and they grabbed our legs! He shouted out that I had lied to him. My bad.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on October 24, 2012, 10:03:16 PM
I thought the No Touch rule was a universal rule.

Two years ago, I took DS, then 10, to a really scary haunted house aimed for older kids and adults. He was really scared, so I kept telling him that they couldn't touch us. 30 seconds into the haunted house, and they grabbed our legs! He shouted out that I had lied to him. My bad.

Our haunted maze says, "We won't touch you unless you touch us. If you do, watch out." But they tell you that upfront, so if you don't like that thing, you don't have to put up with that.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Thipu1 on October 25, 2012, 07:20:52 AM
I agree that no-touch rules are a good thing.  However, I did go to one in which visitors were gently touched. 

It was a scripted show.  Shows were every hour and visitors were led through in groups.  One of the actors was a 'Zombie Cop' whose job was to see that the group stayed together. 

In one of the rooms I was interested in a painting on the wall and fell a bit behind.  I felt a gentle tap on my shoulder and heard, 'Yes.  It's fine art, isn't it.  I can tell you have an excellent Braaaiiin'. 

I'm a terrible skairdy cat but I had to laugh at that one. 
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Hmmmmm on October 25, 2012, 08:42:33 AM
We used to run a haunted house.  Mostly geared toward 8 to 13, but we had several adults completely freak out and have to be escorted out and the last year we ran it we had a HS football palyer friend of my DD's have to go home and change his clothes after only making it half way through. 

I worked the front door and no one was admitted without them repeating the rule "Touch NOTHING and NOTHING will touch you". 

I completely understand someone KNOWING that everything is fake but still freaking out.  Shoot, it was my house and there were a few times I was in there alone and got pretty spooked. 

So I can understand anyone's initial reaction is to fight back if touched, no matter what type of training they have.

For the people volunteering in our house, we always made sure they understood that if a guest was really freaking out, to drop out of character and help them out.  The reason I dislike commercial haunted houses is they train their people to almost pray on the most freaked out of a group (which is usually me) to up the fear factor.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Onyx_TKD on October 25, 2012, 12:02:28 PM
The reason I dislike commercial haunted houses is they train their people to almost pray on the most freaked out of a group (which is usually me) to up the fear factor.

Haunted house for the religio-phobic? "Don't fall behind, anyone. If you do, the whole congregation will converge on you to lay on hands and pray for your immortal soooouuuul."

And back to your regularly scheduled thread. That typo just brought a really funny picture to mind.  ;)
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Jones on October 25, 2012, 12:39:31 PM
I haven't been in a haunted house since I was about 7. I had on a pretty princess dress, and at some point during the walkthrough I was lightly sprayed with a liquid. My friend said it was blood and my dress was ruined. I cried and cried, even when the haunters took me to a lit room and showed me it was water it took me a while to calm down.
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: cocacola35 on October 27, 2012, 10:38:35 AM
I also thought the "no touch" rule was universal in haunted houses.  It just seems common sense that from a safety (not to mention legal) standpoint to protect both actors and patrons.  I think haunted houses are asking for trouble if they allow the actors to touch the patrons.  However if a patron should not participate if they know they will assault someone for jumping out at them.

I've been to a few haunted houses- before we went in the rules were always laid out first (one of the first one being that you cannot touch the actors) and you had the opportunity to leave at that point.  I quickly learned not to act like the most freaked out person there- the actors tend to stalk that person throughout the haunted house! 
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Marisol on November 02, 2012, 04:02:56 PM
No Touch is more universal now, but back in the 80-90s I remember there being a lot more contact.  I think that is why we have no touch rules now.  I distinctly remember hands grabbing my legs on hayrides. 
Title: Re: Haunted House Etiquette.
Post by: Sharnita on November 02, 2012, 04:14:04 PM
BTW, did anybody see this week's episode of New Girl, where a character who is terrified of haunted houses had to go into one to try to tell his friend who worked there something important?  It pretty much acted out the scenarios discussed here.