Etiquette Hell

General Etiquette => Life...in general => Holidays => Topic started by: RebeccainGA on December 24, 2012, 10:44:31 AM

Title: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: RebeccainGA on December 24, 2012, 10:44:31 AM
In my family, we have a few traditions for gifts - my aunt always buys my grandmother a calendar with bears on it. I always make peanut butter cookies to mail to my grandfather. I always buy a pez dispenser for our stockings, and we buy a Christmas ornament with the year on it for the family tree, and a blue ornament for my ornament tree.

What fun traditional gifts do you do in your family?
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Arrynne on December 24, 2012, 01:51:35 PM
Chocolate Covered Cherries.  Apparently my grandpa would buy a box of those for all of his daughters every year for Christmas.  Now it's traditional to exchange boxes of Chocolate Covered Cherries. 
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: magician5 on December 24, 2012, 02:10:46 PM
We used to have one that reflected both the sweet and the un-sweet in my mother.

Every year, I'd get a big bottle of ketchup. I use a lot of it. That was sweet, with all the "Ooh, I don't know what this one is!" comments.

In later years, she stopped wrapping anything. I'd get the ketchup in a small brown paper bag. The lack of care in not wrapping anything grated on me, but the bag for the ketchup made the comments even funnier.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Luci on December 24, 2012, 02:22:14 PM
Our son always gets me a horrible musical toy of some sort. A biker Santa that I don't remember what he sings, a penguin singing Blue Christmas and flopping his blue snowhat, a bear singing Shake Your Booty turning around to wiggle his bottom. He's been doing this for 20 years now. My favorite is a small moose the sings Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer because it's a family joke. He claims he found one that too much even for him. I was afraid to ask!
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Shakira on December 24, 2012, 03:27:34 PM
There is a store near us that sells single serving sizes of Nutella and teeny packages of shortbread cookies. I buy about a dozen of each to put in my DH's stocking every year. He loves to take them to work to snack on while he's walking (DH is a mailman).

For my dad, we always buy him scotch. He always likes it, and always needs more!

Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: siamesecat2965 on December 24, 2012, 06:03:32 PM
My dad always used to get pistachos for my stocking as a kid, and even as an adult, I'd still insist on them :) - now that he's gone, my mom still gets me a bag of them every year!
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: baglady on December 25, 2012, 07:52:11 AM
My dad always used to get pistachos for my stocking as a kid, and even as an adult, I'd still insist on them :) - now that he's gone, my mom still gets me a bag of them every year!

This reminded me of my dad. My mom loves cashews, but she would rarely buy any kind of treat just for herself. So my dad would get her a box of them from Fannie Farmer every Christmas, birthday and Mother's Day, which led to this exchange:

Me: "What's in the box?"
Dad (said with mischievous smile and twinkle in eye): "Your mother's nuts!"
Me: "I know. But what's in the box?"
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: #borecore on December 25, 2012, 09:44:35 AM
We always get practical things in our stockings. Growing up it was underwear, socks, and a toothbrush every year, and often anything else we needed as far as,personal toiletries. This year, I still got lip balm, lotion, hand sanitizer, disposable razors, and cute socks.

My sister, since she learned to sew, has made little stuffed things. This year we got adorable felt penguin ornaments.

My brother gives secondhand or bizarre things. I got a giveaway book about the miracle of coconut water, a freebie keychain, and such. My sister got oddball '90s pop CDs (used). Mom got a bunch of freebie keychains and folders. We all got a nicer gift, too.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Thipu1 on December 25, 2012, 10:24:33 AM
We had the tradition of the box. 

One Christmas, an aunt worked at a store at which our family could never afford to shop.  Because of the employee discount, Aunt could and my mother received a gift in the store's distinctive box.  After that, the box changed hands for around 20 years within both sides of the family.   

During the round of Christmas morning phone calls, the big question was always, 'Who got the box this year?'

Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Drawberry on December 25, 2012, 11:37:50 AM
When I was a child my mother would always bake Grands Biscuits (the flaky layers kind) and have me and my older siblings sit down in the living room to open gifts while she took pictures with such frequency that reviewing them was more like watching a flip book movie.

Now that Boyfriend and I have spent our first Christmas together it seems the tradition is our new cat Jiji waking us up at 8am  ::) Apparently someone else was excited too.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: gmatoy on December 25, 2012, 07:15:31 PM
Because we always went to my mother's house for Christmas dinner, spending basically the whole day, I made Christmas breakfast a BIG deal and always made chocolate cinnamon rolls. Now that the dinner meal is at my house, I still do the breakfast thing, but wish someone would take over one part or the other!
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: daisy1679 on December 25, 2012, 08:42:11 PM
Every year, my grandma would get everyone 12 pairs of socks (there's about 30+ people in four generations). Each sock would be wrapped separately (not pairs, each individual sock), and whoever was passing out gifts would just start tossing the socks at the intended recipient. It would be call a name, throw, call the next name, throw. It was a little crazy, with socks flying everywhere, but the best part of Christmas! When I was younger and us kids would get 12 different pairs, Grandma used to set up a contest to see who could get all their socks unwrapped and matched up first, the prize was usually a box of chocolates or something.

This is one of my family's favorite traditions, even though Grandma is gone now, we have all continued the tradition with our own families!
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: KenveeB on December 25, 2012, 11:22:27 PM
We HAVE to have Lifesaver Storybooks in our stockings every year. One year my mom couldn't find them, and my brother and I were crushed. We were in college at the time!

My mom's wrapping is famous. She likes to put things in odd boxes ("never trust the box" is a family motto -- you might open a box of hair curlers and find an iPod :)) and weigh things down so you can't tell what's what. This year I got a couple of bottles of root beer weighing down various boxes.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: CookieChica on December 25, 2012, 11:27:28 PM
We have a pretty typical one not mentioned yet - Christmas Eve pajamas! I love to go to bed and wake up in brand new pajamas.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: KenveeB on December 26, 2012, 07:29:50 AM
We have a pretty typical one not mentioned yet - Christmas Eve pajamas! I love to go to bed and wake up in brand new pajamas.

We used to have that, but after my brother and I got out of the house, my mom stopped getting pj's for us. I still buy a new pair every year and wear it for the first time on Christmas Eve. :)  Actually, this year my brother got all of us pj's as an early gift. He spent Christmas with his GF's family and said he wanted us to have something of him on Christmas Day.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: SamiHami on December 26, 2012, 10:35:05 PM
Every year Mom takes me out to buy me clothes as a Christmas gift, usually the first weekend of December. She started doing this probably 20 years ago. She decided that it was silly for her buy me clothes that I might not like or may not fit when we could spend the day together shopping and having fun.

My DH and I are big kids. We cannot wait until Christmas morning to open our gifts, but we can't open them early, either. So, we stay up until midnight when it is "officially" Christmas day and open gifts then. That used to drive my nieces crazy when they were little..."But why can't we stay up and open gifts at midnight? Aunt SamiHami and Uncle Wonderful do! No fair!"
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: SheltieMom on December 26, 2012, 10:48:55 PM
Not really a "gift", but more than 30 years ago, my mother's neighbor brought her a pie on Christmas Eve, covered with a small Christmas towel. The towel got packed away with Mother's Christmas decorations, instead of being returned. The next Christmas,  Mother baked a pie, and took it to the neighbor, covered with the towel. The towel has gone back and forth every year since then, always accompanied by a nice visit with the neighbor. She's one of my favorite people, and it's always a nice part of my trip home to get to spend a few minutes with her, and catch up on what our kids are doing.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: baglady on December 26, 2012, 11:24:31 PM
There is a fruitcake that makes the rounds of a certain subgroup of my friend circle. I believe it started as a Christmas thing but these days gets passed around from one person to another, at one event to another, regardless of season. I got it for the first time this summer, when I hosted a party that three members of the Fruitcake Subgroup attended for the first time. I passed it back to one of them a couple of months later.

I haven't actually *seen* the fruitcake itself, as it's still in its original packaging, covered with signatures from the various people who've had custody of it since ... wait for it ... 1995.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Take2 on December 27, 2012, 09:40:48 PM
When I was a little girl, Santa always brought me Fruit Stripe gum with the zebra on it. When I was about 10, he stopped. This year, my DH made sure Santa brought me Fruit Stripe gum again. It was the sweetest surprise!

I also had Lifesavers storybooks as a tradition, as do all my kids and stepkids, now.

A really funny one to me is that before I was born when my big brother was 4, all of Christmas was all set up and my father grabbed a chocolate covered cherry and ate it. My mother exclaimed "that is for M!" My father sheepishly suggested that Santa got hungry and had a snack? Every year after that, Santa brought a package of chocolate covered cherries with one missing. My mother continued the tradition even after my parents divorced. When my brother grew up and moved away, he got a box with one missing in the mail...and I got a box back at home. When I grew up, my mother and I began exchanging boxes, both with one missing. When I got married, my now-ex got a box, too, also with one missing. That marriage fell apart, and this year I got remarried and DH and I had a box of chocolate covered cherries with one missing from Santa. But I noticed on Facebook that Santa also brought a box of chocolate covered cherries with one missing at my ex's house!
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: suzieQ on December 28, 2012, 05:28:53 AM
Chocolate Covered Cherries.  Apparently my grandpa would buy a box of those for all of his daughters every year for Christmas.  Now it's traditional to exchange boxes of Chocolate Covered Cherries.

Yes! But they must be the individually wrapped Cella cherries. These went up to $4 per box this year! Ugh - so I got each person a box and no extra boxes because of cost. We are celebrating Christmas today and I got up to find DH had bought an extra 6 boxes for me! :)
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: nalapuppy on December 28, 2012, 01:57:56 PM
Every year I buy a stuffed animal for my kids, to go with their stocking.  It doesn't matter that my kids are now 18, 17, and 11, and have nothing to do with toys anymore....they still get that one stuffed animal.

The tradition was started by my mom.  She used to give me and my siblings a stuffed animal too, until we moved out on our own.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Nuala on December 28, 2012, 05:18:30 PM
A few years ago we were exposed to the song "I Want a Hippopatamus for Christmas." My daughter thought it was hysterical, so I always tuck something "hippo" in her stocking. This year it was a hippo stapler from the Metropolitan Museum.  When she found it she exclaimed, "Hooray! I wondered what it would be this year!"
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Tierrainney on December 28, 2012, 11:21:54 PM
After reading as a family the Christmas Chapter from Laura Ingals Wilder's Little House on the Prairie, I started putting a shiny penny in the toe of each stocking. But to account for inflation, I also put in a dollar coin :)

We read that chapter once again this year.

Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: bopper on January 02, 2013, 12:20:53 PM
I have bought my kids pajamas for Xmas Eve...when they were little it was so we could carry them straight to bed when we got home from Grandma's, but now my High Schooler reminded me that we needed to pack them to go to Grandma's and I had to make sure I had some for my girls and our exchange student!   

Also I must get Toblerone.

As a kid I remember the orange in the toe of the stocking.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on January 02, 2013, 02:20:48 PM
My family never really had Christmas gift traditions (unless you count the day-after run to a few specific stores to return things from Grandma and pick out new stuff that my younger sisters and I always did).

My new tradition is for SO and I to go pick out an annual Christmas ornament with the year on it for our tree—but we wait until the post-Christmas clearance sales to do it. :D

Also becoming a tradition is for me to stealthily buy something extra for my mom around Christmas and wait until she notices it before fessing up (or, as with this year, until she finally asks my sisters where it came from and they tell her, since they’re in on it too). Every year, she won’t tell me anything about what she needs or what she hasn’t been willing to buy for herself, and every year, we visit and she complains about not having at least one or two things. This year, it was compounded by a house fire in Nov. that caused smoke damage to most of her stuff. Since she no longer had coffee cups or towels of her own—two of her most important things in a daily routine (she is using the furnished rentals’ for now and she hated the small towels), she got a nice-sized coffee cup and two big bath towels. She didn’t notice either for about three days ::) (the cup was next to the coffee pot, and had her first initial on it which she shares with no one else in the family. The towels were a bit more understandable, as she thought they might belong to one of my sisters who was home from college). I think we’ve gotten her coffee cups a few times, good coffee, nice shampoo, etc…
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Thipu1 on January 02, 2013, 05:24:13 PM
A few years ago we were exposed to the song "I Want a Hippopatamus for Christmas." My daughter thought it was hysterical, so I always tuck something "hippo" in her stocking. This year it was a hippo stapler from the Metropolitan Museum.  When she found it she exclaimed, "Hooray! I wondered what it would be this year!"

Was the hippopotamus from the Met named 'William'? 
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Nuala on January 02, 2013, 05:34:12 PM
A few years ago we were exposed to the song "I Want a Hippopatamus for Christmas." My daughter thought it was hysterical, so I always tuck something "hippo" in her stocking. This year it was a hippo stapler from the Metropolitan Museum.  When she found it she exclaimed, "Hooray! I wondered what it would be this year!"

Was the hippopotamus from the Met named 'William'?

That's the one!
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Phoebe on January 02, 2013, 07:00:26 PM
Each year, my mom would give my brother a box of chocolate covered cherries of his own, since otherwise he'd open and finish off the "family" box before anyone even knew they were in the house.  Mom's been gone for a few years now, but we make sure he still gets his very own box. 

This year, I discovered chocolate covered blueberries.  A Christmas miracle!!  They're going to become a tradition, too  ;D
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: snowfire on January 02, 2013, 09:08:53 PM
In our house, the pets always open the first gift.  For the cats, it is a new catnip toy loosely wrapped in tissue paper.  It is hilarious to see them tear into the paper to get to their new, fresh, fragrant toy.  Then, of course, there is the fun of having totally stoned cats around the Christmas tree.  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: ZaftigWife on January 03, 2013, 06:18:35 PM
When we were growing up, Dad always put mini Whitman's samplers in our stockings.  I miss that.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Ambrosia Hino on January 07, 2013, 11:32:32 AM
When I was little, my great-grandparents always bought me and my cousins matching Hallmark Christmas ornaments every year. When we moved away, they started sending money for me to pick out my own ornament instead (not as much fun, because now mine didn't match). I think that continued until around when I turned 18? I know it was after I started driving, because my ornament money ended up in my gas tank at least once.

That's one I need to figure out how to start up again, at least for our house.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: RebeccainGA on January 07, 2013, 12:43:17 PM
When I was little, my great-grandparents always bought me and my cousins matching Hallmark Christmas ornaments every year. When we moved away, they started sending money for me to pick out my own ornament instead (not as much fun, because now mine didn't match). I think that continued until around when I turned 18? I know it was after I started driving, because my ornament money ended up in my gas tank at least once.

That's one I need to figure out how to start up again, at least for our house.

DP and I do it together, 1 ornament every year, dated. It's kind of cool to see how our tastes change. We used to try to get ones that reflected our family at the time (DD, and us, living together). This year, our first Christmas without DD, we got one that just was two doves, and said "Our Christmas Together". Was bittersweet, but certainly reflects our household!
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: LilacRosey on January 08, 2013, 12:18:16 AM
All the women in my families beed so we pass on necklaces and earrings to eachother every year. We all have different styles so it's pretty fun!, LilacRosey
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: gmatoy on March 06, 2013, 10:37:36 PM
I always sew for my family and recently I made PJ's for everyone and my family announced that was the best ever and should be a new tradition. (And does anyone else's family sing, "Tradition!" from Fiddler on the Roof? Because that is part of the tradition at our house!)
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Library Dragon on March 06, 2013, 11:37:22 PM
Several years ago DH had neck surgery.  He was just driving again the week of Christmas.  He went to the local drugstore and shopped on the As Seen On TV aisle.  It's now a tradition that he buys us, DSs, DIL, and me, the cheesiest gifts he can get from this area.  It's funny, but some have turned out to be handy.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: StoutGirl on March 09, 2013, 01:25:44 PM
Every year, my Dad has to get the annual John Deere ornaments, along with some black bear ornaments.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Waterlight on March 09, 2013, 11:48:13 PM
Since my parents were divorced and had each remarried, but both lived in the same town and were on speaking terms (from coolly civil in my high school years to genuinely friendly in the last few years before Dad died), I ended up getting TWO holiday celebrations:  one on Christmas Eve, the other on Christmas Day.   I alternated spending one with Mom and one with Dad--and now that Dad is gone, I alternate spending Christmas Eve and Christmas Day with my stepmom and with my mom and stepdad.  That's a tradition  :)

Another tradition is that my stepdad--who LOVES candy--always gets at least one big Whitman's Sampler box.

When my dad and stepmom's two cats were alive, I got presents each Christmas from "The Boys" with "love and pawprints."  Usually it would be something small, like socks.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: rm247 on November 25, 2013, 04:16:18 PM
Every Christmas eve, I get to open my Nanna's Christmas present, last thing before going to bed.
Every year the contents are the same: Beano Annual, Cadbury's Selection Box & "normal" present.
Which means that for the last 25+ years I get to spend Christmas night in bed reading the beano book eating chocolate.

She used to do something similar with my uncle and the Rupert Annual, but he "grew out of it" so instead his version is now a bottle of port & a jar of stilton.


I have ended up doing something similar for my sister. Despite being in Uni, she still has an old toy stuffed rabbit that used to be mine. So on Christmas Eve, she hangs a mini stocking up for him and during the night I fill it with Milky bars and milky bar buttons because they were her favourite sweets when I started doing this for her about 15 years ago.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Marbles on November 29, 2013, 02:56:42 AM
While my mom was alive, my grandparents would give her an angel every year for Christmas. I have no idea what happened to all the angels once Mom passed. Perhaps they went with her.

Mom also liked to buy a box of new ornaments each year. She'd write the year on the box, so now I have boatloads of ornaments. I've continued the ornament-buying tradition, but try to limit myself to singletons.

At our house Santa always brings everyone a geeky tee of some sort.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Runningstar on November 29, 2013, 04:47:34 AM
We don't always do this, but usually we will have one gift for each of our 3 kids that is hidden somewhere close by.  After all of the gifts and stockings have been opened, we wait a few hours and then tell each one that Santa left one more gift for them but forgot where.  They start the search and usually find each others.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: mechtilde on November 29, 2013, 04:58:58 AM
We open our presents in the afternoon.

I was in my twenties before I found out why this tradition had started happening in our family.

Grandpa was a clerygyman, so he was always very busy all morning on Christmas day. But he wanted to see his children opening their presents. So they would open the things they got in their stockings in the morning, and then open the presents from everyone else in the afternoon. So we continued the tradition- one which started Christmas 1945, the first Christmas after WW2, when Grandpa finally got to spend the day with his three year old son.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: NestHolder on November 29, 2013, 07:09:30 AM
Not precisely a gift tradition, but it is a gift, so... my theatre group used to have an auction at the regular Christmas Celebration.  People bring Stuff, people bid on Stuff, money raised goes to charity.  Well, there was a traditional penguin.  A little plastic wind-up toy of no value whatsoever, but it was always the last item to be auctioned, and always raised the highest sum, to be borne off in triumph by the winner.  Then it would reappear the following year.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: aussie_chick on November 29, 2013, 07:27:39 AM
Ferrero Rocher chocolates! The rectangular box!
Every year without fail, when I hand my dad his wrapped box he makes some kind of "dad joke" about it being a "heavily disguised Ferrari/yacht/bottle of wine" and then he unwraps it and says "I never would have guessed!" Always the same, every single year!
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Another Sarah on November 29, 2013, 07:41:26 AM
When we were kids the rule was that we had to stay in our rooms with our stockings until my parents were awake.
Everyone must be awake before the presents are opened.
Now we are all grown up (I'm the youngest at 29) the rule is that everyone must be here before presents are opened.

However my 32 year old brother still sneaks downstairs in secret every christmas morning (since he was 5) to see the tree with all the presents and then comes upstairs to tell my 34 year old sister and I that christmas has come!!!
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Outdoor Girl on November 29, 2013, 08:07:18 AM
My maternal grandfather was a butcher.  In the 30s and 40s before widespread refrigeration, he would be open late on Christmas Eve, then have to scrub everything down, would be closed Christmas Day and open again on Boxing Day.

He'd get home in the wee hours of Christmas morning, get all the kids up to open their stockings.  Then everyone would go back to bed.  He'd get to sleep longer because the kids would get up and play with their stocking stuff, letting him sleep.

Also back in those days, oranges in this part of the world were relatively rare.  You would get them at Christmas time, though.  So the toe of the stocking was always a big orange.  The heel would be a large apple.  We continue this still.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Another Sarah on November 29, 2013, 10:47:37 AM
Oh I forgot another one - proper stocking construction involves an orange in the toe and a curly wurly through the leg section to provide stability ;D
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: cwm on November 29, 2013, 12:58:55 PM
Oh I forgot another one - proper stocking construction involves an orange in the toe and a curly wurly through the leg section to provide stability ;D

I don't know what a curly wurly is, but we always get an orange in the toe and at least three more fruits in the stocking, and there's always two candy canes hanging out the top.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Snooks on November 29, 2013, 02:27:54 PM
It's a chewy toffee bar covered in chocolate, about 15cm long.

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQlfdJaBXyjdIYq8RMIz-OJz4bdYlQCnOEJXyCunU5Ic1Hj6xmk)
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Mergatroyd on November 29, 2013, 02:51:48 PM
When I was younger, we almost never made it to my grandparents place for Christmas (both sets lived 12 hours drive away, and my mother does NOT travel well.) Mom and Dad  would take pictures of us on christmas morning and mail them out with our thank you notes. Well, by the time I was four, my Grandmothers had gotten tired of seeing me on the fridge in whatever ratty jammies I'd gone to bed in on Christmas Eve. ;D

Grandma A was a seamstress, so she made me a pair of nice red and white jammies and told my parents I had to wear them Christmas eve. The pictures turned out so nice, that the other Grandma (Grandma B) kept up the tradition, sending us pajamas for our Christmas Eve present. It was the only gift we were allowed to open, and we always knew it was pajamas, but still we never knew exactly what she'd found (she didn't sew, so they were store bought).
It didn't always work out, like the hot pink silk nightgown that had an unexpectedly low V neck (I wore a black shirt underneath, and my mother teased her over the phone about it. She'd not noticed, just thought the colour was nice LOL) but the pictures always looked good enough for the fridge, so both Grandma's were happy.

Our other tradition was we were not allowed out of bed till 7, and then could only open the stocking. Presents had to wait till after we'd had breakfast. (And yes, they tortured us by making waffles and bacon instead of letting us eat toast, haha).

Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Outdoor Girl on November 29, 2013, 02:58:28 PM
It's a chewy toffee bar covered in chocolate, about 15cm long.

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQlfdJaBXyjdIYq8RMIz-OJz4bdYlQCnOEJXyCunU5Ic1Hj6xmk)

I remember those!  We used to get them here in Canada.  I don't remember it being called a Curly Wurly, though.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Snooks on November 29, 2013, 03:45:13 PM
It's a chewy toffee bar covered in chocolate, about 15cm long.

(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQlfdJaBXyjdIYq8RMIz-OJz4bdYlQCnOEJXyCunU5Ic1Hj6xmk)

I remember those!  We used to get them here in Canada.  I don't remember it being called a Curly Wurly, though.

Wikipedia suggests a Wig Wag

(http://www.collectingcandy.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/CC_WigWag-bar-wrapper-1970s.jpg)
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Outdoor Girl on November 29, 2013, 03:55:45 PM
That's it!  Thanks, Snooks.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: daen on November 29, 2013, 09:06:33 PM
My current gift tradition is that I don't do Christmas cards, and I do very few gifts. Instead, I make truffles, package them in the tiniest size of brown paper bag, and give them instead.  My truffle list is shorter than a Christmas card list would be, but longer than a gift list would be. There's no fussing about buying cards and writing little messages in them, or having picture cards made, or buying the perfect gift for fifteen people every year. I have to recalculate how much chocolate to buy every year, but that's the most thought I have to put into it. People get a little present from me that they can enjoy, and then it's gone and they don't have to store or dust it, and I'm told some look forward to it every year.

I started off making two flavors and forming them by hand. Then when I started dating my now-husband, he got in on things and we made more flavors and streamlined the process. Now we do somewhere between three and six flavors, and one has to be hot stuff.

I've been doing this for about fifteen years now, and I'm quite happy with it. 
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Library Dragon on November 29, 2013, 10:08:55 PM
We don't do Christmas cards, but an Epiphany letter.  That gives us an extra week to get it out  ;D.  Once we tried to not do a family letter and MIL called to say that there were complaints that cousin or aunt so-in-so didn't get one.  After 20+ years in the Army our Christmas card list was crazy long.  We began only sending a letter to those who sent us a card.  It helped trim the list.

For several years we had the DSs spread the gift opening over the 12 days of Christmas.  Beginning Christmas day they opened the big things and then over the next 12 days opened the smaller gifts they received from aunts and uncles. On January 6th they had the last big gift.  It helped when things were late in the mail or the latest, hottest thing was out of stock until New Year's. 
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: violinp on November 30, 2013, 08:40:44 AM
Cabbage's and my grandma gives Mom, Cabbage, and me each a new ornament for our trees every year (Mom and Dad have one tree, and Cabbage and I have the other). She gives them to us before we eat Thanksgiving lunch, and then we put them on the trees on Friday when we decorate. This year, Grandma gave me an angel ornament with holly sprigs on its dress.
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: kckgirl on November 30, 2013, 08:51:54 AM
We are an "open gifts on Christmas day" kind of family. The kids always ask if they can open one gift on Christmas Eve. That one gift is chosen by the adults and it's always PJs so the Christmas morning pictures look really nice. It took years for the kids to realize that they always got the same early gift (except for the youngest, who recently asked her mother if Grandy was giving them PJs to wear on Christmas Eve).
Title: Re: Christmas gift traditions
Post by: Runningstar on December 01, 2013, 05:41:05 AM
 :)How could I forget!!  We love the Advent Calendars with the little chocolates behind the windows opened everyday of December until Christmas.  Getting them out of the cupboard now - I buy them as soon as they hit the stores.