Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Time For a Coffee Break! => Topic started by: oceanus on January 05, 2013, 06:44:00 PM

Title: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: oceanus on January 05, 2013, 06:44:00 PM
These are a few expressions which (imo) are overused and if I never heard them again, it would be okay (I’m guilty of using a couple of these, but I’m trying to stop.):

Good to go

It’s all good

You go, girl

Typing “lol” at the end of sentences.  Lame way of saying “what I just said is funny, so I'm laughing and you should too”.

Rock star (c’mon, I know a rock star when I see one, and the person you’re talking about is no rock star)

Basically………

The bottom line

My bad

That’s how I/we roll

Making bad choices

In a better place

WhatEVER (if said in a snarky, dismissive tone)




Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: A.P. Wulfric on January 05, 2013, 06:48:12 PM
Sorry not sorry
Fiscal cliff
....is not impressed
bff/biffles
selfies
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabyMama on January 05, 2013, 06:49:29 PM
Totes. TL;DR.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 05, 2013, 06:53:42 PM
You Only Live Once.   ::)  For the longest time I kept seeing YOLO and wondering what the heck it is, then I heard it and the way it was being used. 

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Dark Annie on January 05, 2013, 06:59:54 PM
Amazeballs
Totes amazeballs

On the other hand, I doubt I will ever get sick of adding 'like a sunrise' to every sentence!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on January 05, 2013, 07:01:36 PM
"besties"

"YOLO"

"preggo". Is it really that hard to say pregnant?

"Just Sayin"-to me its the equivalent of "Im not trying to be mean but...."

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: oceanus on January 05, 2013, 07:12:32 PM
Quote
"preggo". Is it really that hard to say pregnant?

"preggers" is even worse
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 05, 2013, 07:15:19 PM
Deets (details)
Jelly (jealous)
Chill (He's a pretty chill professor, et cetera).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Amava on January 05, 2013, 07:15:29 PM
"Scrabble" as a euphemism for sex.
Sorry e-hellions, I love you all, but it drives. me. crazy.  ;D

I'm sure I say a lot of things that annoy someof you, too, though, so it's all good. lol  >:D



Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on January 05, 2013, 07:20:50 PM
Quote
"preggo". Is it really that hard to say pregnant?

"preggers" is even worse

You're absolutely right. I forgot about "preggers".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Jelaza on January 05, 2013, 07:24:57 PM
What's "selfies"?

My pregnancy related term that I hate: "baby bump".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: oceanus on January 05, 2013, 07:36:20 PM
"Scrabble" as a euphemism for sex.
Sorry e-hellions, I love you all, but it drives. me. crazy.  ;D

I'm sure I say a lot of things that annoy someof you, too, though, so it's all good. lol  >:D

 >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: A.P. Wulfric on January 05, 2013, 07:37:09 PM
Selfies is taking a picture of yourself and posting it to twitter, instagram, facebook, tumblr, etc.  Bonus points if your selfie has a duck face and a contorted position highlighting your chest and or rear end. 

I forgot all about amaze-balls. Ugh. 

Can I add FML to the list? 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 05, 2013, 07:37:41 PM
I've posted this before: Shut the front door.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 05, 2013, 08:05:41 PM
FML
People who talk in all caps
namasté
hashtag
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Cat-Fu on January 05, 2013, 08:06:54 PM
If YOLO could just drop off of the face of the earth, I would be so happy.

Overuse of "le [noun]" is starting to drive me crazy, too. Maybe I should stop reading rage comics. :P
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: readingchick on January 05, 2013, 08:11:03 PM
TL;DR.

 ???
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: afbluebelle on January 05, 2013, 08:13:14 PM
Too Long, Didn't Read. Usually used to sum up a long story, i.e.:  Blah blah blah blahsdfsdfsdjfvisdfgbaisdfguisdouvdifu

TL;DR: Blah.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: readingchick on January 05, 2013, 08:20:27 PM
Thanks, afbluebelle!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: kckgirl on January 05, 2013, 08:21:09 PM
It is what it is.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: mbbored on January 05, 2013, 08:53:46 PM
If YOLO could just drop off of the face of the earth, I would be so happy.

Overuse of "le [noun]" is starting to drive me crazy, too. Maybe I should stop reading rage comics. :P

Try living in Yolo County: it was very confusing at first.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: happygrrl on January 05, 2013, 08:58:49 PM
What is FML and amaze-ball?

I hate "a hot mess." Particularly when used by anyone over the age of 12, and said with a snarky little semi twist/flip of the head, and a rather pointed glare, and the mouth being partially open.  Must have self-important attitute to accompany this act.

Why no, the evil person I worked with did not do any of this. Never.  >:D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 05, 2013, 09:09:13 PM
What is FML and amaze-ball?

I hate "a hot mess." Particularly when used by anyone over the age of 12, and said with a snarky little semi twist/flip of the head, and a rather pointed glare, and the mouth being partially open.  Must have self-important attitute to accompany this act.

Why no, the evil person I worked with did not do any of this. Never.  >:D

Eff My Life and amaze-ball is pretty much amazing.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Bijou on January 05, 2013, 09:11:38 PM
"My bad"
"Trust me."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 05, 2013, 09:13:27 PM
Duck face...why in the world is this even a thing and how is it supposed to be attractive? When I was a kid doing a duck face meant putting two pringles in your mouth so it looked like a beak.

I had to laugh once though to see a video spoofing Nickelback's "Photograph" where they're making fun of people who take silly photos with instagram.

"Now a selfie, lookin’ cute
In the same room where I poop!"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn-dD-QKYN4 (some language)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on January 05, 2013, 09:14:53 PM
Too Long, Didn't Read. Usually used to sum up a long story, i.e.:  Blah blah blah blahsdfsdfsdjfvisdfgbaisdfguisdouvdifu

TL;DR: Blah.

I once saw it as a reply to someone's long post. As in

OP: Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah-bitty blah

First response (by different poster): TL;DR

I thought it was breathtakingly rude. If you don't want to read a long post, fine, but no need to share.

I'm normally fairly tolerant of sayings, but YOLO drives me nuts simply because it is so misused.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 05, 2013, 09:18:29 PM
Duck face...why in the world is this even a thing and how is it supposed to be attractive? When I was a kid doing a duck face meant putting two pringles in your mouth so it looked like a beak.

I had to laugh once though to see a video spoofing Nickelback's "Photograph" where they're making fun of people who take silly photos with instagram.

"Now a selfie, lookin’ cute
In the same room where I poop!"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn-dD-QKYN4 (some language)

Thanks!!!  Eagle and I just had a really good laugh at that!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 05, 2013, 09:20:41 PM
Bromance (DS uses this all the dang time)

BFF
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Slartibartfast on January 05, 2013, 09:30:01 PM
adorbs

"that's so gay"  >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 05, 2013, 09:35:01 PM
"*******" yes, I still hear it used, unfortunately.  Not often, but once a year is still too often.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: AmethystAnne on January 05, 2013, 09:35:48 PM
I'm going to date myself with these 2 that I heard a lot in the late '60's:

"Groovy"

"That's my bag"

 ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Amava on January 05, 2013, 09:38:43 PM
"*******" yes, I still hear it used, unfortunately.  Not often, but once a year is still too often.

Apparently the filter agrees with you.  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: GreenEyedHawk on January 05, 2013, 09:40:42 PM
What's "selfies"?

My pregnancy related term that I hate: "baby bump".

NOTHING gets my dander up like "baby bump" "preggers" and "preggo".  Where I come from, Prego is pasta sauce.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 05, 2013, 09:41:05 PM
"*******" yes, I still hear it used, unfortunately.  Not often, but once a year is still too often.

Apparently the filter agrees with you.  ;D

Wow, I never noticed that, but then I've never used it before so there ya go!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Amava on January 05, 2013, 09:42:48 PM
"*******" yes, I still hear it used, unfortunately.  Not often, but once a year is still too often.

Apparently the filter agrees with you.  ;D

Wow, I never noticed that, but then I've never used it before so there ya go!

Great but now we still don't know what you meant and you're making me very curious.
Any hints? Some context?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Slartibartfast on January 05, 2013, 09:44:20 PM
"*******" yes, I still hear it used, unfortunately.  Not often, but once a year is still too often.

Apparently the filter agrees with you.  ;D

I love it when the filter does that, because it filters "republ ican," "dem ocrat," and "les bian" all the same way.  Which means there's usually a humorous fill-in-the-blank possible when a poster says something that's bleeped  :P  There are very few posts where "republ ican" and "les bian" would be interchangeable . . .
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 05, 2013, 09:52:58 PM
"*******" yes, I still hear it used, unfortunately.  Not often, but once a year is still too often.

Apparently the filter agrees with you.  ;D

Wow, I never noticed that, but then I've never used it before so there ya go!

Great but now we still don't know what you meant and you're making me very curious.
Any hints? Some context?

It begins with R and ends with "tard"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Amava on January 05, 2013, 10:05:20 PM
It begins with R and ends with "tard"

Ohh! I hate that too. There are few words I find offensive, but this is one.
And the same goes for "gay" used as a derogative word like Slartibartfast mentioned.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: JennJenn68 on January 05, 2013, 10:20:48 PM
Boy, am I old.  About ninety percent of the expressions posted in this thread are complete mysteries to me; never heard them, and don't really want to do so.

My hot button?  "Hating on".  "Hate" is a verb.  One doesn't "love on", "like on", "want on" or any such thing, so why this prevalence of "hate on"?  To me, it just smacks of a complete lack of creativity.  Surely there are so many more ways to convey this point!

End of sermon. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Ida on January 05, 2013, 10:22:29 PM
"Healthy" and "choice/s" and/or any combination thereof, including "un-."

Also, not so much trendy as wornrighttheheckOUT:

pristine
plight

... OK, yes, I've been working the enviro beat too long.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on January 05, 2013, 10:36:33 PM
"Im over it"

"whatevs"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Please pass the Calgon on January 05, 2013, 11:05:30 PM
"Haters gotta hate"...usually used by someone who is about to do something really ill advised and being dismissive to those telling him/her its a really bad idea.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Dark Annie on January 05, 2013, 11:14:28 PM
Jumping in with two three more trendy expressions I hate...

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 05, 2013, 11:37:53 PM
"bro"
"adorkable"
Hashtags, especially where they don't belong (Facebook, for instance.)






And I second "haters gonna hate" and "so gay." (I love this chart (http://tinyurl.com/aprn3wr) ;) )
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: oceanus on January 05, 2013, 11:42:45 PM
mani-pedi
(a little too cutesy)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: JonGirl on January 05, 2013, 11:46:09 PM
Amazeballs
Totes amazeballs

On the other hand, I doubt I will ever get sick of adding 'like a sunrise' to every sentence!

I'm sorry but I am, I refuse to take part in that.
That woman is despicable.  :(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Redsoil on January 06, 2013, 12:08:08 AM
Agree with all of these.  Loved the Nickelback parody - just great!  ;)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: mikeylou on January 06, 2013, 01:55:22 AM
"Jelly" instead of Jealous
"It is what it is".   
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 06, 2013, 02:25:22 AM
Jelly instead of jealous
Sick instead of neat, wonderful, cool
Ima for I am or I'm
Oh snap
Hood instead of neighborhood
Hashtags
Hate on or haters gonna hate
Fetch
Anyhoo
Ending words with -licious (chocolicious)
axed instead of asked

What in the world is cray-cray?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: mikeylou on January 06, 2013, 02:29:50 AM
What in the world is cray-cray?

It's crazy.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CrochetFanatic on January 06, 2013, 03:43:20 AM
Darn, m2kbug said it before I could.  There was a time when, if something was good, people would say "cool".  Then for a while, it was "phat".  That one had me thinking people were insulting my weight, but that was for all of two seconds until my brain caught up and I realized what they really meant.  Now it's "sick".  I remember when "sick" meant "gross" or "nasty".  Or "sick" as in ill.  Bah...

Another one that sort of strikes me as being kind of cutesy is saying "feels" instead of "feelings"  I wouldn't go so far as to say it bothers me, but you won't catch me using that one.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 06, 2013, 04:05:52 AM
Darn, m2kbug said it before I could.  There was a time when, if something was good, people would say "cool".  Then for a while, it was "phat".  That one had me thinking people were insulting my weight, but that was for all of two seconds until my brain caught up and I realized what they really meant.  Now it's "sick".  I remember when "sick" meant "gross" or "nasty".  Or "sick" as in ill.  Bah...

Another one that sort of strikes me as being kind of cutesy is saying "feels" instead of "feelings"  I wouldn't go so far as to say it bothers me, but you won't catch me using that one.

I was a teen when the word "bad" became popular as an expression of awesome/cool/great.  My mom gave a gift to one of the grandkids and he said "Oooh BAD!"  My mom was upset that the gift wasn't liked or the wrong choice.  "Bad means good, Mom" I explained.  I, myself have never used it.  :D  I imagine the term "cool" makes a certain generation cringe.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 06, 2013, 04:19:47 AM
Duck face...why in the world is this even a thing and how is it supposed to be attractive? When I was a kid doing a duck face meant putting two pringles in your mouth so it looked like a beak.


Hahaha!  Pringles.  Exactly!

My daughter wanted a camera, so I was looking at inexpensive "starter" cameras for Christmas and talked about she's a teen so she'll probably be doing the fish lips pictures.  The salesperson corrected me, "It's duck face."   ;D 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on January 06, 2013, 04:53:00 AM
My hot button?  "Hating on".  "Hate" is a verb.  One doesn't "love on", "like on", "want on" or any such thing, so why this prevalence of "hate on"?  To me, it just smacks of a complete lack of creativity.  Surely there are so many more ways to convey this point!

It's funny; I feel exactly the opposite about this expression. I first encountered it on eHell (it isn't used at all in the UK). I tend mostly to like Americanisms, and was rather taken with this one -- "hating on" something, feels to me a more colourful, intensified variant of just hating: I feel that it is rather creative. The way people have such a variety of opinions and sentiments about so many things, adds interest to life !
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 06, 2013, 05:53:11 AM
Jelly instead of jealous
Sick instead of neat, wonderful, cool
Ima for I am or I'm
Oh snap
Hood instead of neighborhood
Hashtags
Hate on or haters gonna hate
Fetch
Anyhoo
Ending words with -licious (chocolicious)
axed instead of asked

What in the world is cray-cray?

Why fetch? I've never heard it as a "trendy expression" and am curious how it's being used.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 06, 2013, 06:26:40 AM

Why fetch? I've never heard it as a "trendy expression" and am curious how it's being used.

Fetch is a "clean cussing" word for the f-word.  It's used around my parts a lot as well as "oh my heck," which I should have included on my list.  It's one that really crawls under my skin, though I don't know why.  It probably doesn't bother anyone else.   :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Verloona Ti on January 06, 2013, 07:21:51 AM
Online  trendy expressions:

People who think it's cute to spell 'probably' 'prolly'.  So annoying...

People who can't do simple phonics, so they allow spellcheck to fool them into thinking  definitely/def.in.it.el.y could possibly be spelled 'defiantly' (de.fi.ant.ly). Both legitimate words , but very different meanings. (I think they must try to spell it definitaly, and spellcheck offers defiantly as the correct choice. Lack of phonics in Elementary School lets them fall for this.)

Ditto people on political sites , who think secession, secede, succession, and succeed/succede are all the same thing. Four of those are legitimate words-but they are not spelled, pronounced, nor do they mean the same thing. Is spellcheck to blame for people writing succeed in the comments section of an article, the headline of which correctly used secede?

If I were world dictator, using 'amirite?' online would be a capital offense. This is a grating-on-the-last-nerve cutesy way of writing 'am I right?', and I have NEVER seen it used in an online post that didn't make me despise the person using it. It's always used in a snarky, hateful, obnoxious comment.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 06, 2013, 07:24:10 AM
It begins with R and ends with "tard"

Ohh! I hate that too. There are few words I find offensive, but this is one.
And the same goes for "gay" used as a derogative word like Slartibartfast mentioned.

I don't care for that or "sped" used as an abbreviation of special ed.   Heard it a lot as a preteen in middle school where it was used as a synonym for the R word. *shudder* Kids can be so cruel when they find out how much you struggle with math... :-[ 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Emmy on January 06, 2013, 07:27:03 AM
What's "selfies"?

My pregnancy related term that I hate: "baby bump".

NOTHING gets my dander up like "baby bump" "preggers" and "preggo".  Where I come from, Prego is pasta sauce.

I'm glad I'm not the only one.  "Preggo" makes me think of pasta sauce too.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Sharnita on January 06, 2013, 07:36:23 AM
As far as "love on" never being used - it is. I tend to hear it in terms of a person or people just pouring on verbal and physical affection. Think of Grandma loving on her  1 yo grandkid.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: TylerBelle on January 06, 2013, 08:01:54 AM
Starts with an "O", ends with a "G" and has an "M" in the middle. And double the pox if an "F" is added.

I agree with not liking "hot mess" and "prolly" for probably. Also I gotta say I don't care much for "no one" put together as "noone." For I'll catch myself reading it as "noon" aka 12pm.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Syfygeek on January 06, 2013, 08:14:48 AM
My most hated phrase is:
The most bang for your buck!

It just makes me see red.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CrochetFanatic on January 06, 2013, 08:18:42 AM
I'd never heard of "fetch", and I couldn't figure out what it meant!  ;D  I'm not sure I see the point of replacing a "true" swear word with a non-offensive word when it's obvious that the word it's replacing is one of the big ones.  Then again, I've probably done something similar once or twice, so I shouldn't talk!

There's "I'm not feeling it", too.  I didn't realize how odd it could sometimes sound until it came out of my mother's mouth. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: RubyCat on January 06, 2013, 08:27:27 AM
I've got a couple that bug me:

"Take it to the next level"

"Artisanal"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: pwy a wyr on January 06, 2013, 08:31:16 AM
What's the significance of like a sunrise? Edited as phone and nursing don't work.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 06, 2013, 10:23:36 AM
Baby Daddy
Baby Mama
Rents (parents)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Thipu1 on January 06, 2013, 10:31:49 AM
Veggies
buggies (for insects)
So fun! (whatever happened to the 'much')

Well, the 'much' seems to have migrated as in 'entitled much?'

Meggings  -- male leggings.  Nobody looks good in the dang things and they don't even look comfortable.



Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: SpottedPony on January 06, 2013, 10:41:08 AM
Reaching out to and going forward and taking whatever to the next level are what I find annoying.

Spotted Pony
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Army Mom on January 06, 2013, 11:14:20 AM
Kick the can

I hate that phrase! Just leave the poor can alone!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 06, 2013, 11:18:54 AM
Kick the can

I hate that phrase! Just leave the poor can alone!

I'm sorry, I don't understand.  I thought kick the can is a children's game where you literally kick a tin can.  Is it also a phase that mean something else too?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CakeBeret on January 06, 2013, 11:45:06 AM
"It is what it is."

My boss uses the phrase to excuse the fact that her business is failing as a direct result of her poor choices, i.e. "Boss, here are the numbers from December and here is the list of bills that are past due." "Well, it is what it is."

Jeggings. The word just irritates me.

Shortened words such as 'rents' for parents or 'za' for pizza.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Thipu1 on January 06, 2013, 12:16:17 PM
Kick the can

I hate that phrase! Just leave the poor can alone!

I'm sorry, I don't understand.  I thought kick the can is a children's game where you literally kick a tin can.  Is it also a phase that mean something else too?

Kicking the can can also mean dying.  Mel Brooks used that visual image in 'Blazing Saddles'. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: scotcat60 on January 06, 2013, 12:26:33 PM
YOLO

I hadn't heard that until now. But every one knows, you only live twice, Mr Bond.
As for kicking the can, apart from being an old children game, there is also the variant of Kicking the bucket.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Chickadee on January 06, 2013, 12:28:47 PM
What's the significance of like a sunrise? Edited as phone and nursing don't work.

I'm curious about this one too.

I don't know if this is really trendy, but I absolutely see red when someone says "Shut yer piehole". It just sounds so gross and vulgar.  >:(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: 123sandy on January 06, 2013, 12:59:57 PM
YOLO

Imma

Fail!

Earworm

Nom, nom, nom

Especially the last one, it makes me want to scream "grow up"!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 06, 2013, 01:07:58 PM


Nom, nom, nom

Especially the last one, it makes me want to scream "grow up"!


And then it became a verb: nomming.



Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 06, 2013, 01:33:15 PM
I'd never heard of "fetch", and I couldn't figure out what it meant!  ;D  I'm not sure I see the point of replacing a "true" swear word with a non-offensive word when it's obvious that the word it's replacing is one of the big ones.  Then again, I've probably done something similar once or twice, so I shouldn't talk!

There's "I'm not feeling it", too.  I didn't realize how odd it could sometimes sound until it came out of my mother's mouth.

To me "clean cussing" sounds just as bad as regular cussing.  Obviously you're going to clean up your language in public and use "replacement words" from time to time, but cursing up like a clean sailor is still ugly.  You don't say the F-word, why is fetch or fick acceptable?  I keep getting after my son because of his "clean cussing" when he's playing his video games because it really is no different in my mind and sounds much the same.  "Language dear!" I keep saying.  "Shoot" doesn't hit my cuss-o-meter the same way, maybe because it blends with "shucks" in my mind. 

I'm glad someone brought up baby daddy, baby momma, and rents...those annoy me too.  I'm really enjoying seeing what people find annoying.  Some of the things that annoy others, I'm totally okay with.  I never use "nom, nom" in a conversation, but funny for captions.  :)  Do people actually use "nom" in a sentence and conversation?  How?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: afbluebelle on January 06, 2013, 01:42:47 PM
  I never use "nom, nom" in a conversation, but funny for captions.  :)  Do people actually use "nom" in a sentence and conversation?  How?

I am guilty of using "nom" in a sentence. Most frequently is the phase, " I'm going to nom you to death!" as I start chewing on one of my coworkers. I also use it as a rating preference when asked about meal opinion (Pizza = 2 noms, Chinese 3 noms, etc)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 06, 2013, 01:43:13 PM
I'd never heard of "fetch", and I couldn't figure out what it meant!  ;D  I'm not sure I see the point of replacing a "true" swear word with a non-offensive word when it's obvious that the word it's replacing is one of the big ones.  Then again, I've probably done something similar once or twice, so I shouldn't talk!

There's "I'm not feeling it", too.  I didn't realize how odd it could sometimes sound until it came out of my mother's mouth.

To me "clean cussing" sounds just as bad as regular cussing.  Obviously you're going to clean up your language in public and use "replacement words" from time to time, but cursing up like a clean sailor is still ugly.  You don't say the F-word, why is fetch or fick acceptable?  I keep getting after my son because of his "clean cussing" when he's playing his video games because it really is no different in my mind and sounds much the same.  "Language dear!" I keep saying.  "Shoot" doesn't hit my cuss-o-meter the same way, maybe because it blends with "shucks" in my mind. 

I'm glad someone brought up baby daddy, baby momma, and rents...those annoy me too.  I'm really enjoying seeing what people find annoying.  Some of the things that annoy others, I'm totally okay with.  I never use "nom, nom" in a conversation, but funny for captions.  :)  Do people actually use "nom" in a sentence and conversation?  How?


"I'm going to nom on those doughnuts."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Sharnita on January 06, 2013, 01:58:18 PM
FWIW, I went to a parochial school where we would get in trouble for using shoot, heck, darn. I don't remember anybody being bad enough to try even a clean version of the "f word". I don't think I knew it existed until I was at least 14 or 15 since I hadn't heard my parents or any of the adults they socialized with ever use it. I probably heard it from a kid at school but most of my friends had parents simikar to mine.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 06, 2013, 02:22:48 PM
I hate the shortened versions of proper words

nite/night
lite/light
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on January 06, 2013, 02:38:49 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMWi7CLoZ2Q


I say "nom" and I blame it on this video.  :-[ ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 06, 2013, 02:43:18 PM
Reaching out to and going forward and taking whatever to the next level are what I find annoying.

Spotted Pony

Oh, this! I'm following up by reaching out and right-sizing and optimizing our best practices...ugh! Whenever I hear "corporate jargon," my antenna goes up and I wonder what's being obfuscated.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Army Mom on January 06, 2013, 03:31:00 PM
Kick the can

I hate that phrase! Just leave the poor can alone!

I'm sorry, I don't understand.  I thought kick the can is a children's game where you literally kick a tin can.  Is it also a phase that mean something else too?

Kicking the can can also mean dying.  Mel Brooks used that visual image in 'Blazing Saddles'.

Sorry I should have explained! In US politics, this phrase keeps popping up. Each side accuses the other of "kicking the can down the road" as in a temporary fix that puts off the perceived real problem. It makes me think of that video with the guy crying about Britney Spears "leave her alone!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 06, 2013, 04:03:43 PM
Reaching out to and going forward and taking whatever to the next level are what I find annoying.

Spotted Pony

Oh, this! I'm following up by reaching out and right-sizing and optimizing our best practices...ugh! Whenever I hear "corporate jargon," my antenna goes up and I wonder what's being obfuscated.

Corporate jargon, when I hear "team" or "team player", I get a little nervous.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Julian on January 06, 2013, 05:58:35 PM
What's the significance of like a sunrise? Edited as phone and nursing don't work.

I'm presuming it's from this series of ads for a car insurer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85ubtVs5n6A (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85ubtVs5n6A)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Thipu1 on January 06, 2013, 06:22:50 PM
I don't mind the occasional 'nom'. To me, it means that something is so delicious you want to rub it in your hair. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CharlieBraun on January 06, 2013, 07:27:46 PM
"At the end of the day" especially in corporate speak.

Someone please fill me in on "like a sunrise?"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: sweet_basil on January 06, 2013, 08:41:02 PM
I really hate seeing false words like penii and fetii. Penis is not penii because only words that end in -us (singular) can end in -ii. (plural) Fetii is NOT correct because fetus is derived from Latin's fourth declension stating that in plural form fetus would remain the same, but produced differently.

Stop mangling Latin!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 06, 2013, 09:59:50 PM
I really hate seeing false words like penii and fetii. Penis is not penii because only words that end in -us (singular) can end in -ii. (plural) Fetii is NOT correct because fetus is derived from Latin's fourth declension stating that in plural form fetus would remain the same, but produced differently.

Stop mangling Latin!

That goes for octopus and cactus, too.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Julia Mercer on January 06, 2013, 10:13:38 PM
I've posted this before: Shut the front door.

I second that one, especially in that stupid A&W commercial!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 06, 2013, 10:19:58 PM
Another person here asking about the sunrise thing. Can someone explain?

And I agree with Sharnita - "loving on" is very much a saying.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 06, 2013, 11:02:22 PM
Blending two posts:

Quote
I really hate seeing false words like penii and fetii. Penis is not penii because only words that end in -us (singular) can end in -ii. (plural) Fetii is NOT correct because fetus is derived from Latin's fourth declension stating that in plural form fetus would remain the same, but produced differently.

That goes for octopus and cactus, too.

It's penes, fetishes, ocotopodes, and cacti, correct?  I can see the easy slip to peni or octopi, but 'eeds' and 'eens' aren't a part of the average daily language for plurals and are easily missed.  I think "unproper plurals" (penises or octopuses) are becoming more widely accepted, no one speaks Latin.  "Cactuses" can annoy me, living amongst the prickly beasts all my life...it's cacti.  I'm kind of scratching my head how fetish becomes fetii.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: WolfWay on January 07, 2013, 01:00:33 AM
Blending two posts:

Quote
I really hate seeing false words like penii and fetii. Penis is not penii because only words that end in -us (singular) can end in -ii. (plural) Fetii is NOT correct because fetus is derived from Latin's fourth declension stating that in plural form fetus would remain the same, but produced differently.

That goes for octopus and cactus, too.

It's penes, fetishes, ocotopodes, and cacti, correct?  I can see the easy slip to peni or octopi, but 'eeds' and 'eens' aren't a part of the average daily language for plurals and are easily missed.  I think "unproper plurals" (penises or octopuses) are becoming more widely accepted, no one speaks Latin.  "Cactuses" can annoy me, living amongst the prickly beasts all my life...it's cacti.  I'm kind of scratching my head how fetish becomes fetii.

People are using fetii as a plural for fetus, not fetish.  :)

The plural of fetus is fetuses according to wiki.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fetus_%28biology%29#Etymology_and_spelling_variations

Fetishes is a plural of fetish which is an entirely different word.


Plural of octopus can be one of several forms (octopuses and octopodes both being acceptable), but the most commonly used one is octopuses.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octopus#Etymology_and_pluralization
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: WolfWay on January 07, 2013, 01:13:04 AM
TLDR annoys the heck out of me (unless it's used by the original writer themselves as a summary line for lazy readers, which can often be used to humourous effect).

YOLO makes a little muscle under my eye twitch in irritation. A friend of mine ended up sitting next to an annoying group of people in a park who had a kitten with them they'd named "Yolo the adventure cat". <sigh>
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: WolfWay on January 07, 2013, 01:16:02 AM
Another person here asking about the sunrise thing. Can someone explain?

Googling the phrase seems to give an impression of an insurance advert that uses it as a catch phrase(?). I'm unclear on exact tone and usage since I can't watch videos on my pc.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 07, 2013, 01:35:20 AM

People are using fetii as a plural for fetus, not fetish.  :)

The plural of fetus is fetuses according to wiki.


LOL, I really mis-read and went in a completely different direction on that one! 

How is fetuses or feti a trendy word?  I have never heard amazeballs or meggings either.  Just wondering.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: twiggy on January 07, 2013, 01:39:52 AM
Oh Em Gee
 I have a friend who will type the letters out phonetically (is that the right word?) on FB/texts, and I know people who actually say it in real, live conversations.

Also, all versions of LOL either typed or spoken:
Lol
Lawl
Lawlz
Lolz
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: nuit93 on January 07, 2013, 01:42:23 AM
"shiny" used in place of "cool" or "okay".

Look, I miss Firefly too, but come on!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: starry diadem on January 07, 2013, 01:50:50 AM
S.A.N.D.W.I.C.H.   Sandwich.  It always has been sandwich, ever since the Earl Of got peckish while at the gaming table but was on too great a winning streak to get up, and got all "Minion, slap a piece of that ham between two pieces of bread and bring it to me, and Lud! I've invented something new in the gourmet dining line!"  instead.

Sandwich.  Sand-wich.   Sandwich.

Not 'sammich'.  Never has it been 'sammich'.  Never should it be 'sammich'.  That's an awful word. It's childish.  It's on a par with those coy nitwits who don't relieve themselves, but who 'go potty' instead.  It.  Is.  STUPID.

You'll have gathered that I don't like that one!  ;)

Oh and 'furbaby'  is so cutesy and sickening that it almost brings me out in hives.  I don't have a furbaby.  I have a dog.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: WolfWay on January 07, 2013, 02:03:37 AM

Oh and 'furbaby'  is so cutesy and sickening that it almost brings me out in hives.  I don't have a furbaby.  I have a dog.
Friend of mine has parents who have finally got used to the idea that she isn't going to give them grandkids. So now they call her cats their "grandkittens".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on January 07, 2013, 02:36:23 AM

Oh and 'furbaby'  is so cutesy and sickening that it almost brings me out in hives.  I don't have a furbaby.  I have a dog.
Friend of mine has parents who have finally got used to the idea that she isn't going to give them grandkids. So now they call her cats their "grandkittens".

I don't object to it because it's cutesy, because hey, whatever floats your boat. It just annoys me because dogs (in particular) are noble animals who have lived alongside humankind and helped us and hunted with us and protected us for centuries and I hate to hear them reduced to the level of dolls. I have a similar reaction when DD1 talks to our dog in baby talk.

Though I suppose assisting people who feel as though they are missing some essential companionship in their lives may just be yet another step in the relationship between humans and dogs and maybe I just need to get over myself. *sigh*
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 07, 2013, 03:45:07 AM
I have always loathed "kick to the curb", myself.

And while I agree vayjayjay sounds stupid, it belittles women about as much as willie, Mr Happy, or winky do for men.  I just hate it because it's a silly pet name.

Also, "pimp" when used in a positive manner.  Pimps are reprehensible parasites, not worldly men about town.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CrochetFanatic on January 07, 2013, 03:46:22 AM
I say "sammich" sometimes if I'm in a silly mood, but that's just around my family.  I also use emoticons or type "LOL" to add some context to what I'm saying in IM chats, because nuances of tone don't translate very well and misunderstandings can occur.

My mom will sometimes say "pooter" instead of "computer", and it drives me crazy.  That term could easily be used for one's backside because...well...yeah.  Plus, she's old enough (IE not a toddler) to pronounce it correctly.  It's sort of a family joke; she does it to get on my nerves, it does, I correct her, and we go back and forth with it until one of us gets tired of it.  Yeah...we're mature.  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on January 07, 2013, 06:38:57 AM
YOLO makes a little muscle under my eye twitch in irritation. A friend of mine ended up sitting next to an annoying group of people in a park who had a kitten with them they'd named "Yolo the adventure cat". <sigh>

Shouldn't they have named it "Yolnt"...?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Gyburc on January 07, 2013, 06:41:42 AM
Here in the UK, a couple of years ago, someone invented the term 'yummy mummy', referring to an attractive woman with children. It drives me up the wall, for no real reason. I think it's just the childishness of the term.

Also, reporters on the BBC have taken to referring to 'mums' rather than 'mothers' in serious news broadcasts. Since when did the word 'mother' become too complicated to use??
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on January 07, 2013, 06:49:50 AM
Agreeing with all the foregoing except for "furbaby" because I am my cats' mum.

The E-Hell "pod."  Sorry, folks; the original word makes me think of Invasion of the Body Snatchers and doesn't make sense even with the explanation.

Let me also add "Oh, snap!"  I'm not sure what it means, but it sounds so bratty.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: scotcat60 on January 07, 2013, 07:00:07 AM
"Butter soft leather" used by fashion writers.

Butter is not soft when you buy it in the shops out of the cool cabinets. It's only soft if you leave it out of the fridge, but in hot weather, it goes runny, and rancid.

As for sammich, we have butties and sarnies in the UK, as well as sandwiches. There was a sandwich bar in North London called Sam Widges.
And no one is an actress or a heroine these days. Even a well known freezer store had a campaign referring to Mums as heroes.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: starry diadem on January 07, 2013, 07:03:35 AM
As for sammich, we have butties and sarnies in the UK, as well as sandwiches. There was a sandwich bar in North London called Sam Widges.

UK here, too.  Oddly, I can live with a 'butty' as long as it has bacon associated with it, but I hate 'sarnie' as much as I hate sammich.  Isn't it strange how some words just trip our triggers?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Geekychick1984 on January 07, 2013, 07:13:42 AM
I think it's already been mentioned, but I really hate "it is what it is."  It's just a reduntantly pointless saying, and I hate it.  It should be "that's the way it is."

Also, anything that dumbs down the English language or tries to be cutesy (i.e., cray-cray, vajayjay, etc.).  I think I pretty much hate internet speak/text speak.  I do some proofreading at my company, and for some of the younger employees, I'm starting to see this in some of the reports. :(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 07, 2013, 08:41:13 AM
YOLO makes a little muscle under my eye twitch in irritation. A friend of mine ended up sitting next to an annoying group of people in a park who had a kitten with them they'd named "Yolo the adventure cat". <sigh>

Shouldn't they have named it "Yolnt"...?

I thought the same thing!  ;D ;D ;D

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: snowflake on January 07, 2013, 10:00:40 AM
As much as lingo drives me up the wall, I have to admit that I lived in the 80s and said all kinds of horrible phrases so I can't really blame kids these days.

Though when someone my age (30+) uses some new phrase and tries to pretend that it makes them cute, hip and young
 it makes me want to smack them into adulthood.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 07, 2013, 11:19:03 AM
As much as lingo drives me up the wall, I have to admit that I lived in the 80s and said all kinds of horrible phrases so I can't really blame kids these days.

Ah, the 80's.  We all used Valley Girl accents and phases even if we lived in the midwest.  It's a wonder our parents and teachers didn't smack us (though I'm sure they, like, you know, totally wanted to).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 07, 2013, 11:21:52 AM
As much as lingo drives me up the wall, I have to admit that I lived in the 80s and said all kinds of horrible phrases so I can't really blame kids these days.

Ah, the 80's.  We all used Valley Girl accents and phases even if we lived in the midwest.  It's a wonder our parents and teachers didn't smack us (though I'm sure they, like, you know, totally wanted to).

Pssh!  As if!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 07, 2013, 11:22:33 AM
As much as lingo drives me up the wall, I have to admit that I lived in the 80s and said all kinds of horrible phrases so I can't really blame kids these days.

Ah, the 80's.  We all used Valley Girl accents and phases even if we lived in the midwest.  It's a wonder our parents and teachers didn't smack us (though I'm sure they, like, you know, totally wanted to).

Pssh!  As if!

Like, gag me with a spoon!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: whiskeytangofoxtrot on January 07, 2013, 11:46:06 AM
"Awesome!", probably the most overused word in the english language, IMO, and usually applied to things that are far less than that. The miracle of life, the vastness of the universe, or the devastating power of a Category 5 hurricane, for example- tose are things that are truly awesome. But if the fact that I agreed to a simple request, or that I ordered a burger from someone's restaurant menu is sufficient to fill a person with a sense of awe and wonder, they are very easily impressed!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Morticia on January 07, 2013, 11:55:03 AM

Also, "pimp" when used in a positive manner.  Pimps are reprehensible parasites, not worldly men about town.

Pet peeve of all time.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 07, 2013, 12:02:58 PM

Also, "pimp" when used in a positive manner.  Pimps are reprehensible parasites, not worldly men about town.

Pet peeve of all time.

And "bling."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Julia Mercer on January 07, 2013, 12:07:48 PM
Not finishing a sentence ending in with, for example,  "We wanted to come with".......him, her, them, finish your dingdangity sentence people!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Klein Bottle on January 07, 2013, 12:12:49 PM
"Awesome!", probably the most overused word in the english language, IMO, and usually applied to things that are far less than that. The miracle of life, the vastness of the universe, or the devastating power of a Category 5 hurricane, for example- tose are things that are truly awesome. But if the fact that I agreed to a simple request, or that I ordered a burger from someone's restaurant menu is sufficient to fill a person with a sense of awe and wonder, they are very easily impressed!

Not quite as annoying as its counterpart, "Amaaaayyyyzzzzing!" So, so tired of hearing that word.  Not everything can be amazing, and not everything that is amazing, is amazing in a nice way. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CharlieBraun on January 07, 2013, 12:14:34 PM
S.A.N.D.W.I.C.H.   Sandwich.  It always has been sandwich, ever since the Earl Of got peckish while at the gaming table but was on too great a winning streak to get up, and got all "Minion, slap a piece of that ham between two pieces of bread and bring it to me, and Lud! I've invented something new in the gourmet dining line!"  instead.

Sandwich.  Sand-wich.   Sandwich.

Not 'sammich'.  Never has it been 'sammich'.  Never should it be 'sammich'.  That's an awful word. It's childish.  It's on a par with those coy nitwits who don't relieve themselves, but who 'go potty' instead.  It.  Is.  STUPID.

You'll have gathered that I don't like that one!  ;)

POD with a capital on every letter.  It's twee, it's over-precious, and it's over-done.  If you can't open your mouth wide enough to complete the word, then perhaps the object cannot enter either.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 07, 2013, 12:15:05 PM
Not finishing a sentence ending in with, for example,  "We wanted to come with".......him, her, them, finish your dingdangity sentence people!


Or common around here: "Where are you at?"


(Although I'm not sure that's trendy.)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: violinp on January 07, 2013, 12:22:45 PM
S.A.N.D.W.I.C.H.   Sandwich.  It always has been sandwich, ever since the Earl Of got peckish while at the gaming table but was on too great a winning streak to get up, and got all "Minion, slap a piece of that ham between two pieces of bread and bring it to me, and Lud! I've invented something new in the gourmet dining line!"  instead.

Sandwich.  Sand-wich.   Sandwich.

Not 'sammich'.  Never has it been 'sammich'.  Never should it be 'sammich'.  That's an awful word. It's childish.  It's on a par with those coy nitwits who don't relieve themselves, but who 'go potty' instead.  It.  Is.  STUPID.

You'll have gathered that I don't like that one!  ;)

POD with a capital on every letter.  It's twee, it's over-precious, and it's over-done.  If you can't open your mouth wide enough to complete the word, then perhaps the object cannot enter either.

Sammy as an alternative is also incredibly annoying.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 07, 2013, 12:23:20 PM
Not finishing a sentence ending in with, for example,  "We wanted to come with".......him, her, them, finish your dingdangity sentence people!

Ending a sentence with "so."  I was out of toilet paper and went to the store to get some more, so..."  Er, so what?  What?  Is there more you want to say?   :D

Would this constitute as a trendy expression?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 07, 2013, 12:25:47 PM
Not finishing a sentence ending in with, for example,  "We wanted to come with".......him, her, them, finish your dingdangity sentence people!

Ending a sentence with "so."  I was out of toilet paper and went to the store to get some more, so..."  Er, so what?  What?  Is there more you want to say?   :D

Would this constitute as a trendy expression?

Yes, I think it would.  I always ask, "...so what?"  (Not in "So what?  I walked on the moon!").  Eagle has stopped ending things with "so"; I consider it a success.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 07, 2013, 12:26:41 PM
"Awesome!", probably the most overused word in the english language, IMO, and usually applied to things that are far less than that. The miracle of life, the vastness of the universe, or the devastating power of a Category 5 hurricane, for example- tose are things that are truly awesome. But if the fact that I agreed to a simple request, or that I ordered a burger from someone's restaurant menu is sufficient to fill a person with a sense of awe and wonder, they are very easily impressed!

It doesn't mean what it used to.  It did used to mean awe inspiring, now it just means something pretty positive.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabyMama on January 07, 2013, 01:14:50 PM
Baby Daddy
Baby Mama
Rents (parents)

:::cries::: Ha, no not really. I put about 5 seconds into thinking of screen names and a commercial for Tina Fey's movie was on when I was changing this one. (I realized my old one, combined with the picture, was too personal for anonymity.)

Thanks to whoever explained TL;DR! I added it because yes, I find it supremely rude when people post it in response to others. Why even respond then?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabyMama on January 07, 2013, 01:16:58 PM
Also, nine pages in and nobody has brought "ermagherd" into the converation?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: violinp on January 07, 2013, 01:17:37 PM
Baby Daddy
Baby Mama
Rents (parents)

To be fair, Cabbage and I sometimes (to each other) call our parents "the rental units," but that's a joke.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Emmy on January 07, 2013, 01:19:11 PM
Baby Daddy
Baby Mama
Rents (parents)

To be fair, Cabbage and I sometimes (to each other) call our parents "the rental units," but that's a joke.

DH and I will often shorten words, but we usually do that only when talking with each other.  We say rental units too.

I dislike furbaby as well.  It gives me the mental image of a human baby covered in fur. 

I also think not completing sentences is annoying.  I have a friend who would often write similar to this: "If I don't see you Tuesday, I'll see you...." or "We could go catch a movie or......"

What is YOLO supposed to mean anyway?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 07, 2013, 01:21:57 PM
Also, nine pages in and nobody has brought "ermagherd" into the converation?


Ugh! That one is really bad because it purports to make fun of someone with a speech impediment.




Some years ago, there was a very annoying trend on message board.  It consisted in adding a question mark after the subject of a sentence.


"You? Are an idiot."  "This recipe? Rocks."


Once in a while it would have been alright, but it got to be a meme and it was irritating.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on January 07, 2013, 01:29:05 PM
Almost all of the above (I'm the fussy type), plus:

"We're pregnant," used by couples to announce a pregnancy. Pretty sure only one of you is pregnant unless there have been recent advances in medical science that I've overlooked.

The overuse and misuse of the word "insane."
Example 1: "These cookies have an insane amount of nuts in them."
Example 2: An annoying commercial for I don't recall what in which a harried mother exclaims, "Mornings around here aren't just crazy, they're insane!!"

Corporate-speak. All of it.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CakeBeret on January 07, 2013, 01:32:13 PM
How could I have forgotten? I have a friend who thinks the "ehrmahgerd" is so hilarious, and uses that manner of speaking with other words/phrases as well. "Ehrmahgerd, it's mah behrthday!" It makes me think violent thoughts. :P
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on January 07, 2013, 01:33:15 PM
Some years ago, there was a very annoying trend on message board.  It consisted in adding a question mark after the subject of a sentence.

"You? Are an idiot."  "This recipe? Rocks."

That reminds me of another one: "Rock" used as a verb.

Oh - and one more: the increasing tendency of people to mash what should be two words into one. "Rockstar," "highschool," and "nevermind" are examples.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on January 07, 2013, 01:35:04 PM
What is YOLO supposed to mean anyway?

You Only Live Once. But I prefer http://www.alifelessordinary.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/yolo.jpg (http://www.alifelessordinary.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/yolo.jpg).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Shoo on January 07, 2013, 01:42:52 PM
Like a BOSS.

I wonder how that one came about.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: snowflake on January 07, 2013, 01:58:44 PM
What is YOLO supposed to mean anyway?

You Only Live Once. But I prefer http://www.alifelessordinary.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/yolo.jpg (http://www.alifelessordinary.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/yolo.jpg).

This is an extension of the whole "Carpe Diem" thing that went around after Dead Poets Society came out.  I am OK with the sentiment but got annoyed that it was jump started by a movie where some kid realized that to live his dream he had to get off the gravy train and ended it.  Well, glad you seized THAT day.  I'm all for going for opportunity,  but to this day the phrase "Carpe Diem" sets my teeth on edge.

YOLO annoys me because it's said by too many people who are justifying stupid decisions as if "who cares, we might die."  Yes, but you're statistically much more likely to live and make the rest of us listen to you whine as you live with the consequences.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: LibraryLady on January 07, 2013, 02:55:07 PM
Haven't read through them all, but I detest 'baby daddy'
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: violinp on January 07, 2013, 03:00:13 PM
Like a BOSS.

I wonder how that one came about.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but that probably originally referred to being as "cool" a Mafia boss.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Slartibartfast on January 07, 2013, 03:02:51 PM
I can't extricate "sammich" from the whole "make me a sammich, woman!" thing which pervades videogames (specifically voice chat on things like Xbox live) - the sexism makes my blood boil.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Cat-Fu on January 07, 2013, 03:06:04 PM
Oh, I nearly forgot "swag."

I wish I had forgotten it.

Like a boss rose to popularity due to the "Like a Boss" song from SNL by Andy Sandberg/Lonely Island. (It existed as a phrase before that, it was just not quite as entertaining.)

As an warning, the song is totally inappropriate :P
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jedikaiti on January 07, 2013, 03:14:49 PM
Amazeballs
Totes amazeballs

On the other hand, I doubt I will ever get sick of adding 'like a sunrise' to every sentence!

I'm sorry but I am, I refuse to take part in that.
That woman is despicable.  :(

"like a sunrise"? who?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 07, 2013, 03:44:00 PM
Apparently it's some woman named Rhonda.  I still don't get it, but that's all I'm able to find about this "sunrise" thing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HW_kKUWlslo

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: nuit93 on January 07, 2013, 03:51:29 PM
How could I have forgotten? I have a friend who thinks the "ehrmahgerd" is so hilarious, and uses that manner of speaking with other words/phrases as well. "Ehrmahgerd, it's mah behrthday!" It makes me think violent thoughts. :P

A restaurant near my b/f's had a sign up for their breakfast special: "Ermagerd, perncerks!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Amava on January 07, 2013, 03:52:46 PM
How could I have forgotten? I have a friend who thinks the "ehrmahgerd" is so hilarious, and uses that manner of speaking with other words/phrases as well. "Ehrmahgerd, it's mah behrthday!" It makes me think violent thoughts. :P

A restaurant near my b/f's had a sign up for their breakfast special: "Ermagerd, perncerks!"

Pics or it didn't happen! ;)

Just kidding, add "Pics or it didn't happen" to the list, too.  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: nuit93 on January 07, 2013, 03:54:45 PM
How could I have forgotten? I have a friend who thinks the "ehrmahgerd" is so hilarious, and uses that manner of speaking with other words/phrases as well. "Ehrmahgerd, it's mah behrthday!" It makes me think violent thoughts. :P

A restaurant near my b/f's had a sign up for their breakfast special: "Ermagerd, perncerks!"

Pics or it didn't happen! ;)

Just kidding, add "Pics or it didn't happen" to the list, too.  ;D

I wish I had taken a photo, unfortunately I forgot...it was a few months ago.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: kckgirl on January 07, 2013, 04:22:46 PM
I also don't like to see "walkies" in place of sandwich.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: kckgirl on January 07, 2013, 04:24:55 PM
I didn't type walkies. I typed sammies for sanswich. Stupid tablet wouldn't let me edit!!!


Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CrochetFanatic on January 07, 2013, 04:44:43 PM
Someone mention "swag", and that reminded me of someone I know who uses (overuses, really) the word "swagtastic".  I was thinking, "Okay, I know the 'tastic' part came from the word 'fantastic', but now I have to look up 'swag' to make sure this isn't an insult..."

Nope, it isn't.  It just sounds strange to me.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on January 07, 2013, 05:00:33 PM
As much as lingo drives me up the wall, I have to admit that I lived in the 80s and said all kinds of horrible phrases so I can't really blame kids these days.

Though when someone my age (30+) uses some new phrase and tries to pretend that it makes them cute, hip and young
 it makes me want to smack them into adulthood.

*sheepishly raises hand* I do have a tendency to adopt new phrases, but I swear it is just a side effect of loving to mess with language plus the fact that I spend about 4 hours a day talking to teenagers. The latter reason is also why I hate YOLO so much. It's like someone took all the stupidity* that is inherent in youth and distilled it into four letters.

I promise I don't think it makes me look cool though. I'm just quietly enjoying myself.

*I would like to emphatically state that young=/= stupid. I am referring to that lack of understanding of consequences that many otherwise lovely and intelligent teenagers suffer from.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Sharnita on January 07, 2013, 05:45:06 PM
Even worse, amahhhzing
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CharlieBraun on January 07, 2013, 06:39:29 PM
A restaurant near my b/f's had a sign up for their breakfast special: "Ermagerd, perncerks!"

See, I think this is from a Kristin Wiig character from Saturday Night Live - the Target Lady.  Someone upthread was thinking it was making fun of an unavoidable speech situation, but I'm thinking it's the Target Lady.

Still and all....so, so annoying.  It's funny the first 100 times...maybe.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 07, 2013, 06:41:44 PM
CharlieBraun, it comes from here: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/ermahgerd

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CharlieBraun on January 07, 2013, 07:01:01 PM
That's interesting Dotty.  When I saw it spelled, I heard (in my head) this:

http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/target-lady/1379125/
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yankee-Belle on January 07, 2013, 07:05:13 PM
A few that drive me up the wall is when I say thank you, I receive these responses:

"no worries"
"no problem"
"it's all good"

What happened to you're welcome?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jedikaiti on January 07, 2013, 07:14:03 PM
Someone mention "swag", and that reminded me of someone I know who uses (overuses, really) the word "swagtastic".  I was thinking, "Okay, I know the 'tastic' part came from the word 'fantastic', but now I have to look up 'swag' to make sure this isn't an insult..."

Nope, it isn't.  It just sounds strange to me.

OK, I am lost. "Swag" to me means 2 things - either the trash & trinkets you get for free, typically at a convention, or SWAG = Scientific Wild-A**ed Guess
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 07, 2013, 07:17:44 PM
CharlieBraun, that's not where the word came from but I do have to say that that clip is, ummmm, disturbing.  Yikes!

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 07, 2013, 07:18:45 PM
A few that drive me up the wall is when I say thank you, I receive these responses:

"no worries"
"no problem"
"it's all good"

What happened to you're welcome?

A response meaning, essentially, "It's no trouble at all," is actually pretty common around the world. In Spanish, for example, you might say "de nada" which means essentially "it's nothing." They're not meaning to insult or annoy you, they're telling you they're happy to do a nice thing for you and that you're not putting them out at all.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on January 07, 2013, 07:58:47 PM
A few that drive me up the wall is when I say thank you, I receive these responses:

"no worries"
"no problem"
"it's all good"

What happened to you're welcome?

A response meaning, essentially, "It's no trouble at all," is actually pretty common around the world. In Spanish, for example, you might say "de nada" which means essentially "it's nothing." They're not meaning to insult or annoy you, they're telling you they're happy to do a nice thing for you and that you're not putting them out at all.

Some people whom I knew, very long ago, adventurously went on holiday to what was then Czechoslovakia. They tried to master a few basic phrases in the local language, including “thank you very much”; which I gather is something like (anglicised), “motskrat dyekuyi”. Being fairly averagely-silly late-teenagers, they were tickled by this phrase, which they morphed into “muskrat thank-you”. From which they developed a joke by which every time one of the party did something thank-worthy for another, the “thanker” said “muskrat thank-you”; to which the “thankee” had to make a reply involving a North American fauna specimen, and a variation on a gracious response to “thank you” – both, different every time.

Such as – timber wolf you’re welcome
                bison that’s quite OK
                skunk my pleasure
                bear not at all
                cougar no problem
                musk-ox the pleasure is mine
                bald eagle no worries
                raccoon likewise
                opossum no trouble
                beaver that’s fine
                wolverine glad to help
                roadrunner it’s good
                caribou happy to be of service
                coyote that’s all right
                mountain lion not in the least
                cardinal prosim (getting desperate – Czech for “please” – acceptable local 
                “thanks-response”)

The party being all Brits with a less-than-encyclopedic knowledge of North American fauna, both repertoires were run out of before long; but I understand that it was fun while it lasted.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 07, 2013, 08:55:24 PM
"Awesome!", probably the most overused word in the english language, IMO, and usually applied to things that are far less than that. The miracle of life, the vastness of the universe, or the devastating power of a Category 5 hurricane, for example- tose are things that are truly awesome. But if the fact that I agreed to a simple request, or that I ordered a burger from someone's restaurant menu is sufficient to fill a person with a sense of awe and wonder, they are very easily impressed!

That reminds me of a Bill Engvall routine where he talks about people overusing "awesome"

People, usually teen girls, squealing "OH EM GEEEEEEEEEE!" is like nails on a chalkboard to me.  Abbreviations are for when you want to save space and have a character limit. Just say "Oh My Gosh!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CakeEater on January 07, 2013, 09:43:54 PM
Apparently it's some woman named Rhonda.  I still don't get it, but that's all I'm able to find about this "sunrise" thing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HW_kKUWlslo

There's a series of ads for an insurance comapny in Australia - this is one of them.

The drinks server in Bali tells Rhonda, who's a pretty average-looking woman, moreso since she has the glasses tan, that she looks hot today - like a sunrise.

It's just kind of an odd ending to the sentence, and it's become a bit of a phrase here.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 07, 2013, 09:48:39 PM
I abhor what CRUD MONKEYS! stands for, and I wish the abbreviation and the expanded version would disappear. It's offensive to me, and I hate that it's become so mainstream.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CrochetFanatic on January 07, 2013, 11:51:19 PM
Someone mention "swag", and that reminded me of someone I know who uses (overuses, really) the word "swagtastic".  I was thinking, "Okay, I know the 'tastic' part came from the word 'fantastic', but now I have to look up 'swag' to make sure this isn't an insult..."

Nope, it isn't.  It just sounds strange to me.

OK, I am lost. "Swag" to me means 2 things - either the trash & trinkets you get for free, typically at a convention, or SWAG = Scientific Wild-A**ed Guess

Copied straight from the Urban Dictionary: "swagtastic is when you have amazing game (swag,swagger)
Swagtastic derives from the words swagger+fantastic, so literally swagtastic means having fantastic swagger." 

I was lost too, which is why I was wondering if I'd been insulted when someone online called me "swagtastic".  I was thinking, "Um...thanks?  ???"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: wendelenn on January 07, 2013, 11:54:51 PM
Here in the UK, a couple of years ago, someone invented the term 'yummy mummy', referring to an attractive woman with children. It drives me up the wall, for no real reason. I think it's just the childishness of the term.


That's bad, but not quite as bad as one of my peeves: MILF (Mom I'd like to eff)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on January 08, 2013, 12:06:27 AM
Here in the UK, a couple of years ago, someone invented the term 'yummy mummy', referring to an attractive woman with children. It drives me up the wall, for no real reason. I think it's just the childishness of the term.


That's bad, but not quite as bad as one of my peeves: MILF (Mom I'd like to eff)

Is THAT what that stands for??!!?? Ew. That's all I can say. Ew.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: fishy on January 08, 2013, 12:13:25 AM
Apparently it's some woman named Rhonda.  I still don't get it, but that's all I'm able to find about this "sunrise" thing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HW_kKUWlslo

There's a series of ads for an insurance comapny in Australia - this is one of them.

The drinks server in Bali tells Rhonda, who's a pretty average-looking woman, moreso since she has the glasses tan, that she looks hot today - like a sunrise.

It's just kind of an odd ending to the sentence, and it's become a bit of a phrase here.

Yep - the ads are pretty well known and 'like a sunrise' is quoted quite a bit. I like them and find them funny. A previous poster thinks that Rhonda is despicable, just wondering if you could explain why?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: kckgirl on January 08, 2013, 04:58:49 AM
I abhor what CRUD MONKEYS! stands for, and I wish the abbreviation and the expanded version would disappear. It's offensive to me, and I hate that it's become so mainstream.

And I have no idea what CRUD MONKEYS! stands for...but I'm ok with that.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Geekychick1984 on January 08, 2013, 05:29:02 AM
Just thought of another one that bothers me, usually said by young ladies (or teenagers): "I know, right".  Usually you compliment them on something, such as "that's a nice color on you", and you get back "I know, right!". 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Amava on January 08, 2013, 05:48:11 AM
Just thought of another one that bothers me, usually said by young ladies (or teenagers): "I know, right".  Usually you compliment them on something, such as "that's a nice color on you", and you get back "I know, right!".

Haha, well I very much prefer that to people who diffuse and minimize every compliment, no matter how small, you give them!
"That's a lovely dress!"
"Oh, this old thing?"

Of course, "thank you" is the best (and most polite) response to a compliment. But I will take the "I know, right!" agreement over self-depreciation any day!  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on January 08, 2013, 06:01:37 AM
Here in the UK, a couple of years ago, someone invented the term 'yummy mummy', referring to an attractive woman with children. It drives me up the wall, for no real reason. I think it's just the childishness of the term.


That's bad, but not quite as bad as one of my peeves: MILF (Mom I'd like to eff)

I learned that one from Law & Order SVU.  And I agree that it's gross.

Is THAT what that stands for??!!?? Ew. That's all I can say. Ew.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Verloona Ti on January 08, 2013, 07:28:21 AM
I abhor what CRUD MONKEYS! stands for, and I wish the abbreviation and the expanded version would disappear. It's offensive to me, and I hate that it's become so mainstream.

I.Had.No.Clue.

I honestly thought-in my sheltered innocence-that CM was just a cute phrase, like "Leapin' lizards!" or "Good grief!" or  "Great Caesar's Ghost!" or-SOMETHING,  just  a cute , inoffensive way of saying how shocked or startled one is.

I had no idea...So I googled, and now my innocence is shattered.
Thanks. I think...
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 08, 2013, 07:56:22 AM
Apparently it's some woman named Rhonda.  I still don't get it, but that's all I'm able to find about this "sunrise" thing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HW_kKUWlslo

There's a series of ads for an insurance comapny in Australia - this is one of them.

The drinks server in Bali tells Rhonda, who's a pretty average-looking woman, moreso since she has the glasses tan, that she looks hot today - like a sunrise.

It's just kind of an odd ending to the sentence, and it's become a bit of a phrase here.

Ah, so it's an annoying commercial like Flo from Progressive over here.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 08, 2013, 07:58:34 AM
I abhor what CRUD MONKEYS! stands for, and I wish the abbreviation and the expanded version would disappear. It's offensive to me, and I hate that it's become so mainstream.

I.Had.No.Clue.

I honestly thought-in my sheltered innocence-that CM was just a cute phrase, like "Leapin' lizards!" or "Good grief!" or  "Great Caesar's Ghost!" or-SOMETHING,  just  a cute , inoffensive way of saying how shocked or startled one is.

I had no idea...So I googled, and now my innocence is shattered.
Thanks. I think...

I think DottyG meant Oh Em Gee and Crud Monkeys is just the filter taking over.  I don't seriously think E-Hell uses it for what the UrbanDictionary says it is.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: RingTailedLemur on January 08, 2013, 08:33:59 AM
I abhor what CRUD MONKEYS! stands for, and I wish the abbreviation and the expanded version would disappear. It's offensive to me, and I hate that it's become so mainstream.

I.Had.No.Clue.

I honestly thought-in my sheltered innocence-that CM was just a cute phrase, like "Leapin' lizards!" or "Good grief!" or  "Great Caesar's Ghost!" or-SOMETHING,  just  a cute , inoffensive way of saying how shocked or startled one is.

I had no idea...So I googled, and now my innocence is shattered.
Thanks. I think...

I think DottyG meant Oh Em Gee and Crud Monkeys is just the filter taking over.  I don't seriously think E-Hell uses it for what the UrbanDictionary says it is.

I looked it up and I'm still not getting it :/
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on January 08, 2013, 08:34:24 AM
OK, so I finally found out.  Thanks.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: SamiHami on January 08, 2013, 09:20:44 AM
Don't know if anyone's posted this one already, but I could do without "sausage party" for any gathering that happens to be male only.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on January 08, 2013, 09:31:15 AM
That calls up all sorts of unwelcome visuals.  Make it stop, make it stop!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 08, 2013, 09:40:56 AM
I abhor what CRUD MONKEYS! stands for, and I wish the abbreviation and the expanded version would disappear. It's offensive to me, and I hate that it's become so mainstream.

And I have no idea what CRUD MONKEYS! stands for...but I'm ok with that.

CRUD MONKEYS is the eHell censor/replacement for O-M-G.  It might also be a replacement for another word, but I'm not sure about that.  I'm not sure why this is censored word, but I think that the use could be offensive regarding the deity and I think certain words trigger ads that do not align with what this group is about, so those are blocked and censored.  Cuss words get censored.  I think there's a glossary on the replacements around here somewhere.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: twoferrets on January 08, 2013, 09:51:32 AM
Hubby or Hubs

Kiddo

The phrase "on trend" really irritates me.

Any number of corporate buzzwords.  A coworker of mine just learned the phrase "hot dot" and will NOT let it go.

Also, any use of invented sci-fi curse words-- probably because a really irritating person I used to know used them constantly.  Whatever the reason, I find myself tuning people out once those words come up. Frell, frack, you know the ones.  It is for this reason that Stephen King's "Lisey's Story" is not higher on my re-read list ("Smuck," Steve?  Really?!).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on January 08, 2013, 09:57:07 AM
Adding "--ster" or "--meister" to the ends of nouns.  Irritating enough from children but inexcusable from adults.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 08, 2013, 09:59:03 AM
Adding "--ster" or "--meister" to the ends of nouns.  Irritating enough from children but inexcusable from adults.

The "ster" part I get, but "meister" means master, so it usually makes sense to me why it is being added to things.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: nuit93 on January 08, 2013, 10:50:35 AM
Here in the UK, a couple of years ago, someone invented the term 'yummy mummy', referring to an attractive woman with children. It drives me up the wall, for no real reason. I think it's just the childishness of the term.


That's bad, but not quite as bad as one of my peeves: MILF (Mom I'd like to eff)

Pretty sure that one started with the movie "American Pie".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Sharnita on January 08, 2013, 11:16:36 AM
A couple of years ago a kid showed up with a sweatshirt that had a picture of a woman pushing a stroller and saying MILF. I told him he couldn't wear it. He was shocked and a little embarrassed. That was better than the responses.I usually got when I caught what kids thought were cleverly disguised drug or gun refrences and made them change or turn their shirts inside out.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: snowflake on January 08, 2013, 11:40:21 AM
As much as lingo drives me up the wall, I have to admit that I lived in the 80s and said all kinds of horrible phrases so I can't really blame kids these days.

Though when someone my age (30+) uses some new phrase and tries to pretend that it makes them cute, hip and young
 it makes me want to smack them into adulthood.

*sheepishly raises hand* I do have a tendency to adopt new phrases, but I swear it is just a side effect of loving to mess with language plus the fact that I spend about 4 hours a day talking to teenagers. The latter reason is also why I hate YOLO so much. It's like someone took all the stupidity* that is inherent in youth and distilled it into four letters.

I promise I don't think it makes me look cool though. I'm just quietly enjoying myself.

*I would like to emphatically state that young=/= stupid. I am referring to that lack of understanding of consequences that many otherwise lovely and intelligent teenagers suffer from.

It's all in the attitude I guess.  I have been known to use "FAIL" myself.  I know I probably look pathetic doing it at my age.

I suppose the annoyance comes with a remembrance when I was young and disturbed and teachers would try and talk to me in 80s lingo thinking that they "got" me.  I was like, "Um, could you stop trying to be 15?  I sort of need an adult in my life right now.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: GreenEyedHawk on January 08, 2013, 12:14:57 PM
The term "Honey-Do List".  For me, it calls to mind a woman handing her husband a mile-long list of things she wants him to do then breezing off to go shopping or whatever while a cowed husband takes care of everything for her.

(Can you tell I highly value my ability to get things done on my own?)

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on January 08, 2013, 12:47:19 PM
Fracking. As in the f-word substitute used extensively in Battlestar Galactica. Somehow, I’ve come to know a lot of people who use it in real life.

Then again, it made my interpretation of all the "No Fracking" signs found in every other yard in my area of NY really interesting for a while back before the environmental issue became a household term.

(Side note, scrabble as a euphemism has completely overtaken my brain’s first response to that term, so now I have to inwardly snicker every time someone mentions the game—even offline—before remembering that there’s a non-euphemistic definition of the word.)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 08, 2013, 12:51:31 PM
I'm fully in agreement with MILF. First time I ever heard it was American Pie.

I don't like crude baby onesies, the sorts that say "All mommy wanted was a backrub"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: hermanne on January 08, 2013, 01:14:10 PM
I'm fully in agreement with MILF. First time I ever heard it was American Pie.

I don't like crude baby onesies, the sorts that say "All mommy wanted was a backrub"

ew.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 08, 2013, 02:16:16 PM
Quote
I think DottyG meant Oh Em Gee and Crud Monkeys is just the filter taking over.  I don't seriously think E-Hell uses it for what the UrbanDictionary says it is.

Yes, the Oh Em Gee one.  I didn't realize that one was filtered.  Sorry!

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 08, 2013, 02:19:34 PM
Y'all are hearing a lot more "trendy" phrases than I am.  I haven't heard a lot of these before!

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Cat-Fu on January 08, 2013, 02:30:59 PM
I'm fully in agreement with MILF. First time I ever heard it was American Pie.

I don't like crude baby onesies, the sorts that say "All mommy wanted was a backrub"

Sorry, but the idea of that on a onesie is making me crack up!!

edited due to DYAC!!!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on January 08, 2013, 03:41:01 PM
As much as lingo drives me up the wall, I have to admit that I lived in the 80s and said all kinds of horrible phrases so I can't really blame kids these days.

Though when someone my age (30+) uses some new phrase and tries to pretend that it makes them cute, hip and young
 it makes me want to smack them into adulthood.

*sheepishly raises hand* I do have a tendency to adopt new phrases, but I swear it is just a side effect of loving to mess with language plus the fact that I spend about 4 hours a day talking to teenagers. The latter reason is also why I hate YOLO so much. It's like someone took all the stupidity* that is inherent in youth and distilled it into four letters.

I promise I don't think it makes me look cool though. I'm just quietly enjoying myself.

*I would like to emphatically state that young=/= stupid. I am referring to that lack of understanding of consequences that many otherwise lovely and intelligent teenagers suffer from.

It's all in the attitude I guess.  I have been known to use "FAIL" myself.  I know I probably look pathetic doing it at my age.

I suppose the annoyance comes with a remembrance when I was young and disturbed and teachers would try and talk to me in 80s lingo thinking that they "got" me.  I was like, "Um, could you stop trying to be 15?  I sort of need an adult in my life right now.

That annoys me too. Adults exist for a reason , and it's not to be a teenager's "bud".

I'm about the polar opposite to that. I'm approximately the same age as my students' mothers, so a well placed "Whatev-er" or "Cool story, bro" can have them rolling in the aisles :) It's great for defusing tense situations or lightening up a frustrating lesson.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabyMama on January 08, 2013, 07:04:54 PM
I'm fully in agreement with MILF. First time I ever heard it was American Pie.

I don't like crude baby onesies, the sorts that say "All mommy wanted was a backrub"

Or the "50 Shades Baby" ones. Yuck.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on January 08, 2013, 07:34:08 PM
I wonder what those babies will think when they see those onesies in photos later on.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 08, 2013, 08:35:41 PM
"Ew" is what I'd think if I saw that as an adult. 

I've seen the 50 Shades one and think that's worse than the backrub one.  I once made the mistake of looking at the wall of baby onesies in a Spencer's. :P Talk about tacky!  Not that I should be surprised, I know. I don't think there's a t-shirt in there that isn't tacky.

One example: Daddy used to get some till I came along.  Niiiice.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Luci on January 08, 2013, 09:05:26 PM
I must admit that with the right audience I do say 'groovy' or 'far out' a couple of times a year.

"Cool" seem perennial; I like that!

I hate when people put LOL in so many posts, but it is the equivalent to 'Ha-Ha' in old people's writing that drives me nuts, too. At least I am consistent!

Most other things that annoy me will eventually go away. For example, I haven't heard something like, "I like that -- NOT!" or some sort of "EEEP" for an unacceptable response for a long time. I guess "I'm good" instead of 'No thank you" is acceptable and makes sense, and "No problem" instead of "You are welcome" makes sense, too, so I can live with them.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 08, 2013, 09:19:50 PM
I still say "dude" now and then but not as much as I used to. 

I did have to laugh recently when I heard someone say "sike!" Man I hadn't heard that since high school, really took me back!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Breezygirl on January 08, 2013, 10:03:17 PM
"Scrabble" as a euphemism for sex.
Sorry e-hellions, I love you all, but it drives. me. crazy.  ;D

I'm sure I say a lot of things that annoy someof you, too, though, so it's all good. lol  >:D

I don't mind the scrabble term  but it drives. me. crazy. when. people put periods at the end of each word for emphasis. ;) lol :)

"That's what she said".  is one that bugs me.
 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Amava on January 08, 2013, 10:22:10 PM
"Scrabble" as a euphemism for sex.
Sorry e-hellions, I love you all, but it drives. me. crazy.  ;D

I'm sure I say a lot of things that annoy someof you, too, though, so it's all good. lol  >:D

I don't mind the scrabble term  but it drives. me. crazy. when. people put periods at the end of each word for emphasis. ;) lol :)

"That's what she said".  is one that bugs me.
 

XD sorry!

Personally I like "That's what she said" but I try to refrain from it on e-hell as much as possible because I know many people find it grating.  :D I usually just think it, and don't say (or write it).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on January 09, 2013, 08:46:18 AM
In the vein of "That’s what she said”… I don’t hear it very often anymore, but when I visit some of my family in “Missourah” I still see trucks stickered with it and all manner of novelty things printed to say:

“Get ’r done”

Also, my dad says it on occasion still.

Ugh.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on January 10, 2013, 08:01:50 AM
A thing which I find rather prevalent on the Internet:  people writing “a hat tip (or IMO worse, ‘a tip o’ the hat’) to (so-and-so), for”... whatever information or thing, borrowed for the writer’s blog-or-whatever.  Perhaps irrationally, this irks me for its making the writer seem so up-themself / courting admiration for being so cool / hip / flip / cutting-edge / knowledgeable, and condescending to pick up crumbs of info from lesser folk.  Why not just write straightforwardly of thanks, or acknowledgements?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 10, 2013, 09:34:42 AM
A thing which I find rather prevalent on the Internet:  people writing “a hat tip (or IMO worse, ‘a tip o’ the hat’) to (so-and-so), for”... whatever information or thing, borrowed for the writer’s blog-or-whatever.  Perhaps irrationally, this irks me for its making the writer seem so up-themself / courting admiration for being so cool / hip / flip / cutting-edge / knowledgeable, and condescending to pick up crumbs of info from lesser folk.  Why not just write straightforwardly of thanks, or acknowledgements?

With your love of all things old-fashioned, I'd have thought this was one idiom you'd have liked!  ;)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: SCAJAfamily on January 10, 2013, 09:43:02 AM
EPIC!!!

Everything according to A and his friends is/are EPIC!!!!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: whatsanenigma on January 10, 2013, 09:49:33 AM
I really hate the term "vajayjay"! And I hate the term "vacay" because it reminds me of "vajayjay".

And I hate them both because they remind me of that show "Jay Jay the Jet Plane".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: lisat on January 10, 2013, 10:22:05 AM
Hero    I think that this is the one word that gets me everytime I hear it. Do people really understand what a hero is? To me it now is such a diluted word that doesn't mean anything.

I don't tex so when I see all those abbreviations I have no idea what they mean. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on January 10, 2013, 10:40:32 AM
The 50 Shades of [whatever] trend.  The 50 Shades of Kale cookbook.  The 50 Shades of Avocados.  50 Shades of Style.  50 Shades of Smoothies.  Not to mention all of the other books of the same genre as the original ripping off that title.


Somebody please make it stop!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 10, 2013, 01:08:22 PM
Hero    I think that this is the one word that gets me everytime I hear it. Do people really understand what a hero is? To me it now is such a diluted word that doesn't mean anything.

I don't tex so when I see all those abbreviations I have no idea what they mean.

Thank you!  Hero dilution is, other than "literal" dilution, my biggest language peeve.  A person is not a hero just because they save a life, at least to my definition.  My definition of a hero is someone who saves someone's life through risk to themselves in a situation that the hero has no specific training for.  (If you're trained, you're very brave, but it's not heroic, it's your job!)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 10, 2013, 01:34:54 PM
Deleted because I think I got both too personal and too political.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Sharnita on January 10, 2013, 01:48:26 PM
As far as not doing anything dangerous in the military, I have mixed feelings about that. Virtually everyone who goes into the military does so knowing thay there is a chance they will be sent inyo a dangerous situation. And while they are supposed to be sevured the reallity is that even dtsteside military basis are potential targets. I have not met anybody yet with the connection  who could/would safeguard themselves before going into the dervice do lousy hudband or not (and I do think that indicates a serious personality flaw) a person who voluntarily goes inyo the service does put their life on the line. It might never actively happen but they put it out there.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 10, 2013, 01:50:23 PM
As far as not doing anything dangerous in the military, I have mixed feelings about that. Virtually everyone who goes into the military does so knowing thay there is a chance they will be sent inyo a dangerous situation. And while they are supposed to be sevured the reallity is that even dtsteside military basis are potential targets. I have not met anybody yet with the connection  who could/would safeguard themselves before going into the dervice do lousy hudband or not (and I do think that indicates a serious personality flaw) a person who voluntarily goes inyo the service does put their life on the line. It might never actively happen but they put it out there.

Sharnita, I deleted my post because I rethought the potential controversial nature of it.

Nonetheless, I do think character plays a role in whether someone is a hero in my eyes, and if an awful person does something dangerous, he or she is still an awful person to me.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 10, 2013, 03:22:49 PM
Let me clear up any confusion as to my statement:

Everyone who goes into the military with full knowledge that they could wind up in a war zone (there are some people who think they won't ever have to go to war, that they can treat military enrollment as boot camp + college grant, but that's not who I'm talking about here) is far braver than I.  But mere bravery doesn't make one heroic... otherwise, we'd have millions of heroes, and a hero is a one-in-a-million kind of person.  It's that above-and-beyond mentality that makes the hero. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 10, 2013, 04:19:34 PM
Let me clear up any confusion as to my statement:

Everyone who goes into the military with full knowledge that they could wind up in a war zone (there are some people who think they won't ever have to go to war, that they can treat military enrollment as boot camp + college grant, but that's not who I'm talking about here) is far braver than I.  But mere bravery doesn't make one heroic... otherwise, we'd have millions of heroes, and a hero is a one-in-a-million kind of person.  It's that above-and-beyond mentality that makes the hero.

Oh, I think Sharnita's criticizing my statement that I deleted. In retrospect it felt a little too much like a political minefield for this forum, but the gist was that I have a hard time seeing someone as a hero if they're an awful person, even if they've served in the military. Examples were my ex BIL who treated his family badly, and in a more extreme example, people who commit war crimes while in the military.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 10, 2013, 04:29:56 PM
Let me clear up any confusion as to my statement:

Everyone who goes into the military with full knowledge that they could wind up in a war zone (there are some people who think they won't ever have to go to war, that they can treat military enrollment as boot camp + college grant, but that's not who I'm talking about here) is far braver than I.  But mere bravery doesn't make one heroic... otherwise, we'd have millions of heroes, and a hero is a one-in-a-million kind of person.  It's that above-and-beyond mentality that makes the hero.

Oh, I think Sharnita's criticizing my statement that I deleted. In retrospect it felt a little too much like a political minefield for this forum, but the gist was that I have a hard time seeing someone as a hero if they're an awful person, even if they've served in the military. Examples were my ex BIL who treated his family badly, and in a more extreme example, people who commit war crimes while in the military.

Here I thought your deletion may have been a response to me!  There's my good laugh for the day.  :D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 10, 2013, 04:35:39 PM
Let me clear up any confusion as to my statement:

Everyone who goes into the military with full knowledge that they could wind up in a war zone (there are some people who think they won't ever have to go to war, that they can treat military enrollment as boot camp + college grant, but that's not who I'm talking about here) is far braver than I.  But mere bravery doesn't make one heroic... otherwise, we'd have millions of heroes, and a hero is a one-in-a-million kind of person.  It's that above-and-beyond mentality that makes the hero.

Oh, I think Sharnita's criticizing my statement that I deleted. In retrospect it felt a little too much like a political minefield for this forum, but the gist was that I have a hard time seeing someone as a hero if they're an awful person, even if they've served in the military. Examples were my ex BIL who treated his family badly, and in a more extreme example, people who commit war crimes while in the military.

Here I thought your deletion may have been a response to me!  There's my good laugh for the day.  :D

Nah, I totally agree that "hero" has been diluted way too much.  :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on January 10, 2013, 05:54:10 PM
"Well played!" I haaate it but I can't really explain why.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: wendelenn on January 10, 2013, 08:40:15 PM
I have to admit that I'm getting a bit tired of "don't JADE". It's the trendy ehell term of the moment around here.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: afbluebelle on January 10, 2013, 09:36:41 PM
Let me clear up any confusion as to my statement:

Everyone who goes into the military with full knowledge that they could wind up in a war zone (there are some people who think they won't ever have to go to war, that they can treat military enrollment as boot camp + college grant, but that's not who I'm talking about here) is far braver than I.  But mere bravery doesn't make one heroic... otherwise, we'd have millions of heroes, and a hero is a one-in-a-million kind of person.  It's that above-and-beyond mentality that makes the hero.

Oh, I think Sharnita's criticizing my statement that I deleted. In retrospect it felt a little too much like a political minefield for this forum, but the gist was that I have a hard time seeing someone as a hero if they're an awful person, even if they've served in the military. Examples were my ex BIL who treated his family badly, and in a more extreme example, people who commit war crimes while in the military.

I didn't see the original statement, but it makes sense to me. People are people, and an occupation is an occupation. It shouldn't define you as a person or whitewash character flaws. Most recent example are the (naughty words deleted) people in my squadron who have gotten DUIs. Even if they had done heroic actions, they are still jerks for endangering people around them.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Sharnita on January 10, 2013, 09:52:15 PM
I'm also not sure that calling people in the military heroes is all that "trendy" unless we are willing to look at hundreds of years and multiple cultures as trendy. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: afbluebelle on January 10, 2013, 10:04:01 PM
Now I have that creepy Enrique Iglesias song stuck in my head.


I know it has been mentioned, but I figure that "swag" deserved another mention. Only because it seems to be accompanied by flat brim hats. I really, really, REALLY want to bend all the brims I see into normal baseball style configuration. I won't, but the urge is there.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 10, 2013, 10:05:46 PM
I'm also not sure that calling people in the military heroes is all that "trendy" unless we are willing to look at hundreds of years and multiple cultures as trendy.

Calling truly exemplary members heroes has always been with us, yes. It's calling every single person a hero that's new. I think it's an overcorrection for how military people were sometimes treated a few decades ago.

But we're getting into the debate I deleted my post to avoid. Let's get back onto less political stuff. How about "value add"? That's another bit of jargon that drives me nuts.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jedikaiti on January 10, 2013, 10:33:38 PM
Now I have that creepy Enrique Iglesias song stuck in my head.


I know it has been mentioned, but I figure that "swag" deserved another mention. Only because it seems to be accompanied by flat brim hats. I really, really, REALLY want to bend all the brims I see into normal baseball style configuration. I won't, but the urge is there.

Me, too. After I turn them back around the right way.

My annoyance - "walla" instead of "voilà". Causes headaches in the same part of the brain as repeated stupid grammar and punctuation errors.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: baglady on January 10, 2013, 11:08:34 PM
I agree that "hero" is misused a lot. Everyone knows that the correct term is "sub" or "grinder."  ;)

I'm a "hero member" of this forum, and I haven't saved any lives that I know of. I don't think the H word has been cheapened, necessarily, as much as it's just interpreted differently. To some people a hero is someone who saves lives (e.g. doctor). To others, it's someone who risks his own life to save others (firefighter, soldier in war zone). To others still, it's this definition from the dictionary: "a person ... who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements or noble qualities." Helen Keller is one of my heroes, and I don't recall reading about her running into any burning buildings or falling on any grenades.

One word I think definitely *has* been cheapened/corrupted is "diva." It means a (figuratively speaking) larger-than-life female singer -- think Maria Callas or Diana Ross. It doesn't mean just any famous female singer. (Sorry, Britney.) And it definitely doesn't mean spoiled, obnoxious female. (Sorry, all you "Toddlers & Tiaras" moms who describe your daughters' tantrums as "diva moments.")

And I can definitely live without hearing any other syllables amputated and replaced with S: "totes," "adorbs," "whatevs."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 11, 2013, 12:12:09 AM
I agree that "hero" is misused a lot. Everyone knows that the correct term is "sub" or "grinder."  ;)

Oh no you DIN'T.  You did NOT just call a hoagie a sub!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 11, 2013, 03:12:37 AM
I agree that "hero" is misused a lot. Everyone knows that the correct term is "sub" or "grinder."  ;)

Oh no you DIN'T.  You did NOT just call a hoagie a sub!

I never knew that many people outside of PA don't call it a hoagie. I was so confused when I moved away...
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 11, 2013, 09:05:39 AM
I agree that "hero" is misused a lot. Everyone knows that the correct term is "sub" or "grinder."  ;)

Oh no you DIN'T.  You did NOT just call a hoagie a sub!

I never knew that many people outside of PA don't call it a hoagie. I was so confused when I moved away...

The first time I heard hoagie was on The Cosby Show and wondered what the heck Bill was talking about.

Like a PP, I'm also tired of JADE.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jillybean on January 11, 2013, 09:41:58 AM
I haven't come across JADE.  What does that stand for?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 11, 2013, 09:55:50 AM
I haven't come across JADE.  What does that stand for?

Justify, Argue, Defend, Explain
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Bexx27 on January 11, 2013, 03:05:47 PM
JADE is grating on me, too.

I also hate "diva" to describe good-looking, entitled women. A friend of mine has taken to referring to herself proudly as a diva, which seems to mean that she deserves fawning attention and special treatment from men.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 11, 2013, 04:15:24 PM
I keep seen STAN and just found out it means stalker/obsessed fan.  I hated it (and was confused) before learning the meaning and I hate it even more now.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: snowflake on January 11, 2013, 04:30:57 PM
I also hate "diva" to describe good-looking, entitled women. A friend of mine has taken to referring to herself proudly as a diva, which seems to mean that she deserves fawning attention and special treatment from men.

I dislike the term diva to describe a woman who is successful and commands respect.  Sets my teeth on edge. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 11, 2013, 04:46:45 PM
I also hate "diva" to describe good-looking, entitled women. A friend of mine has taken to referring to herself proudly as a diva, which seems to mean that she deserves fawning attention and special treatment from men.

I dislike the term diva to describe a woman who is successful and commands respect.  Sets my teeth on edge.

The literal meaning of it is "goddess," so a real diva is certainly someone who commands respect! :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: afbluebelle on January 11, 2013, 10:12:14 PM
I keep seen STAN and just found out it means stalker/obsessed fan.  I hated it (and was confused) before learning the meaning and I hate it even more now.

I actually liked that term, but that's just because I like Eminem.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Breezygirl on January 12, 2013, 05:49:19 PM
I just remembered "Cool beans".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 12, 2013, 07:55:49 PM
I just remembered "Cool beans".
Which in turn reminds me: "Laters." Why the plural? Whhhhhhhhhhy?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on January 12, 2013, 08:14:10 PM
totes magotes. It makes me want to run into a concrete wall.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: afbluebelle on January 12, 2013, 08:31:33 PM
I read that as "tote maggots"


A maggot filled tote would make me run into a concrete wall as well.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: that_one_girl on January 12, 2013, 08:44:23 PM
"Totes" short for totally.

Totes are large obnoxious bags in which you carry your entire life around.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 12, 2013, 09:32:16 PM
I read that as "tote maggots"


A maggot filled tote would make me run into a concrete wall as well.

I did, too...lol, it was a fun mental image.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: afbluebelle on January 12, 2013, 10:04:36 PM
"Totes" short for totally.

Totes are large obnoxious bags in which you carry your entire life around.

I know the difference, but sometimes my dyslexic tendencies have to be shared... I can't keep the funny to myself :P
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: TylerBelle on January 13, 2013, 06:45:43 PM
"These aren't your (usually older person - mother/father/grandparent) (item of clothing, type of food, etc.)..."

It sounds like things of the past are so out-of-date, uncool, etc., while the newer versions are so much the better. If something's redone, just go for it without slighting an older version. 


Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Thipu1 on January 14, 2013, 08:07:38 AM
I've only heard this from family members but a desk top computer has been called a 'Grandpa Box'.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 14, 2013, 12:33:18 PM
I know artisan or artisanal has been mentioned, but this morning I heard an advertisement for a purple religion private university that offers an authentic purple campus experience.

Do the marketing staff just search the dictionary for words and pick them at random?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 14, 2013, 02:30:11 PM
I've only heard this from family members but a desk top computer has been called a 'Grandpa Box'.

Bah, I can't stand this.  Different devices have their own specialties. PCs have more power, hands down, because laptops sacrifice that for portability, and tablets even moreso.  I will never be without a desktop, ever.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CrochetFanatic on January 14, 2013, 02:49:56 PM
Has anyone heard people say "Whatevs" instead of "Whatever"?  It doesn't bother me personally, but I've imagined people wincing at that one.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on January 14, 2013, 06:40:59 PM
I just did reading your post.   :(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: RingTailedLemur on January 14, 2013, 11:32:00 PM
Butthurt.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 15, 2013, 05:21:53 AM
"Die in a Fire", or just "DIAF".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 15, 2013, 09:48:36 AM
Cougar.  I see nothing wrong with women dating much younger men if that works for them.  I don't like how we treat that as so very bizarre.  Extra points for using it about women who date men who are not that much younger than they.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jedikaiti on January 16, 2013, 10:36:29 PM
Cougar.  I see nothing wrong with women dating much younger men if that works for them.  I don't like how we treat that as so very bizarre.  Extra points for using it about women who date men who are not that much younger than they.

And if the age difference is noticeable, what's wrong with a good old-fashioned "Mrs Robinson"?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: nolechica on January 16, 2013, 10:43:23 PM
I keep seen STAN and just found out it means stalker/obsessed fan.  I hated it (and was confused) before learning the meaning and I hate it even more now.

Yes, from the song, but in some circles it just means more than a casual fan, but nothing sinister. People who go to lots of shows, read/watch lots of interviews, read blogs, search YT.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 17, 2013, 01:36:42 AM
"Gotta go. The cat's on fire."

I can't remember if I mentioned this one earlier or not. But I seriously wish this phrase would be eliminated from EHell. It's one I abhor. And I find that I stop reading posts when I come across it. Everything a person says after that gets skipped.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: tasryn on January 17, 2013, 03:56:17 AM
I can't believe no one has mentioned the term "stabby" as in "I hate such and such celebrity-they make me stabby". That just irritates me. Just by saying you dislike someone, that should be enough to catch the meaning, why add stabby on the end of it?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: 123sandy on January 17, 2013, 04:26:23 AM
"Put on your big girl panties"

"I just threw up in my mouth a little"

"mmm-kay"


I could happily live without ever hearing those again.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: tasryn on January 17, 2013, 05:29:06 AM
Oh one more expression to go with "stabby". Saying you dislike something with "the hatred of a thousand suns". That's just over the top. Again it's simpler to just say you don't like something.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on January 17, 2013, 06:52:52 AM
Agree with most of those.  How about "White Chocolate"?

That stuff is only cocoa butter; for it to be chocolate it has to have actual cocoa in it.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 17, 2013, 07:45:12 AM
Oh one more expression to go with "stabby". Saying you dislike something with "the hatred of a thousand suns". That's just over the top. Again it's simpler to just say you don't like something.


But if we just simply said what we feel in plain words, it would be really dry.  Language isn't just for communicating information.  It also has poetic and humorous features.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 17, 2013, 11:11:59 AM
My flabbler is gasted.  What's wrong with "I'm flabbergasted"

I also dislike stabby.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: gorplady on January 17, 2013, 11:16:10 AM
Get A Life.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: hobish on January 17, 2013, 11:30:51 AM
Oh one more expression to go with "stabby". Saying you dislike something with "the hatred of a thousand suns". That's just over the top. Again it's simpler to just say you don't like something.


But if we just simply said what we feel in plain words, it would be really dry.  Language isn't just for communicating information.  It also has poetic and humorous features.

There is some old joke about that. I don't remember exactly how it goes.

A little girl is eating a piece of cake and exclaims, "I just love cake!" Her governess corrects her, telling her that is the improper use of "just" and we do not love inanimate objects, we like them.
The girl responds, "I like cake."
"...but that sounds as if I'm talking about bread!"

Boom-Ch! I think that is a Reader's Digest oldie, or maybe i read it in a book? I don't remember, but it tickles me.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Phoebe on January 17, 2013, 06:30:50 PM
"Gotta go. The cat's on fire."

I can't remember if I mentioned this one earlier or not. But I seriously wish this phrase would be eliminated from EHell. It's one I abhor. And I find that I stop reading posts when I come across it. Everything a person says after that gets skipped.

I HATE this one.  Shortly after I first came across it here, there was an incident in my city where a young *adult* and his younger friend actually set a cat on fire.  Both were arrested and charged and if I remember correctly, the poor cat didn't survive.  I linked the story and asked for the phrase to be dropped, but apparently people weren't concerned about it.  Some even commented that this sort of thing doesn't really happen, after all.  ::) >:(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Slartibartfast on January 17, 2013, 06:41:04 PM
"Gotta go. The cat's on fire."

I can't remember if I mentioned this one earlier or not. But I seriously wish this phrase would be eliminated from EHell. It's one I abhor. And I find that I stop reading posts when I come across it. Everything a person says after that gets skipped.

I HATE this one.  Shortly after I first came across it here, there was an incident in my city where a young *adult* and his younger friend actually set a cat on fire.  Both were arrested and charged and if I remember correctly, the poor cat didn't survive.  I linked the story and asked for the phrase to be dropped, but apparently people weren't concerned about it.  Some even commented that this sort of thing doesn't really happen, after all.  ::) >:(

I always associated it with the numerous stories I've heard of cats getting their tails singed while investigating candles - never anything serious, more of a "Well he won't do that again!" kind of thing.  I was under the impression this is fairly common.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jedikaiti on January 17, 2013, 06:51:25 PM
Perhaps we need to come up with an equally catchy, even more silly and absurd feline event to use. Like, "Oh dear, cat got in the mayo again" or "Gotta run - Fluffy's about to burn the hollandaise!" or "Can't talk - cat just cornered a penguin in the basement!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CakeEater on January 17, 2013, 06:52:41 PM
I think it started here when someone made a typo - they meant to suggest, "I have to go, the kitchen's on fire", but wrote kitten instead - somoeone replied, 'The kitten being on fire would really make a good excuse to get off the phone' and off it went.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 17, 2013, 07:08:03 PM
How about, "Gotta go, the fish is drowning!"? 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 17, 2013, 07:08:19 PM
Quote
Perhaps we need to come up with an equally catchy, even more silly and absurd feline event to use. Like, "Oh dear, cat got in the mayo again" or "Gotta run - Fluffy's about to burn the hollandaise!" or "Can't talk - cat just cornered a penguin in the basement!"

I would be happier if we could come up with something else.  Something like you've mentioned would be fine.  But a cat on fire is not funny and it's not something that I think should be a "trendy saying" here.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 17, 2013, 08:02:53 PM
"Gotta go, spider invasion!"

*I* like spiders, but most people don't...
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 17, 2013, 08:17:40 PM
I like little spiders. If I have one in my home, I leave them alone (except for talking to them and telling them that they're welcome to stay as long as they realize that getting too close to certain kitty mouths might be unwise! :D )

I'm not crazy about big ones.

I like that phrase, though! :)

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: GreenEyedHawk on January 17, 2013, 10:08:35 PM
I don't like when adults use the terms "yummy" or "nummy".  It seems very babyish to me and there are plenty of words (delectable, for example, or delicious, or tasty, or any number of adjectives) to describe something that's good without sounding like a two-year-old.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on January 17, 2013, 10:09:14 PM
I don't like when adults use the terms "yummy" or "nummy".  It seems very babyish to me and there are plenty of words (delectable, for example, or delicious, or tasty, or any number of adjectives) to describe something that's good without sounding like a two-year-old.

This.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 17, 2013, 10:14:07 PM
Yummy says things that delicious doesn't... comfort food may not be delicious, but it *is* yummy.  It's not so much a flavor as the state of mind in which it puts you.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on January 17, 2013, 11:53:09 PM
Chillaxin'

Has that been brought up yet?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 18, 2013, 01:14:24 AM
Not yet, but I was expecting someone all up in this plizzace to.  (Two-fer!)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CharlieBraun on January 18, 2013, 06:04:46 AM
"Ain't no thang...."

(insert "nails on a chalkboard" emoticon here!)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Emmy on January 18, 2013, 06:07:31 AM
Another phrase I loathe is "come to *insert deity* talk". 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jaxsue on January 18, 2013, 06:13:16 AM
"Ain't no thang...."

(insert "nails on a chalkboard" emoticon here!)

I hate that one, too.  :P
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: tasryn on January 18, 2013, 06:23:47 AM
To the person who responded to my message by saying that words like "stabby" and "hatred of a thousand suns" add color to our language, my issue with these phrases is things like this that I see on message boards all the time "I can't stand Taylor Swift with the hatred of a thousand suns-she makes me stabby." Isn't that a little over the top? It reminds me of Blache Devereaux on the Golden Girls when she talks about how she feels as fresh as the honeysuckle in the morning when the dew hangs from the blossom and the sun kisses it with its golden glaze. There is adding description and there is going way overboard. Also when a phrase becomes overused it also loses it's meaning.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 18, 2013, 10:54:01 AM
Adorkable.  Mostly because when someone act that way, it seems so fake.  "Oh, look at me.  Look how cute and goofy I am."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on January 18, 2013, 01:21:05 PM
V-card.


Just say virginity. :-\
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: *new*mommyagain36 on January 18, 2013, 02:25:34 PM
"My bad" - why, yes, yes it is your bad, now take some responsibility for it and stop acting like that's even a remotely acceptable statement.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: hobish on January 18, 2013, 02:29:58 PM
"My bad" - why, yes, yes it is your bad, now take some responsibility for it and stop acting like that's even a remotely acceptable statement.

In my world it is totally acceptable. It is definitely more acceptable than saying, "stop acting like that's even a remotely acceptable statement."
 ;)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: oceanus on January 18, 2013, 02:32:05 PM
I’m not that fond of “my bad” because it’s a bit too cutesy, and often is an attempt to make light of a mistake that’s sometimes serious.  It’s like “ooooh, ooops, I guess I’m human.  Sowwy!”  I only use the expression rarely and for truly small infractions.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: hobish on January 18, 2013, 02:35:32 PM
"Gotta go. The cat's on fire."

I can't remember if I mentioned this one earlier or not. But I seriously wish this phrase would be eliminated from EHell. It's one I abhor. And I find that I stop reading posts when I come across it. Everything a person says after that gets skipped.

I HATE this one.  Shortly after I first came across it here, there was an incident in my city where a young *adult* and his younger friend actually set a cat on fire.  Both were arrested and charged and if I remember correctly, the poor cat didn't survive.  I linked the story and asked for the phrase to be dropped, but apparently people weren't concerned about it.  Some even commented that this sort of thing doesn't really happen, after all.  ::) >:(

...and just because you link that phrase to a very specific incident that you saw does not mean you should expect a whole intenet community to drop it just because you (and maybe a handful of other people) don't like it. Eyerolling and accusations of people not being concerned - are you intentionally insinuating that we somehow support violence against animals? - does not make your case.

Everyone is going to use phrases other people don't like. That's life.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MrTango on January 18, 2013, 02:42:16 PM
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: hobish on January 18, 2013, 02:42:43 PM
Bully bully bully bully bully bully bully bully. Here a bully there a bully, everywhere a bully bully. Say one mean thing, you are a bully. Scowl? Bullying behavior. Don't like a kid? Bully. Don’t want to sit with someone? Bully. Every interraction that isn't sunshine, lollipops, and wee little ponies is bullying. Tired of hearing about bullying? Well, that's probably because you are a  bully. Bullying is bad, I get it; but  the Raise the Awareness campaign has gotten crazy.

LOL … or maybe I watch way too much kids tv, which hadn’t occurred to me until right this minute, but is entirely possible. I take in an awful lot of cartoons.  :P


Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 18, 2013, 02:43:52 PM
Bully bully bully bully bully bully bully bully. Here a bully there a bully, everywhere a bully bully. Say one mean thing, you are a bully. Scowl? Bullying behavior. Don't like a kid? Bully. Don’t want to sit with someone? Bully. Every interraction that isn't sunshine, lollipops, and wee little ponies is bullying. Tired of hearing about bullying? Well, that's probably because you are a  bully. Bullying is bad, I get it; but  the Raise the Awareness campaign has gotten crazy.

LOL … or maybe I watch way too much kids tv, which hadn’t occurred to me until right this minute, but is entirely possible. I take in an awful lot of cartoons.  :P

Oh, you're right. Write a politely negative review of a book, you're a bully. All the "bullying" is trivializing real actual bullying, which is real and nasty.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jaxsue on January 18, 2013, 02:44:49 PM
Quote
"preggo". Is it really that hard to say pregnant?

"preggers" is even worse

You're absolutely right. I forgot about "preggers".

On a tangent, I wish that the spelling "pregnate" would go away.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jaxsue on January 18, 2013, 02:47:33 PM
"Per say." Okay, so my beef is more about the abuse of the English language, but I see it often enough to qualify for this thread.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Slartibartfast on January 18, 2013, 02:52:22 PM
Not really a "trendy" expression, but I really really really dislike "bossy."  Ever notice how little boys are never "bossy?"  It's a term reserved for girls who try to take leadership in a situation when someone else doesn't want them to.  I acknowledge that kids don't always act appropriately, and we do need a word to describe what "bossy" means (trying to take charge in an unwanted way), but I hate that it has such sexist connotations.  I try very hard not to use it, and I would get royally peeved if someone used it to apply to Babybartfast when, if she were a boy, her behavior would just be "boys being boys" or "rowdy" or "rambunctious" or "playful" or something else without the negative connotations.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 18, 2013, 03:04:22 PM
"Per say." Okay, so my beef is more about the abuse of the English language, but I see it often enough to qualify for this thread.
I see your "per say" and raise you a "walla!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 18, 2013, 03:05:04 PM
"My bad" - why, yes, yes it is your bad, now take some responsibility for it and stop acting like that's even a remotely acceptable statement.

"My bad" is at least owning up to what you did.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 18, 2013, 03:11:14 PM
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

Which remind me "fur babies." Always makes me conjure up an image that send a chill up my spine.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: snowflake on January 18, 2013, 03:11:27 PM
Not really a "trendy" expression, but I really really really dislike "bossy."  Ever notice how little boys are never "bossy?"  It's a term reserved for girls who try to take leadership in a situation when someone else doesn't want them to.  I acknowledge that kids don't always act appropriately, and we do need a word to describe what "bossy" means (trying to take charge in an unwanted way), but I hate that it has such sexist connotations.  I try very hard not to use it, and I would get royally peeved if someone used it to apply to Babybartfast when, if she were a boy, her behavior would just be "boys being boys" or "rowdy" or "rambunctious" or "playful" or something else without the negative connotations.

I see your point.  But I call my kid bossy because he really is.  I have to constantly remind him that he isn't in charge of all the kids at his daycare. ("I TOLD you to play with blocks now!") I normally just try and remind him that other kids get to choose their own play.

My big sister will call herself "take charge."  Whenever I got a new stuffed animal, she would name it because she said I didn't think of good enough names.  I still refer to it as bossy.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: oceanus on January 18, 2013, 03:32:03 PM
"Per say." Okay, so my beef is more about the abuse of the English language, but I see it often enough to qualify for this thread.

It's "per se" and while I know people sometimes use it to mean "as such", I've never thought of it as trendy.  Per se is actually a Latin phrase which is often used as a legal term.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 18, 2013, 03:40:00 PM
"Per say." Okay, so my beef is more about the abuse of the English language, but I see it often enough to qualify for this thread.

It's "per se" and while I know people sometimes use it to mean "as such", I've never thought of it as trendy.  Per se is actually a Latin phrase which is often used as a legal term.

I'm pretty sure Jaxsue meant that she's tired of seeing "per say" instead of "per se".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: oceanus on January 18, 2013, 03:47:23 PM
"Per say." Okay, so my beef is more about the abuse of the English language, but I see it often enough to qualify for this thread.

It's "per se" and while I know people sometimes use it to mean "as such", I've never thought of it as trendy.  Per se is actually a Latin phrase which is often used as a legal term.

I'm pretty sure Jaxsue meant that she's tired of seeing "per say" instead of "per se".

Oh.  Perhaps I misunderstood.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 18, 2013, 03:49:01 PM
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

Which remind me "fur babies." Always makes me conjure up an image that send a chill up my spine.

Why fur babies?  (I'm curious).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 18, 2013, 03:55:06 PM
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

Which remind me "fur babies." Always makes me conjure up an image that send a chill up my spine.

Why fur babies?  (I'm curious).

What do you mean why?  Why I dislike it?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: magicdomino on January 18, 2013, 03:58:34 PM
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

Which remind me "fur babies." Always makes me conjure up an image that send a chill up my spine.

Why fur babies?  (I'm curious).

I suspect Rose Red gets an image of a baby werewolf (fangs, red eyes, thick coat of fur), or maybe a fake human baby made out of fur.  I have to admit that I find the phrase a little twee myself.  "Earthly Avatars of Bast" is a little long to say, though, and doesn't work for dogs.    ;)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 18, 2013, 04:00:59 PM
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

Which remind me "fur babies." Always makes me conjure up an image that send a chill up my spine.

Why fur babies?  (I'm curious).

What do you mean why?  Why I dislike it?

Yes, and why it brings up a bad mental image.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on January 18, 2013, 04:17:08 PM
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

Which remind me "fur babies." Always makes me conjure up an image that send a chill up my spine.

Why fur babies?  (I'm curious).

What do you mean why?  Why I dislike it?

Yes, and why it brings up a bad mental image.

magicdomino got it correct.  Brings up an image of a baby growing animal fur.  I guess you can call it a mental phobia  :-\.  Maybe it's because I read Roald Dahl's short story Royal Jelly too young  ::).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 18, 2013, 04:20:02 PM
Quote
Everyone is going to use phrases other people don't like. That's life.

But, Hobish, that's what this thread is about - listing things we're tired of hearing.  This one is no different than the others that people are mentioning on the other 20 pages of the thread.  I guess I'm confused as to why you've picked out this one to say the above about when the whole thread is full of the same thing (help me understand if I'm missing something).
 


 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 18, 2013, 04:53:12 PM
Quote
Everyone is going to use phrases other people don't like. That's life.

But, Hobish, that's what this thread is about - listing things we're tired of hearing.  This one is no different than the others that people are mentioning on the other 20 pages of the thread.  I guess I'm confused as to why you've picked out this one to say the above about when the whole thread is full of the same thing (help me understand if I'm missing something).

Because you expressed yours not as a peeve but as something you'd like to see as a concrete rule for the forum.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CakeEater on January 18, 2013, 04:56:12 PM
Quote
Everyone is going to use phrases other people don't like. That's life.

But, Hobish, that's what this thread is about - listing things we're tired of hearing.  This one is no different than the others that people are mentioning on the other 20 pages of the thread.  I guess I'm confused as to why you've picked out this one to say the above about when the whole thread is full of the same thing (help me understand if I'm missing something).

I can't speak for Hobish, but I thought the idea that we come up with a new phrase and use it instead  was too much. The thread is about things we're tired of hearing, sure, but for no other phrase did anyone suggest that they would tell others not to use it and give them an alternate.

Trendy expressions are trendy because many people like them. We don't get to make up a phrase and tell people that this is the trendy phrase that we're all going to use now.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: SpikeMichigan on January 18, 2013, 05:06:37 PM

 I'm with those who hate YOLO with a fiery passion. I think that's universal though, I've rarely heard it used seriously, generally its used in a mocking or sarcastic way.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 18, 2013, 06:46:00 PM
Quote
We don't get to make up a phrase and tell people that this is the trendy phrase that we're all going to use now.

Since no one said "this is the trendy phrase we're all going to use now", I'm not sure where you're going with that.

Several people suggested some alternatives (several tongue-in-cheek ones) and I said, "I would be happier if we could come up with something else.  Something like you've mentioned would be fine.  But a cat on fire is not funny and it's not something that I think should be a "trendy saying" here."

I stand by that statement!  I would be happier if there were another phrase used.  I like the ones suggested.  And I don't like that it's a "trendy saying" here.

But I can promise I won't be holding a gun to your head to keep you from saying whatever you'd like. ;)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jaxsue on January 18, 2013, 11:17:21 PM
"Per say." Okay, so my beef is more about the abuse of the English language, but I see it often enough to qualify for this thread.
I see your "per say" and raise you a "walla!"

Ooh, that is a bad one!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jaxsue on January 18, 2013, 11:19:12 PM
"Per say." Okay, so my beef is more about the abuse of the English language, but I see it often enough to qualify for this thread.

It's "per se" and while I know people sometimes use it to mean "as such", I've never thought of it as trendy.  Per se is actually a Latin phrase which is often used as a legal term.

I'm pretty sure Jaxsue meant that she's tired of seeing "per say" instead of "per se".

This. I used to be an editor (before the industry died).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on January 18, 2013, 11:23:02 PM
Quote
before the industry died).

Potential stupid question , but why? What happened to editing?

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yarnspinner on January 19, 2013, 12:26:05 AM
I had my hand slapped for replying to several on-line complements with "Aw, gee "blush-blush" so I guess I am nominating that phrase.  (Although my response to the snarky comment that I was being juvenile and silly was something on the order of "I spend my whole work day working with people who are silly and juvenile...maybe it just wears off on ya after a while.")

Would also like to give support to banishing the use of "amazing" "awesome" and "incredible" for all occasions that are not amazing, awesome or incredible.  (And to the young friend who said "Miss Lily, you look incredible", Sweetie, that suggests I lack credibility, not that I am looking good.

My number one pet peeve, however, is best summed up by a T-Shirt slogan on Snorgtees :  "Your incorrect use of the word literally is making me figuratively insane."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 19, 2013, 12:44:46 AM
I had my hand slapped for replying to several on-line complements with "Aw, gee "blush-blush" so I guess I am nominating that phrase.  (Although my response to the snarky comment that I was being juvenile and silly was something on the order of "I spend my whole work day working with people who are silly and juvenile...maybe it just wears off on ya after a while.")

Would also like to give support to banishing the use of "amazing" "awesome" and "incredible" for all occasions that are not amazing, awesome or incredible.  (And to the young friend who said "Miss Lily, you look incredible", Sweetie, that suggests I lack credibility, not that I am looking good.

My number one pet peeve, however, is best summed up by a T-Shirt slogan on Snorgtees :  "Your incorrect use of the word literally is making me figuratively insane."

In the case of "you look incredible", I've always taken that to mean you look so good that if someone told me how good you looked, I'd have a hard time believing anyone could look that good, so it would strain credibility.  Same with amazing... I'm amazed someone can look that good.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jaxsue on January 19, 2013, 09:47:23 AM
Quote
before the industry died).

Potential stupid question , but why? What happened to editing?

It's really more "what happened to publishing?"

Newspapers are operating with bare-bones staff, traditional book publishing is just as bad. E-books are often not edited at all; download a free one and you will see some lovely examples.

They used to have lots of editors. Now they are making do with very few or outsourcing the jobs.


Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: scotcat60 on January 20, 2013, 10:08:09 AM
Well known people , celebrities, referring to others as "Civilians". A British actress used this term, and had me wondering what rank she held in Her Majestie's Armed Forces.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 20, 2013, 10:25:51 AM
Well known people , celebrities, referring to others as "Civilians". A British actress used this term, and had me wondering what rank she held in Her Majestie's Armed Forces.

I always thought "civilian" was the proper term for anyone not in the military, whether the speaker was in the military or not.  :-\
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Julia Mercer on January 20, 2013, 10:33:49 AM
Da Bomb, or Phat
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on January 20, 2013, 11:07:02 AM
Well known people , celebrities, referring to others as "Civilians". A British actress used this term, and had me wondering what rank she held in Her Majestie's Armed Forces.

I always thought "civilian" was the proper term for anyone not in the military, whether the speaker was in the military or not.  :-\

I think scotcat60 means that celebrities are adopting the use of "civilians" for anyone not a celebrity, not the military sense of the word.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Kendo_Bunny on January 20, 2013, 11:36:47 AM

 I'm with those who hate YOLO with a fiery passion. I think that's universal though, I've rarely heard it used seriously, generally its used in a mocking or sarcastic way.

"YOLO - Carpe Diem for stupid people!" - can't remember where I got that.

I know Eddie Izzard used "I have to go now, my grandmother's on fire" in his 'Dress to Kill' tour.


As for phrases I hate, "nails on a chalkboard" makes me cringe. I can feel the pain of hearing it every time I read it.

Also, "fiscal cliff", as if it's not something that we sailed over years ago. The cliff is a distant memory.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 20, 2013, 11:49:47 AM
Also, "fiscal cliff", as if it's not something that we sailed over years ago. The cliff is a distant memory.

I thought this for a while (and indeed am still sick of hearing it) but didn't realize at first that "fiscal cliff" didn't just mean "the economy is going to get bad," which of course already happened years ago, but a very specific event involving several specific laws expiring.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 20, 2013, 01:45:16 PM
One of the dictionary definitions of "ciivilian" is simply "outsider".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on January 20, 2013, 02:57:09 PM


"YOLO - Carpe Diem for stupid people!" - can't remember where I got that.

I don't care where you git it. I love it and am stealing it forthwith.  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: AuntieA on January 20, 2013, 04:12:31 PM
"as per usual". Makes me grind my teeth.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on January 20, 2013, 11:27:38 PM
I just saw a person on another site describe themselves as qorqeous.

Who decided it was cute to replace g's with q's?  >:(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 21, 2013, 12:17:46 AM
I just saw a person on another site describe themselves as qorqeous.

Who decided it was cute to replace g's with q's?  >:(

The same committee that decided that i's should become y's, and s's should become z's.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on January 21, 2013, 12:51:38 AM
Good point.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 21, 2013, 01:08:20 AM
Good point.

::qrynz::

Okay, I'm giving myself a five minute major for that one.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: marcel on January 21, 2013, 02:28:00 AM
I had my hand slapped for replying to several on-line complements with "Aw, gee "blush-blush" so I guess I am nominating that phrase.  (Although my response to the snarky comment that I was being juvenile and silly was something on the order of "I spend my whole work day working with people who are silly and juvenile...maybe it just wears off on ya after a while.")

Would also like to give support to banishing the use of "amazing" "awesome" and "incredible" for all occasions that are not amazing, awesome or incredible.  (And to the young friend who said "Miss Lily, you look incredible", Sweetie, that suggests I lack credibility, not that I am looking good.

My number one pet peeve, however, is best summed up by a T-Shirt slogan on Snorgtees :  "Your incorrect use of the word literally is making me figuratively insane."
that last complaint always reminds me of this though.
http://xkcd.com/1108/ (http://xkcd.com/1108/)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: 123sandy on January 21, 2013, 04:44:04 AM
Just remembered another..."lush". A FB food page I joined has just about everyone describing every morsel as lush. I can't go there anymore.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Klein Bottle on January 21, 2013, 11:58:19 AM
Just remembered another..."lush". A FB food page I joined has just about everyone describing every morsel as lush. I can't go there anymore.

...and every paperback book has at least one blurb on the cover describing it as "riveting."  That's not exactly "trendy",but it is tiresome.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on January 21, 2013, 12:03:47 PM
I’ve only seen it a few times, but it has bothered me every time:

"pregnants"

It is all over Pinterest.

Pregnant is not a noun. It does not have a plural. Unless we’re talking about Dead Space creatures.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on January 21, 2013, 12:08:52 PM
Good point.

::qrynz::

Okay, I'm giving myself a five minute major for that one.

That made my teeth hurt.  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 21, 2013, 12:10:39 PM
I’ve only seen it a few times, but it has bothered me every time:

"pregnants"

It is all over Pinterest.

Pregnant is not a noun. It does not have a plural. Unless we’re talking about Dead Space creatures.

Along that line, "I want to wife her".  I think this is possibly a bad translation, but it keeps cropping up on a page I visit and it is aggravating.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 21, 2013, 12:29:55 PM


Along that line, "I want to wife her".  I think this is possibly a bad translation, but it keeps cropping up on a page I visit and it is aggravating.


How odd.  Some of those neologisms feel a void but that one? I don't see the need for it. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: JeanFromBNA on January 21, 2013, 12:59:43 PM
"Long story short:" 

You just made it longer.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 21, 2013, 01:09:05 PM
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Layla Miller on January 21, 2013, 03:39:04 PM
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: twiggy on January 21, 2013, 03:48:58 PM
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D

I've used the term "little lady" referring to DD and niece. But not often. Young Man/Lady is much more typical
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Layla Miller on January 21, 2013, 03:56:51 PM
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D

I've used the term "little lady" referring to DD and niece. But not often. Young Man/Lady is much more typical

"Little lady" bugs me a little bit, too, though not as much.  I think I associate with someone peering down their nose and saying "Little ladies don't climb trees/play with trucks/etc."  (Not saying you would say something like that--just a weird quirk of my own.  :))
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: twiggy on January 21, 2013, 04:17:52 PM

I've used the term "little lady" referring to DD and niece. But not often. Young Man/Lady is much more typical

"Little lady" bugs me a little bit, too, though not as much.  I think I associate with someone peering down their nose and saying "Little ladies don't climb trees/play with trucks/etc."  (Not saying you would say something like that--just a weird quirk of my own.  :))

Lol, my little lady is just as rough and tumble as her brother. For me, it's more "little ladies don't put bananas in their hair/shriek at Mommy/run in the store" (she's almost 2 :)) or "what a sweet little lady, thank you for sitting so nicely/getting in your carseat/putting away toys"

But I think I'm a bit unusual in that regard. I don't know anyone else IRL who refers to their young children as ladies/gentlemen. I frequently tell 4yo DS that I am raising a gentleman, not a barbarian.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 21, 2013, 04:23:29 PM
To me, "Little Lady" is what a husband calls his wife as a term of endearment when speaking directly to her.

To me, "Little Man" is a term of endearment for a male child, kind of like "Champ" or "Sport".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: flowersintheattic on January 21, 2013, 07:28:59 PM
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D

I don't mind "little man" if it's used as a term of endearment directly to the child - like saying "Way to go, little man!" - but I don't like the idea of someone using it to describe a child to another adult.

It's been a long time since someone mentioned it, but I loathe the terms "hubs" and "hubby," along with "wifey." They make my skin crawl. I also don't like the cutesy pregnant terms, like prego or preggers, or referring to babies and "bubs" or "bubbee," but I don't see that one as much.

And it was a few pages back, but when someone brought up "fetch," all I could think of was Regina George from "Mean Girls": "Stop trying to make fetch happen. It's never going to happen!"

ETA: I'm watching "The Wire" and they just used the term "Little Man."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on January 21, 2013, 07:49:20 PM
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D

This is interesting because I know that I have occasionally used this term before and you're right, I don't say "Little Woman". After reflection, I think it may be because there are fewer really noticeable physical changes in boys - their beards get shaved off, puberty changes are better hidden by clothing, and so on. So there have been times when my stocky toddler nephew is standing next to his dad, 'helping' with a job, with a very serious and grown up expression on his face that he quite literally looks like a "little man".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on January 21, 2013, 07:51:04 PM
A friend on FB just used "hit me up". It immediately reminded me to come and tell this thread how much I hate that phrase.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yarnspinner on January 21, 2013, 10:48:53 PM
Woman's World magazine drives me insane with the use of certain words...they are perfectly normal words and do not bother me except when used within the magazine (which I buy on occasion because I cannot always resist articles promising me "easy ways to be happy").  Among the phrases/words that send me running for a drink and some dark chocolate:

1) Instead of (fattening item) enjoy (woefully small amount of item that is no where near as good as fattening item).  Example  "Instead of having a scoop of red velvet ice cream, enjoy four ounces of plain greek yogurt with sliced strawberries."  Plain Greek yogurt with strawberries may be good, but if what I want is B&JU's Red Velvet Ice Cream, I am NOT going to "enjoy" that yogurt.

2) This also goes for the word "sip".  Instead of a can of Diet Cola, sip ice water with mint and limes steeped in it."  or "Sip green tea"

3) "Easy Ways to Stretch Your Budget"  "Easy ways to Fall Asleep"  "Easy" followed by just about anything that is followed by ideas that you have been trying your whole life and are not just difficult, they mostly never work.

4)  "You see".  Used in the short romantic fiction (I remember a time when Woman's World had three or four page short stories that were often a great deal of fun to read.  Now it's like reading a dear diary insert".  Anyway, the person writing/telling the story(be it fiction or nonfiction) will relate a lengthy episode at the beginning and then back up and start off with "You see, we had been having financial difficulties...."  or whater... In fiction if yu are usuing that phrase you are telling rather than showing your audience.  In nonfiction, you shouldn't have to address the reader in that way because you shouldn't have been starting out with a teaser scene anyway.  In either cae, those two words are like nails on a blackboard and usually signal lazy writing to me.

And yet I will suddenly decide I need to read something and fork over my two dollars to read articles which feature all my least favorite words and phrases a dozen times.  It could be a drinking game for readers.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Shoo on January 21, 2013, 10:58:56 PM
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D

This is interesting because I know that I have occasionally used this term before and you're right, I don't say "Little Woman". After reflection, I think it may be because there are fewer really noticeable physical changes in boys - their beards get shaved off, puberty changes are better hidden by clothing, and so on. So there have been times when my stocky toddler nephew is standing next to his dad, 'helping' with a job, with a very serious and grown up expression on his face that he quite literally looks like a "little man".

I used to call my daughter Little Missy.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: scotcat60 on January 22, 2013, 03:11:03 AM
 think scotcat60 means that celebrities are adopting the use of "civilians" for anyone not a celebrity, not the military sense of the word.

Yes, that was my understanding of the way the term was used. We are indeed all civilians if we are not in the military, but we usually say "Other people" when referring to other people.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CakeEater on January 22, 2013, 03:30:53 AM
I like little man.

However, I have never in my life heard 'Little lady' used as a term of endearment for a grown woman.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Katana_Geldar on January 22, 2013, 04:01:19 AM
Up close and personal is an expression journalists and interviewers use way too often, it's essentially tautology.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 22, 2013, 05:05:00 AM
Event.  Weather event, snow event, rain event, sales event.  Weather, snow, rain, sale.  YOU DON'T NEED EVENT.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 22, 2013, 07:07:49 AM
1) Instead of (fattening item) enjoy (woefully small amount of item that is no where near as good as fattening item).  Example  "Instead of having a scoop of red velvet ice cream, enjoy four ounces of plain greek yogurt with sliced strawberries."  Plain Greek yogurt with strawberries may be good, but if what I want is B&JU's Red Velvet Ice Cream, I am NOT going to "enjoy" that yogurt.

2) This also goes for the word "sip".  Instead of a can of Diet Cola, sip ice water with mint and limes steeped in it."  or "Sip green tea"

Oh! SO much this! Diet "substitutions" that don't even resemble the thing you were actually craving, and all that "sip" language that makes it sound like not only should we be dieting, but we should also be consuming the food/drink in some kind of super-dainty way.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 22, 2013, 07:36:54 AM
I like little man.

However, I have never in my life heard 'Little lady' used as a term of endearment for a grown woman.

Really?  I have quite a few times, always from the SO of the woman.  I hear it being said as, "Hey, little lady, why don't we hit the town?" said almost seductively as she steps into his arms for a kiss.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Perfect Circle on January 22, 2013, 07:57:59 AM
I like little man.

However, I have never in my life heard 'Little lady' used as a term of endearment for a grown woman.

Really?  I have quite a few times, always from the SO of the woman.  I hear it being said as, "Hey, little lady, why don't we hit the town?" said almost seductively as she steps into his arms for a kiss.

I personally would absolutely hate that as a term of endearment from anyone. I'm not a child and that is how I would associate it.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Verloona Ti on January 22, 2013, 09:17:32 AM
Women's magazine writers and editors are apparently under the impression that "lips" and "mouth" are obscene words. So rather than use those words to describe that portion of a  woman's facial anatomy between her chin and her nose....They call it a "POUT".

"Exfoliate your POUT for a sexy party look" "Make your POUT pop with lipstick shade_____"

So annoying, not least because pout is a verb not a noun, PLUS  it's a word I would not associate with people whose age is in double digits. HATE this!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 22, 2013, 09:20:33 AM
Women's magazine writers and editors are apparently under the impression that "lips" and "mouth" are obscene words. So rather than use those words to describe that portion of a  woman's facial anatomy between her chin and her nose....They call it a "POUT".

"Exfoliate your POUT for a sexy party look" "Make your POUT pop with lipstick shade_____"

So annoying, not least because pout is a verb not a noun, PLUS  it's a word I would not associate with people whose age is in double digits. HATE this!

Oh, I forgot all about "pout"! And all the unnecessary alliteration. "For the perfect pout..."

Once when I was in high school I grabbed up a copy of Seventeen and went through it with a purple pen, circling everything that was purple prose. It was most of the magazine. I thought adult magazines would be less condescending, and to my great chagrin found that they were just as bad.

For a while in the nineties, they all got obsessed with "sleek" to mean "thin." Drove me batty.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Twik on January 22, 2013, 09:35:43 AM
Well, I think that "pout" has some implied meanings, that the model, beyond having normal facial anatomy, is doing that supposedly seductive expression that says "I'm not happy, but if you give me ermine or diamonds, I might lighten up enough to make *you* happy, for a few minutes, at least". Because men are supposed to like women like that.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 22, 2013, 10:20:48 AM
Women's magazine writers and editors are apparently under the impression that "lips" and "mouth" are obscene words. So rather than use those words to describe that portion of a  woman's facial anatomy between her chin and her nose....They call it a "POUT".

"Exfoliate your POUT for a sexy party look" "Make your POUT pop with lipstick shade_____"

So annoying, not least because pout is a verb not a noun, PLUS  it's a word I would not associate with people whose age is in double digits. HATE this!


Or is it poutstick?  (Sounds like Chinese dumplings.)




_______




I'll confess that I'm annoyed with "you see", too.  I see it sometimes on here.  It's not offensive, it doesn't make a post incomprehensible, so I chalk it up to it being my own hangup and I just wince inwards. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on January 22, 2013, 03:26:55 PM
1) Instead of (fattening item) enjoy (woefully small amount of item that is no where near as good as fattening item).  Example  "Instead of having a scoop of red velvet ice cream, enjoy four ounces of plain greek yogurt with sliced strawberries."  Plain Greek yogurt with strawberries may be good, but if what I want is B&JU's Red Velvet Ice Cream, I am NOT going to "enjoy" that yogurt.

2) This also goes for the word "sip".  Instead of a can of Diet Cola, sip ice water with mint and limes steeped in it."  or "Sip green tea"

Oh! SO much this! Diet "substitutions" that don't even resemble the thing you were actually craving, and all that "sip" language that makes it sound like not only should we be dieting, but we should also be consuming the food/drink in some kind of super-dainty way.

Slight tangent, but this is a pet hate of mine. I can remember watching an episode of one of those weight loss shows where they were teaching the people how to substitute foods. One of them prepared this elaborate special bread and fruit and yoghurt and low calorie honey alternative thing as a substitute for a pack of chips. Stupidest thing I have ever seen - it was sweet instead of savoury, took about 10 minutes (no exaggeration) to prepare instead of zero, and you had to have about 5 ingredients in your house instead of one. I suspect these people have never MET a person with bad eating habits because no way are my overweight family members going to go for that. It needs to be "Instead of chips, here is a different snack-in-a-pack with lower GI, less salt and less calories. Have that."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jedikaiti on January 22, 2013, 04:31:22 PM
I like little man.

However, I have never in my life heard 'Little lady' used as a term of endearment for a grown woman.

I've never heard it used as a term of endearment for anyone. For me, it conjures up images of a sleazy salescritter talking down to a customer because he can't believe a little lady could possibly know what she was talking about.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mikayla on January 22, 2013, 04:39:21 PM
Most of mine have been covered, but a couple others:

Iconic.  It's ironic that iconic has itself become iconic. 

lil instead of little. 

Poop.  I loathe this word beyond all reason.  I actually think the extreme version (not to be used in polite society) is much nicer.

brah.  Seriously, use bro.  Or just the name.  Or nothing at all.

Raising awareness. I can't explain it, it just hits me wrong.

And I Really Hate Title Typing.  Who Does This and Why? 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MindsEye on January 22, 2013, 04:50:49 PM
"You need to educate yourself" is the one that really sets my rage off and is the one that guarantees that I will automatically dismiss what you have to say.

Think (for the sake of an easy example) a vegan saying that if you would only educate yourself, then you would see that eating vegan is the only reasonable thing to do.

Really?  You think that by implying that I am a complete ignoramus that I will come around to your way of thinking?

I also hate baby talk in all forms.  If you are not talking to a baby/toddler, then do not talk like one.  It is not "cute" or "endearing".  Trust me.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 22, 2013, 05:03:57 PM
I also hate baby talk in all forms.  If you are not talking to a baby/toddler, then do not talk like one.  It is not "cute" or "endearing".  Trust me.

How about an animal?

Thought of a new one for me: First world problem.  It implies that just because I don't live somewhere that I could be taken from the street and impressed into military service at age ten, that no problem I have is of any consequence.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 22, 2013, 05:09:16 PM
I also hate baby talk in all forms.  If you are not talking to a baby/toddler, then do not talk like one.  It is not "cute" or "endearing".  Trust me.

How about an animal?

Thought of a new one for me: First world problem.  It implies that just because I don't live somewhere that I could be taken from the street and impressed into military service at age ten, that no problem I have is of any consequence.

Oh, that phrase totally gets misused and overused. I do feel like there are times it applies, though, like "I was texting on my iPhone and spilled my latte in my Lamborghini." It shouldn't just be applied to any problem that a person has in the first world. I really think it mostly fits when it's also a "bragplain"--like someone is griping about their problem just so they can namedrop the brands involved in their problem.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MindsEye on January 22, 2013, 05:13:19 PM
I also hate baby talk in all forms.  If you are not talking to a baby/toddler, then do not talk like one.  It is not "cute" or "endearing".  Trust me.

How about an animal?

Thought of a new one for me: First world problem.  It implies that just because I don't live somewhere that I could be taken from the street and impressed into military service at age ten, that no problem I have is of any consequence.

Same thing... Is it a puppy/kitten/foal/calf/chick/etc?  Then I think that baby talk is borderline acceptable.  (I say borderline because while my cats may be my "babies" they are not actually "babies" and they are certainly not "furbabies")

I just think that baby talk demeans both the speaker and the listener.  Plus (all former English majors stand up!) it seriously grates on my ears, to the point where I have difficulty listening to it. 

And I agree with you about "first world problem".  Which reminded me of another of mine... "privileged".  Because I am not poor/disabled/a minority then I can't voice an opinion?  And my problems don't matter as much?  (Honestly, I think that I have been hanging out on feminist boards too much lately.)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: nuit93 on January 22, 2013, 05:27:08 PM
I also hate baby talk in all forms.  If you are not talking to a baby/toddler, then do not talk like one.  It is not "cute" or "endearing".  Trust me.

How about an animal?

Thought of a new one for me: First world problem.  It implies that just because I don't live somewhere that I could be taken from the street and impressed into military service at age ten, that no problem I have is of any consequence.

And I agree with you about "first world problem".  Which reminded me of another of mine... "privileged".  Because I am not poor/disabled/a minority then I can't voice an opinion?  And my problems don't matter as much?  (Honestly, I think that I have been hanging out on feminist boards too much lately.)

Well...if you aren't poor/disabled/a minority then to voice an opinion about something related to any of those groups would be taken less seriously.  It's a "walk a mile in their shoes" type of thing.  I can't speak to being a member of "x" group, so I'm not qualified to say how "x" group should feel about "y" issue.  Yeah, I can voice my opinion, but it's not going to mean as much being someone who hasn't lived/experienced the issue firsthand.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: JeanFromBNA on January 22, 2013, 06:56:17 PM
Sustainable/sustainability

Words that have so many meanings that they're now meaningless.

Renewable, reusable, and recyclable are also understandable.

I'm in the environmental industry, and any e-mail advert with the subject line "sustainable" in it goes directly into my trash. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 22, 2013, 07:06:21 PM
"Utilize" instead of "use".  I cringe every time I hear it.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: GreenEyedHawk on January 22, 2013, 07:26:43 PM
Quote
I also hate baby talk in all forms.  If you are not talking to a baby/toddler, then do not talk like one.  It is not "cute" or "endearing".  Trust me.

I just think that baby talk demeans both the speaker and the listener.  Plus (all former English majors stand up!) it seriously grates on my ears, to the point where I have difficulty listening to it. 



This!  This is what I mean about "yummy" and "nummy" and other such words coming from adults.  You're an adult.  Talk like one.  It even grates on my nerves when someone talks baby talk to my dogs or cats.

Also, another one that bothers me is "As a *insert group*.  Mostly I hear "As a parent *opinion on something non-parent related*".  Just because I've chosen not to have kids does not make your opinion more valid than mine.  Specifically, there was an article about an avenue in my town that is well-known for its bar scene.  Men urinating in the gutters, alleys and sidewalks after the bars closed and they were on their way home/waiting for taxis had become a problem to the point where the city decided to install permanent free-standing enclosed public urinals along the avenue to cut down on the problem.  One woman objected" As a parent, I don't want my three-year-old son to see that."  See...what?  A urinal?  And what would you be doing on the avenue at three in the morning with your toddler?  Being a parent doesn't really have anything to do with anything in this particular case.

ETA Sighh, someday maybe I'll get the hang of trimming quote trees.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MariaE on January 23, 2013, 12:03:00 AM
This!  This is what I mean about "yummy" and "nummy" and other such words coming from adults.  You're an adult.  Talk like one.  It even grates on my nerves when someone talks baby talk to my dogs or cats.

I've come to love the word "nummy" because I can no longer hear it without thinking of Sheldon Cooper and his Meemaw ;)

I don't know if they'd qualify as trendy but "could/would/should of" instead of could/would/should have". It's like fingernails on a blackboard.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Amanita on January 23, 2013, 12:35:20 AM

Well...if you aren't poor/disabled/a minority then to voice an opinion about something related to any of those groups would be taken less seriously.  It's a "walk a mile in their shoes" type of thing.  I can't speak to being a member of "x" group, so I'm not qualified to say how "x" group should feel about "y" issue.  Yeah, I can voice my opinion, but it's not going to mean as much being someone who hasn't lived/experienced the issue firsthand.
[/quote]

I think the problem is that some people take it too far- because you're a part of a "privileged" group, none of your problems are as valid or worthy of concern.
I remember a discussion on some "social awareness" site, where the OP was lamenting the state of public transit in her area, namely a huge problem with sexual harassment. Offhand, she admitted to being what would be considered attractive, as if she had to apologize for being "pretty privileged".
The whole discussion went off the rails when others took it upon themselves to berate her for that, as if it were somehow a moral crime to be conventionally attractive. That and dismiss her concerns- that because she belonged to a "privileged" group, she had little to no right to complain about her problem.
In that mess, the real issue got brushed aside- that sexual harassment is a problem for everyone, regardless of how they look. And it can happen to everyone. And nobody should have to be afraid to use transit because they're afraid of being victimized by some foulmouthed neanderthal.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DaisyG on January 23, 2013, 05:45:22 AM
My least favourite word is 'incident' especially on the train announcements near here - e.g. "This train is delayed due to an earlier incident" which gives me no information at all! There was recently a small fire on a train while I was on my way to work. The power was cut to all trains in the area for a few minutes so everything got delayed. The driver of the train I was on kept us up-to-date with what was happening but when I got off, the announcer was just saying that all trains in the area were delayed after an 'incident' with no other information.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 23, 2013, 05:46:30 AM
It seems "privelaged" and "first world problem" fall into the same category.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on January 23, 2013, 05:48:15 AM
My flabbler is gasted.  What's wrong with "I'm flabbergasted"

Jumping in decidedly late: but -- I'm a person who tends to hold grudges lifelong (not approved of on the etiquette scene, I know): some forty years ago, I was greatly offended by the use toward me of "flabbergasted", by a person with whom I was in an adversarial situation in which I thought -- and continue to think -- I was in the right.  From then till now, that has caused me to loathe the "flabbergasted" word, and anything derived from it.  Not rational. not logical, not sensible -- but I see myself hating the word and its derivations -- and never, ever using it myself -- even if I should live to the age of 120.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: marcel on January 23, 2013, 06:25:22 AM
My least favourite word is 'incident' especially on the train announcements near here - e.g. "This train is delayed due to an earlier incident" which gives me no information at all! There was recently a small fire on a train while I was on my way to work. The power was cut to all trains in the area for a few minutes so everything got delayed. The driver of the train I was on kept us up-to-date with what was happening but when I got off, the announcer was just saying that all trains in the area were delayed after an 'incident' with no other information.
I do not see what is wrong with the word inciden here. Do you really expect them to tell you what has happened exactly? Incident gives all the relevant information about what has happened to everybody not involved with the incident.

Your annoyance seems to be not with the word incidence, but with the fact that they will not satisfy your curiosity. What would it have helped the people on the platform that the incident was a fire? Nothing at all, the delays would still be there, the only difference it would make is that people have somethong extra to talk and speculate about amongst themselves.

The only other information they need to give is that there are delays, and how long the delays will take.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 23, 2013, 06:58:13 AM
I can see "Speaking as a" when experience in that area is applicable.   Ie "Speaking as a parent, reasoning with a tired, teething toddler doesn't work, and is an exercise in frustration."

But "Speaking as a parent" in the situation of urinals and people peeing in streets at zero dark thirty makes no sense at all and ridiculous.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: TaurusGirl on January 23, 2013, 07:09:46 AM
*ahem*
It pains me to even write these out:

- "welp" (as a replacement for "well" in the written word, as in "welp, I'm off to bed")
- "cray" (because it's too hard to say "crazy"???)

Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?

Sorry... I do most of my communicating in the written form, and these just drive me up the wall and make me lose hope for the future of the written word.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: athersgeo on January 23, 2013, 07:11:27 AM
My least favourite word is 'incident' especially on the train announcements near here - e.g. "This train is delayed due to an earlier incident" which gives me no information at all! There was recently a small fire on a train while I was on my way to work. The power was cut to all trains in the area for a few minutes so everything got delayed. The driver of the train I was on kept us up-to-date with what was happening but when I got off, the announcer was just saying that all trains in the area were delayed after an 'incident' with no other information.

Actually, my experience says that "incident" usually gives you a pretty good clue that the problem is  a bit more serious than a signal failure.

If it's a technical failure (or line-side vandalisation), they tend to say so. (The number of times I've heard "Sorry for the delay which was caused by thieves stealing the signaling cable" is really quite disturbing!)

If it's because of a crash/fire/something serious that they don't want people to talk about/cause a panic over, it's called an "incident".

And look on the bright side, at least they're telling you SOMETHING! Having been involved in a (minor) train crash, where we were stuck in the middle-of-nowhere Ohio for six hours without any actual announcement of what happened OR how long we were going to be stuck there, I'll take "incident" any day!

As for expressions I'd like to see the back of I don't think I have one. Though I would gladly do without txt spk (as a whole). Does that count?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 23, 2013, 07:18:19 AM
Also, another one that bothers me is "As a *insert group*.  Mostly I hear "As a parent *opinion on something non-parent related*".  Just because I've chosen not to have kids does not make your opinion more valid than mine.  Specifically, there was an article about an avenue in my town that is well-known for its bar scene.  Men urinating in the gutters, alleys and sidewalks after the bars closed and they were on their way home/waiting for taxis had become a problem to the point where the city decided to install permanent free-standing enclosed public urinals along the avenue to cut down on the problem.  One woman objected" As a parent, I don't want my three-year-old son to see that."  See...what?  A urinal?  And what would you be doing on the avenue at three in the morning with your toddler?  Being a parent doesn't really have anything to do with anything in this particular case.

"As a..." also drives me nuts because it always kind of feels like if you don't think this, then you're not a real X. Like, if someone said "As a feminist, I think this smutty book should be banned." If I don't want the book banned, am I not a real feminist? It feels like people are trying to speak for the whole group, to speak with the weight of the whole group, even if the group is not actually that monolithic.

Another example that comes up here every year is that somebody's neighbor will say "As a Christian, I don't celebrate Halloween" to the Christian ehellion who is celebrating Halloween as they speak.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 23, 2013, 08:10:00 AM
The last one bugs me because Halloween is one of my favorite holidays and I am Christian. It's fine if people choose not to for religious convictions but to imply they're better Christians for not participating is irksome.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DaisyG on January 23, 2013, 08:16:10 AM
My least favourite word is 'incident' especially on the train announcements near here - e.g. "This train is delayed due to an earlier incident" which gives me no information at all! There was recently a small fire on a train while I was on my way to work. The power was cut to all trains in the area for a few minutes so everything got delayed. The driver of the train I was on kept us up-to-date with what was happening but when I got off, the announcer was just saying that all trains in the area were delayed after an 'incident' with no other information.

Actually, my experience says that "incident" usually gives you a pretty good clue that the problem is  a bit more serious than a signal failure.

If it's a technical failure (or line-side vandalisation), they tend to say so. (The number of times I've heard "Sorry for the delay which was caused by thieves stealing the signaling cable" is really quite disturbing!)

If it's because of a crash/fire/something serious that they don't want people to talk about/cause a panic over, it's called an "incident".

And look on the bright side, at least they're telling you SOMETHING! Having been involved in a (minor) train crash, where we were stuck in the middle-of-nowhere Ohio for six hours without any actual announcement of what happened OR how long we were going to be stuck there, I'll take "incident" any day!

I think the reason I dislike it is because I have heard it used for everything from signal failures and not enough staffing to serious derailments, not just the more serious stuff.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 23, 2013, 08:23:54 AM


Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?




"Imma" is not a misspelling; it's a transcription of the way it's pronounced, like "gonna" or "wanna".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Twik on January 23, 2013, 08:31:17 AM
"As a..." also drives me nuts because it always kind of feels like if you don't think this, then you're not a real X. Like, if someone said "As a feminist, I think this smutty book should be banned." If I don't want the book banned, am I not a real feminist? It feels like people are trying to speak for the whole group, to speak with the weight of the whole group, even if the group is not actually that monolithic.

Another example that comes up here every year is that somebody's neighbor will say "As a Christian, I don't celebrate Halloween" to the Christian ehellion who is celebrating Halloween as they speak.

On the other hand, people often want to explain that they are taking a particular stand because of their political/religious/philosophical principles.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: SeptGurl on January 23, 2013, 08:46:17 AM
"Double down."

It seems I cannot read a news article or watch a news program these days without someone doubling down about something.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Twik on January 23, 2013, 09:02:02 AM
"Winding down".

Things used to "wind up". The image that gave me was of a finale, after which you knew the event was concluded. "Winding down" makes me think of one of those parties where people end up getting bored and drifting away from, because they're not sure whether the party is over or not. "Winding down" sounds so disorganized.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 23, 2013, 09:26:50 AM
"Like a boss!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Dalek on January 23, 2013, 09:30:54 AM
Phrases like " Because I said so" , " Because, that's why", or " It just is that way" really annoy me. It's like the person wants to debate but doesn't want to put any work into his argument.
I want facts!  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on January 23, 2013, 09:42:12 AM
"As a..." also drives me nuts because it always kind of feels like if you don't think this, then you're not a real X. Like, if someone said "As a feminist, I think this smutty book should be banned." If I don't want the book banned, am I not a real feminist? It feels like people are trying to speak for the whole group, to speak with the weight of the whole group, even if the group is not actually that monolithic.

Another example that comes up here every year is that somebody's neighbor will say "As a Christian, I don't celebrate Halloween" to the Christian ehellion who is celebrating Halloween as they speak.

On the other hand, people often want to explain that they are taking a particular stand because of their political/religious/philosophical principles.

Well, of course. But I think it's more polite and less annoying to use wording that doesn't sound like one is speaking for the entire group. Why not just speak for yourself? "I think this is sexist." "I feel this is morally wrong."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on January 23, 2013, 11:14:59 AM
"Winding down".

Things used to "wind up". The image that gave me was of a finale, after which you knew the event was concluded. "Winding down" makes me think of one of those parties where people end up getting bored and drifting away from, because they're not sure whether the party is over or not. "Winding down" sounds so disorganized.

A big hate of mine. Largely in my case, personal -- was a favourite expression of the smug, pedantic idiot headmaster of the fifth-rate private school which I attended. Largely because of the ludicrous accent in which (this was in the UK) he spoke -- "u-ine-deeng dooowne" -- still makes me angry, fifty years after.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: twiggy on January 23, 2013, 11:41:20 AM
"Winding down".

Things used to "wind up". The image that gave me was of a finale, after which you knew the event was concluded. "Winding down" makes me think of one of those parties where people end up getting bored and drifting away from, because they're not sure whether the party is over or not. "Winding down" sounds so disorganized.

A big hate of mine. Largely in my case, personal -- was a favourite expression of the smug, pedantic idiot headmaster of the fifth-rate private school which I attended. Largely because of the ludicrous accent in which (this was in the UK) he spoke -- "u-ine-deeng dooowne" -- still makes me angry, fifty years after.

I need to hone my reading comprehension skills. I read hamster, and was confused about how a small rodent could have a smug, pedantic (facial) expression. Then, when the hamster started talking, that really hurt my head.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Twik on January 23, 2013, 12:45:36 PM
Hamsters are usually cool, but gerbils can be SOOOO arrogant at times.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jaxsue on January 23, 2013, 01:21:04 PM
*ahem*
It pains me to even write these out:

- "welp" (as a replacement for "well" in the written word, as in "welp, I'm off to bed")
- "cray" (because it's too hard to say "crazy"???)

Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?

Sorry... I do most of my communicating in the written form, and these just drive me up the wall and make me lose hope for the future of the written word.

We are kindred souls.  :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hillia on January 23, 2013, 01:47:15 PM
Adressing an unknown audience as 'people'...'People, read the signs!'  'It's not difficult, people!'  It sounds so condescending.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on January 23, 2013, 02:49:30 PM
"Winding down".

Things used to "wind up". The image that gave me was of a finale, after which you knew the event was concluded. "Winding down" makes me think of one of those parties where people end up getting bored and drifting away from, because they're not sure whether the party is over or not. "Winding down" sounds so disorganized.

A big hate of mine. Largely in my case, personal -- was a favourite expression of the smug, pedantic idiot headmaster of the fifth-rate private school which I attended. Largely because of the ludicrous accent in which (this was in the UK) he spoke -- "u-ine-deeng dooowne" -- still makes me angry, fifty years after.

I need to hone my reading comprehension skills. I read hamster, and was confused about how a small rodent could have a smug, pedantic (facial) expression. Then, when the hamster started talking, that really hurt my head.
twiggy -- I take it that (as it seems) you ultimately got, that the word was "headmaster", not "hamster". I'll say no more.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on January 23, 2013, 03:16:57 PM


Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?




"Imma" is not a misspelling; it's a transcription of the way it's pronounced, like "gonna" or "wanna".

I thing that's fairly generous. I mean it misses the entire middle word and then ends up sounding like something else very common. The first time my daughter played the Gosh-awful song "Imma be" in my presence I really heard "I'm a bee" for the first bit until they started including other lyrics. The *first* time I heard it was Kanye and his infamous awards interruption and I honestly thought that he was just accidentally missing a whole word out of his sentence. Given how clearly he was on *something* I just kept on thinking that until I heard it somewhere else.

I mean, if you say "gunna" with a broad enough Australian accent it sounds like "gunner", but I don't think those are two really easily confused words. I understand language evolves, and I understand urban groups often want their own private language, I just don't have to be happy about it  :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on January 23, 2013, 04:07:14 PM
Adressing an unknown audience as 'people'...'People, read the signs!'  'It's not difficult, people!'  It sounds so condescending.

I'd forgotten about that one. It thoroughly irks me also, and for the same reason.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on January 23, 2013, 04:28:53 PM


Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?




"Imma" is not a misspelling; it's a transcription of the way it's pronounced, like "gonna" or "wanna".

I thing that's fairly generous. I mean it misses the entire middle word and then ends up sounding like something else very common. The first time my daughter played the Gosh-awful song "Imma be" in my presence I really heard "I'm a bee" for the first bit until they started including other lyrics. The *first* time I heard it was Kanye and his infamous awards interruption and I honestly thought that he was just accidentally missing a whole word out of his sentence. Given how clearly he was on *something* I just kept on thinking that until I heard it somewhere else.

I mean, if you say "gunna" with a broad enough Australian accent it sounds like "gunner", but I don't think those are two really easily confused words. I understand language evolves, and I understand urban groups often want their own private language, I just don't have to be happy about it  :)

I think she's spot on, actually.  "I'm going to" changed to "I'm gunna" to "I'mma", just shortening each time.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on January 23, 2013, 05:07:53 PM


Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?




"Imma" is not a misspelling; it's a transcription of the way it's pronounced, like "gonna" or "wanna".

I thing that's fairly generous. I mean it misses the entire middle word and then ends up sounding like something else very common. The first time my daughter played the Gosh-awful song "Imma be" in my presence I really heard "I'm a bee" for the first bit until they started including other lyrics. The *first* time I heard it was Kanye and his infamous awards interruption and I honestly thought that he was just accidentally missing a whole word out of his sentence. Given how clearly he was on *something* I just kept on thinking that until I heard it somewhere else.

I mean, if you say "gunna" with a broad enough Australian accent it sounds like "gunner", but I don't think those are two really easily confused words. I understand language evolves, and I understand urban groups often want their own private language, I just don't have to be happy about it  :)

I think she's spot on, actually.  "I'm going to" changed to "I'm gunna" to "I'mma", just shortening each time.

Oh, I wasn't disagreeing with the theory, I was just having my little middle-aged tantrum because I don't like it  :) I mean, at least YOLO, lol, cray-cray etc aren't already other word(s) that mean something else entirely.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on January 23, 2013, 06:41:03 PM


Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?




"Imma" is not a misspelling; it's a transcription of the way it's pronounced, like "gonna" or "wanna".

I thing that's fairly generous. I mean it misses the entire middle word and then ends up sounding like something else very common. The first time my daughter played the Gosh-awful song "Imma be" in my presence I really heard "I'm a bee" for the first bit until they started including other lyrics. The *first* time I heard it was Kanye and his infamous awards interruption and I honestly thought that he was just accidentally missing a whole word out of his sentence. Given how clearly he was on *something* I just kept on thinking that until I heard it somewhere else.

I mean, if you say "gunna" with a broad enough Australian accent it sounds like "gunner", but I don't think those are two really easily confused words. I understand language evolves, and I understand urban groups often want their own private language, I just don't have to be happy about it  :)

I think she's spot on, actually.  "I'm going to" changed to "I'm gunna" to "I'mma", just shortening each time.

Oh, I wasn't disagreeing with the theory, I was just having my little middle-aged tantrum because I don't like it  :) I mean, at least YOLO, lol, cray-cray etc aren't already other word(s) that mean something else entirely.


It's very sloppy pronunciation, for sure.  I'm trying to imagine someone who is learning English as a second language and has to decipher "Imma" as "I'm going to/gonna" and "Ahnunno" as "I don't know."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Twik on January 25, 2013, 08:50:43 AM
I recall in the excellent series "The Story of English" a discussion of how pronunciation and word usage change in a given population over time. So, the development of "Imma" in place of "I am going to," or even "I'm gonna" is a natural phenomenon. It's one reason why we now have so many different languages.

The problem with a worldwide language such as English, of course, is that at some point, different forms of "English" may develop until they become mutually unintelligible.There are some interesting sociopolitical issues about whether those forms should be considered variants from "standard" English, or treated as different languages.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: SpottedPony on January 25, 2013, 10:13:40 AM
A couple more that annoy me that I wish would go away.  Making it real or it's getting real.  Also B-itches like or B-itch Please. 

Spotted Pony
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: snowflake on January 25, 2013, 10:56:33 AM
Making it real or it's getting real. 

Spotted Pony

I know that this has been around for awhile, but I despise the modern use of the word "real" and "fake."  Whenever I hear, "She's so fake!  She only thinks about clothes and boys!" I automatically think, "But boys and clothes aren't made up, are they?"

Not to mention the fact that I keep hearing people use "real" to excuse their rude/bratty/nasty behavior.  I think kindness is just as real.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: twiggy on January 25, 2013, 11:32:58 AM
I'm getting tired of seeing people use "littles" to mean children. I just saw a FB update "takin the littles to the park"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CreteGirl on January 25, 2013, 12:01:23 PM
"Rocking" used to mean "wearing".  As in she was rocking (or rockin') a new sweater.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mannerless on January 25, 2013, 02:22:25 PM
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on January 25, 2013, 06:11:18 PM
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

I'm good with the first one because of the cat connection, though I prefer "I can haz."  :D

What on earth is "So many feels" supposed to express, though? I haven't run into that one before. Is it something along the lines of "So many emotions"?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: violinp on January 25, 2013, 07:14:53 PM
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

I'm good with the first one because of the cat connection, though I prefer "I can haz."  :D

What on earth is "So many feels" supposed to express, though? I haven't run into that one before. Is it something along the lines of "So many emotions"?

Feels = feelings or emotions, usually sad or bittersweet. It's usually used in the context of "That episode of Game of Thrones gave me so many feels."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 25, 2013, 09:45:09 PM
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

I'm good with the first one because of the cat connection, though I prefer "I can haz."  :D

What on earth is "So many feels" supposed to express, though? I haven't run into that one before. Is it something along the lines of "So many emotions"?

Feels = feelings or emotions, usually sad or bittersweet. It's usually used in the context of "That episode of Game of Thrones gave me so many feels."

I *think* it cam from Imgur, but I can't be positive.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jedikaiti on January 25, 2013, 10:23:25 PM
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

I'm good with the first one because of the cat connection, though I prefer "I can haz."  :D

What on earth is "So many feels" supposed to express, though? I haven't run into that one before. Is it something along the lines of "So many emotions"?

Feels = feelings or emotions, usually sad or bittersweet. It's usually used in the context of "That episode of Game of Thrones gave me so many feels."

Yea, that really isn't the image that phrase invokes, though...
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jaxsue on January 26, 2013, 01:19:40 PM
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

I'm good with the first one because of the cat connection, though I prefer "I can haz."  :D

What on earth is "So many feels" supposed to express, though? I haven't run into that one before. Is it something along the lines of "So many emotions"?

Feels = feelings or emotions, usually sad or bittersweet. It's usually used in the context of "That episode of Game of Thrones gave me so many feels."

Ugh. That's just awful.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Allyson on January 26, 2013, 06:08:52 PM
Along the lines of 'Imma', there's something I've noticed lately, mostly from late teenage women. 'Can I' becomes 'C'I', so it sounds like 'Ky have the remote...' For some reason this makes my teeth itch every time!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: magicdomino on January 27, 2013, 01:19:10 PM
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

I'm good with the first one because of the cat connection, though I prefer "I can haz."  :D

What on earth is "So many feels" supposed to express, though? I haven't run into that one before. Is it something along the lines of "So many emotions"?

Feels = feelings or emotions, usually sad or bittersweet. It's usually used in the context of "That episode of Game of Thrones gave me so many feels."

Yea, that really isn't the image that phrase invokes, though...

I suspect I get the same image.   :P

"Haz" as in "I can haz" is reserved solely for the use of felines in Internet memes.  If you don't have four legs, no thumbs, and weren't born with sharp pointy bits, you cannot have "haz."  While we are on the subject, please do not use LOLcat language for anything except short captions on photos.  Thank you.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on January 27, 2013, 01:48:58 PM

[/quote]

I suspect I get the same image.   :P

"Haz" as in "I can haz" is reserved solely for the use of felines in Internet memes.  If you don't have four legs, no thumbs, and weren't born with sharp pointy bits, you cannot have "haz."  While we are on the subject, please do not use LOLcat language for anything except short captions on photos.  Thank you.
[/quote]


Agreed.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on January 27, 2013, 05:27:17 PM


I suspect I get the same image.   :P

"Haz" as in "I can haz" is reserved solely for the use of felines in Internet memes.  If you don't have four legs, no thumbs, and weren't born with sharp pointy bits, you cannot have "haz."  While we are on the subject, please do not use LOLcat language for anything except short captions on photos.  Thank you.
[/quote]


Agreed.
[/quote]

I tend to use it ironically, but otherwise I agree.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: marcel on February 01, 2013, 08:04:39 AM


I suspect I get the same image.   :P

"Haz" as in "I can haz" is reserved solely for the use of felines in Internet memes.  If you don't have four legs, no thumbs, and weren't born with sharp pointy bits, you cannot have "haz."  While we are on the subject, please do not use LOLcat language for anything except short captions on photos.  Thank you.
[/quote]


Agreed.
[/quote]
Actualy, I prefer captions on cat photo's top be in normal language as well. I don't know about other cats, but mine does not talk that way :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on February 01, 2013, 08:37:41 AM
I think LOLspeak is cute in moderation. I do admit that it starts to bother me when I have to have a decoder ring from a cereal box just to read some of the photo captions.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 01, 2013, 08:44:56 AM
I think LOLspeak is cute in moderation. I do admit that it starts to bother me when I have to have a decoder ring from a cereal box just to read some of the photo captions.

y u no liek kitteh capshuns, r u speshul snoflaek?

(brb, broke brain...)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on February 01, 2013, 09:41:58 AM
I like lolspeak for cat and dog pictures because, to me, it stands to reason that kittehs and puppehs no spel gud.  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on February 01, 2013, 10:03:27 AM
I don’t see "ermahgerd" often enough for it to really bother me, but I just got a captcha which required typing in "ermahgerd captcher" as the solution.

I think that was my tipping point.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Thipu1 on February 01, 2013, 10:07:55 AM
I like lolspeak for cat and dog pictures because, to me, it stands to reason that kittehs and puppehs no spel gud.  ;D

That kind of caption speak always reminds me of an old 'Far Side' cartoon. 

The family dog has posted a sign on the washing machine with the words 'KAT FUD' and an arrow. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: nuit93 on February 01, 2013, 10:43:11 AM
I like lolspeak for cat and dog pictures because, to me, it stands to reason that kittehs and puppehs no spel gud.  ;D

Me too.  Especially my kittehs.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on February 01, 2013, 12:03:35 PM
I miss Far Side!

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: hobish on February 01, 2013, 01:30:15 PM
I don’t see "ermahgerd" often enough for it to really bother me, but I just got a captcha which required typing in "ermahgerd captcher" as the solution.

I think that was my tipping point.

Oh, yes, so much. I don't know why, but the ermahgerd thing creeps me out. Where did it even come from?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on February 01, 2013, 02:08:44 PM
http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/ermahgerd
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on February 01, 2013, 03:10:27 PM
I think LOLspeak is cute in moderation. I do admit that it starts to bother me when I have to have a decoder ring from a cereal box just to read some of the photo captions.

y u no liek kitteh capshuns, r u speshul snoflaek?

(brb, broke brain...)


LOL! Just L-O-L!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: hobish on February 01, 2013, 03:32:40 PM
http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/ermahgerd

Thanks, Dottie! I was going to come back and post that. Great minds and all that :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Fleur on February 01, 2013, 03:35:20 PM


'All the'. As in a lot of. 'This Christmas I'm not going to stick to my diet, I'll be eating ALL THE FOODS'. Aarghh, why not just say 'a lot of food'. It sounds so childish! There is one website which is awful for it. It is mostly run by twenty and thirty something women, and they all sound so immature! As if they are trying to be highschoolers, it actually makes me embarrased for them.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: hobish on February 01, 2013, 03:46:08 PM


'All the'. As in a lot of. 'This Christmas I'm not going to stick to my diet, I'll be eating ALL THE FOODS'. Aarghh, why not just say 'a lot of food'. It sounds so childish! There is one website which is awful for it. It is mostly run by twenty and thirty something women, and they all sound so immature! As if they are trying to be highschoolers, it actually makes me embarrased for them.

Now that one i think i can identify. I am pretty sure it comes from Hyperbole and a Half, and her post with "Clean all the things!" It's really funny, the post and the blog in general. I don't know if that makes it a little less annoying to you.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Fleur on February 01, 2013, 03:52:13 PM


'All the'. As in a lot of. 'This Christmas I'm not going to stick to my diet, I'll be eating ALL THE FOODS'. Aarghh, why not just say 'a lot of food'. It sounds so childish! There is one website which is awful for it. It is mostly run by twenty and thirty something women, and they all sound so immature! As if they are trying to be highschoolers, it actually makes me embarrased for them.

Now that one i think i can identify. I am pretty sure it comes from Hyperbole and a Half, and her post with "Clean all the things!" It's really funny, the post and the blog in general. I don't know if that makes it a little less annoying to you.

Ah, thanks for the info. I wasn't aware of that blog. I think that the reason I find it annoying is they use this phrase all the time-if it was just once or twice I wouldn't even have noticed.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on February 01, 2013, 03:56:14 PM
Has anyone else's workplace been suddenly overrun by people signing off e-mails with the phrase "Warm regards" instead of, say, "Sincerely" or "Thanks"? Everybody and his uncle does it where I work and I find it insincere and smarmy.

Also spreading like wildfire here is the tendency to replace "about" with "around." Examples include:
- We have some concerns around the budget for next quarter.
- In a few minutes, I'll talk around the first three points on this slide.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: magicdomino on February 01, 2013, 04:08:48 PM


'All the'. As in a lot of. 'This Christmas I'm not going to stick to my diet, I'll be eating ALL THE FOODS'. Aarghh, why not just say 'a lot of food'. It sounds so childish! There is one website which is awful for it. It is mostly run by twenty and thirty something women, and they all sound so immature! As if they are trying to be highschoolers, it actually makes me embarrased for them.

Now that one i think i can identify. I am pretty sure it comes from Hyperbole and a Half, and her post with "Clean all the things!" It's really funny, the post and the blog in general. I don't know if that makes it a little less annoying to you.

Ah, thanks for the info. I wasn't aware of that blog. I think that the reason I find it annoying is they use this phrase all the time-if it was just once or twice I wouldn't even have noticed.

That's true of a lot of trendy expressions.  The are cute or clever the first time, especially if you get the reference.  The might even be cute the next few times.  When you hear them all of the time, under circumstances that have little to do with the original phrase, the expressions just sound irritating.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on February 01, 2013, 04:33:03 PM
Has anyone else's workplace been suddenly overrun by people signing off e-mails with the phrase "Warm regards" instead of, say, "Sincerely" or "Thanks"? Everybody and his uncle does it where I work and I find it insincere and smarmy.

The one that always cracks me up is a spiritual sign-off when the rest of the message is a nastygram.

"You stink and your mother dresses you funny!
Namaste,
Me"

"Go to the hot place with pitchforks!
Blessings,
Me"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MrsJWine on February 01, 2013, 04:38:25 PM
Along the lines of 'Imma', there's something I've noticed lately, mostly from late teenage women. 'Can I' becomes 'C'I', so it sounds like 'Ky have the remote...' For some reason this makes my teeth itch every time!

Huh. I think I've always said this. At least, when talking at normal conversation speed. It's a natural contraction of the two words.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Kendo_Bunny on February 01, 2013, 06:56:12 PM
Ah, thanks for the info. I wasn't aware of that blog. I think that the reason I find it annoying is they use this phrase all the time-if it was just once or twice I wouldn't even have noticed.

http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/06/this-is-why-ill-never-be-adult.html

Yeah, it's a quote/meme that works sometimes.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on February 01, 2013, 06:57:41 PM
Ah, thanks for the info. I wasn't aware of that blog. I think that the reason I find it annoying is they use this phrase all the time-if it was just once or twice I wouldn't even have noticed.

http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/06/this-is-why-ill-never-be-adult.html

Yeah, it's a quote/meme that works sometimes.

I'm a fan of this meme myself, but I can see how hearing it all the darn time could get old.

OT, but I've stopped directing people to hyperbole and a half because I don't want them to share the constant heartbreak of waiting for an update  :'(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 03, 2013, 08:11:00 PM
"Girlish Figure" I know it's not a really new term so not trendy but oh I hate it.  I don't actually hear it that more and I think it's partly because I moved to an area where people aren't nearly as image conscious as they were where I used to live.   I used to work in a body image obsessed office and between them and my parents I heard the "You need to keep your girlish figure!" well into my 20's.  A 5lb gain got comments of "Why are you gaining weight?" or "Do you really need to eat that? Watch that girlish figure!"  ::)  My mother once insinuated that keeping a girlish figure is how you keep a man interested/happy.  :P

I'm 5'2", not very curvy but I do have some where a woman is supposed to have 'em. I'm in a size 10 and I'm cool with that, as I look healthy and feel good about myself.  So if I did hear anyone comment about me keeping my girlish figure, well I'm still working on a polite response to that but as I said, I don't hear it as much so don't really need to.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Tabby Uprising on February 03, 2013, 08:36:52 PM
I am quite tired of the phrase "swag" because I do seem to encounter it frequently.  I swear I'll hear it in ads for a dentist's office. Visit Dr. Dentifrice and leave with a personal swag bag of floss and a toothbrush  Bleah!  It's embarrassing when you're trying to be cool by using a catch phrase past it's expiration date.  And I say this as someone who excels in not being cool. 

I also hate "keeping it real" because that's simply a euphemism for "I'm about to be horribly rude, but please note I can dish it out but not take it".

Otherwise, a lot of these phrases don't bother me because I don't encounter them that frequently. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Slartibartfast on February 03, 2013, 09:02:07 PM
(http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/period_speech.png)

(from www.xkcd.com)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on February 03, 2013, 09:29:07 PM
"Girlish Figure" I know it's not a really new term so not trendy but oh I hate it.  I don't actually hear it that more and I think it's partly because I moved to an area where people aren't nearly as image conscious as they were where I used to live.   I used to work in a body image obsessed office and between them and my parents I heard the "You need to keep your girlish figure!" well into my 20's.  A 5lb gain got comments of "Why are you gaining weight?" or "Do you really need to eat that? Watch that girlish figure!"  ::)  My mother once insinuated that keeping a girlish figure is how you keep a man interested/happy.  :P

I've noticed an uptick in using "girlish figure" ironically--for example, I know some guys who use it when trying to talk themselves out of junk food.  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 03, 2013, 09:57:56 PM
Now that would make me giggle, from a guy referring to himself.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: afbluebelle on February 03, 2013, 10:02:54 PM
I am quite tired of the phrase "swag" because I do seem to encounter it frequently.  I swear I'll hear it in ads for a dentist's office. Visit Dr. Dentifrice and leave with a personal swag bag of floss and a toothbrush  Bleah!  It's embarrassing when you're trying to be cool by using a catch phrase past it's expiration date.  And I say this as someone who excels in not being cool. 

I also hate "keeping it real" because that's simply a euphemism for "I'm about to be horribly rude, but please note I can dish it out but not take it".

Otherwise, a lot of these phrases don't bother me because I don't encounter them that frequently.

See that wouldn't bother me, because it is using swag in the way I've always heard it used. Race swag, event swag, stuff you get for attending something. I just don't understand modern swag and how it relates to neon colors and flat brimmed hats.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on February 03, 2013, 11:17:03 PM
"Girlish Figure" I know it's not a really new term so not trendy but oh I hate it.  I don't actually hear it that more and I think it's partly because I moved to an area where people aren't nearly as image conscious as they were where I used to live.   I used to work in a body image obsessed office and between them and my parents I heard the "You need to keep your girlish figure!" well into my 20's.  A 5lb gain got comments of "Why are you gaining weight?" or "Do you really need to eat that? Watch that girlish figure!"  ::)  My mother once insinuated that keeping a girlish figure is how you keep a man interested/happy.  :P

I've noticed an uptick in using "girlish figure" ironically--for example, I know some guys who use it when trying to talk themselves out of junk food.  ;D

One of my guy friends did use that excuse. However, he's a big joker, so it makes sense. He'll be in a show where he's going to be flying around the stage, so he's trying to make it easier on the crew pulling him around.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on February 05, 2013, 09:52:39 AM
What I've been seeing a lot lately.

Den = then
Stahp = stop


Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BabylonSister on February 05, 2013, 10:17:08 AM
I've seen "dafuq?", which is obviously for "what the f...?" It gets annoying after a while.


I also dislike "Ain't nobody got time for that."  Not because of the botched English, which has its place sometimes, because people post that as a comment on craft/DYI pages.  So you don't want to make things yourself? Fine, then, don't.  Some people, however, like to take the time to do it.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on February 05, 2013, 11:50:35 AM
I've seen "dafuq?", which is obviously for "what the f...?" It gets annoying after a while.


I also dislike "Ain't nobody got time for that."  Not because of the botched English, which has its place sometimes, because people post that as a comment on craft/DYI pages.  So you don't want to make things yourself? Fine, then, don't.  Some people, however, like to take the time to do it.

There was a video of a lady being interviewed on the news after a fire in her apartment building.  The animated way in which she said, "Ain't nobody got time for that!" is the fodder for a lot of memes.  I wonder if that is why you've seen an influx of this, perhaps?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on February 05, 2013, 12:09:06 PM
I like Sweet Brown!  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43PkC2_Bwtw

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on February 05, 2013, 12:13:13 PM
I like Sweet Brown!  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43PkC2_Bwtw

I admit she cracks up me!  "Oh lord Jesus there's a fahr!"  We quote her constantly in my house.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on February 05, 2013, 12:32:00 PM
:D  There are some funny Automixes of it as well!  She cracks me up, too.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 05, 2013, 12:48:30 PM
I wondered about that myself and then googled it and cracked up when I saw the video.   It tickles me when I see some really fancy nail art that is very nice and the pinner has apparently done it rather than getting it done somewhere.

I respect the time and talent it takes to do something that intricate but it would take me probably about half a day to get that done and I do not have steady hands so it would be a day of painting the nail, wiping it off when it smudged or the line shook or what have you.  I ain't got time for that! LOL!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on February 05, 2013, 01:09:14 PM
I also dislike "Ain't nobody got time for that."  Not because of the botched English, which has its place sometimes, because people post that as a comment on craft/DYI pages.  So you don't want to make things yourself? Fine, then, don't.  Some people, however, like to take the time to do it.

I agree.  I don't mind the meme, but it's pointless to post something like that, at least on pages around DIY or crafts.  Personal blog, fine.  :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Ohjustlovely on February 05, 2013, 02:02:28 PM
I also dislike baby-like words, such as "nom" or "yummers."

I also dislike "hating on."

I feel a twing of discomfort when I hear "on the same page" because it implies some are not paying attention. Now, what are doing if not communicating? Oh, we are "not on the same page." Most people whom I have found using the phrase are the ones aren't "on the same page." They remind me of the instance of two small children fighting "you are!" and the other retorting "no YOU are!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BeagleMommy on February 05, 2013, 02:26:17 PM
I also hate cougar.  Frankly, I don't care who other people are dating unless it is my DS.  One of the local saying that I detest is "hayna".  It is used mostly like this:

We're going to the store, hayna or no?  Supposedly, it is a mangling of the words "ain't it".  Which would bother me almost as much.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on February 05, 2013, 02:31:10 PM
Quote
I feel a twing of discomfort when I hear "on the same page" because it implies some are not paying attention.

I use that.  But it's to make sure I'M on the same page as someone - not that they're wrong.  Like at work, I'll contact them to make sure that I'm on the same page with what I'm to be doing or something like that.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hillia on February 05, 2013, 02:32:55 PM
Someone going 'mama bear' or 'mama grizzly' in response to an attack, perceived or real, on their kids.  Anything from refusing the child a second ice cream to full abduction gets this response.  Can we all just agree that yes, most parents do love their kids and would do anything possible to protect them?

Running a close second are people who, when refused some child-related accommodation, respond with, 'But you don't understaaaaaand!  I looooooove my kids!'  The one that almost drove me around the bend was the woman who shared a workspace with me at a part time job - she used the space during the day and I used it at night.  She covered the workstation with photos of her daughter, to the point where I couldn't use the keyboard or see half of the screen (this also tells you a lot about her work habits).  So I would carefully remove the pictures and place them neatly in a safe spot on the desk, and every day she would wait for me at shift change to scream about how I must hate my son because I didn't cover my workspace with his picture, and it wasn't her fault if I was a terrible, unfeeling mother and I just didn't understaaaaaand...
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on February 05, 2013, 09:37:15 PM
*Hangs head in shame*

I am guilty of frequent use of the words "nom" and "dafuq".

We also quote Sweet Brown a lot in my household.  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Ohjustlovely on February 05, 2013, 10:46:09 PM
Quote
I feel a twing of discomfort when I hear "on the same page" because it implies some are not paying attention.

I use that.  But it's to make sure I'M on the same page as someone - not that they're wrong.  Like at work, I'll contact them to make sure that I'm on the same page with what I'm to be doing or something like that.

Well, it's just me. I don't say anything.  Maybe I am around a lot of people who are stuck with using that phrase too much, feel everybody should be on "their" page...
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 06, 2013, 05:26:32 AM
*Hangs head in shame*

I am guilty of frequent use of the words "nom" and "dafuq".

We also quote Sweet Brown a lot in my household.  ;D

I'll join you in the corner, as I seem to be fond of ermagerd and stahp.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on February 06, 2013, 09:12:29 AM
J totally forgot about ermagerd. Yeah, I'm gonna be in this corner a while.  8)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Amava on February 06, 2013, 09:34:08 AM
J totally forgot about ermagerd. Yeah, I'm gonna be in this corner a while.  8)

Nice. Would you like some Gersberrmps Berks to keep you busy in that corner?  ;)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 06, 2013, 09:44:39 AM
J totally forgot about ermagerd. Yeah, I'm gonna be in this corner a while.  8)

Nice. Would you like some Gersberrmps Berks to keep you busy in that corner?  ;)

::Trying so.. SO... hard not to type what I'm thinking::
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Amava on February 06, 2013, 10:03:09 AM
J totally forgot about ermagerd. Yeah, I'm gonna be in this corner a while.  8)

Nice. Would you like some Gersberrmps Berks to keep you busy in that corner?  ;)

::Trying so.. SO... hard not to type what I'm thinking::

Lol... what is it? Do you want me to stahp?  ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 06, 2013, 02:05:53 PM
J totally forgot about ermagerd. Yeah, I'm gonna be in this corner a while.  8)

Nice. Would you like some Gersberrmps Berks to keep you busy in that corner?  ;)

::Trying so.. SO... hard not to type what I'm thinking::

Lol... what is it? Do you want me to stahp?  ;D
I get to consolidate!

"Ermagerd, stahp!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: eltf177 on February 07, 2013, 05:28:08 AM
For me it's "person of interest." Everytime I hear it I know what the cops are really trying to say: "We have no clues and no suspects, but if we admit it we look like idiots. So we use this term to fool the public into thinking we're actually making headway when we actually are just treading water."

I think of  Richard Jewel and Stephen Hatfill everytime I hear this ridiculous phrase...
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: zyrs on February 13, 2013, 06:39:38 AM
u·nique
[yoo-neek]
adjective
1.existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2.having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3.limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4.limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5.not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

Unique does not mean "Come to our store where you and 5 billion other people can buy the same exact unique item."  It's over-used in ads, newscasts, and printed media.


Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: rose red on February 13, 2013, 09:56:23 AM
Fro Yo (frozen yogurt).

I think it's a name of a shop, but now I just hear it as a generic term.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yarnspinner on February 13, 2013, 10:11:33 AM
u·nique
[yoo-neek]
adjective
1.existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2.having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3.limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4.limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5.not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

Unique does not mean "Come to our store where you and 5 billion other people can buy the same exact unique item."  It's over-used in ads, newscasts, and printed media.




A friend of mine used to say "It's the most unique thing I have ever seen!"

Our other friend, the grammar cop, finally said "Is it more unique than the most unique thing you saw LAST week?"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 13, 2013, 11:58:09 AM
u·nique
[yoo-neek]
adjective
1.existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2.having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3.limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4.limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5.not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

Unique does not mean "Come to our store where you and 5 billion other people can buy the same exact unique item."  It's over-used in ads, newscasts, and printed media.




A friend of mine used to say "It's the most unique thing I have ever seen!"

Our other friend, the grammar cop, finally said "Is it more unique than the most unique thing you saw LAST week?"

Most unique is like absolutely final.  Both words are definitive... they can't be modified.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Seraphia on February 13, 2013, 01:20:44 PM
u·nique
[yoo-neek]
adjective
1.existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2.having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3.limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4.limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5.not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

Unique does not mean "Come to our store where you and 5 billion other people can buy the same exact unique item."  It's over-used in ads, newscasts, and printed media.




A friend of mine used to say "It's the most unique thing I have ever seen!"

Our other friend, the grammar cop, finally said "Is it more unique than the most unique thing you saw LAST week?"

Most unique is like absolutely final.  Both words are definitive... they can't be modified.

Thank you! This is one of mine too. "Our cupcakes will have more unique flavors than..." NO THEY WON'T. They can have unusual, rare, uncommon, special, different, surprising flavors. But they do not, will not, and cannot have, more unique flavors, because unique has no gradations. The phrasing is further undermined to a teeth-gritting degree when the "unique" flavor is something like salted caramel or mocha strawberry, which maybe not everybody has come up with, but certainly more than one individual has.

DH just rolls his eyes now when I start shouting "Non-modifiable adjective!" at the television. I think he's finally gotten used to me arguing with cooking shows.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Twik on February 13, 2013, 03:14:52 PM
For me it's "person of interest." Everytime I hear it I know what the cops are really trying to say: "We have no clues and no suspects, but if we admit it we look like idiots. So we use this term to fool the public into thinking we're actually making headway when we actually are just treading water."

I think of  Richard Jewel and Stephen Hatfill everytime I hear this ridiculous phrase...

I assume it means "we have a sort-of suspect, but we won't call him that, in case we're wrong, and he sues us."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Twik on February 13, 2013, 03:16:25 PM
Well, if I painted five paintings from scratch, could I not say I had five unique paintings, if each one was different from any other painting out there?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 13, 2013, 03:24:09 PM
Well, if I painted five paintings from scratch, could I not say I had five unique paintings, if each one was different from any other painting out there?

Yes, but your painting wouldn't be more unique than any other painting (assuming said painting was also unique).  Unique is a binary state, it either is or is not.  I think Seraphia meant "more unique" like "more flavorful" or "more worrisome", rather than "more toys" or "more cookies".

In any event, I don't WANT something that tastes unique.  We've discovered most of the really good flavors by now.  Something that tastes unique is going to be, like, garlic and pork infused bananas.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Slartibartfast on February 13, 2013, 06:17:09 PM
Having something that's "a little unique" whatever is like being "a little pregnant."  We do use both as a shorthand for other characteristics, but they're either true or they're not.  (Someone who is "very pregnant" may be showing more than someone who is "a little pregnant," but they're both equally pregnant.)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Katana_Geldar on February 13, 2013, 06:25:07 PM
What do people mean by 'fall pregnant'?  What did you do? Fall over a man on the road?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: afbluebelle on February 13, 2013, 09:19:42 PM
What do people mean by 'fall pregnant'?  What did you do? Fall over a man on the road?

I'll be quoting Eminem for a week because of that statement ;D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on February 13, 2013, 09:28:43 PM
What do people mean by 'fall pregnant'?  What did you do? Fall over a man on the road?

I'll be quoting Eminem for a week because of that statement ;D

Haha!  I actually quoted that to the Eagle upon reading Katana_Geldar's question...he just looked at me, clueless.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on February 13, 2013, 09:41:11 PM
u·nique
[yoo-neek]
adjective
1.existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2.having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3.limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4.limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5.not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

Unique does not mean "Come to our store where you and 5 billion other people can buy the same exact unique item."  It's over-used in ads, newscasts, and printed media.




A friend of mine used to say "It's the most unique thing I have ever seen!"

Our other friend, the grammar cop, finally said "Is it more unique than the most unique thing you saw LAST week?"

Most unique is like absolutely final.  Both words are definitive... they can't be modified.

Thank you! This is one of mine too. "Our cupcakes will have more unique flavors than..." NO THEY WON'T. They can have unusual, rare, uncommon, special, different, surprising flavors. But they do not, will not, and cannot have, more unique flavors, because unique has no gradations.

Are you sure they don't mean "a larger quantity of unique flavors"--as in, they have 6 unique flavors while the other place only has 5--rather than that any specific flavor is "uniquer" than any other flavor?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Sharnita on February 13, 2013, 10:47:02 PM
For me it's "person of interest." Everytime I hear it I know what the cops are really trying to say: "We have no clues and no suspects, but if we admit it we look like idiots. So we use this term to fool the public into thinking we're actually making headway when we actually are just treading water."

I think of  Richard Jewel and Stephen Hatfill everytime I hear this ridiculous phrase...

I assume it means "we have a sort-of suspect, but we won't call him that, in case we're wrong, and he sues us."

Twik, that is what it means to me, too
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Seraphia on February 14, 2013, 11:15:37 AM
u·nique
[yoo-neek]
adjective
1.existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2.having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3.limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4.limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5.not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

Unique does not mean "Come to our store where you and 5 billion other people can buy the same exact unique item."  It's over-used in ads, newscasts, and printed media.




A friend of mine used to say "It's the most unique thing I have ever seen!"

Our other friend, the grammar cop, finally said "Is it more unique than the most unique thing you saw LAST week?"

Most unique is like absolutely final.  Both words are definitive... they can't be modified.

Thank you! This is one of mine too. "Our cupcakes will have more unique flavors than..." NO THEY WON'T. They can have unusual, rare, uncommon, special, different, surprising flavors. But they do not, will not, and cannot have, more unique flavors, because unique has no gradations.

Are you sure they don't mean "a larger quantity of unique flavors"--as in, they have 6 unique flavors while the other place only has 5--rather than that any specific flavor is "uniquer" than any other flavor?

Sorry, I should have continued my example sentence. When 'more' is being used as its own adjective, (e.g. "we have more food") that's fine. But trying to say something is "more unique" than something else, or claiming that a thing is "the most unique" of the things, that's what makes me a little grouchy.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: BeagleMommy on February 14, 2013, 11:49:33 AM
u·nique
[yoo-neek]
adjective
1.existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2.having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3.limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4.limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5.not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

Unique does not mean "Come to our store where you and 5 billion other people can buy the same exact unique item."  It's over-used in ads, newscasts, and printed media.




A friend of mine used to say "It's the most unique thing I have ever seen!"

Our other friend, the grammar cop, finally said "Is it more unique than the most unique thing you saw LAST week?"

Most unique is like absolutely final.  Both words are definitive... they can't be modified.

Thank you! This is one of mine too. "Our cupcakes will have more unique flavors than..." NO THEY WON'T. They can have unusual, rare, uncommon, special, different, surprising flavors. But they do not, will not, and cannot have, more unique flavors, because unique has no gradations. The phrasing is further undermined to a teeth-gritting degree when the "unique" flavor is something like salted caramel or mocha strawberry, which maybe not everybody has come up with, but certainly more than one individual has.

DH just rolls his eyes now when I start shouting "Non-modifiable adjective!" at the television. I think he's finally gotten used to me arguing with cooking shows.

Thank you, x1000000000!  Would you mind terribly if I start yelling "Non-modifiable adjective" as well?  I was watching a local program where a chef described his dish as having the "most unique" flavor.  What did he make?  Fetuccini with shrimp.  Grrrrr!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Ms_Cellany on February 14, 2013, 12:32:39 PM
Professional writer here:

I'm fine with "more unique" or "very unique."  Think of a line of vases, each different in some way: one is an irregular shape, one has spectacular colors, one is sleek and made of metal, etc.  Then, at the end, is a vase made of cheesecloth cast in resin, with embedded chocolate dragons, and wooden feed hand-carved in the shape of Mickey Mouse gloves, painted in stripes.

Each vase is unique, but that one is really unique.

"Mass exodus," OTOH, just irks me.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 14, 2013, 12:49:20 PM
Professional writer here:

I'm fine with "more unique" or "very unique."  Think of a line of vases, each different in some way: one is an irregular shape, one has spectacular colors, one is sleek and made of metal, etc.  Then, at the end, is a vase made of cheesecloth cast in resin, with embedded chocolate dragons, and wooden feed hand-carved in the shape of Mickey Mouse gloves, painted in stripes.

Each vase is unique, but that one is really unique.

"Mass exodus," OTOH, just irks me.

Sorry, still no.  If there's only one of something in all the universe, it can't be more only of is something in all the universe than something else.  It can be more peculiar, more differing, more interesting, even more artistic, but it can't be more unique.  It *can*, however, be unique i more ways than something else.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Betelnut on February 14, 2013, 01:51:25 PM
"Jump the shark"

It just seems to be used when a TV show, movie or whatever irritates you rather than when it have an episode of sheer ridiculousness.  Being irritated with a show is not the same as a show doing something that totally destroys its integrity.

"The show totally jumped the shark when it had Colleen eat a doughnut!  I mean, she would never do that!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MrTango on February 14, 2013, 01:57:08 PM
"Jump the shark"

It just seems to be used when a TV show, movie or whatever irritates you rather than when it have an episode of sheer ridiculousness.  Being irritated with a show is not the same as a show doing something that totally destroys its integrity.

"The show totally jumped the shark when it had Colleen eat a doughnut!  I mean, she would never do that!"

The phrase is actually a reference to an episode of the show Happy Days, wherein the Fonz is water-skiing and ends up having to literally jump over a shark.  Of course, the more ridiculous part of that scene is that he's still wearing his leather jacket while water skiing...

A variant on that is "Nuke the Fridge," referencing the scene in the 4th Indiana Jones movie in which Harrison Ford climbs into a lead-lined refrigerator to survive a nuclear blast.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Betelnut on February 14, 2013, 02:38:56 PM
"Jump the shark"

It just seems to be used when a TV show, movie or whatever irritates you rather than when it have an episode of sheer ridiculousness.  Being irritated with a show is not the same as a show doing something that totally destroys its integrity.

"The show totally jumped the shark when it had Colleen eat a doughnut!  I mean, she would never do that!"

The phrase is actually a reference to an episode of the show Happy Days, wherein the Fonz is water-skiing and ends up having to literally jump over a shark.  Of course, the more ridiculous part of that scene is that he's still wearing his leather jacket while water skiing...

A variant on that is "Nuke the Fridge," referencing the scene in the 4th Indiana Jones movie in which Harrison Ford climbs into a lead-lined refrigerator to survive a nuclear blast.

I know where the phrase comes from.  I just don't like it being used just because someone doesn't like a plot twist.  It is used too often.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hazmat on February 14, 2013, 05:00:28 PM
Hubby-kins or Wifey-kins.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: artk2002 on February 14, 2013, 08:39:16 PM
Unique is a binary state, it either is or is not.

Maybe yes, maybe no. In an Aristotolean space, where the law of the excluded middle applies, you would be right. But if you apply fuzzy logic, it isn't a binary proposition. Many things that appear binary aren't really. Take "warm." It's either warm or it isn't, right?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 14, 2013, 09:13:41 PM
Unique is a binary state, it either is or is not.

Maybe yes, maybe no. In an Aristotolean space, where the law of the excluded middle applies, you would be right. But if you apply fuzzy logic, it isn't a binary proposition. Many things that appear binary aren't really. Take "warm." It's either warm or it isn't, right?

Warm as in 70 degrees, or as in 80 degrees?  But something can't be "slightly unique".  Unique means there's only one of it.  How can something be slightly one of a kind?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: snowdragon on February 14, 2013, 09:34:32 PM
"He's just a kid" - so he can do/say/be whereever and whatever he wants

"It's the kid's world"

"You're too old for that"

"Fluffy" - meaning fat


"YOLO" - usually in defense of some horribly rude behavior

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Allyson on February 15, 2013, 12:03:45 AM
This one is a term that is really useful to describe a specific behaviour, but is starting to become overused on certain blogs and forums I read..'Gaslighting'. It is supposed to mean a sort of psychological abuse or torment where one convinces the victim to doubt their perceptions and sanity. It's been discussed a lot more recently on some of the social justice and feminist sites I read.

But, rather like hobish's bullying example above (which I also really agree with) it's starting to be used in situations where it's not really accurate. I've seen it applied to situations where it really just seems that both people disagree and are perhaps having a heated argument. I've also seen it applied anytime someone calls someone else 'too sensitive'. They might be *wrong*, they might even be a jerk, but I think jumping to the conclusion that it's intentionally trying to wear down someone's defenses is not always warranted.

I think this sort of thing probably happens anytime a social issue starts getting recognized more--some people will begin applying it to all situations that could possibly be that thing.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Katana_Geldar on February 15, 2013, 02:53:35 AM
Gaslighting refers to a movie.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Betelnut on February 15, 2013, 02:55:16 AM
Unique is a binary state, it either is or is not.

Maybe yes, maybe no. In an Aristotolean space, where the law of the excluded middle applies, you would be right. But if you apply fuzzy logic, it isn't a binary proposition. Many things that appear binary aren't really. Take "warm." It's either warm or it isn't, right?

Warm as in 70 degrees, or as in 80 degrees?  But something can't be "slightly unique".  Unique means there's only one of it.  How can something be slightly one of a kind?

Twins?  They aren't unique (there are two of them) but they ARE unique...?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 15, 2013, 05:41:44 AM
Gaslighting refers to a movie.

I caught that movie on tv once but couldn't bring myself to watch the whole thing, it was just too disturbing.  And well, I think it kind of depends. If it's just one instance with that one person saying "You're too sensitive!" then I wouldn't call it gaslighting, but if it's sort of an ongoing thing it would be a red flag in addition to other signs of emotional abuse.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MrTango on February 15, 2013, 06:38:10 AM
Unique is a binary state, it either is or is not.

Maybe yes, maybe no. In an Aristotolean space, where the law of the excluded middle applies, you would be right. But if you apply fuzzy logic, it isn't a binary proposition. Many things that appear binary aren't really. Take "warm." It's either warm or it isn't, right?

Warm as in 70 degrees, or as in 80 degrees?  But something can't be "slightly unique".  Unique means there's only one of it.  How can something be slightly one of a kind?

I can take a random assortment of pixels on my computer screen and it would most definitely be unique.  I can then take the same assortment of pixels on an identical screen but change one pixel.  The image on the second screen would also be unique, but barely. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 15, 2013, 07:17:40 AM
Unique is a binary state, it either is or is not.

Maybe yes, maybe no. In an Aristotolean space, where the law of the excluded middle applies, you would be right. But if you apply fuzzy logic, it isn't a binary proposition. Many things that appear binary aren't really. Take "warm." It's either warm or it isn't, right?

Warm as in 70 degrees, or as in 80 degrees?  But something can't be "slightly unique".  Unique means there's only one of it.  How can something be slightly one of a kind?

Twins?  They aren't unique (there are two of them) but they ARE unique...?

Every person who's had different experiences than another and processed them internally will be unique.  :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 15, 2013, 07:18:51 AM
Unique is a binary state, it either is or is not.

Maybe yes, maybe no. In an Aristotolean space, where the law of the excluded middle applies, you would be right. But if you apply fuzzy logic, it isn't a binary proposition. Many things that appear binary aren't really. Take "warm." It's either warm or it isn't, right?

Warm as in 70 degrees, or as in 80 degrees?  But something can't be "slightly unique".  Unique means there's only one of it.  How can something be slightly one of a kind?

I can take a random assortment of pixels on my computer screen and it would most definitely be unique.  I can then take the same assortment of pixels on an identical screen but change one pixel.  The image on the second screen would also be unique, but barely.

It would be different, but barely.  Unique does not merely mean different, it means there is literally nothing else exactly like it.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Moray on February 15, 2013, 11:35:32 AM
Gaslighting refers to a movie.

Actually, it stems from a play, which was later made into a movie. Allyson's complaint stands, regardless.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on February 15, 2013, 01:40:46 PM
Quote
Actually, it stems from a play, which was later made into a movie. Allyson's complaint stands, regardless.

There are several versions of the movie out there.  I got one from Netflix a year or so ago to watch.  I must have gotten the wrong one, because I was bored and I couldn't understand what they were saying.  Is there a particular version of it that y'all would recommend?  I do want to see it - but not the one I saw.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: violinp on February 15, 2013, 01:44:10 PM
Quote
Actually, it stems from a play, which was later made into a movie. Allyson's complaint stands, regardless.

There are several versions of the movie out there.  I got one from Netflix a year or so ago to watch.  I must have gotten the wrong one, because I was bored and I couldn't understand what they were saying.  Is there a particular version of it that y'all would recommend?  I do want to see it - but not the one I saw.

The one with Ingrid Bergman is always good.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Allyson on February 15, 2013, 07:22:30 PM
Yep, good movie, too! I do think that it's a really useful term. I just think that, as often happens when something like this gains steam, it can be too broadly applied and as such lose impact.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yarnspinner on February 15, 2013, 11:40:37 PM
Quote
Actually, it stems from a play, which was later made into a movie. Allyson's complaint stands, regardless.

There are several versions of the movie out there.  I got one from Netflix a year or so ago to watch.  I must have gotten the wrong one, because I was bored and I couldn't understand what they were saying.  Is there a particular version of it that y'all would recommend?  I do want to see it - but not the one I saw.

The one with Ingrid Bergman is always good.
Pedantic fan of the play here:  The play was actually titled "Angel Street" and starred Vincent Price (well who else would you choose for the role of the creepy husband?).  The lowering of the gas lights is mentioned, but I don't think the term actually came into play until the movie was made and was retitled "Gaslight." 

I always wonder what Angela Lansbury-as-Jessica Fletcher would say to very very young Angela Lansbury as nasty maid in Gaslight.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: zyrs on February 16, 2013, 05:19:02 AM
Well, definition 5 of unique does allow for unusual/different, but my big beef with it is when it is being used to describe a mass-produced object - not 7 vases that are all made of different materials in different shapes but 40,000 vases all the same height, width, and depth, all the same shade of robin's egg blue, all made by a machine to all the same tolerances but being marketed as unique.

Those aren't unique.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: FauxFoodist on February 16, 2013, 03:31:18 PM
As much as lingo drives me up the wall, I have to admit that I lived in the 80s and said all kinds of horrible phrases so I can't really blame kids these days.

Ah, the 80's.  We all used Valley Girl accents and phases even if we lived in the midwest.  It's a wonder our parents and teachers didn't smack us (though I'm sure they, like, you know, totally wanted to).

<raises hand>

I grew up in the 80s and lived in the San Fernando Valley during most of that time so, yup, I'm actually a Valley Girl (hence the screen name).  However, even I tired of hearing the Valley Girl (and Valley Dude) intonations and, when I started working in a drugstore in SFV, I made a conscious effort to get the Valley Girl-ness out of me, especially when dealing with business calls, because I felt it made me sound really dumb (okay, honestly, I thought others who talked that way sounded dumb also).

As for annoying trendy expressions:

my bad (always hated that)
bucket list (on the top of my list right now and I can't really explain why I despise it so much)
psych (popular when I was teen and I never ever ever used it)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: FauxFoodist on February 16, 2013, 03:47:10 PM
"We're pregnant," used by couples to announce a pregnancy. Pretty sure only one of you is pregnant unless there have been recent advances in medical science that I've overlooked.

Have to admit I've disliked this one as well.  When I first started hearing it, I thought, perhaps, there was some change that made it better to say "we're pregnant," as opposed to "she's pregnant" or "I'm pregnant."

Corporate-speak. All of it.

Reminds me of this hellhole where I used to work years ago with a hellish area director.  She used to use the term "empower" a lot.  One day, after hearing her use it, I commented to someone that, to me, "empower" = we are giving you more work but not giving you more money to do it.  I wonder if that got back to her because I never heard her use that term again after that (which I wouldn't care -- she was a total cow and we had a mutual great dislike for each other).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hazmat on February 18, 2013, 04:34:29 PM
Hubby-kins or Wifey-kins.
Also from the same FB classmate: yummsky
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 18, 2013, 04:57:18 PM
According to one of our vice presidents, everything should be intuitive. Elevators, computers, software, employees, etc. You name it, everything should know what you want and make it happen.

I refer to that as pie in the sky mentality.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hillia on February 19, 2013, 06:20:15 PM
According to one of our vice presidents, everything should be intuitive. Elevators, computers, software, employees, etc. You name it, everything should know what you want and make it happen.

I refer to that as pie in the sky mentality.

This reminds me of the elevators in the Douglas Adams books.  They were build with a mild telepathy, so they sensed where you were and where you wanted to go, and appeared to pick you up as soon as you thought about moving.

Of course, this level of awareness made them get pretty bored with the whole 'going up and down' thing, and as Adams said, they soon took to squatting in basements sulking.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 20, 2013, 09:03:30 AM
I thought of one this morning as I laid awake for a bit.  I just dislike any euphemism for a woman's menstrual cycle.  I dislike the technical terms though so that doesn't leave me with many ways to refer to it.

I've been trying to figure out clever and non-cutesie ways of putting it.  "I'm being decidedly unlike a Vulcan this week."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on February 20, 2013, 09:26:52 AM
Ah, but how did Vulcan women deal with it?

I used to say "that time of the month"; anything else was either uncomfortably Victorian or too clinical.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Ms_Cellany on February 20, 2013, 09:44:30 AM
I thought of one this morning as I laid awake for a bit.  I just dislike any euphemism for a woman's menstrual cycle.  I dislike the technical terms though so that doesn't leave me with many ways to refer to it.

I've been trying to figure out clever and non-cutesie ways of putting it.  "I'm being decidedly unlike a Vulcan this week."

We call it "Vinnie."  Long story.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 20, 2013, 10:48:50 AM
Ah, but how did Vulcan women deal with it?

I used to say "that time of the month"; anything else was either uncomfortably Victorian or too clinical.

Good question.  Do they even have to deal with it?  I admit what I know of Star Trek has only been learned in the last few years of watching it with DH.  I wasn't much of a Star Trek fan before that. 

I have a friend that refers to it as "monthlies", an aunt who hated the term "period" because it made her think of school. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Judah on February 20, 2013, 11:15:01 AM
^^^^I always refer to it as "cranky time" or "my cycle" depending on the audience.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on February 20, 2013, 11:16:34 AM
Many of the books I'm reading now refer to "her courses" - in the context of the stories, it's kind of a nice way of saying it (maybe not for us now, but in these books, it works).

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 20, 2013, 12:36:35 PM
Ah, but how did Vulcan women deal with it?

I used to say "that time of the month"; anything else was either uncomfortably Victorian or too clinical.

Good question.  Do they even have to deal with it?  I admit what I know of Star Trek has only been learned in the last few years of watching it with DH.  I wasn't much of a Star Trek fan before that. 

I have a friend that refers to it as "monthlies", an aunt who hated the term "period" because it made her think of school.

They Pon Farr once every seven years.  I would imagine that simply going through Pon Farr is worse.

What would worry *me* is a Klingon woman at that... uh, period of time.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MrTango on February 20, 2013, 01:07:50 PM
Ah, but how did Vulcan women deal with it?

I used to say "that time of the month"; anything else was either uncomfortably Victorian or too clinical.

Good question.  Do they even have to deal with it?  I admit what I know of Star Trek has only been learned in the last few years of watching it with DH.  I wasn't much of a Star Trek fan before that. 

I have a friend that refers to it as "monthlies", an aunt who hated the term "period" because it made her think of school.

They Pon Farr once every seven years.  I would imagine that simply going through Pon Farr is worse.

What would worry *me* is a Klingon woman at that... uh, period of time.

The Duras sisters?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 20, 2013, 02:33:57 PM
Ah, but how did Vulcan women deal with it?

I used to say "that time of the month"; anything else was either uncomfortably Victorian or too clinical.

Good question.  Do they even have to deal with it?  I admit what I know of Star Trek has only been learned in the last few years of watching it with DH.  I wasn't much of a Star Trek fan before that. 

I have a friend that refers to it as "monthlies", an aunt who hated the term "period" because it made her think of school.

They Pon Farr once every seven years.  I would imagine that simply going through Pon Farr is worse.

What would worry *me* is a Klingon woman at that... uh, period of time.

The Duras sisters?

More Betor than Lursa.  Betor would be shouty and throw things... Lursa would just want Klingon Blood Chocolate.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Editeer on February 21, 2013, 01:05:53 PM
Saw this two-for-one on Facebook today:

"Thinking different is the new normal!"

 :P
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CakeBeret on February 22, 2013, 02:49:42 PM
"Like a Boss." Really getting on my nerves.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 22, 2013, 03:08:58 PM
"Pics or it didn't happen!"  ::)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 22, 2013, 03:35:06 PM
"Deal With It"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: m2kbug on February 22, 2013, 04:18:19 PM
Corporate-speak. All of it.

Reminds me of this hellhole where I used to work years ago with a hellish area director.  She used to use the term "empower" a lot.  One day, after hearing her use it, I commented to someone that, to me, "empower" = we are giving you more work but not giving you more money to do it.  I wonder if that got back to her because I never heard her use that term again after that (which I wouldn't care -- she was a total cow and we had a mutual great dislike for each other).

TEAM Player!  Same concept - we're a team, be a team player - translates to work more without more pay, be happy to stay late or come in early, eagerly come in on your day off, joyfully work through lunch, buy things any time someone brings in a catalog or something from their kid's school, whether you want anything or could afford it, and top it off by spending as much of your free time as possible with your coworkers socially!  Rah-rah-sis-boom-bah.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on February 22, 2013, 06:25:54 PM
"Do me a solid." It sounds like they're talking about pooping to me.  ???
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Verloona Ti on February 23, 2013, 09:27:29 AM
I am running across one that's either new or at least I've been mercifully unaware of it till recently:

"Boo".

Apparently, after typing out a tale of woe, you're supposed to sum up your feeling with "Boo." or "Boo...". or "Boo. :-("  Either way, I  find this grating, trying to make one rather childish word sum  up complex and possibly conflicting emotions.


Oh, and TL/DR. Stands for Too Long/Didn't Read. Apparently people are so terrified of someone responding to a longer post with this snarky aside that they are proactively putting tl/drs at the bottom of their posts with a one sentence summary-even when the original post was only 3-4 sentences long in the first place! If you need several paragraphs to give all the necessary details , do so...Those who are interested can read and respond, those who are not can kindly keep their TL/DR's to themselves.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Verloona Ti on February 25, 2013, 07:52:07 AM
One more and then I'll stop (looks like this thread is pretty much dead anyway):

I really, really hate "easy peasy", especially since it's invariably used in a  way that's snarky and/or dismissive of other people's problems.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hollanda on February 25, 2013, 08:44:54 AM
Anything from The Only Way is Essex. "Well jell" in particular makes me want to rip my eyeballs out.
 
Guide to UK (Nottingham in particular) slang
 
"Do you get me?"  ("Do you understand what I am saying to you?")
"Like noooooooo waaaaaay" ("That cannot be true because I say so")
"Safe" or "Sound as a pound"  ("Many thanks, I really appreciate what you have just done.")
"Innit?" ("I totally agree with what you have just stated")
 
There are more but the four above are my main stressors. None of the people I speak to talk like that, thankfully.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 25, 2013, 10:59:38 AM
One more and then I'll stop (looks like this thread is pretty much dead anyway):

I really, really hate "easy peasy", especially since it's invariably used in a  way that's snarky and/or dismissive of other people's problems.

I like "easy peasy", but that may be ebcause Craig Charles was my introduction to that phrase, and he's brilliant.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Thipu1 on February 26, 2013, 08:46:34 AM
One more and then I'll stop (looks like this thread is pretty much dead anyway):

I really, really hate "easy peasy", especially since it's invariably used in a  way that's snarky and/or dismissive of other people's problems.

I like "easy peasy", but that may be ebcause Craig Charles was my introduction to that phrase, and he's brilliant.

The first and only time I've come across 'easy peasy' was in the 'Idiot's Guide to Cryptic Crosswords'. 

I think it's silly but not particularly unpleasant. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 26, 2013, 08:53:38 AM
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on February 26, 2013, 09:19:47 AM
Agreed on the last two points.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on February 26, 2013, 10:25:16 AM
The first and only time I've come across 'easy peasy' was in the 'Idiot's Guide to Cryptic Crosswords'. 

"Idiot's Guide to Cryptic Crosswords" -- a new one on me !  Puts me in mind irresistibly, of Spike Milligan's "Crossword for Idiots". One single white square, with the number 1 in the corner.
Clues -- 1 across: the indefinite article.  1 down: first letter of the alphabet.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hollanda on February 26, 2013, 12:05:26 PM
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!


It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on February 26, 2013, 01:43:35 PM
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!


It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

In my case, "meh" is the actual word.  Its definition is "neutrally ambivalent to the point of malaise or complete disinterest."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on February 26, 2013, 01:56:24 PM
I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

In my case, "meh" is the actual word.  Its definition is "neutrally ambivalent to the point of malaise or complete disinterest."

Same here. I love "meh."

One I don't like at all, though I'm not sure it can be described as trendy, is the use of the word "toilet" as a verb. "Toileting" is even worse - as in "He's been toileting once or twice during the night on average."

It's the norm in health care and I understand why, but it sets my teeth on edge.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hollanda on February 26, 2013, 03:58:36 PM
Maybe I'm in the minority then lol!  :P
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hazmat on February 26, 2013, 07:58:26 PM
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!


It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

In my case, "meh" is the actual word.  Its definition is "neutrally ambivalent to the point of malaise or complete disinterest."
I'm neutrally ambivalent about "meh" 8)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hollanda on February 28, 2013, 04:49:05 PM
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!


It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

In my case, "meh" is the actual word.  Its definition is "neutrally ambivalent to the point of malaise or complete disinterest."
I'm neutrally ambivalent about "meh" 8)


I see what you did there!!!!! ;D 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 06, 2013, 03:54:40 PM
Occurred to me recently, out of the blue: "for free".

Not an expression which bothers me much ("life's too short") -- although I don't think I'd ever use it, in speech or writing; but I have a friend who loathes it with a passion. He is a great pedant about language-use of all kinds; and "for free" is one of many things on that scene, which make him furiously angry.  Basis: in proper English, if something has a cost / price ("in cash and / or kind"), it's "for" whatever that price is -- if it has no cost, then it's just "free".

My friend tells me of how, some fifty years ago, he and his schoolfriends used "for free" as a satirical, gently authority-mocking, joke and catchphrase -- because everybody knew it was nonsensical (see above).  They would never use it "in real life".  It makes him apoplectic that nowadays, it has come to be the common usage re something which one does not have to pay for -- shows up regularly and frequently even in British "quality" newspapers.  In principle, I see his point -- in practice, I think it not a hill to die on or otherwise dramatically and spectacularly end one's life over. Language is a democracy, and changes and evolves... and I see the alliterativeness of "for free", as likely being irresistible.

Wonder whether "for free", is a tiresome trendy expression (or worse) for anyone else on the board?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jaxsue on March 06, 2013, 04:46:36 PM
Don't know if this has been mentioned: sprinkle, as in mini-shower. If it quacks like a duck and walks like a duck, then it's a duck. Or, in other words, it's a shower.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on March 06, 2013, 04:51:10 PM
I hear "sprinkle" and I admit, I think of something that's done in the bathroom that, depending on gender, one can do sitting down or standing up.  Which makes the idea of a "sprinkle" as a modified baby shower rather unappealing.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Sebastienne on March 06, 2013, 05:32:12 PM
I hear "sprinkle" and I admit, I think of something that's done in the bathroom that, depending on gender, one can do sitting down or standing up.  Which makes the idea of a "sprinkle" as a modified baby shower rather unappealing.

To me, a "baby sprinkle" sounds less like a party and more like an unpleasant diaper changing incident.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on March 06, 2013, 05:48:02 PM
I agree.  I've never heard of that term until I read it here.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Waterlight on March 06, 2013, 06:45:19 PM
Words and phrases that annoy me:

"Going forward" for "from now on" or "in the future"

"Passed on," "passed away" or "passed over" for "died"

"Going potty" said by anyone past elementary-school age for "going to the bathroom/restroom/washroom"

And my personal-most-hated, because usually said by SS's and control freaks, neither of which I have much time or tolerance for:  "You need to..." for "I want you to..."

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: baglady on March 06, 2013, 06:46:44 PM
Occurred to me recently, out of the blue: "for free".

Not an expression which bothers me much ("life's too short") -- although I don't think I'd ever use it, in speech or writing; but I have a friend who loathes it with a passion. He is a great pedant about language-use of all kinds; and "for free" is one of many things on that scene, which make him furiously angry.  Basis: in proper English, if something has a cost / price ("in cash and / or kind"), it's "for" whatever that price is -- if it has no cost, then it's just "free".

My friend tells me of how, some fifty years ago, he and his schoolfriends used "for free" as a satirical, gently authority-mocking, joke and catchphrase -- because everybody knew it was nonsensical (see above).  They would never use it "in real life".  It makes him apoplectic that nowadays, it has come to be the common usage re something which one does not have to pay for -- shows up regularly and frequently even in British "quality" newspapers.  In principle, I see his point -- in practice, I think it not a hill to die on or otherwise dramatically and spectacularly end one's life over. Language is a democracy, and changes and evolves... and I see the alliterativeness of "for free", as likely being irresistible.

Wonder whether "for free", is a tiresome trendy expression (or worse) for anyone else on the board?

I wouldn't call it trendy, since it's been around for decades. It's a colloquialism. I don't think the Joni Mitchell song "For Free" would be quite the same if she said the street musician was "playing free" or "playing for nothing." (Of course, the lyrics also say he played "real good" for free, so the song isn't exactly a shining example of perfect grammar!)  ;)

But your friend is entitled to dislike the usage, just as I'm entitled to dislike the misuse of "entitled" -- which even Garrison Who-Does-The-Writer's-Almanac-And-Should-Know-Better Keillor uses in place of "titled." ("Here's a poem for today entitled ....")
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 06, 2013, 07:03:57 PM
My friend, rather a professional miserable-curmudgeon-and-hater-of-"whimsy"-stuff, doesn't much "do" literature and poetry (in his mind, that's "their" fault, not his), so I don't see him cutting Joni any slack -- and "playing real good", would have him rolling around on the floor gnawing the carpet. As you say, though -- it's a free part-of world, anyone is entitled to dislike what they do. I always have to stop and think about "entitled" (what one may do, or might mistakenly think they may do), versus "titled" (a poem by R. Kipling titled "If...")
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Camarynne on March 06, 2013, 08:05:56 PM
On Facebook. "Like a boss". That one grates on my brain for some reason.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on March 06, 2013, 09:16:55 PM
When someone want you to do something for them. Instead of asking "will you please", "do you mind doing xxxx", they say "do you wanna pick this up/ dump this/ carry this/whatever."

No, I dont wanna.  >:(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: jaxsue on March 07, 2013, 07:09:11 AM
I hear "sprinkle" and I admit, I think of something that's done in the bathroom that, depending on gender, one can do sitting down or standing up.  Which makes the idea of a "sprinkle" as a modified baby shower rather unappealing.

Exactly! When I hear that word I feel the urge to visit the bathroom.  :o
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: whatsanenigma on March 07, 2013, 07:16:14 AM

"Passed on," "passed away" or "passed over" for "died"


I find this one annoying too, but only in certain contexts.  If you are talking about someone who really did "pass away", as in, an elderly person who died peacefully in their sleep, then I am fine with it.  But when people say things like "So and So passed away in the war", or when the death was otherwise violent, as in a car crash or homicide or sucicide, referring to those kinds of deaths with the term "passed away", it is really irritating to me.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on March 07, 2013, 01:08:05 PM
Wonder whether "for free", is a tiresome trendy expression (or worse) for anyone else on the board?

Yep!  It annoys me every time I see it and I've been known to shout "That's wroooong!" at commercials on TV. ;D

Don't know if this has been mentioned: sprinkle, as in mini-shower. If it quacks like a duck and walks like a duck, then it's a duck. Or, in other words, it's a shower.

I encountered that term for the first time yesterday or the day before and it was on this board. I had no clue what it meant, so thanks for explaining. And I loathe it and am with other posters in thinking it sounds like a euphemism for urination.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: violinp on March 07, 2013, 01:20:09 PM

"Passed on," "passed away" or "passed over" for "died"


I find this one annoying too, but only in certain contexts.  If you are talking about someone who really did "pass away", as in, an elderly person who died peacefully in their sleep, then I am fine with it.  But when people say things like "So and So passed away in the war", or when the death was otherwise violent, as in a car crash or homicide or sucicide, referring to those kinds of deaths with the term "passed away", it is really irritating to me.

What's even worse is "He/She passed." As in, "The cow got loose after Mama passed." Passed what? I infinitely prefer "passed away" to that, because it doesn't sound like the sentence got cut off.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: twiggy on March 07, 2013, 01:20:50 PM

"Passed on," "passed away" or "passed over" for "died"


I find this one annoying too, but only in certain contexts.  If you are talking about someone who really did "pass away", as in, an elderly person who died peacefully in their sleep, then I am fine with it.  But when people say things like "So and So passed away in the war", or when the death was otherwise violent, as in a car crash or homicide or sucicide, referring to those kinds of deaths with the term "passed away", it is really irritating to me.

I use "passed" when talking about ODS. It's less jarring in conversation than "my child died" and to me, it feels a little softer, so it's easier on me as well.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on March 07, 2013, 04:47:50 PM
Along those lines, I really dislike the ubiquitous "I'm sorry for your loss." You cannot be sorry for a loss. That makes no sense. You can, however, be sorry about someone's loss or you can be sorry for someone.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Cat-Fu on March 08, 2013, 10:45:05 AM
That's not really a trendy phrase, though, that's just a manner of speech.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on March 08, 2013, 11:05:26 AM
I probably mentioned it upthread already but current use of the word "on" in phrases that it doesn't belong in:

"Good on you" which should be "Good for you."

"Hating on" which simply should be "hating"

Especially when the user should know better.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 08, 2013, 11:50:35 AM
I probably mentioned it upthread already but current use of the word "on" in phrases that it doesn't belong in:

"Good on you" which should be "Good for you."

"Hating on" which simply should be "hating"

Especially when the user should know better.

With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on March 08, 2013, 11:55:33 AM
Quote
With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

And, equally with respect, many of the other phrases and words mentioned in this thread are "established" and "standard operational procedure" in various areas as well.  I've seen quite a few that, while may not be favored in some parts of the US or world, are absolutely correct in my area.  And I'm assuming that's true of ones that irk me as well.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MariaE on March 08, 2013, 11:55:51 AM
I probably mentioned it upthread already but current use of the word "on" in phrases that it doesn't belong in:

"Good on you" which should be "Good for you."

"Hating on" which simply should be "hating"

Especially when the user should know better.

With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

This Kiwi participant certainly does :). Thanks, I was trying to figure out how to phrase it myself.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: twiggy on March 08, 2013, 12:55:01 PM
"Suck it up Buttercup"

and

"time to put on your big girl panties and . . . "

Both sound dismissive and condescending IMO
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Moray on March 08, 2013, 12:57:13 PM
"Suck it up Buttercup"

and

"time to put on your big girl panties and . . . "

Both sound dismissive and condescending IMO

To be fair, that's kind of the point of those phrases :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Chonsil on March 08, 2013, 05:21:51 PM
Only been through half the pages....
Mine are:
My bad.
Bling.
And "slap" for "makeup". As in "Let's go get some slap on." Ugh.
And the current expression "That made me vomit in my mouth." Just yuck.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Ms_Cellany on March 08, 2013, 05:23:54 PM
"slap" for "makeup". As in "Let's go get some slap on." Ugh.

Huhn. I'd only heard that term as a 19th century circus term for clown makeup. Kinda cool that it smoldered underground for so long and re-emerged into the main culture.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on March 08, 2013, 05:28:32 PM
Some of these terms are already gone where I am, but some people are calling them a "new trend" where they are.  These things must go in waves across the world or something.

For instance, the "vomit in my mouth" was a saying here years ago.  I haven't heard someone say that in ages.  It's sure not "trendy."  However, a recent poster called it a "current expression."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Chonsil on March 08, 2013, 07:06:04 PM
Some of these terms are already gone where I am, but some people are calling them a "new trend" where they are.  These things must go in waves across the world or something.

For instance, the "vomit in my mouth" was a saying here years ago.  I haven't heard someone say that in ages.  It's sure not "trendy."  However, a recent poster called it a "current expression."

Well, I am in the UK, but actually, no, I'd say it's more of an indicator of how out of the loop I am with what's trendy ( :)). I've only recently come across the vomit expression being used in Facebook comments from people - who are based in the States. But then, maybe that's why I notice it, because I've never heard it used over here. But then again, the last time I was out and about in a "trendy" social setting was a good four years ago!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on March 08, 2013, 07:26:34 PM
Quote
I've only recently come across the vomit expression being used in Facebook comments from people - who are based in the States.

It could be that it's a "new" saying to the FB people you're reading.  Maybe the wave isn't across the world but even more local.  Maybe it's just now hitting other parts of the US?

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: TaurusGirl on March 08, 2013, 08:02:03 PM
One that several of my friends (who are educated and know better!) keep using the "getting my hair did".

No. You are getting your hair DONE.

 >:(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on March 08, 2013, 08:25:33 PM
One that several of my friends (who are educated and know better!) keep using the "getting my hair did".

No. You are getting your hair DONE.

 >:(

Ugh, that bugs me too!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on March 08, 2013, 08:26:22 PM
One that several of my friends (who are educated and know better!) keep using the "getting my hair did".

No. You are getting your hair DONE.

 >:(

Are you sure they're not making fun of that saying?  I find with people who should know better do these things to poke fun at people who actually same them.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on March 09, 2013, 01:31:26 AM
Quote
With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

And, equally with respect, many of the other phrases and words mentioned in this thread are "established" and "standard operational procedure" in various areas as well.  I've seen quite a few that, while may not be favored in some parts of the US or world, are absolutely correct in my area.  And I'm assuming that's true of ones that irk me as well.

I'll use the word "Antipodean" -- I'm in the UK, so Australia and New Zealand are our geographical antipodes.  The crux of the thing for me is, that (as touched on in more recent posts), "trendy" expressions, for most of us, imply spoken or written stuff which has shown up only recently. For most of my 64 years of life, I've been aware of "Good on..." as an Antipodean congratulatory expression (and to me personally, rather a nice one); so to me, very far from new. It so happens that I'm not annoyed by the expression itself, or by its being borrowed by other peoples. Of course, everyone is free to find any form of words, irritating !

(MariaE, thanks for confirmation from the Antipodes.)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: veronaz on June 05, 2013, 08:41:28 PM

setting boundaries

out of my comfort zone

think outside the box

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: baglady on June 05, 2013, 09:37:03 PM
I'm in the U.S. and have been in love with "good on" since the first time I heard it. I occasionally slip it into my writing to avoid the double "for" ("good on you for doing ___" instead of "good for you for doing ___") because the latter feels clunky to me.

There aren't any "trendy" expressions I'm tired of, because by the time they get to my 54-year-old ears they aren't trendy anymore! Some will go out of style ("Groovy!") and some will stick around ("No way!"). I will continue to use the language I'm comfortable with, just as I wear the clothes I'm comfortable with, despite fashion trends.  ;)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: twoferrets on June 06, 2013, 08:52:50 AM
When people start a reply (online-- this doesn't really strike me the same in actual conversations) with "Um...".  It implies (to me, at least!) that the writer is about to get very smug.  As if it's shorthand for "here's something very obvious that you didn't know."

Use of the term "sat down with" instead of "spoke to" or "interviewed" by journalists.

The term "on trend."  And "kiddos" instead of kids or children.  And "hubby" but I think I may have already said that pages ago.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: veronaz on June 06, 2013, 09:07:10 AM
Quote
When people start a reply (online-- this doesn't really strike me the same in actual conversations) with "Um...".  It implies (to me, at least!) that the writer is about to get very smug.  As if it's shorthand for "here's something very obvious that you didn't know."

Definitely.

As an online reply/remark “ummm” is almost always sarcastic and smug.

IRL “ummm” can simply mean the person is thinking.  It can be sarcasm and smugness, but not always.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: magicdomino on June 06, 2013, 10:01:47 AM
Quote
When people start a reply (online-- this doesn't really strike me the same in actual conversations) with "Um...".  It implies (to me, at least!) that the writer is about to get very smug.  As if it's shorthand for "here's something very obvious that you didn't know."

Definitely.

As an online reply/remark “ummm” is almost always sarcastic and smug.

IRL “ummm” can simply mean the person is thinking.  It can be sarcasm and smugness, but not always.

Interesting.  When I've used "um" on email, posts, etc, I meant the opposite of smug.  I use "um" the same way that I use it in real life:  a way of indicating that I'm not absolutely confident that what I'm about to say is correct.  "Um . . . I may be confused about this."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Allyson on June 06, 2013, 02:49:28 PM
"Um" reads as snooty to me, too. I suspect it's one of those not inherently 'bad' ones that has been used that way so often it reads that way. For instance, "Um, maybe you didn't read my post, but not everyone likes weasels." But, generally the rest of the content will show whether or not it's a 'snooty' um or a conversational one.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: dawnfire on June 06, 2013, 07:05:57 PM
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!


It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

second me on meh, for  while it seemed it was all that came out of my older (he was a teen at the time) son's mouth
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: holly firestorm on June 06, 2013, 07:28:16 PM
One that several of my friends (who are educated and know better!) keep using the "getting my hair did".

No. You are getting your hair DONE.

 >:(

Ugh, that bugs me too!
I likes me some... is similar.

Also, I still hear the vomit in my mouth expression now and again.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on June 06, 2013, 10:40:56 PM
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!


It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

second me on meh, for  while it seemed it was all that came out of my older (he was a teen at the time) son's mouth

For me, "meh" sometimes IS the articulation.  The translation is:  I am so ambivalent about this that I can't even be bothered to find the words to describe the depths of my ambivalence.   
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Awestruck Shmuck on June 06, 2013, 11:23:30 PM
With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

Agreed. I do occasionally cringe inwardly at the state of grammar/word choice in my circles, the exclamation 'goodonya!!' is perfectly logical, reasonable and useful in my mind! I say it even more to two of my dearest friends who are English Public School educated, and enjoy watching them flinch at just how Aussie it sounds!

I found in the Australian 'dialect' (Is it a dialect? I suppose...) anyway, 'good for you' is almost always sarcastic, eg:

Me: I totally nailed my exam yesterday, did much better than I was expecting!

Alternate possible responses:

Brother: Goodonya!! (genuinely pleased for me)
Classmate: Good for you *implied snark* (perhaps didn't do so well)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MariaE on June 07, 2013, 01:25:14 AM
With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

Agreed. I do occasionally cringe inwardly at the state of grammar/word choice in my circles, the exclamation 'goodonya!!' is perfectly logical, reasonable and useful in my mind! I say it even more to two of my dearest friends who are English Public School educated, and enjoy watching them flinch at just how Aussie it sounds!

I found in the Australian 'dialect' (Is it a dialect? I suppose...) anyway, 'good for you' is almost always sarcastic, eg:

Me: I totally nailed my exam yesterday, did much better than I was expecting!

Alternate possible responses:

Brother: Goodonya!! (genuinely pleased for me)
Classmate: Good for you *implied snark* (perhaps didn't do so well)

Thank you!!! I was trying to figure out what bugged me about "Good for you" and you nailed it exactly. So let's just say that the same thing goes for the New Zealand 'dialect'.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: crella on June 07, 2013, 02:26:51 AM
When people start a reply (online-- this doesn't really strike me the same in actual conversations) with "Um...".  It implies (to me, at least!) that the writer is about to get very smug.  As if it's shorthand for "here's something very obvious that you didn't know."


Yes, I agree. It's a turn-off.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on June 07, 2013, 05:39:23 AM
I am misquoted above; it was cabbageweevil who attributed "good on" to Australian usage.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: scotcat60 on June 07, 2013, 06:10:12 AM
The one with Ingrid Bergman is always good.

Curiously I have never seen that version of "Gaslight". i have seen the Anton Walbrook/Diana Wynyard verison several times, and enjoy it.

I am tired of hearing"What do we got?" rather than "What have we got".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: TootsNYC on June 07, 2013, 10:33:42 AM
Boy, am I old.  About ninety percent of the expressions posted in this thread are complete mysteries to me; never heard them, and don't really want to do so.

My hot button?  "Hating on".  "Hate" is a verb.  One doesn't "love on", "like on", "want on" or any such thing, so why this prevalence of "hate on"?  To me, it just smacks of a complete lack of creativity.  Surely there are so many more ways to convey this point!

End of sermon.

Actually, one does. And I think it IS creative, actually. It's taking the word and stretching into a new usage--isn't that what creativity often entails.

It might seem GRACELESS to someone.

(when ones "loves on" one's kitty, one is actively engaging in activites that express love--one is smooching her, petting her, snuggling her. When one is "hating on" someone, one is not just *feeling* negative emotions but is going out of their way to EXPRESS their animosity and disapproval. It's actually very specific and USEFUL)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Judah on June 07, 2013, 10:41:04 AM
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!


It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

second me on meh, for  while it seemed it was all that came out of my older (he was a teen at the time) son's mouth

For me, "meh" sometimes IS the articulation.  The translation is:  I am so ambivalent about this that I can't even be bothered to find the words to describe the depths of my ambivalence.

Exactly! That's a perfect translation, Diane.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Betelnut on June 07, 2013, 10:50:44 AM
Boy, am I old.  About ninety percent of the expressions posted in this thread are complete mysteries to me; never heard them, and don't really want to do so.

My hot button?  "Hating on".  "Hate" is a verb.  One doesn't "love on", "like on", "want on" or any such thing, so why this prevalence of "hate on"?  To me, it just smacks of a complete lack of creativity.  Surely there are so many more ways to convey this point!

End of sermon.

Actually, one does. And I think it IS creative, actually. It's taking the word and stretching into a new usage--isn't that what creativity often entails.

It might seem GRACELESS to someone.

(when ones "loves on" one's kitty, one is actively engaging in activites that express love--one is smooching her, petting her, snuggling her. When one is "hating on" someone, one is not just *feeling* negative emotions but is going out of their way to EXPRESS their animosity and disapproval. It's actually very specific and USEFUL)

Good description of "loves on" and "hating on" Toots!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Happy2BCF on June 07, 2013, 12:48:16 PM
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.


So what to you would be an acceptable term to describe someone who doesn't want children?

I fought with doctors from ages 16 to 31 to get sterilized because I never wanted
kids.  Childless to me means I don't have something I wanted.  Childfree means
I don't have something I never wanted.  From reading childfree blogs & forums it seems most childfree people feel that way.

So yes, for me & I'm sure many other childfree people birthing children is something to be avoided.   
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Bijou on June 07, 2013, 01:58:22 PM
This is from talent shows for singing and jewelry or crafting shows   "Make it your own".  Gads!  I started gritting my teeth at that expression after about the third time I heard it.

Also, "Trust me"  as in when someone says something and follows it with "Trust me."  as though they are the know it all of the universe.  We went to a book signing once by a local author who had the 'trust me' syndrome.  She gave a little lecture about her book and some stories, but what should have been interesting had me stiffening and dreadfully waiting for the next "Trust me!"  What was worse was it was contagious and after that I found myself saying it!  Boy, I broke that habit in a hurry.  :-[ :-[ :-[
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: magicdomino on June 07, 2013, 03:13:17 PM
I never trust anyone who says, "Trust me."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cwm on June 07, 2013, 03:26:08 PM
I'll see you a walla and raise you one.
Wah-lah.

I hate hate HATE lol added to the end of every sentence. I have a friend who will complain about how terrible her life is and every sentence ends with lol.

"Do you want to....?"
No. I don't. And I usually answer in such a manner.

Also, I can't stand it when bosses/managers/higher-ups start with saying "We need to..." Okay, maybe I'm just being difficult here, but if you say WE, then you need to take some ownership of whatever it is you're telling everyone else to do. If "we" need to get all these bins filled with product, don't then stand by and watch as everyone else fills bins with product and you don't.

Then again, most of these I use with my friends/family, but it's all a matter of audience. I don't use a lot of these here, and if I know that someone is exceptionally bothered by something, I try to remember not to say it around them.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: bansidhe on June 07, 2013, 05:30:37 PM
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.


So what to you would be an acceptable term to describe someone who doesn't want children?

I fought with doctors from ages 16 to 31 to get sterilized because I never wanted
kids.  Childless to me means I don't have something I wanted.  Childfree means
I don't have something I never wanted.  From reading childfree blogs & forums it seems most childfree people feel that way.

So yes, for me & I'm sure many other childfree people birthing children is something to be avoided.

This! For me, children were definitely something to be avoided at all costs and thus I am childfree, not childless.

Unrelated:
Add me to the group that dislikes "Umm..." at the beginnings of sentences. I rarely hear it used with other than snotty intentions.

Also add me to the group that can't stand "hating on," "loving on," and - ugh - "crushing on."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: diesel_darlin on June 07, 2013, 05:52:04 PM
I'll see you a walla and raise you one.
Wah-lah.

I hate hate HATE lol added to the end of every sentence. I have a friend who will complain about how terrible her life is and every sentence ends with lol.

"Do you want to....?"
No. I don't. And I usually answer in such a manner.

Also, I can't stand it when bosses/managers/higher-ups start with saying "We need to..." Okay, maybe I'm just being difficult here, but if you say WE, then you need to take some ownership of whatever it is you're telling everyone else to do. If "we" need to get all these bins filled with product, don't then stand by and watch as everyone else fills bins with product and you don't.

Then again, most of these I use with my friends/family, but it's all a matter of audience. I don't use a lot of these here, and if I know that someone is exceptionally bothered by something, I try to remember not to say it around them.


Amen to this whole post.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Sebastienne on June 07, 2013, 06:17:26 PM

Also add me to the group that can't stand "hating on," "loving on," and - ugh - "crushing on."

"Crushing on" at least has a relation to grammar, since one has a crush on someone else. For that reason, "brag on" really bothers me. As in, "I'm going to brag on my kids right now." No, you're going to brag about your kids. The brag is not getting on them at all.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: veronaz on June 07, 2013, 07:15:03 PM
Quote
I hate hate HATE lol added to the end of every sentence. I have a friend who will complain about how terrible her life is and every sentence ends with lol.

I'll second that.
I HATE it when people type "lol".
It's LAME.  ::)
Ugh. (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-basic/puke.gif)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Catananche on June 08, 2013, 06:58:26 AM
I'll see you a walla and raise you one.
Wah-lah.

What does Wah-lah/walla mean? How would it be used in a sentence?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: crella on June 08, 2013, 07:39:41 AM
Catanache, it's 'voila'.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Catananche on June 08, 2013, 08:00:15 AM
Ooooh  :) That would drive me nuts as well.

My own annoyance: my kids using text speak in normal conversation.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Jelaza on June 08, 2013, 11:36:57 AM
I don't know if anyone else would consider this one trendy, but I have noticed more and more people around me using it lately: "needs <past tense verb>".  E.g. "The sink needs fixed" or "The dog needs fed."  No.  "The sink needs to be fixed" or perhaps "The sink needs fixing."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: MERUNCC13 on June 08, 2013, 11:59:55 AM
Mine is "Talk to the Hand" often while snapping ones neck.  :o  To me it shows a total lack of respect to the other person.  I used to see that all the time with one of my students this year (a 2nd grader!?) who despite discussions with her parents and her grand mom would persist with this behavior.  I feel sorry for her, as she will be going to another school next year and I don't think that will be tolerated there (big cultural change!)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: crella on June 08, 2013, 11:51:00 PM
With or without 'talk to the hand' I call that the 'turkey neck'  :P  Both my sister and niece do it and it's very unattractive.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hollanda on June 09, 2013, 03:51:53 PM
Anything Kelly Rowland said on UK X Factor a few years ago.

"You put it down,  girl!"
"You shut the building down!"
"There is an abundance tonight of folk putting!! It!! Down!!"
"You nailed it!"

Simon Cowell:
"I didn't like it. I loved it." (Grrrrrrr)
"I'm not meaning to be rude but... (insert rude comment here)"
"You have 4,533 yesses"
"A million percent yes"

The last one just about sends my brain into orbit.

Louis Walsh "You could be the new Westlife/Shane Ward/Justin Beiber"

Gaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhh.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CharlieBraun on June 09, 2013, 04:28:47 PM
"Eds & Meds" as shorthand for an economic subsector of education and medical.  It's lazy, it's unprofessional, and if you can't discern the specifics of each source (Eds = what, undergrad? grad? trade schools?  K-12? Meds = medical technology? cosmetic surgery? actual doctors? hospitals? nursing homes?) then stop lumping them in, stop being all trendy and attempting to impress, and stop being frankly stupidly jingo-istic.

At a conference last week, I confronted yet another speaker during Q&A about exactly the components of "Eds & Meds."  I had a lot of people come up after and thank me.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on June 09, 2013, 04:46:46 PM
Quote
"I didn't like it. I loved it."

I don't get the problem with this one.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: ladyknight1 on June 09, 2013, 05:23:37 PM
These are most likely repeats, but they drive me mad.

YOLO (I see it on clothing nearly every day, how original! >:()

Any statement about giving/having/improving more than 100%! It isn't possible!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on June 09, 2013, 05:37:53 PM
These are most likely repeats, but they drive me mad.

YOLO (I see it on clothing nearly every day, how original! >:()

Any statement about giving/having/improving more than 100%! It isn't possible!

*Putting on maths teacher hat * Although you can't give more than 100% of a finite quantity, you can certainly improve more than 100%. So for example asking someone to give 110% effort is nonsensical, but if I sell $20 worth of widgets one day and $60 worth of widgets the next I can correctly say that the second day's sales are 300% of the first day's, our an improvement of 200%.

Also I'm with Dotty on "I didn't like it, I loved it". I don't really see the problem.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: AnnaJ on June 09, 2013, 10:21:17 PM
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.


So what to you would be an acceptable term to describe someone who doesn't want children?

I fought with doctors from ages 16 to 31 to get sterilized because I never wanted
kids.  Childless to me means I don't have something I wanted.  Childfree means
I don't have something I never wanted.  From reading childfree blogs & forums it seems most childfree people feel that way.

So yes, for me & I'm sure many other childfree people birthing children is something to be avoided.

This! For me, children were definitely something to be avoided at all costs and thus I am childfree, not childless.

Unrelated:
Add me to the group that dislikes "Umm..." at the beginnings of sentences. I rarely hear it used with other than snotty intentions.

Also add me to the group that can't stand "hating on," "loving on," and - ugh - "crushing on."

Thanks for the 'childfree' thumbs up - I was reading this thread and kicked myself for not marking the post so that I could quote it. 

There is no other shortened phrase for "no, I don't have children" that doesn't sound condescending to me...childless?  No, I am not 'less' because I don't have children.  I spent many years using birth control to make sure I didn't have children - I don't think of them as parasites, but to be avoided (in the sense of me having one)...yes.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hollanda on June 10, 2013, 01:21:44 AM
"I didn't like it.  I loved it. " Simon Cowell is so predictable! 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CreteGirl on June 10, 2013, 05:29:39 PM
It bugs me when people say they "reached out" to someone, when they mean they contacted them.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Midnight Kitty on June 10, 2013, 07:28:57 PM
I finally made it to the end and am surprised that no one else suggested "perfect storm."  I would die happy if I never heard that overused expression again.

A woman with whom I used to work used "frick" instead of the bad 4 letter word starting with "f."  She said "frickin' this" and "frick that" with annoying frequency.  I understand that she was "keeping it clean for work," but when one uses a "clean" substitution, everyone just fills in the bad word anyway.

Another woman with whom I used to work tried to get me to stop using the 4 letter word starting with "s."  Difficult for me as I work in the wastewater world where we use this word frequently.  She got me to use "sugar" at work when not actually referring to the solids in the wastewater.  I would start with "sh", she would lift an eyebrow, and I would end with "ugar" instead of "it." >:D
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: HGolightly on June 10, 2013, 07:38:43 PM
Meh.....I had a horrible and lazy coworker that said " meh" to anything she did not like or want to do.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on June 10, 2013, 08:35:36 PM
Regarding childless vs. childfree.  My best friend is childfree.  She loves kids and enjoys children a great deal and got quite teary when I asked her to be godmother to my youngest. 

But she also says that she knew that she shouldn't be a mother because she didn't think she'd be a good mother and should not have children and thus she took the measures to avoid having them.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: katycoo on June 10, 2013, 08:40:03 PM
I use almost every phrase mentioned in this thread with (mostly ironic) abandon.  And I'm comfortable with that decision.

Also I feel that if every gripe listed was removed from conversation we'd all sound like a bunch of snotty pretentious snobs.  Language conveys so much more than words.

I did have to laugh recently when I heard someone say "sike!" Man I hadn't heard that since high school, really took me back!

Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

My annoyance - "walla" instead of "voilà". Causes headaches in the same part of the brain as repeated stupid grammar and punctuation errors.

Because it is.  Its not 'trendy'.  These people don't usually know they're wrong. 

The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

For some people, perhaps they are?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on June 10, 2013, 08:57:31 PM
I use almost every phrase mentioned in this thread with (mostly ironic) abandon.  And I'm comfortable with that decision.

Also I feel that if every gripe listed was removed from conversation we'd all sound like a bunch of snotty pretentious snobs.  Language conveys so much more than words.

I did have to laugh recently when I heard someone say "sike!" Man I hadn't heard that since high school, really took me back!

Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

My annoyance - "walla" instead of "voilà". Causes headaches in the same part of the brain as repeated stupid grammar and punctuation errors.

Because it is.  Its not 'trendy'.  These people don't usually know they're wrong. 

The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

For some people, perhaps they are?

I’m not sure what tone you intended, but your wording in this post made you sound like a snotty pretentious snob (to use your phrase). Especially to Piratelvr. 'Sike' is an accepted alternate spelling for 'psych'—I dare say even preferred, since 'sike' usually connotes a different thing than trying to 'psych' someone out.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: katycoo on June 10, 2013, 09:22:01 PM
I use almost every phrase mentioned in this thread with (mostly ironic) abandon.  And I'm comfortable with that decision.

Also I feel that if every gripe listed was removed from conversation we'd all sound like a bunch of snotty pretentious snobs.  Language conveys so much more than words.

I did have to laugh recently when I heard someone say "sike!" Man I hadn't heard that since high school, really took me back!

Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

My annoyance - "walla" instead of "voilà". Causes headaches in the same part of the brain as repeated stupid grammar and punctuation errors.

Because it is.  Its not 'trendy'.  These people don't usually know they're wrong. 

The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

For some people, perhaps they are?

I’m not sure what tone you intended, but your wording in this post made you sound like a snotty pretentious snob (to use your phrase). Especially to Piratelvr. 'Sike' is an accepted alternate spelling for 'psych'—I dare say even preferred, since 'sike' usually connotes a different thing than trying to 'psych' someone out.

Yes, lack of tone can have that effect.

In any event, colour me educated.  I have never seen 'sike' (in the referred context or otherwise) and assumed it a misheard word.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on June 10, 2013, 09:33:35 PM
As a teen of the late 80s/early 90s, I can confirm the "sike" comment.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hillia on June 10, 2013, 10:39:41 PM
I don't know if anyone else would consider this one trendy, but I have noticed more and more people around me using it lately: "needs <past tense verb>".  E.g. "The sink needs fixed" or "The dog needs fed."  No.  "The sink needs to be fixed" or perhaps "The sink needs fixing."

I don't think this is trendy so much as a regional grammatical quirk.  My dh and his family are from rural New Mexico, and they all say it.  I think I've seen some ehellions use it also.  It's like saying 'i'm going to the store,do you want to go with?',which is often used by people who come from a German-speaking background, even if they themselves never spoke German.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on June 11, 2013, 07:18:02 AM
As a teen of the late 80s/early 90s, I can confirm the "sike" comment.

As I remember it, sike was pretty much a synonym for "Just kidding!" Or "Gotcha!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Betelnut on June 11, 2013, 07:49:13 AM
I've never seen "psych" spelled as "sike."  Having just googled it, I guess it is but it seems to lose its meaning when spelled like that as "psych" indicates its original derivation.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cwm on June 11, 2013, 08:47:21 AM
I don't know if anyone else would consider this one trendy, but I have noticed more and more people around me using it lately: "needs <past tense verb>".  E.g. "The sink needs fixed" or "The dog needs fed."  No.  "The sink needs to be fixed" or perhaps "The sink needs fixing."

I don't think this is trendy so much as a regional grammatical quirk.  My dh and his family are from rural New Mexico, and they all say it.  I think I've seen some ehellions use it also.  It's like saying 'i'm going to the store,do you want to go with?',which is often used by people who come from a German-speaking background, even if they themselves never spoke German.

My group of friends and I use go with like that, we're in the Midwest and the closest we have to German language is...well, one of my friend's dad is from England, which is closer to Germany than the USA? Yeah, that's all I got...
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on June 11, 2013, 09:17:22 AM
I use "go with" like that, however my family is largely of German ancestry, so I could see that being why.

Also, the Midwest has a lot of German ancestry, cwm. Cole Camp, MO is known for its German heritage, for instance. In fact, they have a lot of people still fluent in Low German there.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mental Magpie on June 11, 2013, 09:21:45 AM
I have a strong German heritage, my grandfather being first generation American...but I also paid attention in school.  "Go with" is not a complete sentence.  I remember my neighbors doing it and how completely annoyed I was even at that young age.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on June 11, 2013, 12:49:07 PM
Quote
Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

Thank you!  It is "psych!", and that is one of my pet peeves.  Yes, people do misspell it as "sike!", but that's not correct.  And, yes, I am in the generation that used it, so it's not like I'm speaking from an ouside perspective.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on June 11, 2013, 01:52:28 PM
Quote
Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

Thank you!  It is "psych!", and that is one of my pet peeves.  Yes, people do misspell it as "sike!", but that's not correct.  And, yes, I am in the generation that used it, so it's not like I'm speaking from an ouside perspective.

… but it’s not. If I’m posturing by nailing a string of three-pointers from the one spot that I can shoot them from (which I never end up doing in a game), that is psyching out the other team.

If I’m all like "here, have this totally delicious cookie! Sike!" I’m not psyching that person out, I’m just being a jerk.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on June 11, 2013, 02:40:27 PM
Quote
Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

Thank you!  It is "psych!", and that is one of my pet peeves.  Yes, people do misspell it as "sike!", but that's not correct.  And, yes, I am in the generation that used it, so it's not like I'm speaking from an ouside perspective.

… but it’s not. If I’m posturing by nailing a string of three-pointers from the one spot that I can shoot them from (which I never end up doing in a game), that is psyching out the other team.

If I’m all like "here, have this totally delicious cookie! Sike!" I’m not psyching that person out, I’m just being a jerk.

Exactly.  As a teen who was around for that, I have never heard any connection to psyching someone out, anymore than a "psych-clops" makes people think it only has one eye,
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on June 11, 2013, 03:37:19 PM
Quote
anymore than a "psych-clops" makes people think it only has one eye,

Not a valid example.  Not only because your version changes the pronunciation of the word itself but, more importantly, because it disregards the fact that the word you're talking about comes from from the Greek cyclos, meaning wheel or circle (hence, his one eye).

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on June 11, 2013, 03:59:52 PM
Quote
anymore than a "psych-clops" makes people think it only has one eye,

Not a valid example.  Not only because your version changes the pronunciation of the word itself but, more importantly, because it disregards the fact that the word you're talking about comes from from the Greek cyclos, meaning wheel or circle (hence, his one eye).

And "sike" is a completely made up word.  It doesn't have any connection to psychology.  There is no psychology involved in pre-internet trolling.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on June 11, 2013, 04:45:28 PM
Quote
There is no psychology involved in pre-internet trolling.

You completely lost me there.

But we've veered into a tangent of the thread.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: katycoo on June 11, 2013, 06:09:19 PM
Quote
Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

Thank you!  It is "psych!", and that is one of my pet peeves.  Yes, people do misspell it as "sike!", but that's not correct.  And, yes, I am in the generation that used it, so it's not like I'm speaking from an ouside perspective.

… but it’s not. If I’m posturing by nailing a string of three-pointers from the one spot that I can shoot them from (which I never end up doing in a game), that is psyching out the other team.

If I’m all like "here, have this totally delicious cookie! Sike!" I’m not psyching that person out, I’m just being a jerk.

'Psyching someone out' doesn't have to be intimidating.  In both cases you are leading the other person to believe you are going to do something which you then don't. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on June 11, 2013, 06:10:21 PM
Quote
There is no psychology involved in pre-internet trolling.

You completely lost me there.

But we've veered into a tangent of the thread.

I mean psych come from psychology, and there's none of that in using "sike", which I consider to be trolling before we knew what trolling was.  :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: gollymolly2 on June 11, 2013, 06:11:27 PM
Quote
There is no psychology involved in pre-internet trolling.

You completely lost me there.

But we've veered into a tangent of the thread.

I mean psych come from psychology, and there's none of that in using "sike", which I consider to be trolling before we knew what trolling was.  :)

I very much enjoyed "pre-Internet trolling" :)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: hobish on June 11, 2013, 06:43:45 PM
Quote
Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

Thank you!  It is "psych!", and that is one of my pet peeves.  Yes, people do misspell it as "sike!", but that's not correct.  And, yes, I am in the generation that used it, so it's not like I'm speaking from an ouside perspective.

… but it’s not. If I’m posturing by nailing a string of three-pointers from the one spot that I can shoot them from (which I never end up doing in a game), that is psyching out the other team.

If I’m all like "here, have this totally delicious cookie! Sike!" I’m not psyching that person out, I’m just being a jerk.

'Psyching someone out' doesn't have to be intimidating.  In both cases you are leading the other person to believe you are going to do something which you then don't.

Exactly. I've seen it spelled "sike" but always thought people just didn't know how to spell. Not trying to be snarky, i promise; that's what i thought...of course since it is 2013 it is probably the most i have seen or heard the word in any spelling in...what? 20 years or more?
Please, oh please, don't let that become a trend again.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yvaine on June 11, 2013, 07:20:55 PM
Today I saw "touchbase" as a noun, meaning a meeting.   ::)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Sebastienne on June 11, 2013, 08:14:11 PM
Today I saw "touchbase" as a noun, meaning a meeting.   ::)

Oh, that's just painful.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Jelaza on June 11, 2013, 10:21:44 PM
I don't know if anyone else would consider this one trendy, but I have noticed more and more people around me using it lately: "needs <past tense verb>".  E.g. "The sink needs fixed" or "The dog needs fed."  No.  "The sink needs to be fixed" or perhaps "The sink needs fixing."

I don't think this is trendy so much as a regional grammatical quirk.  My dh and his family are from rural New Mexico, and they all say it.  I think I've seen some ehellions use it also.

It's spreading beyond it's region of origin then.  All the people I've heard use it live in Wisconsin or Illinois.

Quote
It's like saying 'i'm going to the store,do you want to go with?',which is often used by people who come from a German-speaking background, even if they themselves never spoke German.

*waves hand*  That's me!  Including the not-speaking-German-myself part.  It's not that unusual around here even from people who (as far as I know) don't have the German-speaking background.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: snowdragon on June 11, 2013, 10:23:47 PM
I don't know if anyone else would consider this one trendy, but I have noticed more and more people around me using it lately: "needs <past tense verb>".  E.g. "The sink needs fixed" or "The dog needs fed."  No.  "The sink needs to be fixed" or perhaps "The sink needs fixing."

I don't think this is trendy so much as a regional grammatical quirk.  My dh and his family are from rural New Mexico, and they all say it.  I think I've seen some ehellions use it also.

It's spreading beyond it's region of origin then.  All the people I've heard use it live in Wisconsin or Illinois.

Quote
It's like saying 'i'm going to the store,do you want to go with?',which is often used by people who come from a German-speaking background, even if they themselves never spoke German.

*waves hand*  That's me!  Including the not-speaking-German-myself part.  It's not that unusual around here even from people who (as far as I know) don't have the German-speaking background.[/b]

per the bolded... my Polish family and I say this too.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yarnspinner on June 14, 2013, 12:44:50 PM
"Well, X has issues" to explain truly obnoxious behavior on the part of someone, usually a patron, in their late teens or full adulthood.

I also have issues.  Somehow, my issues don't cause me to go into a place, make loud and revolting noises, claim total innocence when called on the behavior (even though I am the only one in the room) and then accuse the person who asks me to be quiet of being racist.

That's one example.  That phrase used to be handy for explaining some simple meltdowns....but these days it is applied to everything that our teen patrons (in particular) do.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: AnnaJ on June 14, 2013, 03:29:28 PM
Lean in.  It's pretty new but already annoying  :(
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on June 14, 2013, 03:39:48 PM
AnnaJ, can you use that one in a sentence?  I'm not sure of the context of it.

Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: AnnaJ on June 15, 2013, 12:53:26 PM
It comes from the title of this book http://www.amazon.com/Lean-In-Women-Work-Will/dp/0385349947 by Cheryl Sandberg, CEO of Facebook.  It encourages women, particularly mothers, to push harder for promotions and other emblems of success in the workplace; it's the opposite of mommy tracking.  The basic idea is that women should be smart enough to marry men who can back them up at home and allow them (women) to devote however much time and energy they need to succeed at their careers.

To me, this is nothing more than a recycling of "women need to act more like men at work", but that's my opinion.

Example, "You need to lean in at work and be willing to give up some family time to succeed."   
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: TylerBelle on June 15, 2013, 06:22:20 PM
I hate hate HATE lol added to the end of every sentence. I have a friend who will complain about how terrible her life is and every sentence ends with lol.

Oh yes! Another member in a forum I used to frequent did this exact thing. It was rare a sentence of theirs wouldn't end with "lol." I began thinking of it as "lull."
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: juliasqueezer on June 16, 2013, 11:25:04 AM
"Wha-a-a-t?" said in a high, childish voice. It's everywhere.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hollanda on June 17, 2013, 10:41:05 AM
Shut up to mean no way.  That drives me mad.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Mikayla on June 18, 2013, 01:46:10 PM
"Want to go with"?

I think this is more midwest than ethnic based, although it could be originally driven by, say, Germans and then picked up by those of us who aren't.  I used to think it was Chicago based, but it isn't. One of my housemates grew up in Iowa and MN, and she uses it too.  Neither she nor I have any German ancestry.

There's no defense for it grammatically, but I can promise it's a hard one to break!
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on June 18, 2013, 04:48:07 PM
"Oh, snap!"

I have no clue what this is supposed to mean, but it sounds bratty.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: violinp on June 18, 2013, 05:33:19 PM
"Oh, snap!"

I have no clue what this is supposed to mean, but it sounds bratty.

"Oh, snap!" is the new way of saying "You just got told!!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cwm on June 19, 2013, 09:36:14 AM
"Oh, snap!"

I have no clue what this is supposed to mean, but it sounds bratty.

"Oh, snap!" is the new way of saying "You just got told!!"

Yes, but told WHAT, exactly? I don't mind the oh snap because of how infrequently I hear it, but I hate being told that I just got told. Um, yes, that's what usually happens in conversation. You get told or asked various things. It happens.

"Some people just want to watch the world burn." People use that one way too much. I'm sorry, someone who rearranges a set of things in front of someone who just spent hours organizing them doesn't want to watch the world burn, they're annoying. Wanting to watch the world burn is something on a completely different scale.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: nuit93 on June 19, 2013, 10:47:23 AM
"Oh, snap!"

I have no clue what this is supposed to mean, but it sounds bratty.

"Oh, snap!" is the new way of saying "You just got told!!"

Yes, but told WHAT, exactly? I don't mind the oh snap because of how infrequently I hear it, but I hate being told that I just got told. Um, yes, that's what usually happens in conversation. You get told or asked various things. It happens.

"Some people just want to watch the world burn." People use that one way too much. I'm sorry, someone who rearranges a set of things in front of someone who just spent hours organizing them doesn't want to watch the world burn, they're annoying. Wanting to watch the world burn is something on a completely different scale.

I think that "told" is basically short for "told off".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: veronaz on June 19, 2013, 12:57:50 PM
Shut up to mean no way.  That drives me mad.

Yes, also "Stop" or "Stop it".  All mean "no way", "You have got to be kidding me".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: violinp on June 19, 2013, 01:58:40 PM
"Oh, snap!"

I have no clue what this is supposed to mean, but it sounds bratty.

"Oh, snap!" is the new way of saying "You just got told!!"

Yes, but told WHAT, exactly? I don't mind the oh snap because of how infrequently I hear it, but I hate being told that I just got told. Um, yes, that's what usually happens in conversation. You get told or asked various things. It happens.

"Some people just want to watch the world burn." People use that one way too much. I'm sorry, someone who rearranges a set of things in front of someone who just spent hours organizing them doesn't want to watch the world burn, they're annoying. Wanting to watch the world burn is something on a completely different scale.

I think that "told" is basically short for "told off".

"You just got told" is slang for "That person just put you in your place and told you what was what and you are now justly embarrassed in public!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Dr. F. on June 19, 2013, 05:42:19 PM
Now that I've finally understood "Oh, snap!" (I didn't know it, either.) Could someone explain to me what on earth "That's what she said" is supposed to mean?

Dr. F., the hopelessly un-trendy
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: CakeBeret on June 19, 2013, 05:48:05 PM
"Brah" as slang for "bro". Makes me want to twitch every time I hear it.

And, unfortunately, DH has a friend who has taken to calling him "brah". *shudder*
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: DottyG on June 19, 2013, 05:51:59 PM
Now that I've finally understood "Oh, snap!" (I didn't know it, either.) Could someone explain to me what on earth "That's what she said" is supposed to mean?

Dr. F., the hopelessly un-trendy

Used to add sexual innuendo to a conversation.

See: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=that's%20what%20she%20said (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=that's%20what%20she%20said) for examples (to avoid having them here - they can be crude).

 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: katycoo on June 19, 2013, 06:13:29 PM
Now that I've finally understood "Oh, snap!" (I didn't know it, either.) Could someone explain to me what on earth "That's what she said" is supposed to mean?

Dr. F., the hopelessly un-trendy

Used to add sexual innuendo to a conversation.

See: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=that's%20what%20she%20said (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=that's%20what%20she%20said) for examples.

This.  When used properly, it turn the previous statement (the one which you said "That's what she said" in response to) into a double-entendre.
Usually the conversation is completely innocuous.  Imagine a conversation about gardening and person one telling person to about a tomato they had grown.

Eg.  Person one "And I couldn't believe how huge it was!"

Person two "That's what she said".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: White Dragon on June 19, 2013, 06:24:53 PM
I had never actually heard "YOLO" used until today.
It took precisely once for me to get tired of it.  :P

Today, a prominient politician in my country suddenly announced he was leaving office and returning to private life.
This was a big news item.

I was watching the news segment and mentioned to my coworker that I had once seen a very unusual bit of film about this person.
He and a well-known comedian were kidding around and agreed to jump off the dock into the lake - without clothes. (Secluded, fly-in access cabin - not a public venue!)
  :o
The relevant areas were blurred out, but they were definitely "unclad".

For some reason, seeing the clips of this person at work, in his office etc were so at odds with the bit of frivolity that I mentioned it.

My coworker shrugged and said "YOLO?"

Ummm. Not sure that jumping into a lake - unclothed - with a public figure - and having it filmed for national viewing - is something on my "YOLO" list....
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 19, 2013, 07:39:33 PM
Now that I've finally understood "Oh, snap!" (I didn't know it, either.) Could someone explain to me what on earth "That's what she said" is supposed to mean?

Dr. F., the hopelessly un-trendy

"That's what she said" is just a juvenile way to re-frame whatever someone else just said in a sexual way.  It's the ". . . in bed!" of conversational interjections.

"So I swear, it took me all night and I still didn't finish!"
"That's what she said!"

(Implication being ha ha, you could totally interpret "all night" and "not finishing" as sexual, see?  You said something about sex!  Let's all laugh at you now because we're twelve years old and uncomfortable with boy/girl feelings!)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: katycoo on June 19, 2013, 08:05:52 PM
Now that I've finally understood "Oh, snap!" (I didn't know it, either.) Could someone explain to me what on earth "That's what she said" is supposed to mean?

Dr. F., the hopelessly un-trendy

"That's what she said" is just a juvenile way to re-frame whatever someone else just said in a sexual way.  It's the ". . . in bed!" of conversational interjections.

"So I swear, it took me all night and I still didn't finish!"
"That's what she said!"

(Implication being ha ha, you could totally interpret "all night" and "not finishing" as sexual, see?  You said something about sex!  Let's all laugh at you now because we're twelve years old and uncomfortable with boy/girl feelings!)

Aww, come on.  Sometimes its funny!  And I don't think it has anything to do with being uncomfortable about feelings.  Its just that you didn't realise how what you were saying sounded.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: mbbored on June 19, 2013, 08:08:39 PM
I had never actually heard "YOLO" used until today.
It took precisely once for me to get tired of it.  :P

Today, a prominient politician in my country suddenly announced he was leaving office and returning to private life.
This was a big news item.

I was watching the news segment and mentioned to my coworker that I had once seen a very unusual bit of film about this person.
He and a well-known comedian were kidding around and agreed to jump off the dock into the lake - without clothes. (Secluded, fly-in access cabin - not a public venue!)
  :o
The relevant areas were blurred out, but they were definitely "unclad".

For some reason, seeing the clips of this person at work, in his office etc were so at odds with the bit of frivolity that I mentioned it.

My coworker shrugged and said "YOLO?"

Ummm. Not sure that jumping into a lake - unclothed - with a public figure - and having it filmed for national viewing - is something on my "YOLO" list....

Try living in Yolo County in a college town. I hear both meanings multiple times a day and I get very confused.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 19, 2013, 11:57:42 PM
Now that I've finally understood "Oh, snap!" (I didn't know it, either.) Could someone explain to me what on earth "That's what she said" is supposed to mean?

Dr. F., the hopelessly un-trendy

"That's what she said" is just a juvenile way to re-frame whatever someone else just said in a sexual way.  It's the ". . . in bed!" of conversational interjections.

"So I swear, it took me all night and I still didn't finish!"
"That's what she said!"

(Implication being ha ha, you could totally interpret "all night" and "not finishing" as sexual, see?  You said something about sex!  Let's all laugh at you now because we're twelve years old and uncomfortable with boy/girl feelings!)

Aww, come on.  Sometimes its funny!  And I don't think it has anything to do with being uncomfortable about feelings.  Its just that you didn't realise how what you were saying sounded.

Oh, I can be juvenile just as much as the next person sometimes  :P  It *is* juvenile humor, though, and the people who pull "that's what SHE said!" every other sentence get on my nerves . . .
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hazmat on June 20, 2013, 05:24:42 AM
Now that I've finally understood "Oh, snap!" (I didn't know it, either.) Could someone explain to me what on earth "That's what she said" is supposed to mean?

Dr. F., the hopelessly un-trendy
It's sexual innuendo.  If somebody (innocently) says "It only took me 2 minutes" or "That's a big one", some smart-Alec will say "That what she said".  It was made popular by The Office, where Micheal Scott (Steve Carrel) said it constantly.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Hazmat on June 20, 2013, 05:30:42 AM
Now that I've finally understood "Oh, snap!" (I didn't know it, either.) Could someone explain to me what on earth "That's what she said" is supposed to mean?

Dr. F., the hopelessly un-trendy

"That's what she said" is just a juvenile way to re-frame whatever someone else just said in a sexual way.  It's the ". . . in bed!" of conversational interjections.

"So I swear, it took me all night and I still didn't finish!"
"That's what she said!"

(Implication being ha ha, you could totally interpret "all night" and "not finishing" as sexual, see?  You said something about sex!  Let's all laugh at you now because we're twelve years old and uncomfortable with boy/girl feelings!)

Aww, come on.  Sometimes its funny!  And I don't think it has anything to do with being uncomfortable about feelings.  Its just that you didn't realise how what you were saying sounded.

Oh, I can be juvenile just as much as the next person sometimes  :P  It *is* juvenile humor, though, and the people who pull "that's what SHE said!" every other sentence get on my nerves . . .
That'll teach me to read through to the end of the thread before posting. :-[
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 20, 2013, 05:37:31 AM
Now that I've finally understood "Oh, snap!" (I didn't know it, either.) Could someone explain to me what on earth "That's what she said" is supposed to mean?

Dr. F., the hopelessly un-trendy
It's sexual innuendo.  If somebody (innocently) says "It only took me 2 minutes" or "That's a big one", some smart-Alec will say "That what she said".  It was made popular by The Office, where Micheal Scott (Steve Carrel) said it constantly.
Ancient and un-trendy, and much-loved, British-English equivalent: "As the actress said to the bishop" (or vice versa).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Iris on June 20, 2013, 06:05:41 AM
Now that I've finally understood "Oh, snap!" (I didn't know it, either.) Could someone explain to me what on earth "That's what she said" is supposed to mean?

Dr. F., the hopelessly un-trendy
It's sexual innuendo.  If somebody (innocently) says "It only took me 2 minutes" or "That's a big one", some smart-Alec will say "That what she said".  It was made popular by The Office, where Micheal Scott (Steve Carrel) said it constantly.
Ancient and un-trendy, and much-loved, British-English equivalent: "As the actress said to the bishop" (or vice versa).

Haha! I was thinking exactly the same thing! Nothing new under the sun, I guess...
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Fleur on June 22, 2013, 04:24:17 PM


'I'm loving' for 'I love'. Just ghastly, and reminds me of the awful McDonald's jingle.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Pen^2 on June 22, 2013, 04:47:49 PM
This has probably already been said earlier on, but I can't find it, so here we go.

People who say "lol" aloud. If it isn't funny enough to actually be caused to spontaneously laugh out loud, then don't say that you are via an acronym that sounds stupid when not in type. Most of the time I've heard it said, it was more of a reflex thing, and done with a pretty bored-looking face. "Here's a photo of my nephew. He just lost his front tooth." "lol." AAAAARRGHHH

YOLO also bugs me, but for a different reason. It's said almost entirely by people so entitled and pampered that they actually can't conceive of its meaning. If you asked why "you only live once" means you should try to do something daring, they couldn't tell you. And yes, I have asked a few people. It was a long train ride, what can I say?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yarnspinner on June 22, 2013, 08:58:15 PM
Can't remember if this has been mentioned:  "That is unacceptable!" said in aggrieved tones when the speaker has not been allowed to do something that (in this world, using this world's physics) is pretty much impossible. 

Example:

Person: I have just deleted an entire day's worth of writing by accident.  Please hit the correct button so I can retrieve the twenty five pages I have deleted.  What do you mean if it is deleted I cannot get it back?  That is unacceptable.  I NEED that for my class tonight.

Bonus points if they say "That is simply unacceptable!"
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Yarnspinner on June 22, 2013, 09:01:18 PM
I hate hate HATE lol added to the end of every sentence. I have a friend who will complain about how terrible her life is and every sentence ends with lol.

Oh yes! Another member in a forum I used to frequent did this exact thing. It was rare a sentence of theirs wouldn't end with "lol." I began thinking of it as "lull."

Parking a pod here.  I absolutely want to reach through my email or through the chat room or facebook when one of my friends says something fairly nasty and ends it with 'LOL" as if we are all going to agree that the thing is amusing to us.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on June 23, 2013, 12:45:54 AM
If you asked why "you only live once" means you should try to do something daring, they couldn't tell you.

You... should probably not look up the Lonely Island song "YOLO".
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Midnight Kitty on June 24, 2013, 03:11:37 PM
Along the same lines as someone saying "ell oh ell," I find it annoying when someone says "oh em gee."  ::)
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cwm on June 24, 2013, 03:42:53 PM
Along the same lines as someone saying "ell oh ell," I find it annoying when someone says "oh em gee."  ::)

I hear people say lulz a lot. It bothers me. I'm not so bothered by the "oh em gee" bit, but I used to work with someone who claimed that simply saying the letters was religious harassment and that anyone who said those three letters would be subject to a very angry deity holding it over their heads come judgement day. Most of us rolled our eyes at that, but she was absolutely bothered.

The weird part? She would drop f-bombs like they were going out of style, but I suppose since it wasn't the Lord's name, it's okay?
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: magicdomino on June 25, 2013, 02:25:38 PM


I hear people say lulz a lot. It bothers me. I'm not so bothered by the "oh em gee" bit, but I used to work with someone who claimed that simply saying the letters was religious harassment and that anyone who said those three letters would be subject to a very angry deity holding it over their heads come judgement day. Most of us rolled our eyes at that, but she was absolutely bothered.

The weird part? She would drop f-bombs like they were going out of style, but I suppose since it wasn't the Lord's name, it's okay?

When my mother was a child, vulgar words regarding "scrabble" and waste material were tolerated, although not encouraged.  Curse words though, even their polite equivalents like gosh darn or Jesus, would be met with a soaped mouth if you were lucky, a switch if you weren't.  The Bible forbids taking the Lord's Name in vain, but doesn't say anything about being a potty-mouth.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Venus193 on June 25, 2013, 05:10:32 PM
I can't stand when someone writes of a situation (real or fictional) as being "so in lurrrrrrve" because it sounds like they aren't buying it or respecting it.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: mrsholles on July 06, 2013, 12:29:01 AM
Using the word "do" in ways that would make Webster weep.   "will you do?"  instead of "will you take?" or "I'll do the cheeseburger" when ordering in a restaurant.  It drives me nuts. 

Baby mama/daddy, amiright (ugh, that's like nails on a chalkboard),

I have no idea what "hashtag" means, but I'm sure that would annoy me, too. 
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on July 06, 2013, 06:17:39 AM
I have no idea what "hashtag" means, but I'm sure that would annoy me, too.
For some strange reason, the word makes me think of the ancient Middle East.
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: daen on July 06, 2013, 09:50:03 AM
I have no idea what "hashtag" means, but I'm sure that would annoy me, too.
For some strange reason, the word makes me think of the ancient Middle East.
Hashtag -> hashish ->hookah bars -> Middle East? That's where my mind went.

I believe that hashtag refers to # followed by a word or phrasemushedtogetherlikethis, used in Twitter (and now Facebook, I think) to tag a tweet as referring to something specific like #oklahomatornado or #jennysparty or #YOLO or #toosexyformyshirt... or whatever bandwagon you wish to jump on (or start).
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: cabbageweevil on July 06, 2013, 01:54:11 PM
I have no idea what "hashtag" means, but I'm sure that would annoy me, too.
For some strange reason, the word makes me think of the ancient Middle East.
Hashtag -> hashish ->hookah bars -> Middle East? That's where my mind went.

I believe that hashtag refers to # followed by a word or phrasemushedtogetherlikethis, used in Twitter (and now Facebook, I think) to tag a tweet as referring to something specific like #oklahomatornado or #jennysparty or #YOLO or #toosexyformyshirt... or whatever bandwagon you wish to jump on (or start).
It seemed to suggest to me Babylon or the Akkadians or the Hittites, don't know quite why. Anyway, thanks for the "real-world" explanation !
Title: Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
Post by: Elfmama on July 06, 2013, 06:05:20 PM
Hero    I think that this is the one word that gets me everytime I hear it. Do people really understand what a hero is? To me it now is such a diluted word that doesn't mean anything.

I don't tex so when I see all those abbreviations I have no idea what they mean.

Thank you!  Hero dilution is, other than "literal" dilution, my biggest language peeve.  A person is not a hero just because they save a life, at least to my definition.  My definition of a hero is someone who saves someone's life through risk to themselves in a situation that the hero has no specific training for.  (If you're trained, you're very brave, but it's not heroic, it's your job!)
And one is NOT a hero for playing a professional sport!  >:(