Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Time For a Coffee Break! => Topic started by: rain on January 07, 2013, 07:35:00 PM

Title: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: rain on January 07, 2013, 07:35:00 PM
when my DS was little he didn't like trying new fruits ... for me.  He'd eat stuff at Day Care and at my neighbors.

Once I snuck a teeny, tiny piece of pineapple in his cottage cheese - it litterally made him gag (& I never ever did anything like that again)
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Venus193 on January 07, 2013, 07:40:46 PM
This was not the best way to handle this.  Are you aware of any allergies he has?
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: CrochetFanatic on January 07, 2013, 07:54:20 PM
I mentioned in the SS thread that my brother only wanted to eat chicken nuggets for dinner when he was really young, though it wasn't every night.  Some nights our parents could get him to eat what the rest of us were eating, but many nights he would refuse to eat anything unless he could have his nuggets.  I remember my feelings were hurt because the chicken nuggets in the freezer were just for my brother most of the time, though I do get the reasoning behind it now.  Money was tight, I wasn't picky at all, and this was something he would eat.  We actually had to leave a restaurant once because he threw a tantrum when there were no chicken nuggets on the menu.  :-[ I'd been looking forward to spaghetti, but my parents were (understandably) too embarrassed to stay, and we went somewhere else.  Younger bro got the time-out chair when we got home.  The whole chicken nuggets business left a very minor scar on my psyche (Overly sensitive?  Probably.), but I actually think it's kind of funny now.

When I was younger, I couldn't stand to eat scrambled eggs unless they were slathered in ketchup (My dad thinks that ketchup on eggs is gross, by the way).  They looked too much like the foam rubber you'd find in a couch cushion, and if there were any slightly brown bits?  No, I couldn't make myself eat them without ketchup.  I like them now, though.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: The TARDIS on January 07, 2013, 07:59:04 PM
I can't make myself eat Cheetos.  I never have and never will. Reason why is in white below.

Cheetos look like orange dog poop to me!

I'll try ANYTHING else, but please don't offer me Cheetos.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 07, 2013, 08:06:44 PM
I'm not picky but I never have liked pickles and I admittedly am not real crazy about cooked veggies.  I giggle when watching Nanny McPhee, the second one, when one of the guards admits that "broccoli presents a problem" and she advises him to eat it with cheese cause that's one of the things that makes it palatable for me.  That or sprinkling lemon pepper on them, which is how my parents got me to eat veggies.

I don't mind cooked carrots, and have found that asparagus, baked with some oil and sea salt can be quite tasty. So for me it's not a total aversion as it depends on how it's cooked. But I do prefer some veggies raw...with dip.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: rose red on January 07, 2013, 08:33:45 PM
I'm more picky now than when I was little.  There was no such thing as "children's food" back then.  I'm Asian and happily ate salted fish, chicken feet, snails, pickled veggies, etc.  When I came to the US, I had no problem trying exotic foods as meat loaf and pizza.  Now my taste buds are more limited.  Weird.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 07, 2013, 08:45:22 PM
I'm much better now than when I was a kid.  My Dad was (is) a meat and potatoes man, for the most part and my Mom catered to him, mostly.  But then she'd try something more innovative for herself and my brother and I wouldn't eat it.

Now, I eat sushi, Thai, Mexican, Greek, Middle Eastern and other ethnic type foods.  I still don't each much Indian food.  I can't take something in the curry blend.  It binds to my taste buds and doesn't let go for about three days.

Most of the foods I don't like are because of the texture.  Liver, mushrooms, melon, broccoli florets, canned veggies, peas in particular, raw tomatoes, especially grape and cherry.  Some of these things I will eat because I know they are good for me but some of them, I can definitely do without.

Mom did what she called a 'No thank you helping'.  You'd get a tbsp of whatever on your plate and you had to try it three times before you were allowed to say you didn't like it and weren't going to eat it.  I never would have eaten rutabaga if it weren't for this.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Amava on January 07, 2013, 09:24:49 PM
I had somewhat the opposite problem. I wasn't a picky eater as a child, and I don't have children who are picky eaters, but I was the child of a picky eater!!

Or should I say, the child of a very traditional eater. My mom (dad was not in the picture when I was little) would only cook what she had learned to cook from her own mom, and not even all of that, and hardly ever try something new, even when eating outside of the house!

This meant:
for warm meals:
plain boiled potatoes every day, except very sometimes mashed potatoes or fries.
to go with that: vegetables, but also always choosing from a very small range.
traditional meat could be pork chops, steak (overdone shoe-sole style), sausages, chicken, beef stew
Very sometimes fish, but then always the same fish: cod.

Never ever ever spaghetti or rice. Nothing exotic such as curry, pizza, etc.
No casseroles, no lasagna, etc etc (let's just say: she had an oven but very seldom used it).

For breakfast: ALWAYS bread with chocolate. My grandmother who lived with us: always bread with strawberry jam.
For the third meal of the day (could be either lunch or dinner, depending on when it was convenient to make the warm meal): bread with cheese (almost always the same cheese) or some deli meat (again choosing from a very small range).

For me, this seemed normal. This is how I grew up, I had never seen otherwise (I was a bit sheltered, too), and I thought everyone ate this way. 
But then I started having friends and sometimes visiting them over meal time.
Not to mention, I went to live on my own at 18. In one of the most multicultural cities of my country.  :D
And a culinary world opened up to me.

I have become a very adventurous, versatile cook and eater, and Iove to learn and try new things still, all the time. 


Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: bloo on January 07, 2013, 09:32:04 PM
I was a picky kid. I would try things but it was difficult if I didn't like the way it looked or smelled and Deity help us if Mom put more than 3 things on my plate and "O....M....G...is that beet juice going to touch my mashed potatoes?!!!!!! Nooooooooo..." And I had 'rules' for how I ate certain foods.

Since I was a cooperative, quiet sort of kid, my parents humored what a PITA I was at the table. But they never stopped offering all kinds of foods, some pretty exotic because my mom is Asian. And I would usually try a bite of something and be surprised when I liked it. I came to find that there were a lot of things I liked.

Two things helped me to evolve into someone who will eat anything you put in front of me:

1) When I started cooking meals as a teenager, I was chagrined if a family member complained about it. That helped me to stop complaining and not make a big deal of trying something new.
2) Having kids and not having time to eat. Seriously, a chicken nugget covered in dog hair that my toddler threw on the floor looked pretty good when you have forgotten to eat all day. I never say no to anyone that offers me food!

Now that my kids do some of the cooking, they are also FAR less pickier than they used to be. My son has never been picky and compared to some of my friend's kids, my daughter is not picky at all!
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: squeakers on January 07, 2013, 09:52:34 PM
My youngest son won't eat my chili even though it has all the stuff he loves to eat any other time: meat, onions, tomatoes and chili beans. One time I made waaay too much so I sent it over to my sister's.  He happened to spend the night that night and ate 2 bowls of the chili. And loved it.  The same chili he turned his nose up at for lunch.

That was the last time I worried about whether he liked something or not.

My oldest boy won't eat eggs: he ate them a lot up until he was about 6 or 7 and then just got burned out, I guess.  He doesn't mind them cooked into stuff like cakes and cookies but if he can see them he won't eat them.

The only things I can think of that middle son won't eat are pickled stuff like meats or eggs.  he loves cucumber pickles but is not interested in pork hocks or turkey gizzards that have been pickled.  The other 2 like them.

Oh, just remembered the only thing all 3 turn their noses up at: Braunschweiger. More for me!

I do have great/nephews and great/nieces who turned their noses up at anything but mac and cheese, chicken nuggets or hot dogs.  Whether because they had actual aversions or because they did not know better/parents didn't feed them more variety, I don't know.  I do know that a few of them never got over it and didn't like coming to my house because my boys liked snacking on things like raw potatoes, tomatoes, fruit, greens and salads.

My husband won't eat fishy fish but does like shrimp.  He used to turn his nose up at black olives, Italian dressing and sour cream.  He likes all 3 now.

Me? I didn't have the choice to be picky.. we were dirt poor so any food was always eaten. Siblings with allergies or aversions just ate less.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Venus193 on January 07, 2013, 10:17:02 PM
There really was no "children's food" when I was growing up; you ate the same stuff as your parents or went to bed hungry.  There was nothing wrong with that.  Why on earth is that no longer true? 
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: DottyG on January 07, 2013, 11:16:24 PM
Sweet potatoes or white? That's not safe, is it? ???

Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: MrsVandy on January 07, 2013, 11:18:22 PM
My younger siblings were both picky eaters and were often made to sit at the table until they at least tried what they were served. I was never picky and always finished my plate.

One time I was served too much rice a roni and was forced to eat it. To this day I hate it and I was never made to eat it again.

As I've gotten older I've discovered I can no longer eat many foods that I love because they make me ill. I miss red meat and tacos and junk food in general.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Emmy on January 08, 2013, 06:51:08 PM
I was a pretty good eater and ate most foods my parents put in front of me.  I didn't like any type of soda and snack foods with that neon orange 'cheese' stuff on them.  I remember going thirsty at several kids birthday parties because all that was available to drink was soda.

I think having a picky eater would be frustrating.  However, if my child becomes a picky eater, I will teach her manners and that she doesn't get to demand something else if she doesn't like what's for dinner or say 'ewww' to food that is offered.  DD is 17 months now and is a fairly good eater.  She does not like potatoes in any form or eggs, but is good with most other things.  DH and I give her bites off of our dinner plates to let her try new things.  We are counting our blessing now, but realize this may not last.  Many parents say pickiness comes on suddenly. 

DH and I grew up in a house where our parents were less adventurous than we were, especially DH.  His dad was meat and potatoes all the way.  DH recalls his mom would try a new chicken dish that DH would like, but his dad would request that not be made again and that was it.  DH's brother (BIL) is very picky.  He is the opposite of his dad and prefers no red meat at all.  His son, DH's nephew is equally as picky, but has opposite tastes as BIL.  SIL says cooking is a frustrating experiences because somebody will always not like something and she doesn't want to be adventurous because she'll be the only person eating it.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: snowdragon on January 08, 2013, 07:04:59 PM


DH and I grew up in a house where our parents were less adventurous than we were, especially DH.  His dad was meat and potatoes all the way. DH recalls his mom would try a new chicken dish that DH would like, but his dad would request that not be made again and that was it.  DH's brother (BIL) is very picky.  He is the opposite of his dad and prefers no red meat at all.  His son, DH's nephew is equally as picky, but has opposite tastes as BIL.  SIL says cooking is a frustrating experiences because somebody will always not like something and she doesn't want to be adventurous because she'll be the only person eating it.

are you my long lost sister? That is legend in my family. I am fairly adventurous, so are my brothers and mom.  Dad never was.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: SiotehCat on January 08, 2013, 07:12:39 PM
Growing up, my father did all of the cooking and he wasn't the best cook. He had all kinds of "creations". Lima beans with cheese. Ramen noodles with chopped up hot dogs. Ground beef and corn/green beans/other veggies, etc... His motto was that if we were really hungry, we would eat it.

So, now that I am older, I eat whatever I want. If I want pizza 5 nights in a row, I'm going to eat pizza 5 nights in a row.

I also don't make DS eat anything he doesn't want to eat. I will cook him a completely separate meal if he doesn't like what I am making. If I am going to eat something that I like, so is he.

Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Venus193 on January 08, 2013, 07:33:25 PM
Brunhilde has problems arriving at menus because her husband and her son are both less adventurous than she is... and she has her own food phobias (as in no fish or seafood and it's not an allergy).

She's not sure why picky eating runs in her husband's family, but her husband is funny about fruit.  He will eat blueberry pancakes but not pie or the fresh fruit.  It took many attempts to get him to eat asparagus.  He still will not touch brussels sprouts no matter how she prepares them.

Her son finally will eat her excellent red cabbage.  However he now refuses to eat meat gravy -- even on mashed potatoes -- and will not eat salad.  She only gets to eat salad when she eats out.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 08, 2013, 07:36:53 PM
Growing up, my father did all of the cooking and he wasn't the best cook. He had all kinds of "creations". Lima beans with cheese. Ramen noodles with chopped up hot dogs. Ground beef and corn/green beans/other veggies, etc... His motto was that if we were really hungry, we would eat it.

So, now that I am older, I eat whatever I want. If I want pizza 5 nights in a row, I'm going to eat pizza 5 nights in a row.

I also don't make DS eat anything he doesn't want to eat. I will cook him a completely separate meal if he doesn't like what I am making. If I am going to eat something that I like, so is he.

Oh my, your post made me thankfull for my mom because I can so see that being my Dads perspective.  Though he was an excellent cook, he'd cook what he liked and to tarnation if some one else didn't like it.  He considered me a picky eater because at 5, I didn't eat raw oysters and Mom would "spoil" me by boiling shrimp for me instead. 
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Kendo_Bunny on January 08, 2013, 07:51:43 PM
I was pickier as a child, because I'm a super-smeller. Not a super-taster, exactly, but I have an incredibly powerful sense of smell. I can break down the ingredients in just about any dish I'm served, and anything with a particularly strong smell or an odor I found unpleasant I couldn't bring myself to eat. I also have some texture things, have an overactive sense of "spicy" (and a corresponding underactive sense of "sour"), and have a few moderate phobic reactions to some foods.

Since we had a succession of nannies, they all handled it differently. Some thought that I was just being a picky brat, and made me sit there anyway, until I literally would get sick from eating it (stress plays a number on my stomach). Others just assumed that I just wanted pure bland food and made nothing but microwave pizzas and chicken nuggets, even though I loved flavorful meals. I just needed them to have the right smell.

Eventually I just took over the cooking, because it was easier than waiting for someone to take what I liked into account. I turned out to be fantastic with spices, because I spent afternoons smelling everything in the spice cabinet, and was able to intuit well what would taste good with what, based on how it smelled. But I still can't cook things that smell wrong to me - I've never made asparagus or Brussels Sprouts, because they just smell off to me.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Dazi on January 09, 2013, 08:02:12 PM
<raises hand>  Hi, I'm a supertaster and a super smeller.

I can't count the times I've been told I was too picky an eater.  I average about 40 tastebuds in a 7-8 millimeter area. 

I actually really like robust, complex and even spicy food.  I'm especially fond of Indian curries and Thai.  Even some foods that bother other super tasters, I don't mind (spinach, broccoli, brussel sprouts).

Things I find completely revolting:

Tarragon
Anise
Fennell
Coffee
tonic water
Beer
Most wines (a few I can cook with, but can't just drink...especially red wines)

They all have this extremely bitter, astringent, metallic taste and smell.

Things that are borderline revolting ( I can eat them, if I must, but really, really don't want to):
Chocolate
Overly sweet foods (donuts, glazed anything)
Salted food
Fatty foods (goose, duck, dark meats, salmon, mackerel, sardines and other really fishy fish)
Green tea (it taste like dirty grass...and I can say that with confidence because my 3 year old self did once eat dirty grass)


As a supertaster, I can also enjoy the delicate favors of other teas, white fish, foods that others find very bland like naked baked potatoes.  As a super smeller, if it smells bad, I can't eat it.

On the plus side I can almost always copy a restaurant meal I loved because if I've tasted an ingredient before, I can pick it out easily.  Not too long ago I ordered a dish I'm weird about and the waitress wasn't sure what all was in it.  She kindly brought me a small sample, which I sniff tested, took a bite and rattled off all the ingredients, including the brand name of a specific one.     I don't think she believed that anyone could do that, so she went back and comfirmed with the chef.  He was quite impressed that I didn't miss anything.  Ftr, it only took me 2 tries to copy it at home.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: oceanus on January 09, 2013, 08:36:34 PM
When we were young children (below age 10) my father and his side of the family had a rule:  Eat what is put in front of you and be grateful for it.  There was none of that ďeww, I donít like thatĒ stuff.  One of my aunts used to make me eat butter (a lot of it) on bread.  To this day, I cannot stand butter (although I will eat margarine).

I canít stand anything Ďranchí.  The thought of bleu cheese or Roquefort dressing makes me ill.  Also hate sour cream, cream cheese, and cream of mushroom soup (or cream of anything soup).
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: AdakAK on January 09, 2013, 10:20:25 PM
There really was no "children's food" when I was growing up; you ate the same stuff as your parents or went to bed hungry.  There was nothing wrong with that.  Why on earth is that no longer true?
Currently I believe they recommend that you not turn food into a power struggle with your children.  Cook a variety of foods, don't give up after one taste but don't engage in a battle of wills over food. 

Those children resented it, grew up and vowed never to do that to their own children?  I once went to sleep at the table rather than eat something I disliked as a child.   Stubborn?  Me?!   I decided that type of parenting would not be something I did to my own children.  Eat a few bites to taste it, yes.  Force them to eat it, like it or not?  No.  My children are too much like me for that to work anyway. 
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: katycoo on January 09, 2013, 11:05:45 PM
I was a picky child, but am not now.  I am still not good with hot/chilli foods though.

DH is much pickier but he will force most things down, bar seafood.

There are plenty of green vege I prefer with a sauce over plain.  I just use them as a side to a casserole or in a pasta/stirfy.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: CakeEater on January 10, 2013, 12:24:24 AM
I don't see myself as a picky eater at all, but there are a few really common foods I don't like, so I'm sure I seem picky to others.

I don't like eating cereal with milk - I don't like the texture of cereal that starts out crunchy, but ends up soggy. I can snack on a lot of cereals dry, but not with milk. Although I like porridge - I guess it's because it starts out soggy, so I don't mind. Weird, I know.

I quite like quiche, and I can eat scrambled eggs with enough onion, bacon etc in it, but I don't like fried, poached or boiled eggs hot, although I like cold boiled eggs in things.

I also don't like watermelon.

These combined make my inlaws, whose breakfast consists of either cereal or bacon and fried eggs,and who love watermelon, think I'm very picky, but it's honestly just thos three things that I really don't like. I'll eat practically anything else.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Kendo_Bunny on January 10, 2013, 02:10:09 AM
I don't like eating cereal with milk - I don't like the texture of cereal that starts out crunchy, but ends up soggy. I can snack on a lot of cereals dry, but not with milk. Although I like porridge - I guess it's because it starts out soggy, so I don't mind. Weird, I know.

I don't think that's weird at all - crunchy food is supposed to be crunchy and soft wet food is supposed to be soft and wet. People would think it was weird if you soaked your potato chips in cola before eating them.

I don't like cereal with milk either, but it's more because I don't like milk. I got used to people giving me funny looks when I told them I preferred dry cereal, even after I explained that I can only stomach milk when eating very rich chocolate or very warm cookies. I hate the texture of oatmeal and porridge, so I've never really been able to eat it.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: RubyCat on January 10, 2013, 05:56:17 AM
My mother was the picky eater. Dinners were pretty much the same thing every night. A piece of meat, either fried or baked, potatoes, usually mashed, and a vegetable (corn, peas, green beans) out of a can. No seasonings except salt & pepper and some butter. She only made the potatoes for the rest of us - the only potatoes she ever ate we're fried. 

I am mostly not a picky eater though the one thing I can't usually force myself to eat is oily fish. I used to buy a can of sardines about once a year hoping to find a way to eat them because they're so healthy. I would open the can, gag at the smell, and give them to the dog, who absolutely loved them. 
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Venus193 on January 10, 2013, 06:14:07 AM
I like sardines, but in mustard, tomato sauce, or hot sauce.  However, I don't like tasting them four hours later.

I also don't like milk; the sight of it in a glass makes me gag.  I put some in coffee and cook with it if need be, but don't drink it.

With all the different foodstuffs in the world nobody is expected to like everything.  However, excluding entire normal categories (not because of an allergy or religious rules) or kicking up a fuss over something someone is serving goes into Special Snowflake territory.  That is neither charming nor cute.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: blue2000 on January 10, 2013, 07:18:38 AM
Sweet potatoes or white? That's not safe, is it? ???



Perfectly safe. Mother used to love snacking on white potatoes. I don't. They are too starchy for me.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: blue2000 on January 10, 2013, 07:29:47 AM
<raises hand>  Hi, I'm a supertaster and a super smeller.

I can't count the times I've been told I was too picky an eater.  I average about 40 tastebuds in a 7-8 millimeter area. 

I actually really like robust, complex and even spicy food.  I'm especially fond of Indian curries and Thai.  Even some foods that bother other super tasters, I don't mind (spinach, broccoli, brussel sprouts).

Things I find completely revolting:

Green tea (it taste like dirty grass...and I can say that with confidence because my 3 year old self did once eat dirty grass)


This made me laugh. I think it tastes a little like grass as well - and I know that because I used to love eating grass when I was a kid! :P

I have allergies and I still get the 'picky' label from some people, unfortunately. But one of the foods I truly hate is one that I'm not allergic to in the least - badly cooked squash. I adore dry mashed squash. Love, love love it! But some people make it wet and stringy. Ugh!

I've tried brussel sprouts as well, and they always turn out bitter. I'm told they aren't supposed to be. But until I get a good batch, I'm not eating them.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: squeakers on January 10, 2013, 07:55:00 AM
Sweet potatoes or white? That's not safe, is it? ???

Raw white potatoes.  Sprinkled with salt or without.  Crunchy, sort of sweet (I think some people taste a bitterness but that could be the peel) and very tasty. Just be sure they are washed well and/or take the peel off, don't eat green potatoes or sprouted potatoes.

Both white and sweet potatoes can be eaten raw but! you don't get much nutrition from them as it takes cooking to get the starches where humans can actually digest them.  Since we can't fully digest them raw it can cause some gas issues.  The kids and I just eat them as a snack and not as a meal so that usually doesn't happen to us.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on January 10, 2013, 08:17:11 AM
My mother was the picky eater. Dinners were pretty much the same thing every night. A piece of meat, either fried or baked, potatoes, usually mashed, and a vegetable (corn, peas, green beans) out of a can. No seasonings except salt & pepper and some butter. She only made the potatoes for the rest of us - the only potatoes she ever ate we're fried. 

I am mostly not a picky eater though the one thing I can't usually force myself to eat is oily fish. I used to buy a can of sardines about once a year hoping to find a way to eat them because they're so healthy. I would open the can, gag at the smell, and give them to the dog, who absolutely loved them.

Sis, is that you?  :)

My mother is a very picky eater, always was.  There were a lot of foods I simply wasn't exposed to when I was young since if my mother didn't like it, we didn't eat it. 

Things I have learned to enjoy over the years include any vegetable not cooked completely to death, avocadoes, middle eastern food, Indian food, Greek food.

Mom is MUCH pickier now than she was when we were young.  Food is the only thing about her life under her control anymore and she lives on toast, deli ham, dill pickles, and air with a bowl of soup or a couple of pieces of bacon just to confuse you to death.  She likes plain food.  The only thing I can think of that she really enjoys is shellfish, but she's too cheap to buy it and only orders it out.

I've gone from picky to particular and I'm still working on it.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 10, 2013, 08:25:02 AM
Things I find completely revolting:

Tarragon
Coffee
tonic water
Green tea (it taste like dirty grass...and I can say that with confidence because my 3 year old self did once eat dirty grass)

I'm with you on all of these.  Love, love, LOVE the smell of coffee.  Can't drink it.  I hate the flavour going down and I hate the flavour that remains in my mouth for hours afterwards.  Herbal teas, and green tea, mostly smell fantastic but taste like grass.  I keep trying green tea because the antioxidants are supposed to be so good for you.  Everytime, it tastes like grass.

I actually grew tarragon in my herb garden before I knew what it was.  I like the flavour and smell on its own but I've yet to find a dish I can cook it in and enjoy the flavour.  My neighbours love it, though, so I'll keep growing it.

And tonic water is just bitter.  Ick.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Venus193 on January 10, 2013, 08:30:36 AM
I was once friends with someone who believed she couldn't tolerate spices of any kind.  Since her mother treated her and her older brother as though they were still children (she was in her late 20s at the time) I have wondered whether her "problem" was imposed on her by her mother.   

The one time I ate at their home the meal was chicken and rice.  Smelled good enough while it was cooking, but was completely plain.  There was only a salt shaker in the house as well; no pepper of any kind and not even a box of Bell's Poultry Seasoning.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 10, 2013, 08:31:07 AM
There really was no "children's food" when I was growing up; you ate the same stuff as your parents or went to bed hungry.  There was nothing wrong with that.  Why on earth is that no longer true?

Yup - me too. The only time I ever got a separate meal was if I was sick.  And then it was only something like tea, soup, toast, nothing fancy.

And a funny story about that. When I moved out, I wasn't able to take my cat - Boris, aka His Lordship. So he stayed with my parents, where he quickly became my dad's best buddy. I went over there one day, and there's canned food IN his dish, yet my dad is opening another can. I asked what he was doing, and he said, and I quote, "he didn't like that one, so I'm giving him something else" So as a kid, if I didn't like what was served, I either forced it down, or went to bed hungry, yet the CAT gets something different? What's wrong with this picture?
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Venus193 on January 10, 2013, 08:51:43 AM
Cats are royalty and they know it.

Once upon a time I gave Blanche's cats two units of Sheba cat food for Christmas; they typically were fed something cheaper.  A few days later she told me that she served one of them to them the day before and they scarfed them down.  A few hours later she went into the kitchen to discover the male cat knocking the second one off the kitchen counter.  He then sat there and looked at her as if to say "That was good; now we want this one."
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 10, 2013, 08:55:55 AM
It's fun reading everyone's stories.  To me a picky eater isn't someone who has strong dislike of a dozen or more foods, even if they are very common.

Picky eaters to me or the ones that ONLY eat a dozen or so foods.  In college I had  a suite mate mate who only ate cereal and it had to be eaten with whole milk, chicken (but it could be in any form) potatoes in any form (but they could only have salt, pepper, butter or milk) apples, seedless grapes, nectarines, canned asparagus and canned corn.  She ate no bread, pasta, or cheese in any form.  She wouldn't eat any type of fruit with a seed.

Or my friends son who for 2 years lived on chicken nuggets, slices of kraft american cheese or slices of cheddar cheese, cereal, apples, saltine crackers, peanut butter,  and summer sausage.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: AfleetAlex on January 10, 2013, 08:58:26 AM
As a kid, I was a picky eater extraordinaire, although I think a lot of it dealt with issues with texture and an unfortunate bout of something (flu?) that turned me off of many foods I used to eat.

As an adult I'm much better and have gradually tried new things, although some things I simply won't eat. I've tried miso soup twice and loathe it. I just can't do it.

My niece also had a texture issue; her doctor said it was sensory sensitivity. So all her foods had to be separate on her plate when she was little and she couldn't mix the foods on her fork - just one food at a time. She's better now but does have some dietary restrictions. Has anyone else had experience with sensory sensitivity?
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Ambrosia Hino on January 10, 2013, 09:23:44 AM
I grew up on a rather limited menu, as far as veggies go. The only veggies that ever crossed our plates were potatoes in various forms; salads of iceburg, tomato, and carrot, with cucumber, raw onion, celery, and sometimes radishes on the side; and canned corn and one particular type of canned bean (ranch-style).

When I was in high school, I introduced bean sprouts to the house for cooking stir-fry. My parents make faces or weird noises about a lot of my cooking (mostly noises over the phone when I'm telling them about my experiments) because I'm fixing things like squash, eggplant, and broccoli.

I am picky about a few things. Spinach must either be raw or if its cooked, it has to either be smothered in cheese or be in Greek food. Broccoli and cauliflower must be cooked. Mushrooms must be hidden (I'm at least eating them now, in a very few things, so its progress!). And zuchinni and artificial sweeteners need to never touch my food, they make me sick (which stinks because I love zuchinni).

Luckily, my son is usually happy with whatever he gets fed. Hopefully this lasts even once he realizes how much his daddy turns up his nose at because...

My DH is our picky eater. He wants hamburger helper beef stroganoff, not homemade. He wants mac'n'cheese from a box, with the orange powder. Prefers canned veggies for the few he'll eat (peas and corn are about it). Fruits are just as hard to get into him, so far my only success is with sliced apples and occasionally watermelon. Basically, he wants meat, carbs, and dairy. One of his doctors actually forbade green leafy veggies, due to the Vitamin K content and a blood-clotting issue he has (super prone to them). Oh, my only real "success" with fruits and veggies, are ones hidden in desserts. I had to give up, pumpkin pie/bread totally counts as a veggie when he eats it.

I actually find meals easier when he goes on his "dieting" phase, since he usually does Atkins. Then I just make sure the main dishes are acceptable and round out meals for myself and DS with veggies that he doesn't eat anyway (so healthier for us, while not tempting for him). I'm looking forward to hitting the end of our "pantry challenge" (using up all the boxed junk and non-diet-friendly foods) so that we can move into the "diet" phase again.

ETA: I'm also working on cabbage, slowly, for myself. I love eggrolls, and I have started to find a restaurant or two with coleslaw recipes that I kinda like. DS loves coleslaw so far. Introducing that little guy to foods and trying to make sure he doesn't wind up picky (due to catering, not true dislikes) inspires me to try new stuff. Especially when (like with the coleslaw), I put something I don't like on his plate and he tears into it like its the best stuff ever, I have to at least snitch a taste back.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Venus193 on January 10, 2013, 09:25:07 AM
I don't like tofu or anything that's textured like it.  I can't really think of anything else at the moment.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 10, 2013, 09:29:38 AM
I wouldn't consider myself a picky eater, but I have some weird issues with certain foods, and types of food. There are some foods I won't touch, but for the most part, I eat pretty much anything.

As a child, I apparently had issues with whole milk, so the dr. told my mom to give me skim, which back in the late 60's and early 70's on, was unheard of. There weren't any worries about fat, and calories etc. Whole milk makes me gag now.  I also never ate American cheese; my mom didn't care for it, so she bought cheddar. And inevitably, I'd be at a friend's house for lunch, and they'd have grilled cheese with american, and whole milk. BLECH.

I also can stand any kind of cream sauce. Just thinking about them makes me gag. I think it has something to do with my milk aversion.  Yet I can put cream in my coffee with no issues.

I also have issues with the look and texture of certain foods. I like nut, aside from walnuts, but can't stand them in cake, ice cream, cookies etc. I think its the contrast between soft, creamy, smooth, and crunchy. But in chocolate? no problem.  I won't eat anything except real butter, and it even took me months to get up the nerve to try whipped butter v. stick. It was all about the appearance.

Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: learningtofly on January 10, 2013, 09:47:25 AM
DD is very picky.  Very.  As a kid I ate what was put in front of me.  I hated chicken for years and mom worked around it.  Lunch was the same thing every day for years.  But I grew up and tried new things.  Dad wasn't adventurous, still isn't, but likes hearing about the foods we try.

DD doesn't eat what we eat because unlike mom who had dinner on the table at 6 every night I"m walking through the door at 6 and trying to get food into everyone.  I'm working on planning meals and getting new foods into DD.  She used to eat everything.  I"m hoping the pickiness stage wears off soon.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: CakeBeret on January 10, 2013, 10:02:06 AM
My mom is a picky eater and I grew up with a very limited diet. We usually ate turkey sandwiches, spinach salad, or hamburger helper. I hate deli turkey and can't stand raw spinach, so I didn't fare well with that menu! Mom is not a good cook, doesn't like cooking, and has lots of food aversions. I grew up thinking I disliked many foods, because the only times I tried them they were horribly cooked. Mushy brussels sprouts, plain cold salmon from a can, most veggies from a can, meat cooked into oblivion, little to no seasonings, and so on.

Adulthood has been a delicious, fun adventure trying all the foods I thought I hated. I love green vegetables. I adore a piece of properly-cooked salmon. I get regular cravings for sushi and Thai. One thing I heartily dislike is eggs; if they are cooked just right they're okay, but if they're even slightly runny the texture makes me ill.

My DS would be a picky eater if we let him, I think. He has a handful of foods that he adores, and would eat nothing but that if he could. Cheese, hot dogs, peanut butter, pancakes and oranges, mainly. He eats what we eat at mealtimes, and then he can supplement that with some cheese or fruit if he wants to. He's not yet 3 and will happily eat sushi, fish, pasta, chili, spicy foods, guacamole, and all kinds of delicious things.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Cami on January 10, 2013, 11:14:38 AM
I'm not picky, but won't eat tofu because as far as I'm concerned our forebearers crawled out of the primordial swamp on their belly so we don't have to eat pond scum.And I won't eat chitlins. Tried them, not gonna happen again. Sadly, as I've gotten older my body cannot handle certain foods such as bacon or Pizza Hut pizza dough, so I wouldn't say I'm picky, but I do have some dietary restrictions.

My dh is not picky, but he has to be in a "mood" to eat food. I don't get it. He takes forever to order off a menu because he has to first decide what he's "in the mood to eat." I don't get it.

My dd is picky. She was not raised that way, but that is her natural tendency. We never made kid foods for her and expected her to eat what we were eating. Guess what? Did not work. I won't go in to the details, but it took us too long to ignore the advice of those who advised us to "force" her to eat "regular" foods. Food had become a battleground. It was bad. I deeply regret listening to people who told me that all we had to do was stick to our guns and she would "get over" it. She's gotten better as she's gotten older, but she's also realized that it's a texture issu and that realization has enabled her to branch out in her eating because she's not so afraid of trying new things for fear of gagging or vomiting.

Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on January 10, 2013, 11:34:05 AM
Oh, summer squashes!  I can't taste them well at all.  They tasted like stringy water the way my mom cooked them, either boiled to death or swimming in grease so I wouldn't eat them.  Now I still can't taste them well but don't pick them out of stirfries or omelets as long as they still have some texture to them.  Mushrooms, same thing.

Mom's not good at frying.  She doesn't believe in preheating so everything starts in an ice cold pan and gets grease logged as a result. 

My bad thing is pie crust.  I just can't get it right.  I'm going to master it one of these days, I'm not giving up.  :)
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on January 10, 2013, 11:48:48 AM
My DH is our picky eater. He wants hamburger helper beef stroganoff, not homemade. He wants mac'n'cheese from a box, with the orange powder. Prefers canned veggies for the few he'll eat (peas and corn are about it). Fruits are just as hard to get into him, so far my only success is with sliced apples and occasionally watermelon. Basically, he wants meat, carbs, and dairy. One of his doctors actually forbade green leafy veggies, due to the Vitamin K content and a blood-clotting issue he has (super prone to them). Oh, my only real "success" with fruits and veggies, are ones hidden in desserts. I had to give up, pumpkin pie/bread totally counts as a veggie when he eats it.
(snipped for length)

Iím really not a picky eateróin fact, Iíve been forcing myself to try things I hated as a kid to see if they are edible now (fried mushrooms? yum! green olives? all your green olives belong to me).

However, I grew up on a diet of Hamburger Helper, orange mac and cheese, canned veggies and fruits, lasagna of the midwest noodles + spaghettii sauce + cottage and cheddar cheese type, ramen noodles, cheap chicken noodle soup, and fast food.

Now, I have a much expanded diet now and rarely eat those things, but honestly? Iíll take Hamburger Helper, my momís "lasagna", and canned peaches or pears over the homemade or fresh variety any day. I think my taste buds were just conditioned to like those things, and the "real" versions are weird to me.

So, I can see where your DH is coming from in some respect. Not that that doesnít mean I donít think he could expand his tastes if he tried as I have, but the "good" food I like is all stuff that I didnít have until I was a teen or adult, so thereís no boxed or canned equivalent taste memory lurking in my head. Iíll take sushi over Hamburger Helper unless Iím super emotionally grief eating, but if itís gotta be stroganoff, Iíd rather the HH version.

ed. b/c I can spellóusually.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Micah on January 10, 2013, 02:50:05 PM
I have a picky eater, well two really. There is a very limited amount of things my son will eat. He's always been like it. Getting him onto solids when he was a toddler was a nightmare. I've done everything 'right' so to speak, never cooked an entirely separate meal, he's always had to at least try things before he screws up his nose, etc..... He's still shockingly picky and if he doesn't want to eat, he just won't. No threats or bribes of desert, going to bed hungry or loss of tv time will work.

He recently had a sleep over at a friends house. I think the mother thought I pandered to him a bit. She's also heard me lamenting about how tiny he is, so I think she decided in her head that she was going to get him to eat. She rang me at about eight o'clock to apologise because son had gone to bed after eating two bites of a sausage roll for tea. She was astounded. She said, "he ate two bites and then said he didn't like it. He asked politely for something else & when I said no, he just nodded and wandered off! I offered him an ice cream if he ate more, I told him I'd turn the tv off, I said he wouldn't be able to swim in the pool tomorrow & he knew I meant it, nothing worked!" I was roaring with laughter at this point. I said, "I did warn you. If he don't wanna eat, he aint gunna!"

It's very frustrating and his father is very much the same. They're both identical builds too. Muscly and fit as all get out, but without an ounce of spare flesh.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Cami on January 10, 2013, 03:36:01 PM
I have a picky eater, well two really. There is a very limited amount of things my son will eat. He's always been like it. Getting him onto solids when he was a toddler was a nightmare. I've done everything 'right' so to speak, never cooked an entirely separate meal, he's always had to at least try things before he screws up his nose, etc..... He's still shockingly picky and if he doesn't want to eat, he just won't. No threats or bribes of desert, going to bed hungry or loss of tv time will work.

He recently had a sleep over at a friends house. I think the mother thought I pandered to him a bit. She's also heard me lamenting about how tiny he is, so I think she decided in her head that she was going to get him to eat. She rang me at about eight o'clock to apologise because son had gone to bed after eating two bites of a sausage roll for tea. She was astounded. She said, "he ate two bites and then said he didn't like it. He asked politely for something else & when I said no, he just nodded and wandered off! I offered him an ice cream if he ate more, I told him I'd turn the tv off, I said he wouldn't be able to swim in the pool tomorrow & he knew I meant it, nothing worked!" I was roaring with laughter at this point. I said, "I did warn you. If he don't wanna eat, he aint gunna!"

It's very frustrating and his father is very much the same. They're both identical builds too. Muscly and fit as all get out, but without an ounce of spare flesh.
That describes my daughter. There was no incentive or punishment that would work and people never NEVER believed us when we said that. They were always SO sure that we were either lying or were at fault because we were "coddling" her or "spoiling" her or not exposing her to the "right" foods. And then they'd have an experience with her and be utterly shocked!

I am shocked by the number of people I meet DAILY who ascribe to the notion that their experiences are universal and that if you are describing something different you must be lying.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: CakeEater on January 10, 2013, 03:42:28 PM
I have a picky eater, well two really. There is a very limited amount of things my son will eat. He's always been like it. Getting him onto solids when he was a toddler was a nightmare. I've done everything 'right' so to speak, never cooked an entirely separate meal, he's always had to at least try things before he screws up his nose, etc..... He's still shockingly picky and if he doesn't want to eat, he just won't. No threats or bribes of desert, going to bed hungry or loss of tv time will work.

He recently had a sleep over at a friends house. I think the mother thought I pandered to him a bit. She's also heard me lamenting about how tiny he is, so I think she decided in her head that she was going to get him to eat. She rang me at about eight o'clock to apologise because son had gone to bed after eating two bites of a sausage roll for tea. She was astounded. She said, "he ate two bites and then said he didn't like it. He asked politely for something else & when I said no, he just nodded and wandered off! I offered him an ice cream if he ate more, I told him I'd turn the tv off, I said he wouldn't be able to swim in the pool tomorrow & he knew I meant it, nothing worked!" I was roaring with laughter at this point. I said, "I did warn you. If he don't wanna eat, he aint gunna!"

It's very frustrating and his father is very much the same. They're both identical builds too. Muscly and fit as all get out, but without an ounce of spare flesh.

I had a friend who thought something similar about me, I think, with similar results.

I consider myself very lucky that my little picky eater is slowly improving, but I'm very understanding about other people with picky kids now.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: DollyPond on January 10, 2013, 04:10:47 PM
don't like eating cereal with milk - I don't like the texture of cereal that starts out crunchy, but ends up soggy. I can snack on a lot of cereals dry, but not with milk. Although I like porridge - I guess it's because it starts out soggy, so I don't mind. Weird, I know.


Try Crispix with milk.  It is the only cereal I will eat with milk because of this same sogginess issue.  Crispix will stay crispy.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: cheyne on January 10, 2013, 05:26:04 PM
I was never a picky eater.  We ate what was on the table and that was it, there wasn't a huge selection in the pantry/fridge.  I started cooking for the family at 8, as my mother was in nursing school and dad worked full time.  I would make the meals that my mom had planned and taught me how to make, but it never seemed like there was enough.

When I was 10 my mother graduated and got a job as an RN.  We started shopping in the local Mexican food market at about the same time.  Talk about Heaven!  I learned to make all sorts of tasty (and cheap) Mexican dishes that were so filling.  My father learned to stop being a "meat and potatoes" man, and my love all of things HOT and spicy was born.

My DH is a "meat and potatoes" man, so I serve him what he likes and cook the rest of the meal with extra ingredients, spices & whatever. 

The only foods I can't eat are (cooked) spinach and iceberg lettuce.  Both taste completely like dirt to me.  (And as a farmer, I've eaten a lot of dirt!)



Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Dazi on January 10, 2013, 05:27:15 PM
My niece also had a texture issue; her doctor said it was sensory sensitivity. So all her foods had to be separate on her plate when she was little and she couldn't mix the foods on her fork - just one food at a time. She's better now but does have some dietary restrictions. Has anyone else had experience with sensory sensitivity?

Me again!  I think I've posted on this before somewhere on here.  There are certain foods I cannot eat because the texture I find off (raisins are the BIG one, peas are another).  Though I don't always, I prefer to use divided plates.  I don't like my food to touch and I don't like juices to run into the other foods on my plate.  I eat one thing at a time until it is gone and usually eat it in order on the plate (direction doesn't matter, but once I pick one, I stick to it).  I don't mind foods that are supposed to be touching like chili, spaghetti, mixed salads.  On the other side if I have grilled chicken, mashed potatoes and green beans, nothing can touch or run together.

Two exceptions to this are Chicken korma as long as it doesn't have extra whole raisins on top and any strongly spiced curry with fresh peas.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: mj on January 10, 2013, 06:39:38 PM
Picky eating seems to be about perspective, a lot of what is posted isn't necessarily picky to me.  I tend to think of picky eaters as those who have a won't eat list longer than a will eat list.

DHs FOO thinks of me as picky, which is funny because I think they are picky.  Before my medical stuff that required a strict diet change, I could pretty much eat anything but had a couple of limitations.  The quality of the food is my main focus.  So for example, I love fried chicken but won't eat it from a fast food place because the quality is poor.  I love all seafood, but can tell if the fish had previously been frozen.  I'll eat pretty much any type of food from all over the world, but again, the quality has to be good.  I could eat most dairy, but drinking milk straight is one thing I just can't do, that's about the only food I can label as gross -- even though I'll cook with it.

While my husband and his family can eat just about anywhere fast food or buy frozen meat, but they won't eat any type of seafood beyond shrimp.  They also will only eat mainstream American midwest type food.  Going to a Chinese restaurant is a huge deal.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Venus193 on January 10, 2013, 06:46:56 PM
My friend Blanche accuses me of being picky because I insist that my food not be at room temperature.  She eats everything at room temperature because of sensitive teeth, but when I told her that I sent something back because it wasn't piping hot she thought I was being a picky Special Snowflake.  Of course when someone says the word "calamari" in front of her she always says "I never eat anything with suckers.  It's something I live by."

The third time I heard her say that I called her on how that sounded like a bid for attention.  I haven't heard it since.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Bluenomi on January 10, 2013, 07:09:45 PM
DD is a fussy eater but mostly for me  ::) At home there are only 2 vegies she'll eat, corn and brocolli. She will eat more variety at daycare mostly due to peer pressure I suspect. We try her on other things but she either refuses to try or spits it out. It's mostly a power issue I suspect but isn't everything with a 2 year old?

I've been told many a time at you have to offer a child something 10 times before they will eat it but they always will. I can tell you for a fact this is a lie. There are things DD has been offer 30-40 times and she still won't eat them.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Emmy on January 11, 2013, 06:36:57 AM
I have a picky eater, well two really. There is a very limited amount of things my son will eat. He's always been like it. Getting him onto solids when he was a toddler was a nightmare. I've done everything 'right' so to speak, never cooked an entirely separate meal, he's always had to at least try things before he screws up his nose, etc..... He's still shockingly picky and if he doesn't want to eat, he just won't. No threats or bribes of desert, going to bed hungry or loss of tv time will work.

He recently had a sleep over at a friends house. I think the mother thought I pandered to him a bit. She's also heard me lamenting about how tiny he is, so I think she decided in her head that she was going to get him to eat. She rang me at about eight o'clock to apologise because son had gone to bed after eating two bites of a sausage roll for tea. She was astounded. She said, "he ate two bites and then said he didn't like it. He asked politely for something else & when I said no, he just nodded and wandered off! I offered him an ice cream if he ate more, I told him I'd turn the tv off, I said he wouldn't be able to swim in the pool tomorrow & he knew I meant it, nothing worked!" I was roaring with laughter at this point. I said, "I did warn you. If he don't wanna eat, he aint gunna!"

It's very frustrating and his father is very much the same. They're both identical builds too. Muscly and fit as all get out, but without an ounce of spare flesh.
That describes my daughter. There was no incentive or punishment that would work and people never NEVER believed us when we said that. They were always SO sure that we were either lying or were at fault because we were "coddling" her or "spoiling" her or not exposing her to the "right" foods. And then they'd have an experience with her and be utterly shocked!

I am shocked by the number of people I meet DAILY who ascribe to the notion that their experiences are universal and that if you are describing something different you must be lying.

That's why I hate when people put the blame for picky kids only on the parents.  Usually these people are non-parents or parents without a picky kid.  Kids are not robots and have their own tastes and temperaments and the stubborn ones who are determined not to eat will not eat even when their parents do the 'right' things.

DD is sometimes picky about shapes.  She had tried Goldfish shaped pretzels and didn't like them.  I had an appointment and dropped her off with a sitter and the sitter said she loved pretzels that were in the shape of a thin rod.  DD likes cheddar Goldfish, go figure.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: secretrebel on January 11, 2013, 06:47:50 AM
There was a thread on eHell about a child who was made a PBJ by their aunt and didn't like it because it was brown bread not white bread and crunchy peanut butter and a flavour of jam/jelly they didn't like. (I may have got some details wrong)

I remember opinion being really divided in the thread over whether this was a reasonable expectation. A lot of people seemed to feel the tastes/textures were so different it was reasonable. But to me that was being extremely picky. while I think that children (and adults) can ask for or make their own preferred food, as a guest you should accept the local norm unless you have a dietary restriction that could cause you harm or upset.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: nayberry on January 11, 2013, 08:50:02 AM
There was a thread on eHell about a child who was made a PBJ by their aunt and didn't like it because it was brown bread not white bread and crunchy peanut butter and a flavour of jam/jelly they didn't like. (I may have got some details wrong)

I remember opinion being really divided in the thread over whether this was a reasonable expectation. A lot of people seemed to feel the tastes/textures were so different it was reasonable. But to me that was being extremely picky. while I think that children (and adults) can ask for or make their own preferred food, as a guest you should accept the local norm unless you have a dietary restriction that could cause you harm or upset.

to me the taste and texture would be important (although i will not eat PB :P )  if the child liked smooth pb and strawberry jam/jelly and was given crunchy with lime jam/jelly thats a complete change imo


i'm a slightly picky eater in that i cannot stand raw tomatoes or slices of it on food, but i don't mind it in sauces,  i won't eat nuts (texture), but i like the taste of almonds (marzipan etc)  hate the smell and taste of coconut,   so don't eat a lot of thai food,  but i'll eat most veg & meat, even trying some more "exotic" ones such as ostrich, lovely rich flavour for a burger)

whereas i'm working on my husband, he is very fussy but i've gradually gotten him eating more veg and a wider variety, such as sweetcorn & asparagus, but he will not even try cauliflower, more cauli cheese for me :D
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 11, 2013, 08:55:08 AM
There was a thread on eHell about a child who was made a PBJ by their aunt and didn't like it because it was brown bread not white bread and crunchy peanut butter and a flavour of jam/jelly they didn't like. (I may have got some details wrong)

I remember opinion being really divided in the thread over whether this was a reasonable expectation. A lot of people seemed to feel the tastes/textures were so different it was reasonable. But to me that was being extremely picky. while I think that children (and adults) can ask for or make their own preferred food, as a guest you should accept the local norm unless you have a dietary restriction that could cause you harm or upset.

I don't remember this post, but I would say most kids under the age of say around 6 would have an issue with the above scenario.  Most people always serve PBJ one way and it can even be the "good, mom's not making me try something knew" safe haven lunch for this kid.  And instead getting whole wheat versus white, smooth versus crunchy, and a jam versus a smooth jelly would cause most kids to not even recognize the sandwhich.  When my kid's friends visited PBJ, was the one thing I always asked how they liked. Well, PBJ and burgers.  It's like putting mayonaise and ketchup on a hamburger for someone who doesn't like ketchup and mayonaise on burgers.  They aren't picky eaters they've just learned how they prefer their burgers.

I remember my mom telling a story about my sister's new 4 yr old step son and scrambled eggs.  They were up earlier than anyone else and mom offered to make eggs.  Mom's new step grandson sat at the counter as she was preparing them and when mom didn't add milk to the eggs when whipping them he became very upset and wouldn't eat the eggs.  They weren't like his Dad made.  This child even at that age would eat anything.  Not a picky eater, but don't mess with his normal eggs.



Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on January 11, 2013, 08:58:18 AM
I have a picky eater, well two really. There is a very limited amount of things my son will eat. He's always been like it. Getting him onto solids when he was a toddler was a nightmare. I've done everything 'right' so to speak, never cooked an entirely separate meal, he's always had to at least try things before he screws up his nose, etc..... He's still shockingly picky and if he doesn't want to eat, he just won't. No threats or bribes of desert, going to bed hungry or loss of tv time will work.

He recently had a sleep over at a friends house. I think the mother thought I pandered to him a bit. She's also heard me lamenting about how tiny he is, so I think she decided in her head that she was going to get him to eat. She rang me at about eight o'clock to apologise because son had gone to bed after eating two bites of a sausage roll for tea. She was astounded. She said, "he ate two bites and then said he didn't like it. He asked politely for something else & when I said no, he just nodded and wandered off! I offered him an ice cream if he ate more, I told him I'd turn the tv off, I said he wouldn't be able to swim in the pool tomorrow & he knew I meant it, nothing worked!" I was roaring with laughter at this point. I said, "I did warn you. If he don't wanna eat, he aint gunna!"

It's very frustrating and his father is very much the same. They're both identical builds too. Muscly and fit as all get out, but without an ounce of spare flesh.
That describes my daughter. There was no incentive or punishment that would work and people never NEVER believed us when we said that. They were always SO sure that we were either lying or were at fault because we were "coddling" her or "spoiling" her or not exposing her to the "right" foods. And then they'd have an experience with her and be utterly shocked!

I am shocked by the number of people I meet DAILY who ascribe to the notion that their experiences are universal and that if you are describing something different you must be lying.

That's why I hate when people put the blame for picky kids only on the parents.  Usually these people are non-parents or parents without a picky kid.  Kids are not robots and have their own tastes and temperaments and the stubborn ones who are determined not to eat will not eat even when their parents do the 'right' things.

DD is sometimes picky about shapes.  She had tried Goldfish shaped pretzels and didn't like them.  I had an appointment and dropped her off with a sitter and the sitter said she loved pretzels that were in the shape of a thin rod.  DD likes cheddar Goldfish, go figure.

I can see your daughterís side of thatóparticularly if she is pretty young. She sees the goldfish shape, assumes itís the cheddar ones she likes (either because she is to young to really understand the different texture, or doesnít know they make non-cheddar ones), and canít get past the fact that itís not what she expected. Even if she likes pretzels normally, in the moments leading up to eating the goldfish one, she was expecting cheddar and may be excited about it, then when her expectations arenít met, sheís upset and not willing to eat something she normally likes, because she got excited over cheddar goldfish.

Or maybe thatís just me. Sometimes I get in the mood for certain things, and something slightly different will put me off eating that thing all together at that specific timeóeven if I normally like that thing that is slightly different.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 11, 2013, 09:02:51 AM
There was a thread on eHell about a child who was made a PBJ by their aunt and didn't like it because it was brown bread not white bread and crunchy peanut butter and a flavour of jam/jelly they didn't like. (I may have got some details wrong)

I remember opinion being really divided in the thread over whether this was a reasonable expectation. A lot of people seemed to feel the tastes/textures were so different it was reasonable. But to me that was being extremely picky. while I think that children (and adults) can ask for or make their own preferred food, as a guest you should accept the local norm unless you have a dietary restriction that could cause you harm or upset.

I'm ashamed to say I did this once. With my grandparents!  We were visiting my dad's parents, who lived 3000 miles away on the other side of the country. Now my mom was not a good cook, so she didn't make much of an effort. Her mac and cheese was simply boiled mac, and then you put sllices of cheddar on it, stuck it in the oven, and that was that. To this day, and I'm 47, that's the ONLY mac and cheese I'll eat. Only I use shredded cheese. Just thinking about how its traditionally made, with a creamy cheese sauce, makes me gag. due to my aversion to anything warm and creamy, like i described upthread.

So we're there, and my trandmother made this mac and cheese, the "traditional" way, and sprinkled bread crumbs on top, which browned nicely. I threw a hissy fit and refused to eat it. I was 9 too! Something else must have been going on since I normally didn't do that, but I did. And refused to eat it. I don't recall what happened but my parents were NOT amused at all. Neither were the grandparents.

I'm also still like that with certain things; if it doens't look the way I'm used to, or prepared the way I like, I can't eat it. But as an adult, I just politely decline, and leave my "issues" out of it.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 11, 2013, 09:07:30 AM
Agree with the PP.  Your DD is associating shape with taste.  She might have a heightened visual since.  Be prepared for only liking certain pasta shapes, baby carrots versus standard size, apples needing to be cut into cubes versus quarters, and sandwhiches having to be cut a certain way. My DD would complain food didn't taste the same if it wasn't shaped correctly.  Her brain is preparing her taste buds on what to expect.  Think of it like thinking you've been served ice tea and it looks like iced tea put when you take a drink it is a soda.  I love soda but not when I'm expecting iced tea.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: bloo on January 11, 2013, 09:13:22 AM
There was a thread on eHell about a child who was made a PBJ by their aunt and didn't like it because it was brown bread not white bread and crunchy peanut butter and a flavour of jam/jelly they didn't like. (I may have got some details wrong)

I remember opinion being really divided in the thread over whether this was a reasonable expectation. A lot of people seemed to feel the tastes/textures were so different it was reasonable. But to me that was being extremely picky. while I think that children (and adults) can ask for or make their own preferred food, as a guest you should accept the local norm unless you have a dietary restriction that could cause you harm or upset.

I don't remember this post, but I would say most kids under the age of say around 6 would have an issue with the above scenario.  Most people always serve PBJ one way and it can even be the "good, mom's not making me try something knew" safe haven lunch for this kid.  And instead getting whole wheat versus white, smooth versus crunchy, and a jam versus a smooth jelly would cause most kids to not even recognize the sandwhich.  When my kid's friends visited PBJ, was the one thing I always asked how they liked. Well, PBJ and burgers.  It's like putting mayonaise and ketchup on a hamburger for someone who doesn't like ketchup and mayonaise on burgers.  They aren't picky eaters they've just learned how they prefer their burgers.

I remember my mom telling a story about my sister's new 4 yr old step son and scrambled eggs.  They were up earlier than anyone else and mom offered to make eggs.  Mom's new step grandson sat at the counter as she was preparing them and when mom didn't add milk to the eggs when whipping them he became very upset and wouldn't eat the eggs.  They weren't like his Dad made.  This child even at that age would eat anything.  Not a picky eater, but don't mess with his normal eggs.

Definitely!

I used to work at the Silver Spoon Cafe. It was owned by the same corporation as Ruby Tuesday and was in the style of an Italian trattoria. It was a casual Italian atmosphere that conversely emphasized wine service. The food was really good, IMO, 20 years ago!

However, their children's menu left a lot to be desired - by children anyways. It was not popular with them. For example, their grilled cheese sandwiches were not WonderBread with Kraft Singles. They used a delicious, wholegrain bread and real sharp cheddar cheese and then grilled in real butter (not Whirl or some such stuff). The chicken fingers were the breaded chicken used for their salads (delicious to a mature tongue) and sliced with dip. They were nothing like Chicken McNuggets.

Consequently there was always some kid whining about their food but they never altered the menu because adults with small appetites loved eating the delicious offerings on the kids menu with a small upcharge for an adult order!

Texture would make a huge difference to me as a kid. I didn't like peanut butter but if I had to eat it, it better be smooth! Crunchy was difficult to eat and would get all stuck in my teeth and felt funny.

And I used to hate breadcrumbs on anything because it felt like little bugs were in my mouth while I was trying to eat. I was such a little PITA when it came to food when I was a kid!
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Cami on January 11, 2013, 10:15:46 AM
There was a thread on eHell about a child who was made a PBJ by their aunt and didn't like it because it was brown bread not white bread and crunchy peanut butter and a flavour of jam/jelly they didn't like. (I may have got some details wrong)

I remember opinion being really divided in the thread over whether this was a reasonable expectation. A lot of people seemed to feel the tastes/textures were so different it was reasonable. But to me that was being extremely picky. while I think that children (and adults) can ask for or make their own preferred food, as a guest you should accept the local norm unless you have a dietary restriction that could cause you harm or upset.

I'm ashamed to say I did this once. With my grandparents!  We were visiting my dad's parents, who lived 3000 miles away on the other side of the country. Now my mom was not a good cook, so she didn't make much of an effort. Her mac and cheese was simply boiled mac, and then you put sllices of cheddar on it, stuck it in the oven, and that was that. To this day, and I'm 47, that's the ONLY mac and cheese I'll eat. Only I use shredded cheese. Just thinking about how its traditionally made, with a creamy cheese sauce, makes me gag. due to my aversion to anything warm and creamy, like i described upthread.

So we're there, and my trandmother made this mac and cheese, the "traditional" way, and sprinkled bread crumbs on top, which browned nicely. I threw a hissy fit and refused to eat it. I was 9 too! Something else must have been going on since I normally didn't do that, but I did. And refused to eat it. I don't recall what happened but my parents were NOT amused at all. Neither were the grandparents.

I'm also still like that with certain things; if it doens't look the way I'm used to, or prepared the way I like, I can't eat it. But as an adult, I just politely decline, and leave my "issues" out of it.
I think the opposite can be true as well -- you can believe you don't like something because of the way it's tasted every time you've had it before and then you try it another way and the world is different! LOL

I remember when I was a kid, we had a family friend's kid staying with us for a while one summer. One Friday afternoon, my mother announced she was making grilled cheese and tomato soup for lunch. The kid didn't complain, but she obviously did not want that lunch menu. My mother offered to give her a cheese sandwich or no sandwich at all, etc. The kid had been brought up to eat what was put in front of her and insisted she was fine. I can still see the look on her face when she bit into the grilled cheese. Utter shock and amazement and happiness. She scarfed that grilled cheese down and asked if there was any more. My mother asked why she'd changed her mind and she blurted out, "Your grilled cheese is GREAT! My mother's is always burned and hard as a rock. I thought that was the way grilled cheese had to taste." My mother ended up showing her how to make grilled cheese "our" way and when the girl went back home and showed her mother "our" way, the mother got quite upset. Every time the girl would visit subsequently, she'd ask for "our" grilled cheese.

My dh had a similar change of heart with lasagna. He'd only had it the way his mother made it... with tomato soup and cottage cheese. For years, he refused to try any lasagna, because he was sure it was disgusting. One day, I had made a lasagna for a pot luck and he was bascially shamed into taking a portion and to his shock, he loved it. He asks me to make it regularly and now orders it in restaurants.

So a lot of people assume that the way food tasted the first time it was presented to them is the way it always taste and if it tasted bad then, they won't want to try it again.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: rose red on January 11, 2013, 10:49:26 AM
DD is sometimes picky about shapes.  She had tried Goldfish shaped pretzels and didn't like them.  I had an appointment and dropped her off with a sitter and the sitter said she loved pretzels that were in the shape of a thin rod.  DD likes cheddar Goldfish, go figure.

Ha Ha.  I'm this way myself.  I only like thin rod pretzels and will never eat it in goldfish form and I, too, like the cheese flavors.  I remember as a kid being very excited because someone brought over a bag of twisted pretzels, but was disappointed that it didn't taste as good.  I mean, it tasted like pretzels, but...not.  Weird.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: drzim on January 11, 2013, 11:17:20 AM
I myself was a picky eater (now that I'm older I eat a lot of foods so no longer picky).   There was a time when the only meat I would eat was white meat chicken, and the only vegetable I would eat was corn or carrots.  I admit I got catered to a lot, because if I didn't like something, I would just not eat.  I think I freaked my mother out.

I have 2 kids, one picky and one that will eat pretty much anything.  And yes, they were both raised the same way.  I never make them eat anything, but they must at least try a bite.  If they don't want to eat what I serve, they are always welcome to pour themselves a bowl of cereal.  I just don't see the point of them starving, but I don't want to fix a separate meal either.  So cereal it is.

My picky daughter is actually the worst kind of picky and it does drive me a little crazy.  The worst kind of picky is that she actually eats a lot of different foods, but only prepared in one very specific way.  Hamburgers must be thin, not too thick.  Chicken can be grilled, but not fried or with any kind of breading. Raw carrots are fine, cooked carrots are not.  Pasta can only be certain shapes.  I never know whether she'll eat or not when we go somewhere because if someone says "we're having chicken and carrots" she may either scarf it down or refuse to eat altogether. 

Yet, this is the daughter that will happily eat sushi (several different kinds), Thai curry,  salmon, prime rib, chinese chicken salad, tikka masala.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: secretrebel on January 11, 2013, 11:41:29 AM
I think the opposite can be true as well -- you can believe you don't like something because of the way it's tasted every time you've had it before and then you try it another way and the world is different! LOL

I remember when I was a kid, we had a family friend's kid staying with us for a while one summer. One Friday afternoon, my mother announced she was making grilled cheese and tomato soup for lunch. The kid didn't complain, but she obviously did not want that lunch menu. My mother offered to give her a cheese sandwich or no sandwich at all, etc. The kid had been brought up to eat what was put in front of her and insisted she was fine. I can still see the look on her face when she bit into the grilled cheese. Utter shock and amazement and happiness. She scarfed that grilled cheese down and asked if there was any more. My mother asked why she'd changed her mind and she blurted out, "Your grilled cheese is GREAT! My mother's is always burned and hard as a rock. I thought that was the way grilled cheese had to taste." My mother ended up showing her how to make grilled cheese "our" way and when the girl went back home and showed her mother "our" way, the mother got quite upset. Every time the girl would visit subsequently, she'd ask for "our" grilled cheese.

My dh had a similar change of heart with lasagna. He'd only had it the way his mother made it... with tomato soup and cottage cheese. For years, he refused to try any lasagna, because he was sure it was disgusting. One day, I had made a lasagna for a pot luck and he was bascially shamed into taking a portion and to his shock, he loved it. He asks me to make it regularly and now orders it in restaurants.

So a lot of people assume that the way food tasted the first time it was presented to them is the way it always taste and if it tasted bad then, they won't want to try it again.

Cami, I really agree with this. There are some foods that I don't make for myself much because I don't know a really good way of cooking them and I don't like the way I make them but I won't say I don't like them or refuse them because they could turn out to be delicious when made by someone who knows that they're doing.

I didn't think I liked aubergine until I tasted a friend's aubergine parmigiana. It was AWESOME. I asked for the recipe at once and now I make "Rob's aubergine parmigiana" often. I also didn't think I liked leeks but my OH loves them so I started to experiment with cooking them and leeks are actually nommy. So now I always try everything except the few foods I know I can't handle (celeriac and coriander).

However, their children's menu left a lot to be desired - by children anyways. It was not popular with them. For example, their grilled cheese sandwiches were not WonderBread with Kraft Singles. They used a delicious, wholegrain bread and real sharp cheddar cheese and then grilled in real butter (not Whirl or some such stuff). The chicken fingers were the breaded chicken used for their salads (delicious to a mature tongue) and sliced with dip. They were nothing like Chicken McNuggets.

Consequently there was always some kid whining about their food but they never altered the menu because adults with small appetites loved eating the delicious offerings on the kids menu with a small upcharge for an adult order!

Bloo, do kids in the US commonly eat pre-cooked food? Those ready meal dishes are so expensive and bland at the same time it wouldn't occur to me to provide them for children although I would provide a simpler children's menu for kids visiting me. Mac and cheese is always made from scratch by me with cheese and butter.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 11, 2013, 11:42:32 AM
   So a lot of people assume that the way food tasted the first time it was presented to them is the way it always taste and if it tasted bad then, they won't want to try it again.

Hehehe - for me, it was this, and also just the way it looked. I hated asparagus as a child since my mom served canned, which was nasty and slimy. Fresh, TOTALLY different and I love it.  I also hated the way squash looked, so I was convinced I didn't like it. well, one day i'm watching some cooking show, and see butternut squash puree. I thought hmm...that looked yummy, maybe I'll try it, and i realized I had NEVER EVER tasted it, i just assumed i wouldn't like it.

Big surprise, I do. Same with zucchini and yellow squahs. not one of my favorites, but i will eat it, and grilled zucchini is the bomb!
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: blue2000 on January 11, 2013, 12:15:05 PM
DD is sometimes picky about shapes.  She had tried Goldfish shaped pretzels and didn't like them.  I had an appointment and dropped her off with a sitter and the sitter said she loved pretzels that were in the shape of a thin rod.  DD likes cheddar Goldfish, go figure.

Ha Ha.  I'm this way myself.  I only like thin rod pretzels and will never eat it in goldfish form and I, too, like the cheese flavors.  I remember as a kid being very excited because someone brought over a bag of twisted pretzels, but was disappointed that it didn't taste as good.  I mean, it tasted like pretzels, but...not.  Weird.

I like both but I can totally see that. Pretzels have a starchy 'inside' and a salty 'outside' shell. Thin pretzels have more 'outside' to them than thick goldfish pretzels and crunch differently. To a small child, this can be a huge difference.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Girlie on January 11, 2013, 01:05:25 PM
My husband is extremely texture senstive, as well as just being plain picky.
He won't eat ground meat or anything that has "whole" oats or grains in it because of the texture.
He won't eat vegetables. Or fruit.
His diet, shamefully, consists mostly of chicken, beef, pork, white breads, white pastas, cheese, potatoes, and tomato sauce (but only if it doesn't have actual pieces of tomato or anything else in it).

Yeah...he's weird.
We eat out a lot because I find that I tend to eat healthier when I'm not having to worry about catering to his preferences.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Mikayla on January 11, 2013, 01:30:09 PM
Agree with the PP.  Your DD is associating shape with taste.  She might have a heightened visual since.  Be prepared for only liking certain pasta shapes, baby carrots versus standard size, apples needing to be cut into cubes versus quarters, and sandwhiches having to be cut a certain way. My DD would complain food didn't taste the same if it wasn't shaped correctly.  Her brain is preparing her taste buds on what to expect.  Think of it like thinking you've been served ice tea and it looks like iced tea put when you take a drink it is a soda.  I love soda but not when I'm expecting iced tea.

Wow, you may have solved a lifelong mystery for me!  Seriously.  I don't think I'm an overly picky eater, but the one issue I've had my whole life has to do with shapes of pasta.  Penne is awesome, ziti is fine in emergencies, and with a gun to my head, I can do the larger size of spaghetti.  That's it.

What's funny (but not part of the above) is my brother has a lifelong hatred of cooked pasta.  My mom would make it, and his serving would be raw, just broken into smaller pieces.  He's still like that.

My only other must-avoid is cumin.  Even in small quantities, I feel like I'm sweating it for days afterward!  And I'm very sensitive to the smell of it.  My sis and BIL tried testing me on it once (not in a mean way - they were going to tell me before I ate it) but they made peas with cumin for Thanksgiving.  The minute I walked in the front door, it was overpowering.

Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: AfleetAlex on January 11, 2013, 02:51:35 PM
From the conversation about PB&J:  I realized when I was older the reason I didn't like my grandmother's peanut butter was because she was using natural pb, and I was used to a specific brand (the brand I still buy to this day). To me, natural peanut butter is like licking wallpaper paste. I won't do it. I cringe even thinking about it.

Neither will I buy low-fat PB, although I can eat it if I have to. I just find that it's slightly squeaky on my teeth.

Also, I never wanted spinach as a kid because it looked like cooked seaweed plopped on the plate, all stringy and wet. Imagine my surprise as an adult to learn that I love it cooked in dishes and raw in salads.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Venus193 on January 11, 2013, 03:34:43 PM
I don't like natural peanut butter either, at least not on bread.  The texture might be useful for other recipes, but it tends to separate, which I also don't like.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: bloo on January 11, 2013, 04:02:39 PM

However, their children's menu left a lot to be desired - by children anyways. It was not popular with them. For example, their grilled cheese sandwiches were not WonderBread with Kraft Singles. They used a delicious, wholegrain bread and real sharp cheddar cheese and then grilled in real butter (not Whirl or some such stuff). The chicken fingers were the breaded chicken used for their salads (delicious to a mature tongue) and sliced with dip. They were nothing like Chicken McNuggets.

Consequently there was always some kid whining about their food but they never altered the menu because adults with small appetites loved eating the delicious offerings on the kids menu with a small upcharge for an adult order!


Bloo, do kids in the US commonly eat pre-cooked food? Those ready meal dishes are so expensive and bland at the same time it wouldn't occur to me to provide them for children although I would provide a simpler children's menu for kids visiting me. Mac and cheese is always made from scratch by me with cheese and butter.

It seems like it. I live in NE Ohio and food is the end-all, be-all of this area. And the more processed, the better. But in different parts of the US, that's not the case. Even in the situation I mentioned from 20 years ago, that was in South Florida and maybe 1 out of 5 kids would turn their nose up the kid's menu, while others would either enjoy it or passively eat it. So it wasn't a problem for most kids.

But judging from my friends and acquaintance where I live now? It would be a problem for better than half the kids around here! Which is a shame from a nutritional standpoint.

Bless you for making homemade mac-n-cheese! Yum-may!
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Dazi on January 11, 2013, 05:21:52 PM
DD is sometimes picky about shapes.  She had tried Goldfish shaped pretzels and didn't like them.  I had an appointment and dropped her off with a sitter and the sitter said she loved pretzels that were in the shape of a thin rod.  DD likes cheddar Goldfish, go figure.

Ha Ha.  I'm this way myself.  I only like thin rod pretzels and will never eat it in goldfish form and I, too, like the cheese flavors.  I remember as a kid being very excited because someone brought over a bag of twisted pretzels, but was disappointed that it didn't taste as good.  I mean, it tasted like pretzels, but...not.  Weird.

I like both but I can totally see that. Pretzels have a starchy 'inside' and a salty 'outside' shell. Thin pretzels have more 'outside' to them than thick goldfish pretzels and crunch differently. To a small child, this can be a huge difference.

Goldfish pretzels and thin rod pretzels do not have the same texture nor do they taste the same (says the supertaster).  I like thin rod pretzels, I loathe gold fish pretzels or pretzels in any other form, except the big soft baked ones.  I also like the cheddar goldfish.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Lady Snowdon on January 11, 2013, 07:40:52 PM
I'm considered a fairly picky eater.  It's not so much that I don't eat anything as that what I don't like is considered so normal (tomatoes, eggs, watermelon, cottage cheese) that people who say they don't like it are pegged as picky because most people like whatever it is.

I also don't like a ton of seasoning/flavoring on things.  I don't put mustard/mayo/tomatoes/lettuce/pickles on my burger, for example.  Just the burger itself, with maybe a bit of ketchup, is fine. 

My one totally picky thing is mac-n-cheese.  It has to be Kraft, from the box, made just so.  Homemade mac n cheese?  I can't eat it; it doesn't taste good.  It's one area where my tastebuds have permanently adapted to the "low class" version. 
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: pearls n purls on January 11, 2013, 10:39:06 PM
My DH thinks I'm a bit of a picky eater because I can't handle too much spice.  I like different spices, but if food is too spicy, all I feel is heat and no flavor.  When we go out to eat, I prefer to get spicy food at 2-3 stars, where he likes 4-5.  We usually split two entrees, so we usually get one at 3 stars and one at 4, which I think is a good compromise.

Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: bloo on January 11, 2013, 11:15:12 PM
I'm considered a fairly picky eater.  It's not so much that I don't eat anything as that what I don't like is considered so normal (tomatoes, eggs, watermelon, cottage cheese) that people who say they don't like it are pegged as picky because most people like whatever it is.

I also don't like a ton of seasoning/flavoring on things.  I don't put mustard/mayo/tomatoes/lettuce/pickles on my burger, for example.  Just the burger itself, with maybe a bit of ketchup, is fine. 

My one totally picky thing is mac-n-cheese. It has to be Kraft, from the box, made just so.  Homemade mac n cheese?  I can't eat it; it doesn't taste good.  It's one area where my tastebuds have permanently adapted to the "low class" version.

Oh it definitely has to be Kraft! I didn't even like boxed mac-n-cheese as a kid because my mom always bought generic brands. When I got married I inwardly sighed when my DH asked me to make Kraft mac-n-cheese. Kraft, you say? Kraft! And a special request - mix half the powder with the milk, butter and hot macaroni. Then sprinkle on the rest after you've plated it.

Huh? ???

It was actually pretty good, although I discovered a latent pleasure in Kraft mac-n-cheese, made just so - w/o sprinkles! :)
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: geekette on January 12, 2013, 12:01:01 AM
I'm considered a fairly picky eater.  It's not so much that I don't eat anything as that what I don't like is considered so normal (tomatoes, eggs, watermelon, cottage cheese) that people who say they don't like it are pegged as picky because most people like whatever it is.

I also don't like a ton of seasoning/flavoring on things.  I don't put mustard/mayo/tomatoes/lettuce/pickles on my burger, for example.  Just the burger itself, with maybe a bit of ketchup, is fine. 

My one totally picky thing is mac-n-cheese. It has to be Kraft, from the box, made just so.  Homemade mac n cheese?  I can't eat it; it doesn't taste good.  It's one area where my tastebuds have permanently adapted to the "low class" version.

Oh it definitely has to be Kraft! I didn't even like boxed mac-n-cheese as a kid because my mom always bought generic brands. When I got married I inwardly sighed when my DH asked me to make Kraft mac-n-cheese. Kraft, you say? Kraft! And a special request - mix half the powder with the milk, butter and hot macaroni. Then sprinkle on the rest after you've plated it.

Huh? ???

It was actually pretty good, although I discovered a latent pleasure in Kraft mac-n-cheese, made just so - w/o sprinkles! :)

My mum was always upset that I never finished my mac-n-cheese when she made it; she cooked it differently to my dad, making the sauce runnier - which meant duller flavor and pasta that was the wrong texture.
It was about the only food I was allowed to get away with not eating a certain amount of. My parents never pulled the 'eat it or go hungry' route, because I would go choose to hungry and Geek-bro would copy me. Geek-bro was too thin as a kid as he had to take a medication for school that dulled hunger; he would skip lunch and was eating more like two meals a day than three (he had a pediatrician to help with that, but it was pretty unanimous that skipping a second meal was bad).
Instead, I had to eat a certain amount (about 2/3rds of whatever was served) and was not allowed to leave the table until I did so.  And, of course, I also hated tomato sauce, so I couldn't try to block out flavours and deal with only texture. :P  I think my record was four hours of just sitting there, not eating my roast lamb, until I got sent to bed because my mum wanted to go to sleep.


When I was about 13, I mortally offended my new aunt-in-law by refusing seconds of a dessert she'd made; it had berries in it, and I cannot stand any sort of berry, so I deliberately took the smallest piece and then said I wasn't hungry when she tried to feed me a second piece.  I was not welcome into her house for five years.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: MrsJWine on January 12, 2013, 12:18:22 AM
I think that pickiness is hard-wired to a certain degree, but that parents can make it worse. I was all smug about my first kid being such a great eater because I did everything right and then HAHAHAHAHA she stopped eating anything that wasn't beige for about two years. I want to punch Past Naomi in the face.

My kids are healthy, so they're completely fine not eating if they refuse to eat what's in front of them. If they're truly hungry, they really will eat. On the advice of both doctors they've had, we attempted to put one food on the table that they'd eat at every meal--just no second helpings until they'd tried a bite or two of everything else.

Current advice is to not offer a separate meal OR to force-feed. Just like my first daughter, I was extremely picky as a child, and I remember long nights where I would choose to sit at the table forever instead of eating the hated food (which was all of them, except most fruits and vegetables, oddly enough). My parents did eventually capitulate on fish; if they made fish for dinner, I did get something else, since they realized it was a real aversion and not just pickiness. Apparently there was a food poisoning episode early in my life, and I've been off it ever since.

(I'm sure we'll find out something about the currently recommended methods is wrong by the time my kids are grown up and attempting to feed their own children, so I'll keep my mouth shut about it when that time comes.)
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: ammyd on January 12, 2013, 01:47:52 AM
My family sometimes consider me a picky eater but honestly it's just a few texture issues that run through the foods they want me to try. I can't do pork chops no matter what way they're cooked the texture of the meat is always wrong to me. I couldn't eat sliced cheese until last year because when I was younger family members would force me to eat sandwiches with them on there. Raw mushrooms are ok but cooked they feel slimey and gross in my mouth.

I love sushi, Indian food, and would willingly order chef salads for myself when I was four, I'm not that picky.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: CakeEater on January 12, 2013, 04:04:02 AM
I think that pickiness is hard-wired to a certain degree, but that parents can make it worse. I was all smug about my first kid being such a great eater because I did everything right and then HAHAHAHAHA she stopped eating anything that wasn't beige for about two years. I want to punch Past Naomi in the face.

Ha ha ha! I hear you!
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 12, 2013, 10:49:54 AM
I'm considered a fairly picky eater.  It's not so much that I don't eat anything as that what I don't like is considered so normal (tomatoes, eggs, watermelon, cottage cheese) that people who say they don't like it are pegged as picky because most people like whatever it is.

I also don't like a ton of seasoning/flavoring on things.  I don't put mustard/mayo/tomatoes/lettuce/pickles on my burger, for example.  Just the burger itself, with maybe a bit of ketchup, is fine. 

My one totally picky thing is mac-n-cheese. It has to be Kraft, from the box, made just so.  Homemade mac n cheese?  I can't eat it; it doesn't taste good.  It's one area where my tastebuds have permanently adapted to the "low class" version.

Oh it definitely has to be Kraft! I didn't even like boxed mac-n-cheese as a kid because my mom always bought generic brands. When I got married I inwardly sighed when my DH asked me to make Kraft mac-n-cheese. Kraft, you say? Kraft! And a special request - mix half the powder with the milk, butter and hot macaroni. Then sprinkle on the rest after you've plated it.

Huh? ???

It was actually pretty good, although I discovered a latent pleasure in Kraft mac-n-cheese, made just so - w/o sprinkles! :)

My mum was always upset that I never finished my mac-n-cheese when she made it; she cooked it differently to my dad, making the sauce runnier - which meant duller flavor and pasta that was the wrong texture.
It was about the only food I was allowed to get away with not eating a certain amount of. My parents never pulled the 'eat it or go hungry' route, because I would go choose to hungry and Geek-bro would copy me. Geek-bro was too thin as a kid as he had to take a medication for school that dulled hunger; he would skip lunch and was eating more like two meals a day than three (he had a pediatrician to help with that, but it was pretty unanimous that skipping a second meal was bad).
Instead, I had to eat a certain amount (about 2/3rds of whatever was served) and was not allowed to leave the table until I did so.  And, of course, I also hated tomato sauce, so I couldn't try to block out flavours and deal with only texture. :P  I think my record was four hours of just sitting there, not eating my roast lamb, until I got sent to bed because my mum wanted to go to sleep.


When I was about 13, I mortally offended my new aunt-in-law by refusing seconds of a dessert she'd made; it had berries in it, and I cannot stand any sort of berry, so I deliberately took the smallest piece and then said I wasn't hungry when she tried to feed me a second piece.  I was not welcome into her house for five years.

I think that would be a ban I'd welcome. 

I had a friend in college who'd makes Kraft Mac & Cheese with just melted butter mixed with the powder.  She didn't vwantb to keep milk on hand because it would spoil before she'd use it up. Later I had a friend who made a lower fat version mixing the powder with low fat sour cream and a little  skim milk.  It wasn't bad and I still like to up the creaminess of the box stuff with a little sour cream.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Firecat on January 12, 2013, 12:29:07 PM
I don't consider myself especially picky, but I have a few "can't eat" and some "don't like" foods. On the can't eat list are: shellfish and rhubarb (allergic) and pepperoni (ok, technically it won't kill me, but I will be horribly uncomfortable for several hours afterwards). My digestive system apparently thinks tofu is a toxic substance - I actually didn't mind it in the item I tried it in (a frozen meal that included chunks of tofu), but my intestines apparently said: "What the @#$!! is THIS STUFF??? CORE DUMP! CORE DUMP!"

On the won't eat list: melon (I've found that I dislike watermelon, canteloup, and honeydew, so it's easier to just say I don't like melon); spicy food that's "hot" spicy; I don't care for slices or chunks of raw tomato, but will eat salsa (as long as it's mild), and tomato sauces are just fine. I'm not big on green beans, but will eat them occasionally, and I tend to prefer broccoli and cauliflower raw, but will eat them cooked as long as they still have some texture and aren't completely cooked to mush. Oh, and I won't eat jello...unless it's in a jello shot, which comes under different rules.

The rule at my house was I had to try two bites of something. If I didn't like it, I could fill up on other stuff and nothing would be said about it. There were children's menus at some places when I was growing up, but I usually didn't want one. I'd usually just order something like a petite steak or something like that off the regular menu instead. Which delighted my maternal grandfather in particular; he loved a good steak, and loved buying me one. 
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 12, 2013, 01:03:55 PM
The kids menu discussion got me to wondering when they became popular.  I'm in my mid 40s.  As a child our family only dined out once a month or so for dinner.  I do remember there being kids meal items on menus, but in most cases they were just smaller portions of the same adult menu.  I only have one memory of actually receiving a different menu as a child and that was at an upscale steak house when i was around 8. The hostess handed me a different menu but my mom interceded and ask for a regular menu to be brought to me.

With my kids, we probably ate out dinner 3 nights a week when the kids were little.  They always had the option of ordering from the kids menus, sharing a plate between them, sharing with me, or ordering appetizer as their main.  But when they both made the move with in a year of each other (at about 9 for DD and 8 for DS) from the kids to full adult meals, we definately started cutting back on dinners out because it had just become so expensive.  I wonder if the popularity of kids menus was tied to the increased frequency of families eating out and the cost. 
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Emmy on January 12, 2013, 07:04:57 PM
Agree with the PP.  Your DD is associating shape with taste.  She might have a heightened visual since.  Be prepared for only liking certain pasta shapes, baby carrots versus standard size, apples needing to be cut into cubes versus quarters, and sandwhiches having to be cut a certain way. My DD would complain food didn't taste the same if it wasn't shaped correctly.  Her brain is preparing her taste buds on what to expect.  Think of it like thinking you've been served ice tea and it looks like iced tea put when you take a drink it is a soda.  I love soda but not when I'm expecting iced tea.

DD is very young, 17 months so she is learning what stuff is and what it is supposed to look like.  She doesn't seem to mind graham cracker goldfish, but like another poster eating the same food in different shapes is often a different experience.  She is definitely starting to have foods she doesn't like.  I gave her a little bit of a scrambled egg today and she pressed it with her fingers, decided she didn't like the texture, and handed it back to me. 

As a kid, I didn't like, but would eat white bread.  It tastes like flour and water to me.  I much preferred wheat bread as a small kid and probably would have loved multi-grain.  I don't plan on introducing DD to white break, she likes wheat.  I'm hoping if she develops a taste for certain foods before getting to the age where many kids decide they look 'funny' or 'yucky', she'll be comfortable with continuing to eat them.  I can only hope. 

I would also define picky as somebody who eats only very limited food due to preference, not allergies, religious, or health reasons.  I don't think not liking certain foods or even a whole group of food (like seafood) makes somebody especially picky.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: snowdragon on January 12, 2013, 11:35:26 PM
Sweet potatoes or white? That's not safe, is it? ???

There is some old wives tale that white potatoes raw are poisonous...I have been eating them that way for as long as I can remember.  So did my grandma and an uncle. I have eaten the green parts and even the peels, no issues. They can be harder to digest than mashed or baked, but I can't imagine that they will actually harm you.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Rohanna on January 12, 2013, 11:53:06 PM
http://www.livestrong.com/article/523041-the-risks-of-eating-raw-potatoes/

Taters, precious! :)
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Elfmama on January 13, 2013, 02:40:31 PM

So a lot of people assume that the way food tasted the first time it was presented to them is the way it always taste and if it tasted bad then, they won't want to try it again.
That's my DH, right there.  If his mother prepared it poorly, he won't eat it now, no matter HOW mine differs from his mother's.  (MIL served the same thing every night: meat baked into shoe leather, mashed potatoes, and fresh/frozen veggies boiled until they tasted like canned.  NO seasonings, no onions, garlic, herbs, nothing but salt, and after FIL had to limit salt intake, not even that.)

And if his mother never made it at all, he won't eat it.  He "just knows" that he doesn't like it.  ::)

And he claims that *I* am a picky eater, because I can't stomach meat fat.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Elfmama on January 13, 2013, 02:49:50 PM
Also, I never wanted spinach as a kid because it looked like cooked seaweed plopped on the plate, all stringy and wet. Imagine my surprise as an adult to learn that I love it cooked in dishes and raw in salads.
Oh, gawds, canned spinach!  Little Brother loved it (because his TV hero Popeye ate it to make himself strong) and I loathed it, just the way AfleetAlex did.  Mom cooked it with vinegar, the way her mother did, and it would lie on the plate in this reeking slimy green mass.   :P   Fortunately Mom didn't like it either, because HER mother had forced her to eat it, so she didn't make me eat it.  Little Brother was welcome to my share.

I can eat it cooked in something like pizza or quiche, but raw green leafy veg give me terrible gas, so I skip any and all forms.  I like lettuce, but it doesn't like me.  :'(
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Lady Snowdon on January 13, 2013, 03:04:12 PM
Also, I never wanted spinach as a kid because it looked like cooked seaweed plopped on the plate, all stringy and wet. Imagine my surprise as an adult to learn that I love it cooked in dishes and raw in salads.
Oh, gawds, canned spinach!  Little Brother loved it (because his TV hero Popeye ate it to make himself strong) and I loathed it, just the way AfleetAlex did.  Mom cooked it with vinegar, the way her mother did, and it would lie on the plate in this reeking slimy green mass.   :P   Fortunately Mom didn't like it either, because HER mother had forced her to eat it, so she didn't make me eat it.  Little Brother was welcome to my share.

I can eat it cooked in something like pizza or quiche, but raw green leafy veg give me terrible gas, so I skip any and all forms.  I like lettuce, but it doesn't like me.  :'(

My dad used to love canned spinach, cooked in the microwave for a couple of minutes, with apple cider vinegar poured on top.  Blech!  To this day, I can only handle spinach in small quantities, because of my associations with it.  I've heard so much about how using vinegar to clean things is a good alternative, so I bought a bottle of vinegar to try it out with.  I opened it, caught a whiff, and immediately gagged - it smelled like my memory of cooked canned spinach.  I can't use it at all. 
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Kimblee on January 13, 2013, 03:42:10 PM
A friend of mine had a picky eating toddler. (She would eat cold cheese, her mom's homemade steak fingers and various veggies/fruits. Everything else was a failure. And she drank water. Not juice, certainly not milk, water.)

The pediatrician told her mom to give her only milk to drink, and not to let her have her three foods, and eventually she'd get hungry enough to eat and drink what she was offered. Kiddo never fussed, never fought, just refused the offered foods and drinks. And as far as they can tell, went hungry for quite awhile. Everytime my friend would get freaked and call the doctor to say her daughter still wasn't eating he would insist she not give in and let the toddler "win". (yes, common sense would say the doctor is full of it. But my friend was a young mom and she believed in the doctor.)

Mom (and doc) lost. Big time. The kiddo dehydrated herself pretty badly. So Friend gave up, got a new pediatrician and figured she'd just make steak fingers forever. Of course her toddler then decided she loved EVERYTHING except eggs within four months of her hospital visit. My friend told me she was afraid to have more kids because she didn't want another picky eater.(I assume she was joking) She has five kids in all now, and the younger four seem to be human vacuum cleaners, they eat and eat and eat! And anything on an adult's plate is far better than their own food.

Oldest kiddo still won't drink anything except water though. She's kinda a weird kid. She doesn't like most deserts, except cheesecake, but loves spicy foods and anything vaguely asian. And veggies of any sort, she saw me eat an entire can of collard greens once and I'm informed I "ruined" her because that's now her favorite after school snack.

@Elfmama and Lady Snowdon: I love canned greens of any sort with vinegar. But it has to be that "peppered vinegar" So yummy.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Cami on January 13, 2013, 04:02:12 PM
A friend of mine had a picky eating toddler. (She would eat cold cheese, her mom's homemade steak fingers and various veggies/fruits. Everything else was a failure. And she drank water. Not juice, certainly not milk, water.)

The pediatrician told her mom to give her only milk to drink, and not to let her have her three foods, and eventually she'd get hungry enough to eat and drink what she was offered. Kiddo never fussed, never fought, just refused the offered foods and drinks. And as far as they can tell, went hungry for quite awhile. Everytime my friend would get freaked and call the doctor to say her daughter still wasn't eating he would insist she not give in and let the toddler "win". (yes, common sense would say the doctor is full of it. But my friend was a young mom and she believed in the doctor.)

Mom (and doc) lost.
That was the advice two pediatricians, two PAs and everyone I know gave me about my dd as well. Luckily, I knew enough to stop it before my dd got dehydrated, but the pediatrician scolded me for "giving in too early."
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Kimblee on January 13, 2013, 04:05:49 PM
A friend of mine had a picky eating toddler. (She would eat cold cheese, her mom's homemade steak fingers and various veggies/fruits. Everything else was a failure. And she drank water. Not juice, certainly not milk, water.)

The pediatrician told her mom to give her only milk to drink, and not to let her have her three foods, and eventually she'd get hungry enough to eat and drink what she was offered. Kiddo never fussed, never fought, just refused the offered foods and drinks. And as far as they can tell, went hungry for quite awhile. Everytime my friend would get freaked and call the doctor to say her daughter still wasn't eating he would insist she not give in and let the toddler "win". (yes, common sense would say the doctor is full of it. But my friend was a young mom and she believed in the doctor.)

Mom (and doc) lost.
That was the advice two pediatricians, two PAs and everyone I know gave me about my dd as well. Luckily, I knew enough to stop it before my dd got dehydrated, but the pediatrician scolded me for "giving in too early."

Oh wow, it wasn't just one doctor?

My friend (7+ years later, since her picky toddler is a lovely, charming ten year old now.) still feels bad when she talks about it. Her daughter's reply shen she appologized.

"Don't feel so bad. All I remember is getting to eat a can of peaches in the hospital."
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Firecat on January 13, 2013, 04:17:12 PM
A friend of mine had a picky eating toddler. (She would eat cold cheese, her mom's homemade steak fingers and various veggies/fruits. Everything else was a failure. And she drank water. Not juice, certainly not milk, water.)

The pediatrician told her mom to give her only milk to drink, and not to let her have her three foods, and eventually she'd get hungry enough to eat and drink what she was offered. Kiddo never fussed, never fought, just refused the offered foods and drinks. And as far as they can tell, went hungry for quite awhile. Everytime my friend would get freaked and call the doctor to say her daughter still wasn't eating he would insist she not give in and let the toddler "win". (yes, common sense would say the doctor is full of it. But my friend was a young mom and she believed in the doctor.)

Mom (and doc) lost. Big time. The kiddo dehydrated herself pretty badly. So Friend gave up, got a new pediatrician and figured she'd just make steak fingers forever. Of course her toddler then decided she loved EVERYTHING except eggs within four months of her hospital visit. My friend told me she was afraid to have more kids because she didn't want another picky eater.(I assume she was joking) She has five kids in all now, and the younger four seem to be human vacuum cleaners, they eat and eat and eat! And anything on an adult's plate is far better than their own food.

Oldest kiddo still won't drink anything except water though. She's kinda a weird kid. She doesn't like most deserts, except cheesecake, but loves spicy foods and anything vaguely asian. And veggies of any sort, she saw me eat an entire can of collard greens once and I'm informed I "ruined" her because that's now her favorite after school snack.

@Elfmama and Lady Snowdon: I love canned greens of any sort with vinegar. But it has to be that "peppered vinegar" So yummy.

Not a parent here, but if she was eating steak fingers, cheese, and veggies and fruit, I don't understand being terribly concerned. She was getting protein and dairy and veggies and fruit, and don't a lot of toddlers go through a picky stage? It just seems odd to me to be so concerned about it when it sounds like she was getting a pretty sound diet, for the most part.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: MrsJWine on January 13, 2013, 04:38:08 PM
That's really odd advice from a pediatrician. We've gotten pretty much the opposite from doctors: if your kid drinks only water, that's really good; milk is okay but overrated and should only be given with meals; juice is vastly overrated, since you get all the sugar of fruit with fewer benefits, especially fiber.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Kimblee on January 13, 2013, 05:21:29 PM
A friend of mine had a picky eating toddler. (She would eat cold cheese, her mom's homemade steak fingers and various veggies/fruits. Everything else was a failure. And she drank water. Not juice, certainly not milk, water.)

The pediatrician told her mom to give her only milk to drink, and not to let her have her three foods, and eventually she'd get hungry enough to eat and drink what she was offered. Kiddo never fussed, never fought, just refused the offered foods and drinks. And as far as they can tell, went hungry for quite awhile. Everytime my friend would get freaked and call the doctor to say her daughter still wasn't eating he would insist she not give in and let the toddler "win". (yes, common sense would say the doctor is full of it. But my friend was a young mom and she believed in the doctor.)

Mom (and doc) lost. Big time. The kiddo dehydrated herself pretty badly. So Friend gave up, got a new pediatrician and figured she'd just make steak fingers forever. Of course her toddler then decided she loved EVERYTHING except eggs within four months of her hospital visit. My friend told me she was afraid to have more kids because she didn't want another picky eater.(I assume she was joking) She has five kids in all now, and the younger four seem to be human vacuum cleaners, they eat and eat and eat! And anything on an adult's plate is far better than their own food.

Oldest kiddo still won't drink anything except water though. She's kinda a weird kid. She doesn't like most deserts, except cheesecake, but loves spicy foods and anything vaguely asian. And veggies of any sort, she saw me eat an entire can of collard greens once and I'm informed I "ruined" her because that's now her favorite after school snack.

@Elfmama and Lady Snowdon: I love canned greens of any sort with vinegar. But it has to be that "peppered vinegar" So yummy.

Not a parent here, but if she was eating steak fingers, cheese, and veggies and fruit, I don't understand being terribly concerned. She was getting protein and dairy and veggies and fruit, and don't a lot of toddlers go through a picky stage? It just seems odd to me to be so concerned about it when it sounds like she was getting a pretty sound diet, for the most part.

True. I'm not sure what the doctor's problem was. I never met him. My friend says he was VERY fixated that children should drink five glasses of milk a day, and other dairy sources were somehow "inferior"

And I goofed in the OP. Kiddo will now also drink iced tea or hot tea, but only "as brewed" or possibly with a splash of lemon juice. Add honey or sugar and she won't touch it. Her mom thinks maybe she is sensitive to sweet flavors.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Cami on January 13, 2013, 05:23:13 PM
A friend of mine had a picky eating toddler. (She would eat cold cheese, her mom's homemade steak fingers and various veggies/fruits. Everything else was a failure. And she drank water. Not juice, certainly not milk, water.)

The pediatrician told her mom to give her only milk to drink, and not to let her have her three foods, and eventually she'd get hungry enough to eat and drink what she was offered. Kiddo never fussed, never fought, just refused the offered foods and drinks. And as far as they can tell, went hungry for quite awhile. Everytime my friend would get freaked and call the doctor to say her daughter still wasn't eating he would insist she not give in and let the toddler "win". (yes, common sense would say the doctor is full of it. But my friend was a young mom and she believed in the doctor.)

Mom (and doc) lost.
That was the advice two pediatricians, two PAs and everyone I know gave me about my dd as well. Luckily, I knew enough to stop it before my dd got dehydrated, but the pediatrician scolded me for "giving in too early."

Oh wow, it wasn't just one doctor?

My friend (7+ years later, since her picky toddler is a lovely, charming ten year old now.) still feels bad when she talks about it. Her daughter's reply shen she appologized.

"Don't feel so bad. All I remember is getting to eat a can of peaches in the hospital."
I feel bad about it too. My dd doesn't remember any of it, thankfully. But I'll never forget.

I think one reason I was willing to believe them was because my sister was incredibly picky and I believed it was because my parents spoiled her. "Don't like the meatloaf? Oh, that's too bad, poor baby. Have some chocolate ice cream for dinner..." Meanwhile, I was forced to eat foods that actually made me vomit (I seem to have an allergic reaction when fried ground beef and white rice are combined). I'm not picky and my sister is super picky. So I thought that my sister was picky because she was given sweets and treats instead of eating real food at many meals.

Then I had my dd and learned differently.

That said, having such a picky eater in the family was extremely difficult and made traveling impossible. She's gotten better as she's gotten older and learned how to order off menu by asking for a plain chicken breast, etc. But it's amazing how many wait staff feel the need to make comments about her choices.

My sister is still the pickiest eater I know personally. I do know of someone who eats only macaroni and cheese, waffles and white bread. She's 30 something and seems apparently quite healthy.

Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: dietcokeofevil on January 13, 2013, 05:46:14 PM
My brother and I weren't picky eaters.  My parents were really good cooks and we always had a main dish, 2 or 3 sides, and bread with each meal.  So even if we didn't like one thing, there was always something we liked.

 When  I was 13/14 when I started babysitting for one family everyday after school and all day during school breaks.  I was responsible for cooking dinner for the kids every night and then wrapping up the rest for the parents to eat.  The mother left me a menu each day.  Dinner was always Meat, veg and fruit.  Meat was cooked very plainly with almost no seasons. The only fresh veggie was potatoes (mashed or baked).  The fruit was normally canned, but occasionally they would have something fresh.   On school breaks I would also fix the kids breakfast and lunch.  Breakfast was always frozen pancakes or waffles, lunch was normally Mac and Cheese-maybe hotdogs.  I always felt sorry that the kids never got to really experience fresh food.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: rose red on January 13, 2013, 06:14:10 PM
I have a friend who's one child eat, or at least try, everything.  Loves food.  Very adventurous.

The other one, though, only eat sweets.  Every meal time is a battle.  I normally don't believe in forcing kids to eat, but with this one, you have to.  If there was one food she likes, they'll probably serve it for every meal just to stop the battles, but she doesn't like anything except sweets, not even sweet fruit unless it's in a smoothie.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Kaora on January 13, 2013, 07:25:15 PM
I'd like to be adventurous.  I am autistic (PDD-NOS is my exact diagnosis), so I have texture issues.  I can't eat broccoli or asparagus, though I've tried many a time, because it makes me gag. :-\ I also have allergies, and not quite sure what I'm allergic to, but usually follow my mum's guidelines, since we're both atopic.  I know for sure I'm allergic to avocados, and other things I'm just sensitive to, like cucumbers.  Not pickles, though.

This kills me more than some people might think, who write me off as being picky. :-\ I don't like being picky, I just really have to limit my food choices.  Doesn't help most of my allergies are to uncooked veggies, some uncooked fruits.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Tea Drinker on January 13, 2013, 09:18:54 PM
I am suddenly grateful to my own long-ago pediatrician.

My mother tells me that when I was quite young, there was a period when I refused everything but milk and cucumbers. Mom was worried enough to ask the pediatrician about it, and he basically told her "it's not doing her any harm, she'll get over it." (The logic seems to have been that I was getting protein, calories, and plenty of liquid.)

I'm told it took a few months, but I started eating other things. I was particular about vegetables for a long time, and at 20 or so discovered I like a great many things if they are stir-fried in a wok with ginger and/or garlic. I am still very fond of cucumber, but drink far less milk these days.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Firecat on January 13, 2013, 09:40:08 PM
A friend of mine had a picky eating toddler. (She would eat cold cheese, her mom's homemade steak fingers and various veggies/fruits. Everything else was a failure. And she drank water. Not juice, certainly not milk, water.)

The pediatrician told her mom to give her only milk to drink, and not to let her have her three foods, and eventually she'd get hungry enough to eat and drink what she was offered. Kiddo never fussed, never fought, just refused the offered foods and drinks. And as far as they can tell, went hungry for quite awhile. Everytime my friend would get freaked and call the doctor to say her daughter still wasn't eating he would insist she not give in and let the toddler "win". (yes, common sense would say the doctor is full of it. But my friend was a young mom and she believed in the doctor.)

Mom (and doc) lost. Big time. The kiddo dehydrated herself pretty badly. So Friend gave up, got a new pediatrician and figured she'd just make steak fingers forever. Of course her toddler then decided she loved EVERYTHING except eggs within four months of her hospital visit. My friend told me she was afraid to have more kids because she didn't want another picky eater.(I assume she was joking) She has five kids in all now, and the younger four seem to be human vacuum cleaners, they eat and eat and eat! And anything on an adult's plate is far better than their own food.

Oldest kiddo still won't drink anything except water though. She's kinda a weird kid. She doesn't like most deserts, except cheesecake, but loves spicy foods and anything vaguely asian. And veggies of any sort, she saw me eat an entire can of collard greens once and I'm informed I "ruined" her because that's now her favorite after school snack.

@Elfmama and Lady Snowdon: I love canned greens of any sort with vinegar. But it has to be that "peppered vinegar" So yummy.

Not a parent here, but if she was eating steak fingers, cheese, and veggies and fruit, I don't understand being terribly concerned. She was getting protein and dairy and veggies and fruit, and don't a lot of toddlers go through a picky stage? It just seems odd to me to be so concerned about it when it sounds like she was getting a pretty sound diet, for the most part.

True. I'm not sure what the doctor's problem was. I never met him. My friend says he was VERY fixated that children should drink five glasses of milk a day, and other dairy sources were somehow "inferior"

And I goofed in the OP. Kiddo will now also drink iced tea or hot tea, but only "as brewed" or possibly with a splash of lemon juice. Add honey or sugar and she won't touch it. Her mom thinks maybe she is sensitive to sweet flavors.

Heh. He'd have flipped his lid if he'd had me as a patient when I was a kid, then. I'll drink a lot of things, but milk hasn't been one of them since I was about 6. (At least not just milk; I'll happily drink hot chocolate or even milk steamers, and other things that have milk as a component - but not straight milk.) I'm pretty sensitive to the taste of milk that's even slightly "off," and I really, really don't like it. And being forced to drink it in elementary school even when I said it tasted bad pretty much ruined it for me for life, I think. And now if I'm going to have cereal with milk for breakfast, I have to get the lactose-free stuff or get a really nasty bellyache - weirdly, it's only first thing in the morning. Later in the day when I've had other things to eat, it doesn't seem to be a problem.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on January 13, 2013, 10:07:55 PM
I don't drink milk either.  Dry cereal aka people kibble all the way.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Venus193 on January 14, 2013, 06:35:22 AM
I don't drink milk either.  Dry cereal aka people kibble all the way.

I stopped drinking milk at the age of two.  I gag at the sight of it in a glass.  The dairy industry has been attempting to convince us that humans need to keep drinking it throughout their lives and many of us are mildly to moderately lactose intolerant.

As to the pediatrician telling the mother above to serve only milk to her child, that was abusive.  One has to hope that nobody does this anymore.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Thipu1 on January 14, 2013, 09:10:51 AM
It's odd.  I liked milk as a child but, when I got into my late teens, I couldn't handle it anymore.  Once in a while, I'd have a glass with a slice of chocolate cake and suffer the consequences. 

Once I got into my 50s, I started to crave the stuff.  I now average a half-gallon a day, but only when we're at home.  When we travel, I don't feel the need for a glass of milk unless we're gone for a week or more. 
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Dazi on January 14, 2013, 06:22:13 PM
Funny story from tonight...

My DH and I went out to dinner and he was eating a Caesar salad.  I made a comment on how I didn't know how he could eat that...I find the smell rather revolting.  He couldn't figure out why I didn't like the smell as he said it was just buttermilk and Parmesan cheese and there's nothing I find wrong with those smells.  He looked vaguely green when I told him that Caesar dressing was not made from buttermilk anything, that Caesar dressing should never contain buttermilk, that batch was homemade and had anchovy paste (not Worcestershire sauce, but actually anchovies paste....totally different smell), egg, oil olive, lemon, garlic, pepper, salt and fresh Parmesan. 

He HATES anchovies.  I don't know how he couldn't smell it, let alone, not taste it.



Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: blue2000 on January 14, 2013, 07:11:35 PM
Funny story from tonight...

My DH and I went out to dinner and he was eating a Caesar salad.  I made a comment on how I didn't know how he could eat that...I find the smell rather revolting.  He couldn't figure out why I didn't like the smell as he said it was just buttermilk and Parmesan cheese and there's nothing I find wrong with those smells.  He looked vaguely green when I told him that Caesar dressing was not made from buttermilk anything, that Caesar dressing should never contain buttermilk, that batch was homemade and had anchovy paste (not Worcestershire sauce, but actually anchovies paste....totally different smell), egg, oil olive, lemon, garlic, pepper, salt and fresh Parmesan. 

He HATES anchovies.  I don't know how he couldn't smell it, let alone, not taste it.





I had no idea it contained fish either when I was much younger. I don't have a good sense of smell - it does not smell or taste of fish to me. Just smells like regular salad dressing.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: CakeBeret on January 14, 2013, 08:07:03 PM
Funny story from tonight...

My DH and I went out to dinner and he was eating a Caesar salad.  I made a comment on how I didn't know how he could eat that...I find the smell rather revolting.  He couldn't figure out why I didn't like the smell as he said it was just buttermilk and Parmesan cheese and there's nothing I find wrong with those smells.  He looked vaguely green when I told him that Caesar dressing was not made from buttermilk anything, that Caesar dressing should never contain buttermilk, that batch was homemade and had anchovy paste (not Worcestershire sauce, but actually anchovies paste....totally different smell), egg, oil olive, lemon, garlic, pepper, salt and fresh Parmesan. 

He HATES anchovies.  I don't know how he couldn't smell it, let alone, not taste it.

I hate anchovies too, but I loooove a good Caesar dressing. I just don't think about what's in there. :P I'd love to make it homemade, but I won't because of the anchovies.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: MizA on January 14, 2013, 09:03:17 PM
Caesar Salad originally didn't have anchovies. Alton Brown has a great recipe for it.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/hail-caesar-salad-recipe/index.html
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Rohanna on January 14, 2013, 10:22:53 PM
Lots of restaurant and other commercial caesar dressings don't contain anchovy- it's a common additive but not a manditory one. Let the man enjoy his salad in peace! :)
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: Dazi on January 15, 2013, 06:35:41 AM
Lots of restaurant and other commercial caesar dressings don't contain anchovy- it's a common additive but not a manditory one. Let the man enjoy his salad in peace! :)

This one most certainly had anchovy and a lot of it.  The lingering smell, bleh, bleh, bleh.
Title: Re: Picky Eaters (S/O from Snow Flake thread)
Post by: snowflake on January 15, 2013, 03:51:30 PM
I don't see myself as a picky eater because I eat all kinds of things.  But there are a few ingredients that I cannot eat: Eggs that taste like eggs (Normally OK scrambled IF there is over-powering cheese), lemongrass, fresh mint, walnuts, pinto beans and anything but a hint of black pepper a few others.  I know none of the foods make sense but it is what it is.  On a good day I'll just shudder while tasting them.  On a bad day I will vomit immediately.  I'm not being dramatic.  My sister refers to an episode as "absolutely spectacular!"

My mother was always trying to hide these foods in other foods to prove to me that I'm faking it.  For instance, once when I had just had wisdom teeth surgery, she was visiting and offered to make me lunch.  I asked for a scrambled egg sandwich but told her that she MUST add onions and brie.  She handed me a plain egg sandwich, I didn't notice because I was very out of it and ended up puking on top of everything else.

The other day I visited them and she tried to serve me a salad.  I could see that it had walnuts and boiled eggs in it so I declined.  She insisted because it had her special dressing which is made with fresh mint.  I just shook my head.  Really, after cleaning up my vomit for years and years has she not learned a thing here?