Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Time For a Coffee Break! => Topic started by: mmswm on January 22, 2013, 01:02:06 PM

Title: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on January 22, 2013, 01:02:06 PM
The kitchen disaster stories have been a lot of fun.  I thought it would be fun to share disasters from other rooms in our homes.

Here's one of mine:

At the time I had a 4 bedroom/2 bath house.  I had the master bath ripped apart because I was remodeling it.  One of my children threw a toy ambulance into the other toilet. I couldn't reach it to pull it up.  I tried to plunge it out.  It wouldn't budge.  I tried to snake it out.  It still wouldn't budge.  It was wedged firmly in a curve in the toilet before the pipe in the floor.  I called my father for advise.  He suggested taking the toilet out, putting it on it's side and then running water through it with a high pressure hose.  Okay, no problem.  I've installed many toilets in my lifetime, this shouldn't be a big deal.  As happens from time to time with toilets, the flange bolts were rusted.  I drove to my father's house, grabbed a small angle grinder and went back to cut the bolts off.  No problem there.  I finally got the toilet out of the house.  Unfortunately, right as I was setting it down on the patio, the toilet slipped.  Do you have any idea how much of a mess an exploding toilet makes? 

Thank goodness my neighbor was nice and gave me a key to her house so I could use the bathroom while I got the new toilet installed.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: SDG31000 on January 22, 2013, 01:09:53 PM
There was the time that my lovely DS1 decided at age 4 that the kitchen floor needed greasing.  So he up-ended a very expensive bottle of olive oil onto it.  After looking at it in despair for a while, I tried using washing up liquid to get it up.  Unfortunately I used rather too much of it and then spent nearly two hours mopping up the suds.  It was like something out of a horror movie, they just kept growing and growing.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: BabyMama on January 22, 2013, 01:20:03 PM
This summer my husband decided our bedroom carpet needed a wash. He was right, it did. Unfortunately our carpet cleaner, while having no problem with suction, didn't seem to be dispensing the carpet cleaning fluid evenly and our carpet seemed too dry and also a bit soapy.

I was sitting in our living room when I heard our back door open. DH walked through the hallway, carrying the hose with the spray attachment on. That was his solution to getting the carpet wet enough.

Luckily it worked (so was a success!) but holy cow. I swear my heart stopped until he was done.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on January 22, 2013, 01:47:20 PM
Our house has a tiny (likely not allowed by modern codes) half bath right off the kitchen. We didn’t use it much after moving in, because the toilet is ancient and needs to be replaced as it was leaking between the tank and the bowl, so we just keep the door shut and have it on our todo list.

After finishing the renovations on our full bath right after moving in, we decided to hold off on the half bath for a while, because there were plenty of other projects too. At some point, my SO unhooked the feed line to the toilet tank though, just to make sure it could be done (we were concerned that there was so much corrosion that the whole plumbing, including the shutoff valve would need replacement). He also managed to stop the leak in the toilet, so left the water on once he reconnected the feed line figuring that we might want to use that one if the other of us was using the full bath.

He must not have tightened it enough when he reconnected everything, because a few months later, we woke to a river running through our kitchen, and a rain shower in our basement right over our furnace—the joint between the valve and the feed line had burst at some point overnight.

It took a good 6 hours to get everything dry, but somehow all the water manage to not do any damage to the furnace. Whew.

14 months after moving in, we still haven’t touched that bathroom again, though. Right now the water is completely turned off, so at least we won’t have a repeat river.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: alkira6 on January 22, 2013, 01:53:02 PM
situation 1: We moved in to our home about 3 years ago. Everything was absolutely new and we had picked out the wall colors, tile, flooring, ect. But (big but) everything was neutral with the thought that we would live in the house and decorate as we got more comfortable. Well, we decided that the alcove for the dining table needed to be painted a nice bright scarlet. We bought several different samples and blocked off squares with painters tape so that we could compare shades on the wall. We painted and when we pulled the tape off it took the friggin wall with it! There is this giant patch of about 3ftx4ft that is absurdly ragged and rough. We still haven't fixed it yet and it looks horrible.

Situation 2: The garbage disposal clogged and we had the brilliant idea to dismount it, fix it, and reinstall. That went fine, but dang it, don't turn the water back on full blast unless you're sure that the pipes are completely connected. We did this twice (because we're slow).
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 22, 2013, 02:24:46 PM
Something I did as a toddler. Apparently I was a holy terror, who would wake up before my parents, and run amok, wreatking havoc on the house.

So the story goes, I woke up one day, and decided I was going to empty the fridge. of everything, ONTO the coffee table, eggs, etc. which rolled and smashed. My mother was not amused.

and perhaps at the same time, but I don't know for sure, at least at about the same age, I decided I was going to start peeling a banana like mommy did, with the SHARP paring knife. I'm 47 and still have a big scar on my knuckle where I sliced it.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: GratefulMaria on January 22, 2013, 02:49:17 PM
One from my parents:

This was in January of 1991, DH was active duty military, and my mother and father had come down from New England to visit us in Texas.  The day after the air war started (so they're already worried for DH) our phone rings -- it's their next-door neighbor.  My father takes the call, talks a while, and closes with, "Well, thanks for calling, Bob.  As long as the place is still standing, don't worry about it."  Their boiler had failed, pipes had frozen and burst, and walls and floors were damaged.  The neighbors let in repair crews, but my parents still came home to a hideous aftermath.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ITSJUSTME on January 22, 2013, 03:00:32 PM
A day or two after we moved into our new (19 years ago) house DH parents came over to view it.  There was a manhole cover in the back yard that apparently covered a "spill over" or some kind of I don't know what but all the houses in my area have them.  It is surrounded by cement and the cover comes off.  I guess they can be cleaned out.  DH father asked what the cover was.  DH apparently did not know but thought it would be a good idea to remove the cover and look inside.

As DH and dad leaned over to look down into the pit, which had what appeared to be muddy water at the bottom, the keys (one and only set - we had just moved in) fell out of DH pocket into the well.  Splash.  We remembered seeing a long pole in the garage with a sauce pan attached to one end - the pan being full of holes.  We surmised this had been used by previous owners to scoop out whatever had to be scooped out of this pit.  It was in the garage - locked.

Luckily we had in the house a long pole meant to clamp a paint brush onto for painting high ceilings.  Dh brought this out and also brought out a wire basket meant for cooking french fries in a pan of hot oil.  He managed to somehow atttach the basket to the end of the pole and after many many many tries got the keys into the basket.  Did I mention it was a Sunday and no locksmiths were open?  Needless to say I have never cooked french fries since - or anything in deep fat for that matter.  And I insisted DH get my a set of my own keys at once.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: turtleIScream on January 22, 2013, 03:15:33 PM
I had been painting, and finished off a gallon of paint. I set it out in the driveway to let it dry out. We have a two-car garage, with a double wide driveway, so I set the paint can on my side behind my car since I wasn't planning to go anywhere. My husband came home, parked in his side, and everything was fine. He left later in his car (maybe to pick up something from the store?) and managed to pull out at such a crooked angle, he drove right over the paint can. Which was not dried up yet. And splattered all over his new car.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Shalamar on January 22, 2013, 03:21:37 PM
My ex-father-in-law had his own interior decorating business.  One day,  he came home with a strip of wallpaper.  "This is what I put in a lady's house today," he said, "what do you think?"  The wallpaper was very pretty - a white background with little bunches of pink and blue flowers.  Thing is, he was holding the strip so that the stems of the flower bunches were pointing upwards.  We said "It's nice, but aren't you holding it upside down?"   He looked dismayed and said "Oh, NO!"
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Julian on January 22, 2013, 03:28:54 PM
Useless ex-H was good at household disasters. 

He fell through a wall once, putting on his pants.  All the way through.

He put a new thermostat in my car - the wrong way around.  The car boiled three times in a 7km trip, I essentially missed a day's work.

One day I was baking, rental house, leaky old gas oven.  I didn't realise how bad it was.  As I was putting the pavlova in the preheated oven, I noticed a small, black spider spinning down on a web from the exhaust vent above.  'Oh, pretty spider...' then I noticed the red spot on it's bum.  Yup, don't like redbacks in the house!  So I'm whacking away with a fly swatter trying to kill said redback, which fell down between the stove and the fridge next to it.  Useless had been napping...  he came out when he heard the ruction, and asked what the 'f' I was doing.  I explained, in a state of panic by now.  His bright solution was to use flyspray to kill the spider.  So I got the spray, gave a good blast to the area between the oven and the stove.  The resulting ka-boom was pretty impressive!  Yes, the spray ignited and exploded.  Luckily there was no damage, and no, I never did find the spider...

Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Amava on January 22, 2013, 04:07:41 PM
I have told this story before, and sorry if it sounds too crazy to believe, but it happened.

It was back in my childhood, around 30 years ago. I lived in a small village where there were some farmers.
An ox had escaped from one of the farms, and gone on a crazy race through the town.

Now, my great-grandmother's house was located at the end of a cul-de-sac. Her house /formed/ the end of the cul-de-sac, facing the road directly.
The crazed ox stormed into the cul-de-sac, saw its mirrored image in my great-grandmother's window and must have thought: "Hey!! A friend!! Yayyyyyy!!" (Or maybe he thought: "an enemy! Attack!" Or hey, maybe he just thought: "Leeeeeeerooooooy Jennnnkinnns!!!" Who can tell?)
 
And he jumped, and BLASTED right through the window. Blood, wood splinters and shards of glass scattered everywhere, the huge beast landing somewhere in the middle of chairs and table - miraculously not breaking any bones.

Thank goodness my great-grandmother was in the back room of the (very small) house.
She heard a loud crash and a surreal MOOOOOOOOOO...
and came out of the back room to see probably the biggest ravage she had seen since WWII.
The ox raised his head, which he had likely smacked into the side of the table while coming to a skidding halt on his knees, gave her a sort of "dazed and confused" look, and stumbled outside like a drunk, wiping his bloody sides on the wallpaper and on the door in the process.

By then, a little crowd had gathered in the cul-de-sac, looking perplexed. The farmer came running on, thankfully the people there in the village like my great-grandmother and the farmer were all very calm and level-headed people and the farmer immediately promised to reimburse her for all the damage (he did). The ox was by now very "calm",  or rather, still too befuddled to give any sort of resistance while he was being lead home. Bleeding from quite a few superficial wounds but all in all nothing too bad.

My grandmother, mother and I, who all lived together "in a little crooked house"  a street further, had by now also heard the news - I don't remember who it was but someone came running to our door saying great-grandma needed help. Of course we went there immediately.

Great-grandma was also still a little dazzled, but otherwise fine. After all, she had witnessed both World Wars (and don't forget we live in Belgium!) so there wasn't much that fazed her.
But the mess, oh my goodness, the mess! Blood, glass, ox dung, all over the place. The wallpaper, the furniture, the floor, the tablecloths...

Other neighbours arrived and very soon a makeshift wooden board was made to cover the hole of the window.  The tablecloth was thrown out, some furniture was dragged outside to be cleaned, buckets of soap water were filled to scrub the place.

It was one of those "small village stories that lives on".
Unbelievable? Yes. If it had been in a movie, we would have said "what over the top nonsense!"
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: snowfire on January 22, 2013, 05:22:33 PM
First, repeat after me: "A bored engineer is a dangerous thing!"  Got that?

DH was home from work one day with a kidney stone & therefore on the remains of some rather good painkillers from the hospital.  This may have affected his judgement just a bit.

We had recently finished laying the wood flooring in our basement family room and were getting ready to fit the cabinets for the wet bar.  One of the things that needed to be done to accomplish this was to cut the caps off the pipes for the sink and put valves on them.  DH turned off what he thought was the main water shutoff for the house and put a bucket under the cold water pipe, cut the cap off with no problems and only the expected dribble of water.  He happily installed the valve and went to cut the hot water pipe.  As the cut off pipe shot across the room and a full force hot water gusher came out of the pipe he realized that there was a problem of major proportions.  I was on the main floor and I heard him bellow my name and got to the stairwell in time to see a DH shaped blur go racing past me.  I went flying down the stairs and heard/saw the gusher.  I realized that DH had gone flying to the crawlspace to get to what we KNEW was the main shut off for the water.  I ran to the bathroom and grabbed every towel in the place, then upstairs and grabbed all the upstairs towels and all the dirty laundry as well.  I threw these down to absorb the water just as the gush quits.  Then I'm trying to think of what to do to suck up the rest of the water before it kills the brand new wood floor.  I knew that my shop vac was currently set up for dry and I didn't have time to clean it and swap it over for wet.  Then I remembered our rug shampooer.  Its job is to suck up water, right?  I got that and got the rest of the water cleaned up.  Luckily, the water was not on the floor long enough to do any damage.  I was also surprised that a man who had been a curled up ball of hurt that morning could move that fast and go up a ladder, through an 18" square hole in the wall, across about 15 feet of crawl space, wiggle through a stud wall, then over about 15 more feet of crawl space that quickly. Normally this takes several minutes, I think he did it in under 1 minute.

BTW, why on earth are water main shutoffs in such inaccessible places?  I've only been in one house where they were easy to get to without crawling through miles of crawlspace.  With my knees the way they are now it is easier to just pop the lid and shut it off at the meter at the street than it is to try to do it inside the house.

Our old house had the shutoff inside the coal bin, where the only way to get to it if you had a full load of coal in for the winter involved coveralls, a shovel and a lot of slithering.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ica171 on January 22, 2013, 05:51:35 PM
We have a long history of both minor and major household disasters. There was the time DH put dishwashing liquid in the dishwasher, but I think a lot of people do that. There was the time we lived without electricity on the second floor of our new (to us) house for two weeks until my dad came up and discovered that we had a fusebox that had not been disclosed to us and we had blown a fuse. In the same house, there was the time that leaving the pilot light on in a furnace in an uninsulated addition (we had to because the washer and dryer were there and we didn't want the pipes to burst) resulted in us getting a $500 gas bill. Or, in that same house, the time that I tried to uninstall the crappy old stove but ended up putting out the pilot light and not being able to relight it. Don't ever do something like that in a small town; you'll get multiple trucks from the gas company, police cars, ambulance and at least two fire trucks at your door. That house had character, but it was definitely the cause of some stress eating and ripped out hair.

Probably the one that physically hurt the most was when we lived in a mobile home. It was just meant as a place to live and save up for a big down payment on a house, but the condition we had been told it was in was very far from the condition it was actually in, once we got in there and really started looking. So we gutted the whole thing and remodeled it. But this happened while we were still in the early stages. I was ripping out all the cabinets in the kitchen (they were full of bug poop; I wouldn't even entertain the notion of keeping them) and I knew there was a spot in front of where the fridge would go that was soft, so I avoided standing on it as much as possible. However, I got really into figuring out how to get a cabinet down, took one step forward and wham, I had one leg through the floor. We ended up replacing probably 75% of the subfloors in there.

The most recent completed house disaster was in our current house. YDS flooded the upstairs toilet, right into a vent on the floor. Instead of the downstairs bathroom (right below the upstairs bathroom) flooding, it ended up on the opposite end of the basement since that was the closest vent lower than the one in the bathroom. Water went all over the built-in shelves over there, which I ripped out as soon as everything was dry. Yuck. Given the amount of mold I found on some of the less visible areas, this oviously wasn't the first time it had flooded that way.

I've been trying to remodel our main floor bathroom for over a month now, three weeks of which has been dedicated to the floor. I decided to put down porcelain tile and I heartily wish I hadn't. I've reinstalled some of the tiles twice now, with a third time on the way, and they just keep popping up. In fact, the last time I worked on it two more tiles popped up. It's neverending. I keep making the mortar wetter but the bond keeps failing. I might install tile in our small entryway, assuming I have figured out what the problem is by then, but no way will I be tackling the kitchen now.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: jpcher on January 22, 2013, 06:03:41 PM
Labor Day weekend. LDH goes off on a man-vacation. DDs (5 and 7?) and I had plans to do this-that-and-more wonderful things.

First, there were a few chores to take care of. One being adding conditioner and topping off the waterbed.

I connected the hose to the sink faucet, put the conditioner in the bed, put the hose well into the bed, turned on the water, set the DDs up with coloring books in their room (closed their door), told them DO NOT go near the bed in my room (closed my BRdoor), and went outside for a quick smoke.

With the water bed, I do this annually. Never a problem.

I walked back into my bedroom after about 5-10 minutes and the hose was lying on the floor, pouring out water.

Suffice it to say, we did not have a fun weekend.

I had to empty and disassemble the bed (it was on a closed-in wooden frame), move everything out of the bedroom (dressers/nightstands/bed), rent a wet-vac, soak up all the water from the carpet . . . plus! clean up all the leakage that went to the basement all over our storage room (cardboard boxes? Yeah, not a good thing.)

Then, of course, there was the reassembly of everything once the carpet was dried.



'nough said?


Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Jaelle on January 22, 2013, 06:44:26 PM
Amava, you had me in tears with that description. :)

The stuff of Elephantschild family legend:

I was about 10-11. My younger brother was about 3-4. Dad was somewhere, I don't really remember. Mom was getting ready to go to work and went upstairs to get showered and dressed, leaving me downstairs with DB.

I am a bookworm. I have always been a bookworm. And I acknowledged her request to keep an eye on him, but I also had a book in my hands. See where this is going?  ::) ;D

Mom came back downstairs a bit later to discover DB standing at the foot of the stairs, beaming, clutching a box of dry cereal. Then she noticed the wet little footprints leading to the kitchen.

"Oh," she thought, "he's gotten into the dog's water again!"

It wasn't the dog's water. It was cooking oil.

DB had gotten into the kitchen cupboard and gleefully upended just about everything. Cereal. Pasta. Flour. Cooking oil and cracker crumbs and vanilla and spices. It was a mess of epic proportions.

She stormed back out to the living and said, "Elephantschild! Why aren't you watching your brother?!"

I lifted my head from my book, blinked and looked at the grinning imp, then slowly took in the footprints and beyond him, the mess.  And I said, "Oh! You naughty boy!"

Today it's an amusing story. (DB, who is in his 30s, is probably tired of hearing it.) But mom admits that at the time, she was in tears and furious.

She got her revenge, though. YDS is just like his uncle, personality-wise.  ::)
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Octavia on January 22, 2013, 06:55:47 PM
I learned the hard way that the fill/drain valve for automatic dishwashers will eventually fail, and that the best insurance is to replace it at least every five years before it fails. I learned this after being away for a long weekend while water trickled through the failed valve, soaking the kitchen floor, cabinets, living room carpeting, furniture, and so on. I had to hire a disaster recovery company to use special vacuums to remove as much water from the carpeting as possible before mold started to grow. Then I got to live with three enormous, noisy dehumidifiers for a few days so that the cabinets and furniture could dry out. Cost of clean-up was $2,000. Cost of a new valve was less than $10.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: norrina on January 22, 2013, 07:17:56 PM
When I bought my first house, I was only 25 years old. While I was smart enough not to actually take out the maximum mortgage I was approved for, there still wasn't a lot of room in my budget after the mortgage was paid each month, so even the smallest "joys" of homeownership felt like disasters. My favorite memory is The Great Exploding Stove, which I blogged about on my MySpace account (this happening in 2006 when MsSpace was still all the rage). I logged back into my account just now to pull the story, which probably had Tom Anderson, or whoever owns MySpace now, jumping for joy.

The Story of The Great Exploding Stove (as originally told on 7/24/06)
About a week ago, I created a "His and Hers To Do List".  On my side of that list, somewhere in priority after scraping, priming, glazing, and repainting the windowsills before cold weather sets in again and they rot away over the winter, was fixing two broken burners in my 1960s Tappan Fabulous 400 stove, and finding someone that could figure out what was wrong with the big oven and put it back to rights.  I haven't been able to bake a pizza since I've had this house, the pizza pan won't fit in the little oven.

Well, in true it-never-rains-but-it-pours fashion, since this was the weekend that I was down to the wire helping my boss meet an important State Bar deadline, this also had to be the weekend that my little oven decided it was going to present a show of solidarity against the neglect of my big oven.  And in quite spectacular fashion, at that.

I was on something in the line of my fifth cup of coffee for the day, and had thought a cinnamon roll might go nicely.  Heaven knows I wasn't going to find time to pull together any sort of nutritionally beneficial meal until this stint was over, might as well push through on a caffeine and sugar high.  I flipped the oven to 350, tossed a bakery cinnamon roll into the Springform pan that happened to be the first thing I found when I opened the cabinet door, and went back to work.  Not two minutes later, there was an incredible racket from towards the back of the house, and as I went to investigate, the kitchen was filled with flickering orange light.  As I raced through the doorway into the kitchen, I could see that this flickering orange light was caused by a veritable fireworks of sparks exploding within my oven.

Acting on terror and addreneline, I burst across the kitchen and yanked open the oven door.  It occurred to me, after this heroic act, that perhaps it would have been wise to throw the breaker before touching a sparking electrical appliance.  A check of the breaker box showed that my house's electrical system has more sense than I do, evidently, and the breaker had already been thrown.  The sparks danced around like kernels of popcorn in a pan, and slowly began to die out.  I stood sentry the fire extinguisher, and a wary eye on the glowing red ember that was my molten oven element, the cause of this great excitement.  I didn't want to use the extinguisher unless I absolutely had to, those things make a darned mess, and the oven was already in sorry shape, what with the explosion it had just contained.

Having spent its energy on a showy display, the element cooled down demurely, and I retrieved my cinnamon roll from the oven.  After all the hoopla, the pastry was lukewarm, at best.

I took a couple deep breaths, calmed down enough to dial the phone, and called sweetie on his cell to tell him we were minus another oven.  I may have been a bit exciteable during this call, he has pointed out to me that the stove did not actually catch fire.

Semantics notwithstanding, it was agreed that the stove was no longer safe, and besides, neither of us felt like scrubbing the oven.  Online research and several trips to the appliance stores settled us on a GE 30" ceramic cooktop range.  The old stove has been disassembled and hauled to the curb, leaving a lovely view of 1960s wallpaper.  Sweetie tells me he painted over that this morning.  The man is worth his weight in gold.

RIP my sweet Tappan.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v55/audibear78/HOUSE/stoveopen2.jpg)







Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: doodlemor on January 22, 2013, 10:53:38 PM
Many years ago I was defrosting a chest freezer in our cellar.  DH decided that he would help me get the icebergs out quicker with his handy dandy propane torch. 

He lit the torch, put it into the freezer, and shut the top.  After several minutes he opened the freezer and saw that the torch flame was out.  He said that he supposed that he had smothered the flame when he shut the top of the freezer.  As he reached in to get his torch out I told him to be careful, that the bottom was probably full of propane and it would be bad for him to breathe the stuff.

DH scoffed that I didn't know what I was talking about, such a thing couldn't happen.  To prove his point he quickly lit an match and threw it in, before I could even get a word out to stop him.

Fortunately DH was standing several feet back, because there was a mini explosion as all of the trapped propane in the bottom of the freezer ignited at once.  Fortunately, everything around was concrete, and the ceiling was too high to catch fire.  The freezer was OK too, surprisingly enough.

Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: guihong on January 23, 2013, 12:22:24 AM
Can I just say, I hope no one here or in that kitchen disaster thread minds if I'm in tears of laughter right now  ;D.  I suppose if you didn't want people laughing at your stories, you wouldn't post them.

Here's some from me (and my parents):

One Easter, my dad secretly got the idea that it would be fun to make a bunny foot out of an old powder puff, tape it somehow to a stick, and make bunny tracks with flour in a kind of trail to follow for the eggs  ::).  He waited until we were all in bed to make all his tracks.  What he didn't anticipate is the fact that flour is hard to clean up (and Mom made him do it all).  He also didn't think that our two cats would find the flour pans, and mixed in with the bunny tracks were hundreds-thousands-of paw prints on the floor, the furniture, everywhere.  My mother was not amused.

For a brilliant man, he didn't think things through enough.

My parents' family room had two floor-to-ceiling bookcases flanking the fireplace.  One night, there was a huge BOOM!  When we ran downstairs, there were two terrified cats under furniture, and one of the bookcases was completely collapsed, with books everywhere.  There was a bright end to that story; instead of building the bookcase again, they knocked out both of them and put in a sunroom behind the original family room. 

In my own house, we have a gas fireplace.  Right after Christmas, there was an ice storm and we lost power for four days.  DH got the fireplace going (it's rarely cold enough to use it here), and that's what I tried to cook Chef Boy-Ar-Dee over, in the dark or by flashlight.  Don't know if that counts as a "disaster", but it was definitely disastrous cooking  ;D.



Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: YummyMummy66 on January 23, 2013, 07:26:53 AM
My ex-father-in-law had his own interior decorating business.  One day,  he came home with a strip of wallpaper.  "This is what I put in a lady's house today," he said, "what do you think?"  The wallpaper was very pretty - a white background with little bunches of pink and blue flowers.  Thing is, he was holding the strip so that the stems of the flower bunches were pointing upwards.  We said "It's nice, but aren't you holding it upside down?"   He looked dismayed and said "Oh, NO!"

This reminded me of my own story!  I had remet my now husband, (we had gone to school together), and I thnk we were either dating or by this time had moved in with him, (myself and my two children from a first marriage).  We were eating dinner in his kitchen, (city, small row home), and were admiring the decorated paneling he had put up.  I don't remember it being wallpaper.  It also had some kind of flowers on it.  And I said, "It looks nice, but isn't it upside down?".   Uh oh, it was!  It had been up for years, I think, and it still looked nice, and apparently, I was the first one who noticed it anyway, so no big deal! 
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Thipu1 on January 23, 2013, 08:52:25 AM
It was a lovely spring day so we left the windows open when we went to work. 

The brickwork on the building was being repointed but they were working on the other side of the building, or so we thought.

For some reason, the workmen decided to work on our side that day.  We returned home to find brick dust all over absolutely everything.  Even the air in the living room was pink. 
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on January 23, 2013, 09:10:56 AM
While we were at work one day back when we lived in our last apartment, our landlord finally got around to spraying in the insulation he’d been promising for two, maybe three years.

Everything went well that first day—he sprayed it in the broad side of the house where we could sometimes actually feel a draft through the walls. We were very excited about our potential lowered energy bills for the last couple of months we’d be there (we’d just put an offer down on the house before this started).

The second day didn‘t go nearly as well. Or, I should say, he thought it went swimmingly, but he didn’t bother to look through the windows into our apartment as he sprayed in the front of the house.

At the very front of our second story apartment was a porch. You accessed it through a small alcove that had a door to the porch and a closet (which was mostly filled with various things we never needed).

When we moved into the apartment four years prior, the landlord had just finished replacing the porch door. Part of that process required that he strip all the plaster off the lathe (and some of the lathe strips too) on that wall (about 4" on either side of the door). I don’t know why. Anyway, he still hadn’t fixed it when we moved in, and always promised to do it sometime, but never did. We just hung a curtain over the doorway to the alcove to hide it and block any drafts in the winter.

Yep, you guessed it. When he sprayed in insulation through that part of the house, there was nothing to trap it in the wall—it just sprayed all over our living room and into that spare closet. It was a total mess.

On the bright side, it got us in gear to clean out and pack up that closet for our move!
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: LibraryLady on January 23, 2013, 02:35:44 PM
Norrina

Some friends of our have an oven/stove just like yours (or very similar to it) and are still using it.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: emwithme on January 23, 2013, 03:04:53 PM
I was about 14 years old, and my mum and I were spending the day at my Aunt's house.  This was *not* an unusual occurrence - mum and Aunty were very close and visited with each other most week days - shopping together, just hanging. 

I was sent into the kitchen to make a pot of tea.  At that time, Aunty used leaf tea.  There wasn't enough in the caddy and so I reached into the cabinet to get the fresh box.

And then

CRASH
SMASH
TINKLE
EEEK!

The kitchen had a solid, tiled floor. 

My mum and aunt came running in from the next room to find me standing there, holding the two cupboard doors surrounded by the contents of the (at that time) only food cupboard in the house.  I was surrounded by loose tea, sugar, coffee, pickles of various types, ketchup and their broken bottles and packaging.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on January 23, 2013, 03:47:48 PM
A near disaster today reminded me of a real disaster from a long time ago.  At the time, my father owned 27 houses in south Miami-Dade County.  This is the area that was hardest hit by Hurricane Andrew. Every single house was completely destroyed.    With that many destroyed houses, it became necessary for all us kids to spend every free moment helping to rebuild. So one afternoon we were working on the roof of one of the houses.  Somehow or another, my foot slipped and I kicked a 2X4 off the roof.  It was like it was a guided missile right to the front windshield of my father's truck.  It was not a happy few minutes after that.  My dad was livid, but called out a guy to replace the glass.  Not an hour later, my father was loading boards into the back of the truck and swung too hard.  I must be a horrible daughter because it took me forever to stop laughing after he threw yet another 2X4 straight through the back windshield.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: jpcher on January 23, 2013, 05:07:07 PM

RIP my sweet Tappan.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v55/audibear78/HOUSE/stoveopen2.jpg)

Oh, so Sad! I had a stove similar to that (it was gas) and I LOVED it! I wish they still made a model like that, I'd buy it in a heartbeat. I had to give it up when I sold my house.

Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: blueyzca01 on January 23, 2013, 05:24:21 PM
Useless ex-H was good at household disasters. 

He fell through a wall once, putting on his pants.  All the way through.

He put a new thermostat in my car - the wrong way around.  The car boiled three times in a 7km trip, I essentially missed a day's work.

One day I was baking, rental house, leaky old gas oven.  I didn't realise how bad it was.  As I was putting the pavlova in the preheated oven, I noticed a small, black spider spinning down on a web from the exhaust vent above.  'Oh, pretty spider...' then I noticed the red spot on it's bum.  Yup, don't like redbacks in the house!  So I'm whacking away with a fly swatter trying to kill said redback, which fell down between the stove and the fridge next to it.  Useless had been napping...  he came out when he heard the ruction, and asked what the 'f' I was doing.  I explained, in a state of panic by now.  His bright solution was to use flyspray to kill the spider.  So I got the spray, gave a good blast to the area between the oven and the stove.  The resulting ka-boom was pretty impressive!  Yes, the spray ignited and exploded.  Luckily there was no damage, and no, I never did find the spider...

At least there was a kaboom!  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8rYotiiFP8

Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Catananche on January 23, 2013, 05:42:02 PM
My husband and I moved into our newly decorated apartment. One day (while he was at work) I had finished my daily chores when I noticed a stain on our brand-new carpet. I had no idea what had caused the stain, so I used just water to clean it. The spot dried and the stain was gone.
The next day I was very surprised to see that the stain was back. Well, water worked the day before, so I cleaned the stain again. The wet spot dried and the stain was gone. Again.

The next day: stain was back. Again I cleaned it with water, but I was getting a bit worried. What was causing that stain and why was it coming back over and over?
The day after that? No stain! I had done it, it was gone.
The day after that? The stain was back. I was reaching the end of my rope: it was a new carpet, I didn't want to use anything too harsh to clean it, but this was getting ridiculous!

The day after that my husband was home and the stain came back. I pointed the stain out to him. He dropped to his knees to examine the stain and then started laughing. After he had regained his composure he started asking me questions:

Does the stain appear in the same place? When it's sunny outside? And always at the same time? And never when it rains? Yes, yes, yes and no, but why would he ask that?

He then pointed at the stained glass window hanger that made a stain-like shape on the carpet when the sun hit it at the right time. Yes, people, I had been cleaning a SHADOW the entire time!

I'm just happy I only used water and not any of the more aggressive cleaning solutions. Because bleach WOULD have left a stain, a nice white one.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: MrsJWine on January 24, 2013, 12:46:41 AM
We bought kind of a fixer-upper. It was in good shape, but really dirty, and the paint colors were atrocious (my favorite rooms were the sickly mustard yellow, the PURPLE! room, and the Green Bay Packers room, which was dark green on top and gold on the bottom, and all these rooms were pretty small). We did a lot of cleaning and cosmetic work on it ourselves. I spent ALL DAY cleaning the refrigerator. Our realtor had done the trash-out, so there were no containers growing anything, but every inch of it needed scrubbed. I was six months pregnant at the time, so it was even more super fun. I finally finished up and took one of the glass shelves upstairs to clean in the bathtub. I must have dragged the glass across the tub floor juuust right to cause precisely the necessary vibrations because it EXPLODED in my hands. I am so glad it was over the bathtub and not in the kitchen. It still took forever to clean up. Tiny pea-size beads of glass everywhere.

We also spent a lot of time picking out paint colors. We chose complementary colors for the living and dining rooms: pale sand, almost white, on top, and then on the bottom, a warm brown in the dining room and a muted darkish blue on the bottom.

Pale sand: Pink. Or pale lavender. We couldn't really tell. It was one of those things where it looked different from different angles. Like a hologram. Only not fun.

Muted darkish blue: Superman. Recycling bins. Gym class mesh jerseys. The most violent, unaesthetic royal blue that you can think of. That was it.

Warm brown: Maroon.

We had spent our paint budget, so we just had to make do. We did both rooms in the pink/maroon combo. It was not horrible; in fact, a lot of people specifically commented that they liked it. But it was absolutely not what we wanted, and our couch was blue. If you ever get Glidden paint, ask for samples actually painted out; don't rely on the chips in the store. Ugh.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: clio917 on January 24, 2013, 12:58:16 AM
We also spent a lot of time picking out paint colors. We chose complementary colors for the living and dining rooms: pale sand, almost white, on top, and then on the bottom, a warm brown in the dining room and a muted darkish blue on the bottom.

Pale sand: Pink. Or pale lavender. We couldn't really tell. It was one of those things where it looked different from different angles. Like a hologram. Only not fun.

Muted darkish blue: Superman. Recycling bins. Gym class mesh jerseys. The most violent, unaesthetic royal blue that you can think of. That was it.

Warm brown: Maroon.

We had spent our paint budget, so we just had to make do. We did both rooms in the pink/maroon combo. It was not horrible; in fact, a lot of people specifically commented that they liked it. But it was absolutely not what we wanted, and our couch was blue. If you ever get Glidden paint, ask for samples actually painted out; don't rely on the chips in the store. Ugh.

We have a similar problem... But every paint color we bring into our house ends up turning into green. Tan/cream paint = light green, dark brownish gold paint = brownish green, light brown carpet = green. We have pretty much given up and decorated the majority of our rooms in brown, tan and green. I want to paint our master bedroom, but I'm afraid what kind of green that our choice of orangey tan will turn into.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 24, 2013, 08:35:39 AM
My ex-father-in-law had his own interior decorating business.  One day,  he came home with a strip of wallpaper.  "This is what I put in a lady's house today," he said, "what do you think?"  The wallpaper was very pretty - a white background with little bunches of pink and blue flowers.  Thing is, he was holding the strip so that the stems of the flower bunches were pointing upwards.  We said "It's nice, but aren't you holding it upside down?"   He looked dismayed and said "Oh, NO!"

Hehehe - this reminds me of something my mother did.  Their first house, which was built probably in the 1940's or 50's - had maroon and gray tile in the one teeny bathroom. the kind of tile that goes halfway up the wall, all around, and is one color, with the other as an accent.  My mother search high and low for wallpaper to watch, and finally found some. Which was in the same color scheme, with foil, in a bamboo-like print (this was 1969 or 70).  She is so proud of herself for finding it, and putting it up herself. As I said, it was a small bathroom, so not a lot of paper to put up. 

After its all said and done, she kept looking at it, thinking it looked funny. Over a period of months. Finally one day, she realized, the bamboo was pointing upside down. Yes, she had put up the wallpaper upside down.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: norrina on January 24, 2013, 01:05:12 PM
When I was repainting my house, I wanted pale colors on the walls because the rooms were so small that dark/bright colors would be overwhelming. All of the "stock" colors were too concentrated though. So when I found a tone that I liked I bought an extra quart of untinted base, poured the gallon of color into a 2 gallon bucket, and added base until I had the shade that I actually wanted. The only problem was I had to be absolutely positive I had mixed up enough color for the room before I started, because if I ran out halfway through there was no way I was going to match the color again.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: lilfox on January 24, 2013, 01:23:17 PM
We have a similar problem... But every paint color we bring into our house ends up turning into green. Tan/cream paint = light green, dark brownish gold paint = brownish green, light brown carpet = green. We have pretty much given up and decorated the majority of our rooms in brown, tan and green. I want to paint our master bedroom, but I'm afraid what kind of green that our choice of orangey tan will turn into.

You may have already tried this, but would changing out the type/color of light bulbs that you use help reduce the "green" effect?  We accidentally discovered, when replacing burned out bulbs, that different brands or even same brands and different effects produce a pretty wide spectrum of "white" light, from blue-ish tinted to pure to yellowy.  And that's before you get to incandescents vs CFLs vs LEDs...

Along those lines - DH and I finally decided on an exterior house color to replace the allegedly beige default color.  We chose a pretty spring green with (I thought) yellow undertones.  However, when it was done, the color came off as a vivid mint (blue undertones), which is not at all what we had in mind.  I held up the paint card and it was an exact match in all light/shade conditions - the card color was great, the house color ... took some getting used to.

So sometimes those paint cards might not be a match, but even when they are the color effect could still be quite different when it's on a really big surface.  This also explains why our upstairs bathroom is peach instead of sand.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: tiff019 on January 24, 2013, 01:31:05 PM
We have a similar problem... But every paint color we bring into our house ends up turning into green. Tan/cream paint = light green, dark brownish gold paint = brownish green, light brown carpet = green. We have pretty much given up and decorated the majority of our rooms in brown, tan and green. I want to paint our master bedroom, but I'm afraid what kind of green that our choice of orangey tan will turn into.

You may have already tried this, but would changing out the type/color of light bulbs that you use help reduce the "green" effect?  We accidentally discovered, when replacing burned out bulbs, that different brands or even same brands and different effects produce a pretty wide spectrum of "white" light, from blue-ish tinted to pure to yellowy.  And that's before you get to incandescents vs CFLs vs LEDs...

Along those lines - DH and I finally decided on an exterior house color to replace the allegedly beige default color.  We chose a pretty spring green with (I thought) yellow undertones.  However, when it was done, the color came off as a vivid mint (blue undertones), which is not at all what we had in mind.  I held up the paint card and it was an exact match in all light/shade conditions - the card color was great, the house color ... took some getting used to.

So sometimes those paint cards might not be a match, but even when they are the color effect could still be quite different when it's on a really big surface.  This also explains why our upstairs bathroom is peach instead of sand.

This exact same thing happened to us in our living room. Nice soft green (actually the exact shade my mom has in her bedroom - where it looks awesome) looked like an easter egg!! It took 3 paint colors to find the right one for that room. I think the room itself shrunk a little based on the 5 coats of paint it got that weekend! haha
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on January 24, 2013, 01:34:14 PM
We have a similar problem... But every paint color we bring into our house ends up turning into green. Tan/cream paint = light green, dark brownish gold paint = brownish green, light brown carpet = green. We have pretty much given up and decorated the majority of our rooms in brown, tan and green. I want to paint our master bedroom, but I'm afraid what kind of green that our choice of orangey tan will turn into.

You may have already tried this, but would changing out the type/color of light bulbs that you use help reduce the "green" effect?  We accidentally discovered, when replacing burned out bulbs, that different brands or even same brands and different effects produce a pretty wide spectrum of "white" light, from blue-ish tinted to pure to yellowy.  And that's before you get to incandescents vs CFLs vs LEDs...

Along those lines - DH and I finally decided on an exterior house color to replace the allegedly beige default color.  We chose a pretty spring green with (I thought) yellow undertones.  However, when it was done, the color came off as a vivid mint (blue undertones), which is not at all what we had in mind.  I held up the paint card and it was an exact match in all light/shade conditions - the card color was great, the house color ... took some getting used to.

So sometimes those paint cards might not be a match, but even when they are the color effect could still be quite different when it's on a really big surface. This also explains why our upstairs bathroom is peach instead of sand.

A couple of days ago I got into a little bit of trouble with my father for "wasting paint".  We were in the middle of painting the underside of the carport and he ran off to deal with an emergency at another rental.  During this downtime, I grabbed the sprayer and painted a fairly large chunk of the side of house, then finished with the carport.  He came back while I was cleaning up, and got irritated that I'd painted the chunk of the side.  Well, lo and behold, when we came back the next morning, he took one look at the larger "sample" and decided he hated the color.  We finished the soffits in the color we had and ran out to get a slightly darker shade of bluish-grey.  The original color just looked to white.  The end result with the teal blue trim, white soffits and grey-blue walls looks fantastic.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: hermanne on January 24, 2013, 01:35:00 PM
DH bought a wall TV mount and spray-painted it white. He did it in our gravel driveway and it turned out nice. But he didn't factor in the gentle breeze that blew white enamel paint mist onto my maroon colored truck. >:(
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Julian on January 24, 2013, 01:53:21 PM

At least there was a kaboom!  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8rYotiiFP8

I love Marvin!   ;D
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 24, 2013, 02:04:24 PM
In my baby book is a note scrawled on a piece of notepaper: "Warning, house is boobytrapped in peanut butter and jelly."

Apparently when I was very little my mother made the mistake of falling asleep after giving me a pb & j sandwich and woke up to it smeared on the walls.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: artk2002 on January 24, 2013, 03:01:41 PM
We have a similar problem... But every paint color we bring into our house ends up turning into green. Tan/cream paint = light green, dark brownish gold paint = brownish green, light brown carpet = green. We have pretty much given up and decorated the majority of our rooms in brown, tan and green. I want to paint our master bedroom, but I'm afraid what kind of green that our choice of orangey tan will turn into.

You may have already tried this, but would changing out the type/color of light bulbs that you use help reduce the "green" effect?  We accidentally discovered, when replacing burned out bulbs, that different brands or even same brands and different effects produce a pretty wide spectrum of "white" light, from blue-ish tinted to pure to yellowy.  And that's before you get to incandescents vs CFLs vs LEDs...

Along those lines - DH and I finally decided on an exterior house color to replace the allegedly beige default color.  We chose a pretty spring green with (I thought) yellow undertones.  However, when it was done, the color came off as a vivid mint (blue undertones), which is not at all what we had in mind.  I held up the paint card and it was an exact match in all light/shade conditions - the card color was great, the house color ... took some getting used to.

So sometimes those paint cards might not be a match, but even when they are the color effect could still be quite different when it's on a really big surface.  This also explains why our upstairs bathroom is peach instead of sand.

This exact same thing happened to us in our living room. Nice soft green (actually the exact shade my mom has in her bedroom - where it looks awesome) looked like an easter egg!! It took 3 paint colors to find the right one for that room. I think the room itself shrunk a little based on the 5 coats of paint it got that weekend! haha

As well as ambient light and other colors in the room changing the color of paint, it's important to make sure that you do the right job with an undercoat or enough coats of the color to truly cover what was underneath. It's amazing what can come through.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: snowfire on January 24, 2013, 03:28:01 PM
Hint: If you are doing a severe color change, make your first coat a good primer which is tinted to match your final paint. 
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Snooks on January 24, 2013, 03:47:52 PM
Our living room looks almost lilac in some lights.  It's supposed to be beige/brown.  It looks like the half wall under the window in the hallway is painted in a much darker shade than all the other walls but it's just because it doesn't get any light.  I hate decorating.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: lilfox on January 24, 2013, 05:14:09 PM
On the plus side, in my previous house I used differing ambient light to create a really cool effect in my bathroom.  I chose two shades of teal (lighter and darker) and painted two walls with one and two walls with the other.  Then I painted large circles (bubbles!) with the darker color on the lighter wall, and lighter color on the darker wall.  Because of the large window and where the light was mounted, the end effect was many different related shades of blue, which gave it more depth and interest (imo).

I'm guessing the first thing the new owners did was paint over it.   ;)
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: greencat on January 24, 2013, 06:03:52 PM


 
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: nutraxfornerves on January 24, 2013, 07:07:34 PM
This dates to the 1970s. A friend bought a new water bed. He got it home, but didn't have a way to fill it with water. We figured out that his kitchen faucet would take a standard garden hose. I lived in an old house converted to apartments and my landlady had a collection of garden hoses stored in the basement. So I figured I could borrow one for a few hours.

I showed up. We connected the hose to the kitchen faucet and to the water bed. The hose wandered through the living room & down a hall. My friend, in the bedroom, calls out to me in the kitchen that he's ready and turn on the water.

An immediate shriek of a number of colorful obscentiies.

Honestly, I didn't know that I had brought a sprinkler hose. Imagine this in your apartment.
(http://www.swelluk.com/img/shop/original/hozelock-7.5m-15m-sprinkler-soaker-hose-3-6755-6756.jpg)
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 25, 2013, 09:10:00 AM
This dates to the 1970s. A friend bought a new water bed. He got it home, but didn't have a way to fill it with water. We figured out that his kitchen faucet would take a standard garden hose. I lived in an old house converted to apartments and my landlady had a collection of garden hoses stored in the basement. So I figured I could borrow one for a few hours.

I showed up. We connected the hose to the kitchen faucet and to the water bed. The hose wandered through the living room & down a hall. My friend, in the bedroom, calls out to me in the kitchen that he's ready and turn on the water.

An immediate shriek of a number of colorful obscentiies.

Honestly, I didn't know that I had brought a sprinkler hose. Imagine this in your apartment.
(http://www.swelluk.com/img/shop/original/hozelock-7.5m-15m-sprinkler-soaker-hose-3-6755-6756.jpg)

Oh, my.  LOL.

This happened to a coworker:  She and her husband were away for a few days.  They came home to a house with a toilet that had let go on an upper floor and had been spewing water practically the whole time.  Most of the house had to be taken back to the studs and it was almost a year before they were back in.

But at least they got to redesign it and pick all new finishings and basically have their dream house now.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Seraphia on January 25, 2013, 09:13:17 AM
This dates to the 1970s. A friend bought a new water bed. He got it home, but didn't have a way to fill it with water. We figured out that his kitchen faucet would take a standard garden hose. I lived in an old house converted to apartments and my landlady had a collection of garden hoses stored in the basement. So I figured I could borrow one for a few hours.

I showed up. We connected the hose to the kitchen faucet and to the water bed. The hose wandered through the living room & down a hall. My friend, in the bedroom, calls out to me in the kitchen that he's ready and turn on the water.

An immediate shriek of a number of colorful obscentiies.

Honestly, I didn't know that I had brought a sprinkler hose.

Nutrax, that's hysterical! I'm in fits of giggles here, which I desperately needed. Thank you.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: zyrs on January 25, 2013, 01:25:18 PM
The sprinkler hose reminded me:

A friend's boyfriend was a very large man with a temper problem.  He never hit anyone, but inanimate objects felt his fury.  He was also not very handy.  My friend is a small woman.

My friend bought a waterbed.  The frame was the standard waterbed style, a box of 4 sides that 3 large flat boards laid on to form a flat base for the mattress, then the four sides of the frame attached to the flat base.  My friend had splurged for a nice waveless mattress, a top of the line liner and a set of drawers for under the bed storage.  I had helped her put it together because I had a waterbed and knew how.  She decided to keep her drain/repair kit in her bedside table.

Fast forward a few months.  My friend's boyfriend needs his pants hemmed.  Friend does so and boyfriend sits on the corner of the bed to put them on.  His weight is such that the base boards the waterbed frame is attached to break right at the storage drawers about a foot in each direction so now the water filled mattress is resting on pointed, jagged wood that it's sagging over and the whole side of the waterbed is now sloping towards the floor.

He decides it will take too long to drain the mattress and he can fix it by detaching the frame sides, moving the brackets and re-attaching them and he doesn't need to drain it to do that.  However, because waterbeds are full of liquid which wants to spread out, ever time he goes to push the mattress away so he can get to a screw, the mattress oozes back to it's normal place.  This keeps happening and he gets more and more irritated until...

He stabs the mattress with the screwdriver a few times.

So now the mattress (full of water) has holes in it.  Luckily, they are on top so as long as you hold the mattress top off the water, it won't leak.  Because of the high-end liner, nothing is getting on the floor.  So now, the smart thing to do would be for one person to hold the mattress off the top of the water while the other hooks up the drain kit and removes the water so that you can then repair the base board and fix the mattress, right?

I get a frantic phone call at 8:15 PM.  My friend is calling me with one hand from her bedroom phone while holding the mattress off the water with her other hand.  Her boyfriend, citing how tired he is and how this is all her fault, has left because this is her problem not his.  So she is stuck holding the mattress off the water so it doesn't leak by herself.  Because she is so small, she had to kick the phone off the beside table to get it close enough for her to reach with her hand.

I drive over and she runs to the door and lets me in then runs back to grab the mattress.  I hook up the drain kit and take over holding the mattress as she's been doing it for over an hour.  In a while I can move the mattress around so none of the holes are near water and it can finish draining.  I can now look at the damage and she needs a new base board, as this one is totally messed up.  Luckily the liner kept her mattress from being harmed by the splintered wood.

The next day I get some wood and fix the bed base and luckily the repair kit worked so she can refill the mattress, but she decided to sell it a few months later because it stressed her out thinking he might damage it again.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on January 25, 2013, 01:33:22 PM
I think your friend got rid of the wrong thing, zyrs :(
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: magicdomino on January 25, 2013, 01:41:59 PM
I think your friend got rid of the wrong thing, zyrs :(

I agree.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: zyrs on January 25, 2013, 01:45:09 PM
I think your friend got rid of the wrong thing, zyrs :(

I agree.
I think your friend got rid of the wrong thing, zyrs :(

Well, she finally got rid of him too.  Married a great guy and seems very happy.  She called a couple weeks ago to chat.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: magicdomino on January 25, 2013, 01:59:48 PM
One of the great recent home improvement inventions has been the sample can of paint.  You used to have to buy a quart to test out a color in the real world of your home -- maybe even a gallon if it was a very pale color.  I greatly recommend slopping a little can of paint on your walls before slopping on the big can.  (Voice of experience?  What voice of experience?)  :D

While I didn't have to go that far when I painted the basement, I thought I would.  Now, basements are dark, especially if there are only a few windows.  That means pale colors, right?  Whites, off-whites, the palest shades of blue or green.  So, I picked up a brochure of "white" paint samples.  Noted some pretty ones, took the brochure downstairs, and danged if every one of those samples looked dirty and dingy.  I already had dirty, dingy walls; painting them a different dirty, dingy color wouldn't help. 

Turns out that the best shade was a bright mid-level one with little or no gray or yellow tones.  Conversely, the green that was so pretty in the basement was screaming green when I tested it in a bedroom.   ???

Paint is not for wimps.   :)
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ica171 on January 25, 2013, 02:28:10 PM
One of the great recent home improvement inventions has been the sample can of paint.  You used to have to buy a quart to test out a color in the real world of your home -- maybe even a gallon if it was a very pale color.  I greatly recommend slopping a little can of paint on your walls before slopping on the big can.  (Voice of experience?  What voice of experience?)  :D

While I didn't have to go that far when I painted the basement, I thought I would.  Now, basements are dark, especially if there are only a few windows.  That means pale colors, right?  Whites, off-whites, the palest shades of blue or green.  So, I picked up a brochure of "white" paint samples.  Noted some pretty ones, took the brochure downstairs, and danged if every one of those samples looked dirty and dingy.  I already had dirty, dingy walls; painting them a different dirty, dingy color wouldn't help. 

Turns out that the best shade was a bright mid-level one with little or no gray or yellow tones.  Conversely, the green that was so pretty in the basement was screaming green when I tested it in a bedroom.   ???

Paint is not for wimps.   :)

Light definitely makes a difference, as does the undertone of the color. A blue can go gray, purple or green; beige can go orange or pink, etc.

I had some pale greens that I had used on my kitchen cabinets and loved, but I forgot that the Formica counter had green flecks in it that the green cabinets accented. So I had a little over a gallon total of pretty vintage jadeite-type greens. A few years later, we were redoing a wall in the basement and needed to paint, but we had so much paint and were on a strict budget, I thought we could kill two birds with one stone, mix the greens and paint. The walls turned what I like to call "mental hospital green." Guess that'll teach me to take decorating shortcuts. (Except that a few weeks ago I saw two gallons of a nice creamy very pale yellow on the oops table and bought them for the basement instead of the other, also creamy very pale yellow but a bit more tan, color I had planned on; let's hope that turns out better than the green because I really don't want to paint again.)
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 25, 2013, 02:30:53 PM
I redid my bathrooms a few years ago.  I like white fixtures and pale wall colours.  The colour I chose for both bathrooms was white with a hint of lilac purple in it.  It doesn't look purple but it must reflect well because the first time one friend was at my place, she asked me, 'Where'd you get the purple throne?'

To her, the toilet looked purple from the paint reflection.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Moray on January 25, 2013, 02:44:00 PM
I think your friend got rid of the wrong thing, zyrs :(

I agree.

Yeah, living in fear of a HULK SMASH!!! moment is still living in fear.

That said, you're an awesome friend for helping her out like that.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Julian on January 25, 2013, 03:11:05 PM
My last house had a very pale grey wall colour throughout.  It sounds dreadful, but was great in reality.  I noticed early on that the grey picked up and reflected the colour of the curtains in each room, so all I needed to do to change the 'colour scheme' was to change the curtains.

The current house, Chez Backwater, I've gone a bit nutz with colour.  And I love it.  So far, no real mistakes, and all the internal painting is done.  Each bedroom is a different scheme, the living parts of the house are tonal in the same colour, and the loungeroom is different again.  The hardest part has been painting over the riot of paint that was here before I started.

As an example - my lovely lilac loungeroom started off 'Plastic Bucket Yellow', with a fire-engine red external door frame, a Violent Grape purple window frame, and terracotta orange internal door frame.  With an orange pine feature wall behind the wood heater, yellow-orange curtains and bright blue carpet.  Barf inducing.  It is now a soothing light lilac, white trim, bare floorboards and pale cream curtains.  The orange pine doesn't look quite so bad now, and I'm still debating whether to paint it white or not. the same orange pine in the kitchen to dado height is now white and it looks great.  But the wood heater sits on a brick base and backboard in front of the pine, and painting the pine will accentuate the bricks so I'm just not sure!

Anyway, back to the household disasters...  when I painted the spare bedroom I used painters tape to make a sharp edge between the feature wall and the adjoining walls.  Apparently you need to take it off fairly promptly after painting.  Otherwise it takes the paint off with it.  Who knew?   :D  So I still need to finish up and tidy the join area.  Sigh. 

Also when I installed the main shower head over the spa tub (there are two heads, a hand held and the main 'rain shower' one) I sort of did it wrong.  It was fine for a few days, then the water pressure blew it off while I was showering.  The darn thing whacked me in the head, fell into the tub (and took a chunk off the surface) then the water spray hit the opposite wall of the bathroom, soaking everything! 

And I grouted the bathroom floor tiles on the hottest day of the year.  The grout is now all crumbling away, and three of the tiles have cracked.  I am also having major doubts about the tiles I used anyway (they are very slippery when even just bathroom-misty damp) so I'm debating whether it's worthwhile re-grouting or just retiling the darn lot. 

I probably should mention that until I bought this house, I've never tiled, plumbed, painted or anything 'handyman', so it has all been quite a learning curve.  Disasters'R'Me!   ;D
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on January 25, 2013, 04:28:49 PM
I'm laughing so hard at some of these.  I find myself cheering up just a bit whenever I see a new post to this thread!

All the painting stories reminded me of another painting story.  Again, this was in the aftermath of hurricane Andrew.  We were painting the outside of one of the rentals.  It was me, my father, my cousin, his wife, one of my uncles and two of my sisters.  My cousin-in-law's father had been been a professional house painter.  During lunch, we were joking about how her father would always say that you could tell how good a paint job was done by how much paint was on the person doing the painting.  More paint = better job. So, there I am on a 16 foot extension ladder, painting the soffits by hand (at the time my father only had one spray gun).  The ladder wobbled.  I fell.  A 5 gallon bucket of paint fell on top of me.  I walked around the corner of the house dripping from head to toe in grey paint.  My cousin-in-law took one look, fell to the ground laughing and said "that must be one he** of a paint job"!
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mbbored on January 28, 2013, 09:43:02 PM
3 in the last 24 hours:

1) My bathroom sink was draining slowly, so I poured some bleach down the drain, let it sit for a few minutes, then ran the hot water. I promptly forgot about the hot water, went to walk the dog and came back to a flooded bathroom.

2) After I mopped up the bathroom, I headed to my friend's house where I'm cat and chicken sitting. I promptly broke the litterbox, forcing me to disassemble it, dump the contents, clean it out, reassemble and refill.

3) This morning I went back to to let the chicken's out of their coop and feed them. In an effort to reach something outside of the coop so I bent back a portion of the coop covering. This evening I came back to close the chickens into their coop and found them waiting for me by the backdoor.

Remind me to never attempt to fix the plumbing or take care of pets while running a fever.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: heyyoume on January 29, 2013, 11:28:06 PM
This wasn't so much a disaster as amateur hour on the repair front leading to chaos and mayhem.   Our bathroom sink blocked and we had to remove the S-bend to clear it.   It turned out that the person who put the sink in had used a drain that was a size too small for the sink hole so removing the S-bend dislodged the putty and the sink started leaking. 

We took it apart to reinstall with new putty but the putty we brought early last year had been left with the lid not properly on and so had hardened, so we had working taps but no drain  :) and it was after six so also no way of getting more until the next day.  I threw a towel over the sink hole and reminded my partner and my sister who was staying with us not to use the sink until I had been to the hardware store.  About five minutes later I went to wash my hands and flooded the cupboards beneath the sink to the great amusement of and much teasing from the others.   I had only just got it cleaned up when I heard and oh **** from the bathroom and partner had again flooded the cupboards.  Between us I think we absent-mindedly turned on that tap about fives times in the fourteen hours it took me to get to the hardware store and get the sink put back together again.   Those cupboards are REALLY clean.

What makes it worse is that we have a working sink in the lavatory next door to the bathroom... there was no excuse...
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: KimberlyM on January 30, 2013, 01:03:45 PM
I have horrible luck with sink drains...

I plugged up the garbage disposal in the kitchen sink with potato peels for the 1200th time and decided I didn't want the lecture from my husband about not running them down the disposal since it would clog every time.  I figured I'd watched him do it enough times I could manage.  So I got a bucket took the pipe apart and cleared the clog.  For some reason I decided I should check to make sure it was clear before putting everything back together again.  I don't know what I was thinking, but with the pipes apart, I stood up, turned on the water, hit the disposal switch and proceeded to shoot dirty water and potato peels at high speed in every direction.  Took me hours to clean up.


Next one is kinda gross, so I'll white out part:

A few years ago my teenage son got sick in the middle of the night.  He didn't quite make it to the toilet and threw up in the bathroom since.  He had eaten several steak sandwiches that night and as a typical teenage boy he inhaled rather than chewed his food so there were large chunks of steak mixed in it.  When I got up in the morning I tried to rinse it down the drain and it backed up.  So I dumped a bottle of draino down it and came back an hour or so later to check, it still was backed up so I dumped in another bottle....still didn't clear.  Husband decided to go buy a drain snake and began clearing it that way.  But apparently over time the pipe underneath had loosened some because as he got to the U in the pipe it popped of spraying 2 bottles of draino and the contents of my kids stomach all over the cupboard.  I had to throw EVERYTHING away.  The draino ate through several sponges and a couple pairs of latex gloves during the clean up process.  It was horrible!
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: RebeccainGA on January 30, 2013, 01:49:50 PM
Our old house (now where DD and her roommates live) was a real horror show sometimes. It was older (1950s) and hadn't really been renovated much since then - no outlets with ground wires, plumbing and wiring in horrible shape, furnace a nightmare, etc. Thankfully, though, most things worked msot of the time, until DP got sick. Thank God I'm handy.

The kitchen sink needed replumbing - the drains were leaking into the wall. We had a family friend, who was a contractor, offer to do it for us, at least the basics, and we would pre-pay for some additional work that needed to be done (she never did the work - her work partner absconded with the money and left her high and dry - so this was the ONLY thing that had a contractor at the root of it). She decided to do it cheaply, and bought flexible, corrugated pipes that have friction fittings for most of the drain work. This may have been fine, except that she didn't count on the friction fittings not working correctly, and that those aren't meant to be used with a garbage disposal. I had to replumb the thing, from scratch, at least a half dozen times, keeping the same parts until I learned better and bought the correct, glued fittings for most of the length (did have to have one flexible section thanks to poor design of the system). MANY evenings of sitting on a upturned bucket, under the sink. I got it fixed for good right before me moved.

The furnace. Ye gods. NOT vented, and so when we replaced it, they had to cut through the roof. Also, hot water heater in same closet had to be replumbed when it was replaced, as the overflow drain was going nowhere (plugged up and capped) and was a major hazard. Let the pros handle that - I wasn't about to tackle that mess.

Funniest one, though, was our waterbed. We had a king sized, hard side, waveless mattress that DP had owned about 20 years. Mattress sprung a leak - we spent two months on the futon in the living room, drying things out, including the wood frame (liner was as old as the mattress!) during one of the most humid and cold falls that our area had seen. We replaced the mattress and liner, and had it for three years of lovely sleep, until we got ready to move. We decided to get rid of the hard side bed and get a soft side, and just kept the headboard to re-use, since it matched the huge dresser we were keeping. For some reason, the siphon pump, the small electric pump, and the venturi siphon (the one you run water into from the sink) wouldn't drain this bed. I learned later it was because of the kind of wave less it was - you HAVE to use a strong pump. So I got a SUPER STRONG pump from Harbor Freight. Which leaked a cup for every gallon it sucked out of the bed, at least. And was half the strength it should be because of the leak, so it took three hours to empty. The entire time, I had to bail water out of the basin I had the pump sitting on, so it wouldn't overflow, and hold towels around other leaky spots. My back hurt so bad by then end I was crying. The floor was drenched, even with all this. Luckily, the kids pulled the carpets out in there - it was a HUGE mess.

I've learned my lesson - we had the new bed delivered, and made sure that the bed can be filled and drained with only a garden hose and the little venturi siphon. *sigh*
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: lady_disdain on January 30, 2013, 03:41:58 PM
Remember the movie The Money Pit? I once lived in a house very similar to that one (and haunted as well, it seems).

It was a gorgeous older house with a huge garden, filled with bromeliads and tall shady trees. However, the previous owner had fallen on hard times and had let maintenance slip or had slapped something together to solve the problem. We kept finding his creative fixes, like the attic wiring, which included a large mass of wires that reminded me of a rubber band ball and the two wires that had been joined together with a plug and socket, hovering suspended over the floor. We ended up doing a lot of renovating (partially with the help of a sleazy contractor who sexually harassed the cleaning lady and called the cops on my father at 3am one night).

Perhaps the most memorable incident was the in house flood. One long weekend, my parents decide everyone needed a break from the house and packed the four of us into the car and off we went to the beach. Three days later, we return to the house, tired and happy. As we enter, we hear rain. But it was a beautiful clear night. And the sounds were coming from inside the house!

The water heater in the loft had cracked, some time in the past. The cheapstake previous owner decided not to replace it but to patch the crack with epoxy. Of course, the epoxy wouldn't hold for ever and it gave up trying on the day we left. Imagine 2 or 3 days of water running out the heater, cascading down the walls, flooding the upstair and saturating the floor, dripping down onto the kitchen. It was quite a sight.

Now, remember the tall shady trees? Yup, little sunlight reached parts of the house. Brick likes to hold water. Mold loves damp, dark places. In two days, we had a magnificent mold colony: orange, blue, red, yellow and black. There was one that glowed faintly in the dark. Fun times.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: otterwoman on January 30, 2013, 04:10:46 PM
Remember the movie The Money Pit? I once lived in a house very similar to that one (and haunted as well, it seems).

It was a gorgeous older house with a huge garden, filled with bromeliads and tall shady trees. However, the previous owner had fallen on hard times and had let maintenance slip or had slapped something together to solve the problem. We kept finding his creative fixes, like the attic wiring, which included a large mass of wires that reminded me of a rubber band ball and the two wires that had been joined together with a plug and socket, hovering suspended over the floor. We ended up doing a lot of renovating (partially with the help of a sleazy contractor who sexually harassed the cleaning lady and called the cops on my father at 3am one night).

Perhaps the most memorable incident was the in house flood. One long weekend, my parents decide everyone needed a break from the house and packed the four of us into the car and off we went to the beach. Three days later, we return to the house, tired and happy. As we enter, we hear rain. But it was a beautiful clear night. And the sounds were coming from inside the house!

The water heater in the loft had cracked, some time in the past. The cheapstake previous owner decided not to replace it but to patch the crack with epoxy. Of course, the epoxy wouldn't hold for ever and it gave up trying on the day we left. Imagine 2 or 3 days of water running out the heater, cascading down the walls, flooding the upstair and saturating the floor, dripping down onto the kitchen. It was quite a sight.

Now, remember the tall shady trees? Yup, little sunlight reached parts of the house. Brick likes to hold water. Mold loves damp, dark places. In two days, we had a magnificent mold colony: orange, blue, red, yellow and black. There was one that glowed faintly in the dark. Fun times.

Gasoline and a match. The perfect fix.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: snowfire on January 30, 2013, 04:33:21 PM
Yikes, lady disdain.  That is just plain scary about the electrical.  I sometimes wonder just what on earth these idiots are thinking when they do some of these stupid "fixes".  I just saw one on TV where someone had cut the head off an extension cord and twisted the ends together with the existing knob & tube wiring, then plastered over the whole mess.  How many kinds of wrong can you find there?

Many years ago my IL's had just bought a house in our city as they were planning to move up here.  They had brought some furniture up but went back down to their city to get their house on the market.  It just happened that winter was one of the coldest in the last 100 years in our area.  Normal winter temps are about 25 - 35 during the day and 15 - 25 at night.  That winter the temps were about 0 for a high and -25 for lows. 

One night DH and I went over to IL's house as it was supposed to get record cold.  We were going to turn on a trickle of water so that the pipes wouldn't freeze.  When we got to the house we couldn't open the front door.  It would unlock but we couldn't get it to budge.  We went around to the kitchen door and saw about 2 inches thick ice on the windows in the kitchen and that door was stuck as well.  We could also hear water running.  In an unoccupied house, this is Not A Good Thing!

We went back to the front door and forced it open.  The place was dripping with humidity, the wallpaper in the stairway to the second floor was dangling in strips.  We went into the kitchen and there was water running down one of the kitchen walls.  I looked downstairs to the basement and saw the shop vac go floating by as the water in the basement was about 4 feet deep.  There was no heat in the house since the furnace and water heater were in the basement and currently doing the backstroke.  I was concerned about the electricity so I grabbed a broom and opened the main breaker panel, which was in the stairwell, over the water.  I used the wooden handled broom to kill the main breaker.  DH found the water shutoff for the house and stopped Old Faithful, which was a water line in the 2nd floor bathroom which had broken.  We quickly drove over to my Mom's house which was about a mile away. (Pre-cell phone days.)  DH got on the phone trying to find someone with a pumper truck to pump out the basement.  We were afraid that if we didn't get the water out of the basement it would freeze into the world's biggest ice cube and blow the foundation out. 

We finally found someone with a pumper truck which wasn't frozen up and he met us over at the house.  I started a fire in the fireplace as DH and the truckdriver took turns manning the hose on the truck and coming over to the fireplace to thaw out.  I even went and got a load of wood from my Mom's house when I had burned all the wood at IL's.  I think that they pumped something like 5000 gallons of water out of the basement.  It would have been worse if the drain for the washer hadn't been in the basement.  Water had been going out that.  (No, there wasn't a floor drain.  Don't know why.)

The upside was that IL's got the whole house redone, the downside was that they had to argue everything with the insurance company & the folks that did the restoration did some cheap shortcuts. 

Since it was winter, at least we didn't have to deal with glow in the dark mold.  :o
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on January 30, 2013, 07:49:02 PM
RebeccainGA, your story reminds me of my parents' current house.  They used to live a couple miles from here, but in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, they jumped on a chance to purchase a house several times larger for a fraction of what it would be worth once it was restored.  So far so good, right?  The house has very sturdy "bones".  It actually sustained very little damage beyond drywall, windows and shingles.  They did take the opportunity to remodel the inside and make in a 6bedroom instead of a 5. 

Anyway, the house was built in the 1960's.  The people who sold it to my parents were the people that built it.  My father (and all the rest of us) rebuilt the house ourselves.  All is going well.  Since we basically re-ran all the plumbing and electric, put in all new walls and a new roof, my father was pretty unconcerned about major repairs cropping up.  Boy was he wrong.

You see, when  house is built on a slab foundation, a small amount of the plumbing is under the slab.  You can't get to it unless you rip up the foundation.  Late 2002/early 2003, we started to notice a weird smell out on the pool deck.  It seemed to be coming from where the kitchen plumbing drained into the larger pipes that ran underneath the slab.  Dad and I cut through the stucco and masonry in the wall on the outside, behind the kitchen sink.  The pipes seemed to be fine, but there was nasty water built up inside the cinder block frame.  We cleaned that up and grabbed the camera snake to inspect the rest of the plumbing.  We found the problem.

The plumbing in the kitchen runs to a joint under the slab where the pipes from the bathroom meet up to merge into a larger output pipe that runs into the septic tank.  The pipes from the kitchen take a bit of a curve under the living room.  Our theory is that before he owned the house, the kitchen sink must have kept backing up.  The old owners poured bottle after bottle after bottle of Draino down the sink.  It just built up in that curve.  A roughly 9 inch section of pipe under the living room floor was completely gone.  Essentially, for the 9ish years my parents had own the house, all the water that was drained from the kitchen and laundry room had just been absorbed into the ground under the foundation around the area of the living room.  Thankfully, Dad had an empty rental and he was able to move my mother my now 20 something sister (they didn't have the current little ones at the time)  into it for a few days while he and I took a jackhammer to the living room floor to dig up and repair the pipe.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ica171 on January 31, 2013, 10:40:48 AM
RebeccainGA, your story reminds me of my parents' current house.  They used to live a couple miles from here, but in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, they jumped on a chance to purchase a house several times larger for a fraction of what it would be worth once it was restored.  So far so good, right?  The house has very sturdy "bones".  It actually sustained very little damage beyond drywall, windows and shingles.  They did take the opportunity to remodel the inside and make in a 6bedroom instead of a 5. 

Anyway, the house was built in the 1960's.  The people who sold it to my parents were the people that built it.  My father (and all the rest of us) rebuilt the house ourselves.  All is going well.  Since we basically re-ran all the plumbing and electric, put in all new walls and a new roof, my father was pretty unconcerned about major repairs cropping up.  Boy was he wrong.

You see, when  house is built on a slab foundation, a small amount of the plumbing is under the slab.  You can't get to it unless you rip up the foundation.  Late 2002/early 2003, we started to notice a weird smell out on the pool deck.  It seemed to be coming from where the kitchen plumbing drained into the larger pipes that ran underneath the slab.  Dad and I cut through the stucco and masonry in the wall on the outside, behind the kitchen sink.  The pipes seemed to be fine, but there was nasty water built up inside the cinder block frame.  We cleaned that up and grabbed the camera snake to inspect the rest of the plumbing.  We found the problem.

The plumbing in the kitchen runs to a joint under the slab where the pipes from the bathroom meet up to merge into a larger output pipe that runs into the septic tank.  The pipes from the kitchen take a bit of a curve under the living room.  Our theory is that before he owned the house, the kitchen sink must have kept backing up.  The old owners poured bottle after bottle after bottle of Draino down the sink.  It just built up in that curve.  A roughly 9 inch section of pipe under the living room floor was completely gone.  Essentially, for the 9ish years my parents had own the house, all the water that was drained from the kitchen and laundry room had just been absorbed into the ground under the foundation around the area of the living room.  Thankfully, Dad had an empty rental and he was able to move my mother my now 20 something sister (they didn't have the current little ones at the time)  into it for a few days while he and I took a jackhammer to the living room floor to dig up and repair the pipe.

Our house isn't on a slab, but I worry about something like this happening here. When we moved in our pipes had nasty sludge built up in them. They were OK for about a year, but after that the kitchen sink started backing up at least once a month. We've cleaned them mechanically as much as we can, but we also use drain cleaner once a month. We use the enzyme cleaner that's not supposed to hurt your pipes. Hopefully that's true.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on January 31, 2013, 10:48:57 AM
RebeccainGA, your story reminds me of my parents' current house.  They used to live a couple miles from here, but in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, they jumped on a chance to purchase a house several times larger for a fraction of what it would be worth once it was restored.  So far so good, right?  The house has very sturdy "bones".  It actually sustained very little damage beyond drywall, windows and shingles.  They did take the opportunity to remodel the inside and make in a 6bedroom instead of a 5. 

Anyway, the house was built in the 1960's.  The people who sold it to my parents were the people that built it.  My father (and all the rest of us) rebuilt the house ourselves.  All is going well.  Since we basically re-ran all the plumbing and electric, put in all new walls and a new roof, my father was pretty unconcerned about major repairs cropping up.  Boy was he wrong.

You see, when  house is built on a slab foundation, a small amount of the plumbing is under the slab.  You can't get to it unless you rip up the foundation.  Late 2002/early 2003, we started to notice a weird smell out on the pool deck.  It seemed to be coming from where the kitchen plumbing drained into the larger pipes that ran underneath the slab.  Dad and I cut through the stucco and masonry in the wall on the outside, behind the kitchen sink.  The pipes seemed to be fine, but there was nasty water built up inside the cinder block frame.  We cleaned that up and grabbed the camera snake to inspect the rest of the plumbing.  We found the problem.

The plumbing in the kitchen runs to a joint under the slab where the pipes from the bathroom meet up to merge into a larger output pipe that runs into the septic tank.  The pipes from the kitchen take a bit of a curve under the living room.  Our theory is that before he owned the house, the kitchen sink must have kept backing up.  The old owners poured bottle after bottle after bottle of Draino down the sink.  It just built up in that curve.  A roughly 9 inch section of pipe under the living room floor was completely gone.  Essentially, for the 9ish years my parents had own the house, all the water that was drained from the kitchen and laundry room had just been absorbed into the ground under the foundation around the area of the living room.  Thankfully, Dad had an empty rental and he was able to move my mother my now 20 something sister (they didn't have the current little ones at the time)  into it for a few days while he and I took a jackhammer to the living room floor to dig up and repair the pipe.

Our house isn't on a slab, but I worry about something like this happening here. When we moved in our pipes had nasty sludge built up in them. They were OK for about a year, but after that the kitchen sink started backing up at least once a month. We've cleaned them mechanically as much as we can, but we also use drain cleaner once a month. We use the enzyme cleaner that's not supposed to hurt your pipes. Hopefully that's true.

Snakes with camera attachments aren't terribly expensive to rent these days.  It might be worth the cost just for your piece of mind.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ica171 on January 31, 2013, 11:00:33 AM
RebeccainGA, your story reminds me of my parents' current house.  They used to live a couple miles from here, but in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, they jumped on a chance to purchase a house several times larger for a fraction of what it would be worth once it was restored.  So far so good, right?  The house has very sturdy "bones".  It actually sustained very little damage beyond drywall, windows and shingles.  They did take the opportunity to remodel the inside and make in a 6bedroom instead of a 5. 

Anyway, the house was built in the 1960's.  The people who sold it to my parents were the people that built it.  My father (and all the rest of us) rebuilt the house ourselves.  All is going well.  Since we basically re-ran all the plumbing and electric, put in all new walls and a new roof, my father was pretty unconcerned about major repairs cropping up.  Boy was he wrong.

You see, when  house is built on a slab foundation, a small amount of the plumbing is under the slab.  You can't get to it unless you rip up the foundation.  Late 2002/early 2003, we started to notice a weird smell out on the pool deck.  It seemed to be coming from where the kitchen plumbing drained into the larger pipes that ran underneath the slab.  Dad and I cut through the stucco and masonry in the wall on the outside, behind the kitchen sink.  The pipes seemed to be fine, but there was nasty water built up inside the cinder block frame.  We cleaned that up and grabbed the camera snake to inspect the rest of the plumbing.  We found the problem.

The plumbing in the kitchen runs to a joint under the slab where the pipes from the bathroom meet up to merge into a larger output pipe that runs into the septic tank.  The pipes from the kitchen take a bit of a curve under the living room.  Our theory is that before he owned the house, the kitchen sink must have kept backing up.  The old owners poured bottle after bottle after bottle of Draino down the sink.  It just built up in that curve.  A roughly 9 inch section of pipe under the living room floor was completely gone.  Essentially, for the 9ish years my parents had own the house, all the water that was drained from the kitchen and laundry room had just been absorbed into the ground under the foundation around the area of the living room.  Thankfully, Dad had an empty rental and he was able to move my mother my now 20 something sister (they didn't have the current little ones at the time)  into it for a few days while he and I took a jackhammer to the living room floor to dig up and repair the pipe.

Our house isn't on a slab, but I worry about something like this happening here. When we moved in our pipes had nasty sludge built up in them. They were OK for about a year, but after that the kitchen sink started backing up at least once a month. We've cleaned them mechanically as much as we can, but we also use drain cleaner once a month. We use the enzyme cleaner that's not supposed to hurt your pipes. Hopefully that's true.

Snakes with camera attachments aren't terribly expensive to rent these days.  It might be worth the cost just for your piece of mind.

We've talked about doing that, but I think we're afraid to mess with it while it's not acting up. I think we've got them cleaned pretty far now--our 25 foot snack put in the main cleanout in the basement doesn't catch anything anymore.

I can't believe I forgot this disaster.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-abcezkXdAtU/UATeqH87PyI/AAAAAAAACBE/8sbW5AWeh9E/s640/014.JPG)

That's DH holding a mallet up to an enormous crack in our foundation. We had a very dry summer here and our foundation shifted. Not this much, this is what we found after we removed an old patch the previous owners did. They didn't do it very well, but hopefully the one we did holds better. Anyway, now we know that if there's a drought we need to water our foundation, at least at this house. I still haven't finished patching all the drywall.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: turtleIScream on January 31, 2013, 08:22:33 PM
I can't believe I forgot this disaster.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-abcezkXdAtU/UATeqH87PyI/AAAAAAAACBE/8sbW5AWeh9E/s640/014.JPG)

That's DH holding a mallet up to an enormous crack in our foundation. We had a very dry summer here and our foundation shifted. Not this much, this is what we found after we removed an old patch the previous owners did. They didn't do it very well, but hopefully the one we did holds better. Anyway, now we know that if there's a drought we need to water our foundation, at least at this house. I still haven't finished patching all the drywall.

This reminds me of our foundation story...

When we were buying our house, we put in an offer contingent on passing inspection. The inspector came and discovered a significant (but reparable) crack in the foundation. We rewrote the offer, lowering our bid price and agreeing to cover the cost of repair. Offer was accepted, contractor was scheduled, and we figured everything was good to go. The next night, one day before the scheduled repair, we had a HUGE thunderstorm, flash flooding in areas, and that crack proved to be disastrous. The whole basement flooded, ruining everything, including the newly installed carpet. Fortunately, the owner was responsible for clean-up fees, but it was a mess!
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 01, 2013, 07:53:06 AM
I have never owned a house, but when we were in our old apartment, we saw the wrong way to re-roof a building. The management company had the roofers lay new tar-paper and shingles over the old roof. This happened twice in the seven years we lived there. The roof became so heavy, two buildings had their roofs cave in!
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: lilfox on February 01, 2013, 01:19:12 PM
We just replaced our roof, and discovered the previous (original) owner had done exactly that with the roof.  Apparently he couldn't afford to replace the rotting out sections below the shingles, so the new roof was put over top.  There were several sections that had leaked over the years, but luckily with little to no resulting damage.  We only ever found one leak, and a recent one at that.

My parents had a disaster with their house - brand new construction, almost 25 years ago.  Within a month or so of moving in, one of the master bathroom pipes failed due to a nail puncture that gave way.  This was discovered after the leaked water flooded out the large light fixture directly underneath (one of those boxy fluorescent tube deals popular in the late 80s), which happened to be the central kitchen light.  I have no idea how they managed to remove the light and not spill water everywhere.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on February 04, 2013, 11:51:44 AM
I posted the beginning of this in the "Kids say the funniest things" thread.  My 13yo mixed up the levers for the pool pump and the main water supply to the house, so instead of turning on the pump to top of the water level in the pool, he shut off the water to the house.  His reaction was priceless, like it never dawned on him that different levers might operate different things.  It's still funny, but unfortunately, there was some collateral damage.  When we tried to turn the water back on, the pump pretty much blew up.  We had to cut the breaker to the well pump, and now my father is running to the supply store to get the parts to replace the water pump.  In the meantime, we have no water and have to use a 5 gallon bucket to retrieve water from the pool in order to flush the toilets.  Oh, the joy of a 13yo boy trying to figure out how to be a handyman.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Lady Snowdon on February 04, 2013, 08:06:28 PM
I'm waiting to see what happens to cause a total catastrophe in our house one day.  The people who lived here before us did some renovations, and they weren't always done right.  Some of the stuff we caught on inspection and had them fix, and some we're still just finding out about five years in!

-- When the house was inspected, it was found that the electrical wires for the washer and dryer were shoehorned into the electrical box and were almost melted through, since they hadn't been wired properly.  Better yet, for some reason there's insulation in our electrical box, so if they had melted through, it could have started an electrical fire of epic proportion! 

-- Whoever installed the hot water heater installed it with the relief valve on top (at about face height), and never put in a pipe to direct it anywhere else.  Thankfully that was an easy fix!

-- When the basement was finished and insulated, they put the insulation on the wrong side, so our kitchen sink pipes freeze on average of five times per winter.  Or we keep the water running, and have insanely high water bills.  From what we can tell, the layers behind the drywall in the basement go: drywall, insulation, pipes, concrete, instead of drywall, pipes, insulation, concrete. 

-- Someone tried to fix a mold outbreak in one of the bathrooms by putting down a layer of plywood, and then a new layer of linoleum.  As we found out when we pulled the linoleum out, they hadn't even tried to kill the mold before putting the plywood down!  Thankfully this just looked bad and the subfloor was still sound. 

-- A wood shed was put in behind the garage.  Floor directly on the ground, with no concrete slab.  The shed was conveniently situated so that all the water from the garage roof dripped on the shed roof, as it was under the eaves.  ::)  In Minnesota, where there's lots of rain and snow, this contributed to rot, very quickly.  The first time we tried to look inside the shed, the door fell off, and the floor had holes in it.  We ended up tearing it down, only to find that it was holding part of our fence up! 
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: RebeccainGA on February 05, 2013, 08:11:39 AM
I'm waiting to see what happens to cause a total catastrophe in our house one day.  The people who lived here before us did some renovations, and they weren't always done right.  Some of the stuff we caught on inspection and had them fix, and some we're still just finding out about five years in!

I think you bought from the people my parents did.

- "Wallpaper" above the cabinets in the kitchen - old contact paper, stuck over the (unwashed) walls.
- Floor tiles in the kitchen? Stolen from the school district (the old owner worked for them in maintenance) and stuck directly to the (unwashed) tile below them - so they started to slide around after the first year
- No insulation behind the paneling in the living room, which was nailed to the studs of the outside wall (so it was, from the outside in, vinyl siding, studs and air space, paneling) which let in every draft, every bug, and dust like crazy.
- Three layers of various vintage roofing material nailed on top of each other, threatening to collapse the whole roof.
- extension cords inside the walls instead of proper wiring - non-UL approved, cheap ones at that
- Half the house, including the kitchen outlets, one bedroom, the hall and the dining room all on ONE breaker.
- Shower in the master bathroom not plumbed to a drain, so the water went out a pipe, took a left turn and then went UNDER THE HOUSE. A house with a wood frame and no concrete foundation. In Florida, land of termites and pests galore.

It took them ten years to uncover all this stuff. I don't know how that house is even standing.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: lady_disdain on February 05, 2013, 08:32:48 AM
Looks like the guy has been busy, considering he has sold houses to all of us!

Don't these people think a little?
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Seraphia on February 05, 2013, 08:46:22 AM
Looks like the guy has been busy, considering he has sold houses to all of us!

Don't these people think a little?

Sure they do. They think: "Ughhhh, why is wood and insulation and wallpaper so darn expensive? I know, I'll use this road sign instead!" That's where you wind up with my parents' house, which my father as been slowly bringing up to code for the last 17 years. Seriously - cardboard beer boxes used as shims, unfinished barn wood for framing, four types of pipe to cover three feet of floor, linoleum nailed to uninsulated walls, a shower drain that shot water when the sink clogged... The things he's uncovered when trying to do something simple like put in new carpet have been ridiculous.

On the plus side, he's offered to come look over houses with us when DH and I start home shopping, and I know he'll find every flaw, plus help me fix them when we decide what to buy.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on February 05, 2013, 10:00:50 AM
Looks like the guy has been busy, considering he has sold houses to all of us!

Don't these people think a little?

Sure they do. They think: "Ughhhh, why is wood and insulation and wallpaper so darn expensive? I know, I'll use this road sign instead!" That's where you wind up with my parents' house, which my father as been slowly bringing up to code for the last 17 years. Seriously - cardboard beer boxes used as shims, unfinished barn wood for framing, four types of pipe to cover three feet of floor, linoleum nailed to uninsulated walls, a shower drain that shot water when the sink clogged... The things he's uncovered when trying to do something simple like put in new carpet have been ridiculous.

On the plus side, he's offered to come look over houses with us when DH and I start home shopping, and I know he'll find every flaw, plus help me fix them when we decide what to buy.

I nearly bought a house that would have had major problems that my inspector missed.  There was a problem with my bank at the last minute (they didn't like the structure of my student loans...long story), so the sale fell through.  A friend of mine who was also house shopping, who loved the house immediately jumped on the now available house, with my blessing.  Her inspector found some major issues.  The house was originally built in 1898, so neither of us expected it to be perfect.  What we didn't expect, however, was the owner splicing new wiring into the old system so that when you looked at the surface, it looked like the electrical had been updated.  If you followed the lines down a few inches, the new stuff was spliced into the old wiring, which is illegal and very unsafe.  They'd done something similar with the plumbing.  You have no idea how grateful I was to my bank for screwing things up.  That house would have been a huge money pit.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ica171 on February 05, 2013, 12:01:13 PM
I really hope when we sell the new owners don't think that we're morons, although sometimes I wonder. I've already told myself that I'm going to have to take out the toilet and reinstall it before we sell*, because I cracked the tile that goes under it so it a) looks like crap and b) wobbles a tiny bit, and only if you know how to make it. It's fine for us, but I wouldn't sell it to someone like that.

*It will probably actually get fixed this spring or summer. The only reason I'm not doing it now is because my daughter's first birthday party is in eleven days and we already don't have a sink or finished tile in there.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: QueenofAllThings on February 05, 2013, 12:49:02 PM
I have an old house that has had several DIY former owners.  We are in the middle of a kitchen Reno  and have discovered that a) half the kitchen has no subfloor, just a sheet of plywood, and b) holes were cut to install fans, a/c, etc and supporting beams were sawed through.

When we moved in, we discovered -
- wallpaper border stuck on with Elmer's glue;
- board nailed to ceiling of closet, with drippy pipe above it - and a foil pie plate to catch drips;
- bookshelves built in front of windows (no insulation); and
-plastic hooks glued to every surface imaginable
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: MissRose on February 05, 2013, 02:58:13 PM
My mother worked with a neighbor's son-in-law to install hard wood flooring in the house during 1 summer while I was still going to college.  In the living room, they encountered the challenge of removing the carpet and below was some wood.  It was not a pleasant task for 1 main reason: a few years prior our cat would do a #1 in that corner if the litter box was not clean to her standards, which was rectified after she was caught a few times.  Lets say that cat stuff really soaks into the wood, and they had to replace that part of the floor first then lay the wood flooring after.  Whether or not the garbage men who collected the wood scraps placed in the trash from that area were impressed or not with the stench I have no idea!
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Kaora on February 09, 2013, 11:57:10 PM

At least there was a kaboom!  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8rYotiiFP8

I love Marvin!   ;D

This is my dad, the mechanical engineer's, motto. :P

ETA: I probably provided my own disaster for my parents when I was tiny. ;D

They had just finished painting the walls a nice, neutral white (which they are to this day), so I decided to help them.  By scribbling crayon everywhere.  I later on scribbled stick figures in pencil on the hall wall.

My "art" stood until the invention of the Magic Eraser, thank you. :)
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Elfmama on February 10, 2013, 04:29:11 PM
RebeccainGA, your story reminds me of my parents' current house.  They used to live a couple miles from here, but in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, they jumped on a chance to purchase a house several times larger for a fraction of what it would be worth once it was restored.  So far so good, right?  The house has very sturdy "bones".  It actually sustained very little damage beyond drywall, windows and shingles.  They did take the opportunity to remodel the inside and make in a 6bedroom instead of a 5. 

Anyway, the house was built in the 1960's.  The people who sold it to my parents were the people that built it.  My father (and all the rest of us) rebuilt the house ourselves.  All is going well.  Since we basically re-ran all the plumbing and electric, put in all new walls and a new roof, my father was pretty unconcerned about major repairs cropping up.  Boy was he wrong.

You see, when  house is built on a slab foundation, a small amount of the plumbing is under the slab.  You can't get to it unless you rip up the foundation.  Late 2002/early 2003, we started to notice a weird smell out on the pool deck.  It seemed to be coming from where the kitchen plumbing drained into the larger pipes that ran underneath the slab.  Dad and I cut through the stucco and masonry in the wall on the outside, behind the kitchen sink.  The pipes seemed to be fine, but there was nasty water built up inside the cinder block frame.  We cleaned that up and grabbed the camera snake to inspect the rest of the plumbing.  We found the problem.

The plumbing in the kitchen runs to a joint under the slab where the pipes from the bathroom meet up to merge into a larger output pipe that runs into the septic tank.  The pipes from the kitchen take a bit of a curve under the living room.  Our theory is that before he owned the house, the kitchen sink must have kept backing up.  The old owners poured bottle after bottle after bottle of Draino down the sink.  It just built up in that curve.  A roughly 9 inch section of pipe under the living room floor was completely gone.  Essentially, for the 9ish years my parents had own the house, all the water that was drained from the kitchen and laundry room had just been absorbed into the ground under the foundation around the area of the living room.  Thankfully, Dad had an empty rental and he was able to move my mother my now 20 something sister (they didn't have the current little ones at the time)  into it for a few days while he and I took a jackhammer to the living room floor to dig up and repair the pipe.

Our house isn't on a slab, but I worry about something like this happening here. When we moved in our pipes had nasty sludge built up in them. They were OK for about a year, but after that the kitchen sink started backing up at least once a month. We've cleaned them mechanically as much as we can, but we also use drain cleaner once a month. We use the enzyme cleaner that's not supposed to hurt your pipes. Hopefully that's true.
Do you pour leftover cooking grease down the drain?  If so, STOP!  In 40 years I've never had a kitchen drain back up.  My waste grease goes into a plastic sour cream tub (once it has cooled!) and when the tub is full, I just snap on the lid and drop it in the trash.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mbbored on February 10, 2013, 06:12:52 PM
The last resident of my townhouse was a contractor who got foreclosed on. The place was bought at bank auction by brand-new flippers who quickly realized that they weren't going to make back their investment, so they slapped on some much needed beige paint and new flooring.

However, after moving in I discovered a few presents left for me by the ticked off contractor. Like the fact that most of the vent for the dryer had been yanked out from the wall and then just the connector stuck back in, so I had to cut a hole in the dry wall to reinstall the tubing. Also, all lights and sockets downstairs (fortunately except for the refrigerator and stove) were wired to a single switch in the upstairs bathroom so everything would work or nothing at all. Plus all the phone jacks had been disconnected from behind. The list goes on and on.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: VorFemme on February 10, 2013, 08:44:48 PM
Moved into a rental house after four strippers and their male roommates moved out.  They painted....

They painted over the phone jacks (we had to have all of them replaced) & some electrical outlets, the phone system had to have the box replaced as it was somewhere in the basement behind paneling and the amount of static on the line indicated that it was badly corroded (might have been something done by a previous owner - no telling now), and they painted over hand done borders done by the owner's wife and got paint on the carpet & ceiling, too.  They broke a glass storm door and pulled the frame & hardware off the side entrance, then hid things under the deck behind the house.  They left a huge, torn open bag of dog food open under the sink & a beach towel in the laundry room (roach food & mildew smells).

And, worst of all, the "real estate agent" didn't bother getting the place cleaned, any repairs done, the yard mowed, the bushes trimmed, or the pool set up to be cared for for three months while it was on the market until we  moved in.....so we found it the way four strippers and their "guys" left it. 
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: LilacRosey on February 10, 2013, 08:51:50 PM
I somehow eneded up with mice a while back and my landlady blamed it on me having a cat. It was pretty bad for a while., LilacRosey
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ica171 on February 10, 2013, 09:31:45 PM
RebeccainGA, your story reminds me of my parents' current house.  They used to live a couple miles from here, but in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, they jumped on a chance to purchase a house several times larger for a fraction of what it would be worth once it was restored.  So far so good, right?  The house has very sturdy "bones".  It actually sustained very little damage beyond drywall, windows and shingles.  They did take the opportunity to remodel the inside and make in a 6bedroom instead of a 5. 

Anyway, the house was built in the 1960's.  The people who sold it to my parents were the people that built it.  My father (and all the rest of us) rebuilt the house ourselves.  All is going well.  Since we basically re-ran all the plumbing and electric, put in all new walls and a new roof, my father was pretty unconcerned about major repairs cropping up.  Boy was he wrong.

You see, when  house is built on a slab foundation, a small amount of the plumbing is under the slab.  You can't get to it unless you rip up the foundation.  Late 2002/early 2003, we started to notice a weird smell out on the pool deck.  It seemed to be coming from where the kitchen plumbing drained into the larger pipes that ran underneath the slab.  Dad and I cut through the stucco and masonry in the wall on the outside, behind the kitchen sink.  The pipes seemed to be fine, but there was nasty water built up inside the cinder block frame.  We cleaned that up and grabbed the camera snake to inspect the rest of the plumbing.  We found the problem.

The plumbing in the kitchen runs to a joint under the slab where the pipes from the bathroom meet up to merge into a larger output pipe that runs into the septic tank.  The pipes from the kitchen take a bit of a curve under the living room.  Our theory is that before he owned the house, the kitchen sink must have kept backing up.  The old owners poured bottle after bottle after bottle of Draino down the sink.  It just built up in that curve.  A roughly 9 inch section of pipe under the living room floor was completely gone.  Essentially, for the 9ish years my parents had own the house, all the water that was drained from the kitchen and laundry room had just been absorbed into the ground under the foundation around the area of the living room.  Thankfully, Dad had an empty rental and he was able to move my mother my now 20 something sister (they didn't have the current little ones at the time)  into it for a few days while he and I took a jackhammer to the living room floor to dig up and repair the pipe.

Our house isn't on a slab, but I worry about something like this happening here. When we moved in our pipes had nasty sludge built up in them. They were OK for about a year, but after that the kitchen sink started backing up at least once a month. We've cleaned them mechanically as much as we can, but we also use drain cleaner once a month. We use the enzyme cleaner that's not supposed to hurt your pipes. Hopefully that's true.
Do you pour leftover cooking grease down the drain?  If so, STOP!  In 40 years I've never had a kitchen drain back up.  My waste grease goes into a plastic sour cream tub (once it has cooled!) and when the tub is full, I just snap on the lid and drop it in the trash.

Nope, never have. It goes into a separate container then either in the trash, or, when we have dogs, over their food. Or DH will dump it in the yard sometimes, which I hate but doesn't seem to affect anything out there one way or the other. Looking back, it seems like a lot of stuff had been quickly repaired to get the house ready for sale, so I'm going to guess this was an ongoing problem that they did a Band-Aid fix on to get the house sold. They're also cast iron pipes that are 45 years old, so I assume that has something to do with it. That's why we try to use the enzyme stuff instead of Draino or anything like that; if there's a weak spot I don't want it to be affected by chemicals.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: dietcokeofevil on February 10, 2013, 11:02:43 PM
We've had a lot of problem with the pipes in our laundry room.   They're on an exterior wall and we've had to struggle with them freezing every winter.  A few years ago the burst and we had a big hole cut in the wall to repair it    With it being the laundry room and the washer being in front of the hole, we didn't get around to repairing it until this last summer.  Got the drywall repaired, repainted and everything.  Two weeks ago the pipe burst again. 
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: magicdomino on February 11, 2013, 10:58:53 AM
I somehow eneded up with mice a while back and my landlady blamed it on me having a cat. It was pretty bad for a while., LilacRosey

Isn't it supposed to be the other way around?  You have mice, then you get the cat, then you don't have mice anymore.  Unless your cat is like mine, and thinks mice are fun toys, not tasty snacks.  Anyhow, I've never heard of blaming a mice infestation on a cat.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Ms_Cellany on February 11, 2013, 11:29:47 AM
Do you pour leftover cooking grease down the drain?  If so, STOP!  In 40 years I've never had a kitchen drain back up.  My waste grease goes into a plastic sour cream tub (once it has cooled!) and when the tub is full, I just snap on the lid and drop it in the trash.

We put a can in the freezer (large tomato can is a good size). You can pour hot grease directly into it, then put back in freezer. Put in trash when full. 
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: norrina on February 11, 2013, 04:18:13 PM
I somehow eneded up with mice a while back and my landlady blamed it on me having a cat. It was pretty bad for a while., LilacRosey

Isn't it supposed to be the other way around?  You have mice, then you get the cat, then you don't have mice anymore.  Unless your cat is like mine, and thinks mice are fun toys, not tasty snacks.  Anyhow, I've never heard of blaming a mice infestation on a cat.

Well, mice can be attracted to pet food, if it is not properly stored, but it still seems unlikely that a cat's gonna start inviting the neighborhood mice over for parties.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: 2littlemonkeys on February 11, 2013, 04:42:09 PM
So far, we haven't had any major Oopsies (unless you count the time the sewer pipe in the street collapsed, rendering us waterless for two weeks and the hideous yellow paint we nearly painted our kitchen with.  Thank goodness for sample cans!)

But I have a doozie from when I was renting.

I had two roommates and we rented a 3 bedroom apartment.  One of my roommates had the back bedroom and one winter was quite cold and it affected the temperature of her room.  She didn't want to run a heater and decided to sleep on the couch instead.

One day, I was in the bathroom getting ready when I heard a terrific crash and then water dripping in her room.  Thinking one of the cats had knocked a plant over, I went into her room to assess the damage. 

It was way worse than that.

Apparently, the snow was not draining off the roof properly and water had gotten up in the ceiling somehow.  And it eventually all came crashing down onto my roommate's bed.  It's a good think she hadn't been sleeping there!
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 11, 2013, 07:36:06 PM
^ Reminded me of my friend's household disaster.

She was living in a apartment in a subdivided house.  She woke very early one morning to an incredibly loud noise.  Turns out, a drunk driver drove off the road and through her living room, ending up in the bedroom of her neighbours!

No one was seriously hurt, mainly because people kept my friend from getting to the drunk.  ;)  (kidding)

She couldn't go back in for weeks, had no tenant insurance and had to find a new place to live in short order.  The house was torn down.  She lost a lot of stuff.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: lady_disdain on February 11, 2013, 07:51:30 PM
Many years ago, my father built a lovely house near the beach. One of the things he insisted on was a stone wall around the corner lot, made from rough hewn granite. It was beautiful but building it under the hot tropical sun was quite a job. When it was finally done, my father organized a little celebration for the masons, grilling meat and drinking beer in the garden, looking over said wall. Just when things were wrapping up, everyone was proud of themselves and relaxed, a car came speeding down the road, missed the turn and crashed into the brand new wall, tearing a large portion down. Yep, a lot of cursing followed.

The driver had been drunk but fortunately was not hurt. The car, however, didn't survive its headlong encounter with granite. The wall had to be rebuilt.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: VorFemme on February 12, 2013, 09:07:58 AM
Some thirty-odd years ago now, a coworker called in because some drunk in the passenger seat of a pickup (UTE to the Down Under crowd) had managed to crash into several trees & mailboxes coming down the street then into his daughter's car, which went into his his truck which knocked into his wife's station wagon, which came through the front door & wall of their house....that they had just moved back into after fifteen or so years and remodeled (last assignment with the military moved him back to where he'd graduated high school, gotten married, and they had bought their first house). 

He was a big, blond guy who'd played football in high school, twenty-odd years earlier....when he went running out the back door to the drunk's pickup, the drunk decided to wait for the nice policemen as they wouldn't let this angry guy anywhere near him......

It took weeks to get their house put back together - but the wall the vehicle had gone through was the one displaying the souvenirs from the various overseas assignments - most of which were smithereened.  I think it took him three days to get back to work....all three vehicles had been damaged, too.

Drunk's insurance was not happy - the "legal minimum" of coverage did not cover all the damages to vehicles, the house, the mailboxes, the trees, and whatever else the driverless truck had bounced off of from where his brother got out of the driver's seat a few blocks down the road & left the vehicle running.....and the drunk brother or the drunk still in the car managed to knock it into gear to take off down the road with only a drunk belted into the passenger seat to try to figure out what to do to get stopped.....

It was four am, about as safe a time to bounce down a residential street as you could get - nobody was hurt, since the drunk stayed put until the cops got to the scene.  And nobody was in the living room at 4 am, either.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on February 12, 2013, 03:21:35 PM
The last two stories remind me of one from a friend. She is a cop in a big city and was involved in a high speed chase. When she attempted to swerve around a civilian car she lost control and slammed into a parked car fast enough that the parked car took flight and slammed into the wall of the house it was in front of. Thankfully there were no serious injuries and the residents were generously compensated by the city for their trouble.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: LEMon on February 12, 2013, 10:15:09 PM
We learned 'never buy a house from inexperienced do-it-yourselfers'.  Let's see ...

Kitchen floor lineoleum was the twelve by twelve sticky tiles (dirt gets caught in the crevases so it never looked clean).  Guy out to give us an estimate to replace realizes we have five layers of lino, one on top of the other.  Third estimate guy brings up the question of asbestos.  Sure enough asbestos in layer three.  Had to have hazmat suited guys rip it out for us.

Garage door wheels to lift it were hung backward, plus they used thin alumunium strips to prevent the wobble (Didn't work.  Watching that door go up you could see the sway in the long lead to the motor.)

Back shed put on wood planks.  I think ours was holding up part of the fence too.

Fence had lots of plants growing on it - when we went to clean them up, turns out that was what was holding it up.  That and the layers of extra wood just tacked on or leaning up against it.

I'm trying to forget the rest since they weren't as big a mess.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ica171 on February 12, 2013, 11:21:30 PM
We learned 'never buy a house from inexperienced do-it-yourselfers'.  Let's see ...

Kitchen floor lineoleum was the twelve by twelve sticky tiles (dirt gets caught in the crevases so it never looked clean).  Guy out to give us an estimate to replace realizes we have five layers of lino, one on top of the other.  Third estimate guy brings up the question of asbestos.  Sure enough asbestos in layer three.  Had to have hazmat suited guys rip it out for us.

Garage door wheels to lift it were hung backward, plus they used thin alumunium strips to prevent the wobble (Didn't work.  Watching that door go up you could see the sway in the long lead to the motor.)

Back shed put on wood planks.  I think ours was holding up part of the fence too.

Fence had lots of plants growing on it - when we went to clean them up, turns out that was what was holding it up.  That and the layers of extra wood just tacked on or leaning up against it.

I'm trying to forget the rest since they weren't as big a mess.

Well, there's inexperience and there's not caring. People who are inexperienced can find someone who knows what they're doing to help, can read a book, can look online for all kinds of videos and tutorials. People who don't care just do whatever's fastest, easiest and cheapest.   
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: darling on February 13, 2013, 09:40:13 AM
We learned 'never buy a house from inexperienced do-it-yourselfers'.  Let's see ...

Kitchen floor lineoleum was the twelve by twelve sticky tiles (dirt gets caught in the crevases so it never looked clean).  Guy out to give us an estimate to replace realizes we have five layers of lino, one on top of the other.  Third estimate guy brings up the question of asbestos.  Sure enough asbestos in layer three.  Had to have hazmat suited guys rip it out for us.

Garage door wheels to lift it were hung backward, plus they used thin alumunium strips to prevent the wobble (Didn't work.  Watching that door go up you could see the sway in the long lead to the motor.)

Back shed put on wood planks.  I think ours was holding up part of the fence too.

Fence had lots of plants growing on it - when we went to clean them up, turns out that was what was holding it up.  That and the layers of extra wood just tacked on or leaning up against it.

I'm trying to forget the rest since they weren't as big a mess.

Well, there's inexperience and there's not caring. People who are inexperienced can find someone who knows what they're doing to help, can read a book, can look online for all kinds of videos and tutorials. People who don't care just do whatever's fastest, easiest and cheapest.   

You forgot the people who are inexperienced, but won't recognize that they don't know what they are doing, LOL!
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Shalamar on February 13, 2013, 10:10:22 AM
My husband and I often say that the good thing about us is that we're not the least bit handy, and we know it.  Therefore, when we need something done around the house, we hire a professional.  That way it gets done quickly and it gets done well - or, if it's NOT done well, we complain and withhold payment until it's fixed.

I have a co-worker who prides himself on always doing his own house projects.  He took three years to put in his swimming pool because of complications, lack of time, etc.  Last week, his wife wanted something small-ish done (I think she wanted some steps fixed), and she hired a guy to do it.  Co-worker was extremely annoyed, saying "Why didn't she just ask me?"  Everyone at the coffee table said in unison "BECAUSE SHE DIDN'T WANT TO WAIT FOR THREE YEARS!"
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Thipu1 on February 13, 2013, 10:33:07 AM
The pointing incident was the only 'Household Disaster' we've encountered indoors.  However, we have had several outside.  There was the time that a transformer caught fire on one end of our block.  Two weeks later, a transformer on the other end of the block also exploded. It made walking a bit uneasy for a while. 

There was the time when construction was going on further up the block.  We'd been having a lot of rain and it was  a day of thunderstorms when I heard a particularly loud clap around ten in the morning.  When I went out early in the afternoon, I was amazed to find that one wall of a three- story building had collapsed.

 It was like looking into a doll's house.  The kitchen of an apartment was entirely laid open.  From the street you could easily see the table with a table cloth and the calendar on the wall.  It was good that nobody was home and there  were no injuries but the building had to be demolished.

Another was the demise of our tree.  We had a lovely street tree right outside our kitchen window.  In the spring, it had lots of white blossoms, thick green foliage in the summer and brilliant gold leaves in the fall. One morning, after a week of rain, I went to work.  When I returned, the tree had fallen over.  The deities be thanked that it fell up the street instead of falling into the building so no damage was done.

Finally, there was the time after a major snowfall that dumped about two feet on the neighborhood.  While waiting to be plowed out, a water main burst.  however, that's another story.       


Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Zenith on February 13, 2013, 11:13:43 AM
I somehow eneded up with mice a while back and my landlady blamed it on me having a cat. It was pretty bad for a while., LilacRosey

Isn't it supposed to be the other way around?  You have mice, then you get the cat, then you don't have mice anymore.  Unless your cat is like mine, and thinks mice are fun toys, not tasty snacks.  Anyhow, I've never heard of blaming a mice infestation on a cat.

Well, mice can be attracted to pet food, if it is not properly stored, but it still seems unlikely that a cat's gonna start inviting the neighborhood mice over for parties.
You have never met my cat. She brings in stunned, unharmed mice for me to either play with or she feels sorry for me because I don't hunt. She was the sole reason that my old house and the 3 houses surrounding me had a field mice infestation for 4 months one summer. Idiot. Now she's teaching the dog but the dog chases pissed off possums through her doggy door to show me her new 'toy'. The dog's not hurting the possums and the cat actually plays with them, the possums just get pissed off because the dog runs them over in excitement. The possum often comes over for night visits but wisely stays in the front yard away from the dog and the doggy door and gets a few pats from me. Still took 2 midnight 'incidents' for the possum to learn to stay out of the back yard. Possums sound like off key opera singers being tortured to death when they panic. Gets you up real darn fast.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 13, 2013, 11:54:51 AM
My father-in-law and mother-in-law designed their home and were involved in the construction. The house was completed in 1986.

What has not been completed includes: loose wires around the windows (waiting for that security system in the original house design), door frames are not nailed on, base boards are not nailed on, marble window sills are not glued on, the porch was never finished, the walls still have the primer from 1986 and never received the final coat.

Since the house was built, the foundation settled (because FIL buried vegetation behind the house and it has decomposed), and one of the sliding glass doors no longer opens. The house has the original carpet, which was off-white and has been through 2 kids and 3 adults living in it for 26 years. MIL doesn't think they will need to replace the carpet when they sell the house, which they have been talking about for 10 years.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: selkiewoman on February 13, 2013, 12:12:42 PM
My daughter bought an 'owner-built' house.  The roof was not finished properly, so every time it rained, water ran down the INSIDE of the front doorframe (explained why the door fit so poorly.)  The cutoff switch for the airconditioner/heating system was located in the attic space, which could only be accessed through a closet (took them awhile to figure that one out.)  After they moved in, the new lawn and landscaping promptly started dying.  They watered assiduously, it died faster.  Turned out the sprinkler system was hooked up to the hot water.  Oh, and they discovered the gaps in the foundation when morning glory started climbing up the bathroom wall.

The kicker is, the original homeowner is still boasting to everyone who will listen about this triumph of architecture which he built 'with hisown hands.'  It is apparently the crowning achievement of his existence.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 13, 2013, 12:13:45 PM
I can't imagine the bills from heating water for irrigation!
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Hmmmmm on February 13, 2013, 01:25:52 PM
Well, I just cleaned up one of my worse disasters. But on 2 eggs to boil, forgot about them until I heard exploding. Oops.

But it reminded me of another that was a kitchen disaster but not a "cooking" one and would probably fit as well in the house disasters.

We'd had some work done in our home. I started noticing that I would occasionally get a mild shock if I wiped up something from the top with a wet rag.  Happened 3 or 4 times to me but never to DH. I'm always getting a "static electricity" shocks so just thought it had something to do with that.

One afternoon I was cooking a huge pot of chili using a pot with a copper bottom. When the chili was about done, I went to stir with a large metal spoon and not the wooden one I'd been using all day.  The metal spoon hit the bottom of that pot and electricity shot up my arm and the spoon and pot went flying.  I was able to jump up on the counter to keep from getting burned by the hot chili.  DH arrives in the kitchen to a seen of me totally freaking out on the counter, kitchen floor covered in chili and more dripping from the ceiling.

After carrying me out of the kitchen (I was barefooted of course) DH was able to turn off the stove (he was no longer doubting me about being shocked by the stove) clean up most of the chili (we ended up having to repaint the ceiling).  An electrecian came out the next day and we discovered that when they were putting up the crown molding, they somehow nailed through a critical piece of wiring that grounded our stove. 

Even though it's been close to 20 years, I can still feel that electricity shooting up my arm. I'm not sure how someone ever survives a lightening strike.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ica171 on February 22, 2013, 12:10:14 AM
My parents have a super old milkshake/malt maker that is ungrounded. It's the type that has a long rotating metal stick on the main body and a metal cup that hooks onto the main body. You put your ingredients in the cup, stick it on so the metal stick is in the middle of the cup, flip the motor on and move the cup around until your milkshake is done.

At the time, they had a built-in stovetop that had a metal huddee ring around it. I was making a milkshake, one hand on the cup to steady/move it. I moved to rest one hand on the counter and put it on the huddee ring instead. The shock wasn't super strong, but it was enough to blank my mind for a few seconds. Then I realized, oh! I'd better move my hand. It was actually kind of pleasant, but I wouldn't do it again.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: greencat on March 16, 2013, 10:25:59 PM
Weirdly enough, I feel virtually nothing when I get shocked by household voltage.  I do, however, blow the breaker when it happens. 

I am currently trying to figure out how to solve my latest household disaster - anyone know how to get RIT dye out of a bathtub?  Mine is not supposed to be green.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mbbored on March 16, 2013, 11:20:18 PM
Weirdly enough, I feel virtually nothing when I get shocked by household voltage.  I do, however, blow the breaker when it happens. 

I am currently trying to figure out how to solve my latest household disaster - anyone know how to get RIT dye out of a bathtub?  Mine is not supposed to be green.

Something abrasive with bleach?
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on March 16, 2013, 11:21:51 PM
Weirdly enough, I feel virtually nothing when I get shocked by household voltage.  I do, however, blow the breaker when it happens. 

I am currently trying to figure out how to solve my latest household disaster - anyone know how to get RIT dye out of a bathtub?  Mine is not supposed to be green.

Is your tub fiberglass or porcelain?
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: greencat on March 17, 2013, 09:25:24 AM
Weirdly enough, I feel virtually nothing when I get shocked by household voltage.  I do, however, blow the breaker when it happens. 

I am currently trying to figure out how to solve my latest household disaster - anyone know how to get RIT dye out of a bathtub?  Mine is not supposed to be green.

Is your tub fiberglass or porcelain?

Enameled steel.  I'm not entirely sure if the dye has entered microcracks in the enamel or if it is clinging to otherwise invisible hard water stains.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: mmswm on March 17, 2013, 09:28:56 AM
Weirdly enough, I feel virtually nothing when I get shocked by household voltage.  I do, however, blow the breaker when it happens. 

I am currently trying to figure out how to solve my latest household disaster - anyone know how to get RIT dye out of a bathtub?  Mine is not supposed to be green.

Is your tub fiberglass or porcelain?

Enameled steel.  I'm not entirely sure if the dye has entered microcracks in the enamel or if it is clinging to otherwise invisible hard water stains.

I'm out of ideas then.  I'll ask my mother, who's the queen of getting anything clean, next time I talk to her.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: alkira6 on March 17, 2013, 09:57:50 AM
Weirdly enough, I feel virtually nothing when I get shocked by household voltage.  I do, however, blow the breaker when it happens. 

I am currently trying to figure out how to solve my latest household disaster - anyone know how to get RIT dye out of a bathtub?  Mine is not supposed to be green.

Is your tub fiberglass or porcelain?

Enameled steel.  I'm not entirely sure if the dye has entered microcracks in the enamel or if it is clinging to otherwise invisible hard water stains.

I'm out of ideas then.  I'll ask my mother, who's the queen of getting anything clean, next time I talk to her.

Weirdly enough, CLR. It cleaned an old sink that I used for EVERYTHING, including dying.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: rain on March 17, 2013, 11:56:09 AM
barkeeper's friend might work - it shouldn't scratch at all
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: JoW on March 17, 2013, 12:12:31 PM
I second the CLR.  But use their Bath and Kitchen Cleaning spray.  Its detergent-based cleaning spray with acid to remove minerals.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Miss Tickle on March 17, 2013, 12:56:50 PM
Weirdly enough, I feel virtually nothing when I get shocked by household voltage.  I do, however, blow the breaker when it happens. 

I am currently trying to figure out how to solve my latest household disaster - anyone know how to get RIT dye out of a bathtub?  Mine is not supposed to be green.

Is your tub fiberglass or porcelain?

Enameled steel.  I'm not entirely sure if the dye has entered microcracks in the enamel or if it is clinging to otherwise invisible hard water stains.
I have soft water and dye has never stained our 60 year old enamel tub , so I'd bet it's your hard water deposits. Try CLR or a magic eraser?
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: sevenday on March 17, 2013, 01:35:59 PM
heck, try all three. With respectable time between Barkeeper's Friend and CLR.  We have very hard water here, and barkeeper's friend is the ONLY thing that keeps our shower stall clean. Otherwise it looks tan when it's meant to be white! 
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: miritree on March 17, 2013, 04:02:03 PM
Weirdly enough, I feel virtually nothing when I get shocked by household voltage.  I do, however, blow the breaker when it happens. 

I am currently trying to figure out how to solve my latest household disaster - anyone know how to get RIT dye out of a bathtub?  Mine is not supposed to be green.

Have you tried Magic Eraser?
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: JoW on March 17, 2013, 04:21:51 PM
The house I'm in now does not have city water.   The water supply is a well in my side yard.  The water contains a little silt, so all of the water goes through a water filter.   The way a filter works you have a permanent housing and a disposable element that gets changed periodically.   There are valves before and after the filter so the element can be changed easily. 

The builder left out those two valves.   So to change the element you had to drain every bit of water from the house.  Turn off the pump. Turn off the water heater.  Open every tap and let the water run until the pressure tank (30 gallons) is empty and all of the taps stop running.   Then, after you replace the element and turn everything back on you have to let the air out of all the pipes, and you don't have any hot water until the water heater recovers.  Changing the water filter should be a 5-minute job.   The lack of those 2 valves made it 1-hour job.

I had the housing replaced several years ago.  The new one has those 2 valves. 

Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Mediancat on May 14, 2013, 06:55:00 PM
Just saw this thread. I can think of a couple of these in my family. There was the time I was trying to change my (semi-invalid) mother's light bulb and somehow ended up screwing it in so incorrectly that it could be turned in neither direction for fear it would break. Someone got it out, but I have no idea who or how.

Another time, Dad was cleaning the mirror on our medicine cabinet when he pushed it too hard trying to scrub out a particularly stubborn stain and it popped out.

Instinctively, he tried to catch it.

Not what one would call a good idea. We ended up having to go to the emergency room to fix the cut at the base of his thumb, and then take an hour or so when we finally got home to clean up the shattered glass on the bathroom floor.

Rob
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: Amara on June 17, 2013, 09:08:00 AM
Saturday afternoon I put a load of white and off-white clothes into washer only to return to find all of them a not-so-nice dark gray. (Two shirts, a black and a navy, both new and unwashed, had slipped in unnoticed and left their extra dye on everything.) I was devastated. Ruined were two bath mats, a pillowcase, a kitchen towel, and, worse, a white cotton embroidered broomstick skirt and a white button vest that goes with it.

But ... I was able to save it as it turned out. Here's how: Here is what I did after I did the initial wash that blackened the entire load:

(1) Wash in cold water with 1 1/2 cups of bleach.
(2) Wash in cold water with 1 cup of bleach.
(3) Wash in plain cold water.
(4) Wash in plain cold water.
(5) Wash in cold water with laundry detergent.
(6) Wash in plain cold water.
(7) Wash in plain hot water.
(8) Dry in hot dryer.

Everything including the bath mats and skirt, which were dark gray, are white again! They even smell nice. And clean.
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: ladyknight1 on June 17, 2013, 11:05:38 AM
On a non-home related tv program (Tanked), I saw what to do if you spill tea or wine on a white fabric.

1: Have a bucket of soapy water next to you.

2: Beat two eggs and add a beer. Dip the fabric in there and hold it under, swishing it around for a few minutes.

Move to bucket one, and swish, checking every few minutes.

Amazing!
Title: Re: S/O Kitchen Disasters-Household Disasters
Post by: greencat on June 18, 2013, 12:29:41 AM
When I spill something on my clothes when I'm not home, I usually go to the bathroom and get the liquid soap and/or hand sanitizer and apply it liberally to the spot after I blot it. This usually keeps the stain from setting - works well for everything but certain red dyes.