Etiquette Hell

General Etiquette => All In A Day's Work => Topic started by: oceanus on January 24, 2013, 09:26:13 PM

Title: When you overhear two managers complaining about you (UPDATE Post #28)
Post by: oceanus on January 24, 2013, 09:26:13 PM
Susie started her job as an Admin Asst about a month and a half ago at a small company, and she does work for several managers.  For whatever reason(s) there have been several people in and out the door over the past couple of years; i.e., people don’t last long in that position.  That was a red flag, but she needed the job.  Things are not exactly working out, and Susie is already looking for another job.

Yesterday while approaching the office of HR Manager, Susie heard one of the managers and the HR Manager saying negative things about her.  HR Manager said “……….yes, I know, she takes EVERYTHING personally………..”  She stood at the (opened) door a moment, then they saw her and stopped talking.  Susie stepped in, put HR Manager’s mail on her desk, stood there a moment, then asked “Is there a problem I should know about?”  Managers just looked at each other and shook their heads ‘No’.  (From what she overheard, Susie is 100% positive they were talking about .her)  She said “Good, glad all is well” and walked back to her office. 

Today nothing was said about the incident.

My comment to her is that once she heard them, she probably should have cleared her throat to let them know she was approaching.  I don’t think she should have asked or said anything other than maybe “Excuse me, here’s your mail.”  Now Susie is thinking the axe will fall any day (she is still on probation) and she’ll be back collecting unemployment.

Any other thoughts as to what she should have done, and what – if anything – she should do now.


Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: starry diadem on January 25, 2013, 03:09:34 AM
Your comment to her is spot on.  She was very foolish and comes over as aggressive and rather unpleasant to deal with.

But I must admit I had to laugh.  They were talking about someone taking everything personally and she jumps to the conclusion that is was about her?  Way to go in confirming that impression, if indeed they were discussing her. 
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: lady_disdain on January 25, 2013, 06:16:25 AM
Your comment to her is spot on.  She was very foolish and comes over as aggressive and rather unpleasant to deal with.

But I must admit I had to laugh.  They were talking about someone taking everything personally and she jumps to the conclusion that is was about her?  Way to go in confirming that impression, if indeed they were discussing her. 

I have to agree. From what she overheard, nothing was pointing to her directly. The awkward pause would be natural if they discussing any employee and someone came in.

Even if she had been mentioned by name, she mishandled the situation. She should have knocked on the door (even if open, to announce herself) and left the paper. Later, she should have asked for a private chat with one of the two managers and say that she accidentally overheard a phrase when she dropped by that day and how could she improve.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 25, 2013, 08:01:55 AM
Your comment to her is spot on.  She was very foolish and comes over as aggressive and rather unpleasant to deal with.

But I must admit I had to laugh.  They were talking about someone taking everything personally and she jumps to the conclusion that is was about her?  Way to go in confirming that impression, if indeed they were discussing her. 

I have to agree. From what she overheard, nothing was pointing to her directly. The awkward pause would be natural if they discussing any employee and someone came in.

Even if she had been mentioned by name, she mishandled the situation. She should have knocked on the door (even if open, to announce herself) and left the paper. Later, she should have asked for a private chat with one of the two managers and say that she accidentally overheard a phrase when she dropped by that day and how could she improve.

This.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: TootsNYC on January 25, 2013, 09:30:05 AM
Your comment to her is spot on.  She was very foolish and comes over as aggressive and rather unpleasant to deal with.

But I must admit I had to laugh.  They were talking about someone taking everything personally and she jumps to the conclusion that is was about her?  Way to go in confirming that impression, if indeed they were discussing her. 

I have to agree. From what she overheard, nothing was pointing to her directly. The awkward pause would be natural if they discussing any employee and someone came in.


I think you are mistaken.

from the OP:

Yesterday while approaching the office of HR Manager, Susie heard one of the managers and the HR Manager saying negative things about her.  HR Manager said “……….yes, I know, she takes EVERYTHING personally………..”  She stood at the (opened) door a moment, then they saw her and stopped talking . . .  (From what she overheard, Susie is 100% positive they were talking about .her)


Susie overheard more than a single phrase.

But I do agree that confronting it does underline the "she takes things personally / she is looking for offense / dealing with her is a minefield" impression.

For now, Susie should either completely drop it.

Or, go in person and confidentially to the HR manager and say, "I couldn't help but overhear a lot of your conversation. I want very much to have a good work experience here and to be a valuable member of this team. [because she does, even if she leaves; she wants to leave a good impression behind her]
   "I would appreciate any information you can give me that might help me work with the managers more effectively. And if you have any advice for me, I'd welcome that."

And then she needs to seriously think about whether she DOES take things too personally, AND whether there's anything she can do/say to COUNTERACT that impression.

She should also remember that even if she thinks other people are overreacting and reading too much into things, the reality is that they THINK she takes things too personally.

So she needs to do some major PR work. Be cheery and friendly, even to that manager. Bite her lip whenever someone corrects her or whatever, and not show any reaction that's negative.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on January 25, 2013, 09:34:01 AM
If I am discussing an employee with another supervisor, I will pause if anyone approaches.  Did Susie actually hear any identifiers?

I also agree that she handled it poorly.  If I approach someone who is obviously discussing something they don't want me to hear, I act professional, and cheerful, do or say what I need to, and get out of there.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Lynn2000 on January 25, 2013, 10:08:29 AM
This reminds me of a thread from a while ago, where a young woman at a law firm learned that other employees thought less of her because she always wore the same suit every day. She was just starting out and literally owned only this one nice suit, and thought she was being responsible by not spending a lot of money on her wardrobe. I can't remember now if she overheard two employees talking about her, or if one of them said something to her directly. Anyway, one of the most insightful comments I read said that, even though the message might have been delivered rudely, in a sense they were doing her a favor by telling her something she could improve (and people had lots of ideas for finding nice-looking but cheap suits, or making one outfit look like many). In other words, that she shouldn't get so upset about the method of delivery that she missed the point of the message and shot herself in the foot by refusing to change.

I think the same could apply to Susie. Now's her opportunity to change something that colleagues obviously find unprofessional about her. Maybe the way she learned about it was less than ideal, but she could make the best of it by trying to figure out what they meant and improve it.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: DavidH on January 25, 2013, 12:02:14 PM
As others have said, a better plan would have been to knock even if the door was open and pretend she'd never heard the prior conversation. 

Since she is convinced this is about her, I'd suggest taking the feedback to heart and working on it.  As a manager, it's much easier to give positive feedback or none at all than to be critical.  If a manager doesn't care or has decided to fire the person, they may not even bother.

If someone takes the time to give negative feedback, it is worth taking a deep breath, thinking about whether or not you agree, accepting that the other person believe it whether or not you do, and then either asking how you might improve or coming up with ideas on your own (general you, not specific). 

I think TootsNYC's phrasing and ideas are a great way to move forward and try to make lemonade out of lemons in this case.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Moray on January 25, 2013, 12:06:35 PM
Obviously, the managers should have picked a more private place for their discussion, but the OP almost makes it sound like Susie was eavesdropping for a bit before making her presence known. I agree fully with the others that she handled it poorly and only reinforced negative perceptions of herself. Might be a good time for some introspection on her part.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Em-and-Em on January 25, 2013, 12:15:52 PM
I agree with DavidH, the best thing for Susie to have done is pretend she never heard this conversation.

That way, the managers now have the choice of what to do in this situation.  If they were truly talking about here, they can either:  decide that since Susie overheard them, this is a perfect opportunity to talk to her about the issue; or, if it was just a off-handed gossipy aside, not bring it up again since it wasn't important to begin with.

I'm of the mind that it is always rude to jump into a conversation you know you're not included in, regardless of the subject matter.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: oceanus on January 25, 2013, 12:34:39 PM
OP here.
The way it was relayed to me, there is no doubt they were discussing her.  She said the one manager was talking specifically about his interaction with her earlier that day.   She overheard more than one phrase, and they were not talking in low tones.

What I don’t like about Susie’s question and comment to them is that it comes off as “Aha!  I caught you.  I know you were talking about me.”   The “Good.  Glad all is well” remark comes off as a bit smart-alecky.

I asked if she has ever been spoken to directly about performance deficiencies and she said she has made some mistakes.  The main problem seems to be that there was quite a backlog of work piled up because the position had been vacant for a couple of months.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Fleur on January 25, 2013, 12:44:08 PM

Susie certainly mishandled the situaton, and shot herself in the foot (possibly) when it comes to getting past the probationary period of that job. That said, I don't think anyone comes out of this smelling like roses: the managers were rather unprofessional to talk so loudly about employee performance. And I can also understand Susie's frustration if she is expected to do a great deal because they had problems filling the vacancy. I don't think that the firm is entirely in the right, not Susie entirely in the wrong.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: bah12 on January 25, 2013, 01:51:47 PM
So, he heard them mention her by name, or talked about specific instances that she was involved in that no one else could have been involved in?

Either way, she did mishandle the situation.  I don't think it was wise to confront them in the manner that she did.  Not saying that her managers shouldn't have been a lot more discreet and professional when discussing employees, but Suzie put them on the spot...and that's not good to do to your own managers, especially when under probation.  I honestly don't know that there is anything she can (or should) do about it now.   Since she doesn't see a future there anyway, if I were her, I would continue with my job search and just let the cards fall where they may with this particular company.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: oceanus on January 25, 2013, 02:13:28 PM
Quote
So, he heard them mention her by name, or talked about specific instances that she was involved in that no one else could have been involved in?

Yes.

Quote
I honestly don't know that there is anything she can (or should) do about it now.   Since she doesn't see a future there anyway, if I were her, I would continue with my job search and just let the cards fall where they may with this particular company.

I agree.

I don’t see a “what can I do to improve?” meeting as accomplishing anything. 

I think it’s time to go into “cut my losses” mode.  Continue to go in, do as much work as is reasonable and possible, be civil and professional.  If things get worse and she is actually terminated, she should keep her emotions in check, not get defensive and accusatory, and immediately refile for unemployment benefits (unless or until she finds another job).
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Sirius on January 25, 2013, 03:52:26 PM
Depends on what they're complaining about.  If they're complaining that I do such a good job I'm making them redundant, I take it as praise.  If they're complaining about the way I wear my hair or the tonal quality of my speech, I'd ignore it.  If they're complaining about something that I really am doing wrong, I'd approach it that way:  "I heard you say that you're tired of correcting the mistakes in my paperwork.  Exactly what am I doing wrong, and what can I do to fix it?"  Or words to that effect.  This has two results:  It shows that you're serious about doing a good job, and it also shows them that they should talk to you directly in the future instead of griping behind your back.

That, of course, is in a perfect world.  We all know that in real life it doesn't always happen that way. 
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: cheyne on January 26, 2013, 08:13:19 AM
First, these sound like horribly unprofessional HR managers.  I'm not in HR but am a manager and would not discuss an employee's performance or personal issues with the door open. No wonder the position is a revolving door. 

I will agree that Susie should have knocked on the [open] door.  It gives the appearance of her just arriving in the area and allows the managers to save face and at least question whether Susie heard them or not. 

I know I am an odd duck, but if I were this HR manager and Susie asked me "Is there a problem I should know about?" and we had been discussing her, I would have sat her down right there and told her the issue.  I hate behind-the-back-cloak-and-dagger stuff and like to have things out in the open.  I can't expect someone to improve their performance if they don't know there is a problem.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Fleur on January 26, 2013, 11:48:55 AM
First, these sound like horribly unprofessional HR managers.  I'm not in HR but am a manager and would not discuss an employee's performance or personal issues with the door open. No wonder the position is a revolving door. 

I will agree that Susie should have knocked on the [open] door.  It gives the appearance of her just arriving in the area and allows the managers to save face and at least question whether Susie heard them or not. 

I know I am an odd duck, but if I were this HR manager and Susie asked me "Is there a problem I should know about?" and we had been discussing her, I would have sat her down right there and told her the issue.  I hate behind-the-back-cloak-and-dagger stuff and like to have things out in the open.  I can't expect someone to improve their performance if they don't know there is a problem.
POD. Very well put.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Zilla on January 26, 2013, 11:56:03 AM
I would take the criticism to heart and try to be different in her work habits.  What's interesting is that the very comment of taking everything so personally, she just did exactly that by asking if there is a problem.  She proved their point beautifully and probably will be used as an example as to demonstrate what her issues are.
She should have simply knocked or cleared her throat and delivered the mail and left.  And thought long and hard on what she can do differently.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: NyaChan on January 26, 2013, 01:18:17 PM
First, these sound like horribly unprofessional HR managers.  I'm not in HR but am a manager and would not discuss an employee's performance or personal issues with the door open. No wonder the position is a revolving door. 

I will agree that Susie should have knocked on the [open] door.  It gives the appearance of her just arriving in the area and allows the managers to save face and at least question whether Susie heard them or not. 

I know I am an odd duck, but if I were this HR manager and Susie asked me "Is there a problem I should know about?" and we had been discussing her, I would have sat her down right there and told her the issue.  I hate behind-the-back-cloak-and-dagger stuff and like to have things out in the open.  I can't expect someone to improve their performance if they don't know there is a problem.
POD. Very well put.

I'm kind of on this side as well - I don't think it was necessarily wrong of her, once it was obvious that she had heard, to ask if there was something she needed to know.  In my opinion, that shows her willingness to talk things out, to face problems, and as long as her tone of voice wasn't confrontational, it could show a willingness to hear and take the criticism to heart.  If they were talking about her, the managers should have grown up and addressed it either then, or later.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Seiryuu on January 26, 2013, 02:03:36 PM
I feel that she could've done more than knock by moving back a few feet and conspicuously clicked her shoes (whatever they may be) to make a lot of sound and let the managers know someone was coming. If that wasn't possible (not enough sound) she could have faked a phone call.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: oceanus on January 26, 2013, 04:56:46 PM
Another thing she could have done (and none of us mentioned it) is to have backed up, walked away, and come back later to deliver the mail.   In other words, not let them know she heard them

As far as her proving them right re: the criticism that she takes everything personally – well, they WERE talking about her, and the remarks were negative.  How was she supposed to take it?  ???

I also think they just don’t like her (for whatever reasons) and they want her gone.  Otherwise, later that day or the next day she would have been called in and spoken to about specific performance problems and she would have a chance to improve.  It doesn’t look like that is going to happen.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Zilla on January 26, 2013, 05:10:34 PM
Another thing she could have done (and none of us mentioned it) is to have backed up, walked away, and come back later to deliver the mail.   In other words, not let them know she heard them

As far as her proving them right re: the criticism that she takes everything personally – well, they WERE talking about her, and the remarks were negative.  How was she supposed to take it?  ???

I also think they just don’t like her (for whatever reasons) and they want her gone.  Otherwise, later that day or the next day she would have been called in and spoken to about specific performance problems and she would have a chance to improve.  It doesn’t look like that is going to happen.
Certainly not by eavesdropping and then confronting them vaguely by asking if there is a problem with her.  I am not saying she did it on purpose but you definitely don't confront them as she did and prove their very complaint.  You instead make an appointment with the boss privately and ask how to better improve.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: bonyk on January 26, 2013, 05:11:58 PM
I'm kind of on this side as well - I don't think it was necessarily wrong of her, once it was obvious that she had heard, to ask if there was something she needed to know.  In my opinion, that shows her willingness to talk things out, to face problems, and as long as her tone of voice wasn't confrontational, it could show a willingness to hear and take the criticism to heart.  If they were talking about her, the managers should have grown up and addressed it either then, or later.

I agree with this.  Susie sounds proactive in trying to address the managers' issue.  I think they come off as the inappropriate ones.  Unfortunately, that won't help Susie keep her job.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: oceanus on January 26, 2013, 05:25:38 PM
Another thing she could have done (and none of us mentioned it) is to have backed up, walked away, and come back later to deliver the mail.   In other words, not let them know she heard them

As far as her proving them right re: the criticism that she takes everything personally – well, they WERE talking about her, and the remarks were negative.  How was she supposed to take it?  ???

I also think they just don’t like her (for whatever reasons) and they want her gone.  Otherwise, later that day or the next day she would have been called in and spoken to about specific performance problems and she would have a chance to improve.  It doesn’t look like that is going to happen.
Certainly not by eavesdropping and then confronting them vaguely by asking if there is a problem with her.  I am not saying she did it on purpose but you definitely don't confront them as she did and prove their very complaint.  You instead make an appointment with the boss privately and ask how to better improve.

Again, one of the complaints was that she takes things too personally.

I'm confused here - I'm not asking what she should NOT have done; we've discussied that.

What I'm asking is how should she have taken it (the negative remarks)?   Impersonally? As a compliment? ??? ???

Quote
Susie sounds proactive in trying to address the managers' issue.  I think they come off as the inappropriate ones.  Unfortunately, that won't help Susie keep her job.

I think they are ticked of 1) that she heard them 2) that she let them know she heard them.  This will most likely escalate whatever adverse action is brewing (and imo that's definitely happening).
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Zilla on January 26, 2013, 05:44:20 PM
Another thing she could have done (and none of us mentioned it) is to have backed up, walked away, and come back later to deliver the mail.   In other words, not let them know she heard them

As far as her proving them right re: the criticism that she takes everything personally – well, they WERE talking about her, and the remarks were negative.  How was she supposed to take it?  ???

I also think they just don’t like her (for whatever reasons) and they want her gone.  Otherwise, later that day or the next day she would have been called in and spoken to about specific performance problems and she would have a chance to improve.  It doesn’t look like that is going to happen.
Certainly not by eavesdropping and then confronting them vaguely by asking if there is a problem with her.  I am not saying she did it on purpose but you definitely don't confront them as she did and prove their very complaint.  You instead make an appointment with the boss privately and ask how to better improve.

Again, one of the complaints was that she takes things too personally.

I'm confused here - I'm not asking what she should NOT have done; we've discussied that.

What I'm asking is how should she have taken it (the negative remarks)?   Impersonally? As a compliment? ??? ???

In my original post I said she should have taken it to heart and examine her own actions and think about if she is indeed taking everything too personally.  That isn't a trait that is professional and there might or might not be a grain of truth to it.  In the end, these weren't mere coworkers, but her bosses.  They do have a right to discuss her and wonder if perhaps it's only one of them that notices this.  It's very unfortunate that she overheard them. 
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: Amara on January 26, 2013, 06:00:07 PM
In one way, Zilla, I think you are right when you say it was unfortunate she overheard them. It likely won't help her keep her job even if she changes her approach and her attitude. However, the good part is that if she is willing she can take some lessons from this incident, channel them productively, and go into her next job, hopefully one with a genuine future at a good company, and emerge with a high level of professionalism. Lemons into lemonade.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: cross_patch on January 26, 2013, 07:11:47 PM
Another thing she could have done (and none of us mentioned it) is to have backed up, walked away, and come back later to deliver the mail.   In other words, not let them know she heard them

As far as her proving them right re: the criticism that she takes everything personally – well, they WERE talking about her, and the remarks were negative.  How was she supposed to take it?  ???

I also think they just don’t like her (for whatever reasons) and they want her gone.  Otherwise, later that day or the next day she would have been called in and spoken to about specific performance problems and she would have a chance to improve.  It doesn’t look like that is going to happen.
Certainly not by eavesdropping and then confronting them vaguely by asking if there is a problem with her.  I am not saying she did it on purpose but you definitely don't confront them as she did and prove their very complaint.  You instead make an appointment with the boss privately and ask how to better improve.

Again, one of the complaints was that she takes things too personally.

I'm confused here - I'm not asking what she should NOT have done; we've discussied that.

What I'm asking is how should she have taken it (the negative remarks)?   Impersonally? As a compliment? ??? ???

In my original post I said she should have taken it to heart and examine her own actions and think about if she is indeed taking everything too personally.  That isn't a trait that is professional and there might or might not be a grain of truth to it.  In the end, these weren't mere coworkers, but her bosses.  They do have a right to discuss her and wonder if perhaps it's only one of them that notices this.  It's very unfortunate that she overheard them.

I agree with zilla. I think she could still have taken on board the comments and adjusted her behaviour accordingly, without being confrontational and further confirming their idea of her as over sensitive.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you
Post by: DavidH on February 01, 2013, 01:23:59 PM
Personally may not be the best word, since as you point out, they aren't meant about employees in general.  I think that when they say personally, what they mean is either she gets defensive or offended to the point where the opportunity for a discussion about how to improve is lost.

For example, if someone says that a report is sloppy, taking it to mean you're sloppy and responding along the lines of no, I'm not sloppy, I am always careful or no, it's great, I don't know how you can say that would be examples of what I would call taking it personally.  A better approach would be to say, I'm sorry that it wasn't what you wanted, can you give me some examples of things that need revision and how you'd like them revised. That opens up a conversation along the lines of this wasn't spell checked, I think some of the wording is awkward, etc. 

Another example might be if someone says you take feedback badly.  If the response is no I don't or I can't believe you'd think that one might refer to it as taking it personally even though it's not the best word.  A better response would be, I'm sorry I gave that impression, I do value your feedback.  Can you give me examples so that I will have the opportunity to improve.  If you honestly believe the comment isn't justified, you could add, I do value your feedback and do my best to take action on it, for example, when you told me XYZ, I did ABC to improve. 

In this case, if she absolutely felt that she had to respond, she could have said, "I couldn't help but overhearing the end of your coversation and am sorry to hear that you think I take things too personally.  Can we set up some time to talk through some examples and ways I might improve".  Although she would have to admit to overhearing the conversation, at least it states a willingness to change.   
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you (UPDATE)
Post by: oceanus on February 01, 2013, 04:31:24 PM
Well, the axe fell.

I received an email.  Yesterday morning Susie was called into the conference room.  HR manager and also the Executive Director were there.  She said HR manager said things aren’t working out, that it took her too long to complete tasks, and also said several people had complained about her defensive attitude.  Executive Director nodded and said it boiled down to Susie not having the skill set they needed for the job.

Susie said she felt the backlog of work and lack of basic training  (instructions) contributed to her inability to complete tasks in a timely manner.  She also mentioned the incident where she had heard negative comments about her, and that upon asking she had been told nothing was wrong.  This seemed to irritate HR manager, who said something along the lines of “not seeing any point in dredging up last week”.  She was asked for her keys and was told she would be paid thru the end of the day.  She was given a termination letter which didn’t state the reasons – just explained her pay and the termination of benefits.

She said she’s refiled for unemployment and also that she intends to (re)register next week with a temp agency that she worked with a while back, and of course continue to look for another job.


Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you (UPDATE Post #28)
Post by: Scuba_Dog on February 02, 2013, 08:07:12 PM
I'm sorry your friend lost her job.  Aside from the reasons it may of happened, it's still a difficult thing to have happen.

I hope she will find new employment soon.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you (UPDATE Post #28)
Post by: cheyne on February 03, 2013, 12:39:05 AM
I am sorry Susie lost a job, but not this job.  So management was sub par, expected her to work miracles and didn't like her personality?  It sounds like a miserable job TBH, she's better off not being there.

I love how the HR manager tried to cover her own butt, what an unprofessional piece of work.

I am sure that Susie will find a better job.

Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you (UPDATE Post #28)
Post by: Fleur on February 03, 2013, 04:56:36 AM
I am sorry Susie lost a job, but not this job.  So management was sub par, expected her to work miracles and didn't like her personality?  It sounds like a miserable job TBH, she's better off not being there.

I love how the HR manager tried to cover her own butt, what an unprofessional piece of work.

I am sure that Susie will find a better job.

I agree. I actually think that management were super unprofessional. No wonder the position was a revolving door!
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you (UPDATE Post #28)
Post by: TinyVulgarUnicorn on February 03, 2013, 03:38:45 PM
If I was your friend I'd consider it a blessing in disguise.  Not only was management expecting your friend to be a mind reader, she somehow needed to pull a miracle out of her you-know-what with little training.  Yeahhhh.....good luck with that....
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you (UPDATE Post #28)
Post by: oceanus on February 03, 2013, 03:54:14 PM
Quote
I love how the HR manager tried to cover her own butt, what an unprofessional piece of work.

Yeah, I agree.
"Let's not dredge up last week".  Indeed.   ::)
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you (UPDATE Post #28)
Post by: Girlie on February 06, 2013, 12:07:26 PM
The very BEST managers to work under are the ones who see a problem, pull you aside to discuss it privately right then and there, and then let it go.
Hanging a problem over an employee's head, talking about the employee behind their back (conversations about an employee between managers should always be behind CLOSED doors), and not making expectations and instructions explicitly clear are all terribly ineffective management styles and can create a tense, unstable and miserable working environment.
While I'm sorry your friend lost her job, I have to agree with PPs who have said it might be a blessing in disguise.
Title: Re: When you overhear two managers complaining about you (UPDATE Post #28)
Post by: Minmom3 on February 06, 2013, 01:22:12 PM
Not very deep disguise, either!