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Hostesses With The Mostest => Recipe Requests => Topic started by: stitchygreyanonymouse on March 12, 2013, 08:16:04 AM

Title: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on March 12, 2013, 08:16:04 AM
On the time-vacuum that is Pinterest, I keep seeing a pin for crock pot bread. It is from a blog post on the people who wrote the * Bread in 5 Minutes a Day.

This isn’t so much a recipe request as a question: has anyone actually made their bread—particularly the basic recipe (either the original or whole wheat)? Is it any good?

Is it really as simple as they make it sound (pour ingredients into bowl, stir, let sit, refrigerate until needed, make a ball, bake)?

I want to try, but my experience with yeast-y things comprises a single attempt at helping my grandmother make bread about 20 years ago, where by helping, I mean I just watched her do it all, providing a bit of manual labor as needed.

I like the crockpot idea, though, because we don’t have an oven in the house.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Zilla on March 12, 2013, 08:20:18 AM
I've made the Dutch oven artisan bread and its that easy and delicious.  But I've never seen the crockpot version.  I can't see it being hot enough.  link?
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on March 12, 2013, 08:44:52 AM
www.artisanbreadinfive.com/2012/05/29/crock-pot-bread-baking-fast-bread-in-a-slow-cooker

They use their basic recipe from the book (so I’m mostly curious if the recipe is tasty and worth making… worst case scenario, I can take it over to my SO’s parents’ and bake it there if really needed) and claim it works out okay, with the caveat that it needs a few min in the oven to crisp up the crust (I think my toaster oven will suffice for that, just probably not the whole baking process)
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Zilla on March 12, 2013, 09:08:37 AM
Go for it, I like how they are truthful it's not browned.  it sounds like it would work.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: ITSJUSTME on March 12, 2013, 11:07:36 AM
I use a similar method - I mix my bread ingredients, usually for a single loaf, then put the dough into a sturdy plastic bag which I have oiled inside or sprayed with cooking spray to prevent sticking.  I don't even knead the dough before I put it in the bag.  Every once in a while I pick up the bag and squeeze the dough several times.  I stick this in the fridge and leave it there three or four days before baking.  The dough gets nicely rice and flavorful.  When it's time to bake I take it out of the fridge and let it warm up to room temp for a little while before shaping and baking.  Very easy and the yeast always rises (I usually use a very small amount of yeast due to the long fermentation time).

I would love to try the multi-loaf recipe but my fridge is not large enough to store a large container of dough for that long so I just do it a loaf at a time.  Remember to allow a few days in the fridge for the dough to ripen.

I will definitely give the crock pot method and try and see how it works.  I say go for it.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: NyaChan on March 12, 2013, 02:22:32 PM
I've made the Dutch oven artisan bread and its that easy and delicious.  But I've never seen the crockpot version.  I can't see it being hot enough.  link?

Zilla, would you be willing to post your recipe?  I haven't made bread in a while, so my fingers are itching :)
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Zilla on March 12, 2013, 03:08:37 PM
http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/2009/03/11/baking-bread-in-a-dutch-oven


It's the same dough recipe in the OP only in the dutch oven.  One trick I learned is that the best bread internal temp (taken with a meat thermometer) is 200 degrees.  So take the temps close to the end to check for doneness.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Just Lori on March 12, 2013, 03:22:49 PM
I like to make a basic white bread loaf.  It's ridiculously easy, although you need to be home for about three hours to wait out the rising times.  My biggest concern with white bread is that we scarf it down like children who haven't eaten for several days.  It's quite addictive.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: magician5 on March 13, 2013, 06:05:03 AM
When the "no-knead bread" recipe first became popular, the recommended rising time (using a teensy 1/4 teaspoon of yeast) was 14 to 20 hours rising time covered in a bowl on your counter (I find the top of my refrigerator to be ideal).

The flavor that develops is marvelous: complex, deeply satisfying, real REAL bread. I can't see how 3 hours in the refrigerator would do as well. Of course you don't have to be home all that time - it's "stir it together and forget it" bread!

I bake in a dutch oven and I would like to know how anyone experienced in this method gets a crust a little easier to cut.

And I'll have to look up the recipe for "crockpot bread", it looks interesting.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Zilla on March 13, 2013, 08:14:13 AM
When the "no-knead bread" recipe first became popular, the recommended rising time (using a teensy 1/4 teaspoon of yeast) was 14 to 20 hours rising time covered in a bowl on your counter (I find the top of my refrigerator to be ideal).

The flavor that develops is marvelous: complex, deeply satisfying, real REAL bread. I canbju't see how 3 hours in the refrigerator would do as well. Of course you don't have to be home all that time - it's "stir it together and forget it" bread!

I bake in a dutch oven and I would like to know how anyone experienced in this method gets a crust a little easier to cut.

And I'll have to look up the recipe for "crockpot bread", it looks interesting.

The 3 hour one I do at room temp and uses alot more yeast than the original one you mentioned.  As for the crust in Dutch oven, what do you mean easier to cut?  Mine is crusty and cuts fine with a bread knife.  I've also done it with a touch of water in the dutch oven so it steams.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: blarg314 on March 13, 2013, 08:17:44 PM
When the "no-knead bread" recipe first became popular, the recommended rising time (using a teensy 1/4 teaspoon of yeast) was 14 to 20 hours rising time covered in a bowl on your counter (I find the top of my refrigerator to be ideal).

The flavor that develops is marvelous: complex, deeply satisfying, real REAL bread. I canbju't see how 3 hours in the refrigerator would do as well. Of course you don't have to be home all that time - it's "stir it together and forget it" bread!

I bake in a dutch oven and I would like to know how anyone experienced in this method gets a crust a little easier to cut.

And I'll have to look up the recipe for "crockpot bread", it looks interesting.

The 3 hour one I do at room temp and uses alot more yeast than the original one you mentioned.  As for the crust in Dutch oven, what do you mean easier to cut?  Mine is crusty and cuts fine with a bread knife.  I've also done it with a touch of water in the dutch oven so it steams.

3 hours at room temperature with lots of yeast sounds like a standard bread recipe, which involves the usual kneading. The no-knead breads have long rising times, less yeast, and little kneading (the long rise produces the same re-arrangement of gluten molecules as the kneading does, and it goes more slowly because the yeast takes more time to produce its effect).

As an aside - I had previous noticed that in older books people talk about setting the bread to rise before going to bed, and baking the bread in the morning. That makes sense if they were making bread with less yeast.

Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: CakeBeret on March 13, 2013, 09:45:32 PM
http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/2009/03/11/baking-bread-in-a-dutch-oven


It's the same dough recipe in the OP only in the dutch oven.  One trick I learned is that the best bread internal temp (taken with a meat thermometer) is 200 degrees.  So take the temps close to the end to check for doneness.

I always bake my bread to an internal temperature of 180 degrees and it's always fully cooked.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: marcel on March 13, 2013, 10:29:24 PM
It is a little bit different from the OP, but when I make bread, I usualy go for soda breads. There is no simpler bread, you do not even have to let it sit to rise, you can have fresh bread 1 hour after you decide to make bread.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: magician5 on March 13, 2013, 11:06:33 PM
The 3 hour one I do at room temp and uses alot more yeast than the original one you mentioned.  As for the crust in Dutch oven, what do you mean easier to cut?  Mine is crusty and cuts fine with a bread knife.  I've also done it with a touch of water in the dutch oven so it steams.

When I've done it, it almost takes a chainsaw to get through the crust (especially when adding a bit of water to the oven for steam) - I'm tempted to do the same recipe in the crockpot as you folks have suggested, and see what happens.

Regarding the yeast: 16 hours at room temperature and a teensy bit of yeast multiplies itself wonderfully, ferments for hours, and creates a fabulous beery yeast flavor. You might want to see http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html?_r=0
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Nikko-chan on March 14, 2013, 01:29:19 AM
I used the recipe, only i baked it in the oven.... and forgot to put a pan of water in with it *headdesk* However I will let you know my results when it cools and I can taste it.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: jpcher on March 14, 2013, 04:52:58 PM
It is a little bit different from the OP, but when I make bread, I usualy go for soda breads. There is no simpler bread, you do not even have to let it sit to rise, you can have fresh bread 1 hour after you decide to make bread.

Would you please post a recipe?

Thanks.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Nikko-chan on March 21, 2013, 09:17:25 PM
I used the recipe, only i baked it in the oven.... and forgot to put a pan of water in with it *headdesk* However I will let you know my results when it cools and I can taste it.

I forgot to let y'all know what happened. It was hard as a rock on the outside, but chewy goodness on the inside... next time I will remember that pot of water in the bottom of the oven!
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on March 22, 2013, 08:35:28 AM
I made the dough last night, but it wasn’t nearly as wet as the pictures on their website (in fact, I had to add another half cup of water, because it was so dry, I couldn’t incorporate all the flour at first, and I know I measured the flour properly). It also didn’t seem to rise very well in the two hours I had it on the counter.

I stuck it in the fridge overnight, and it did seem to have risen a bit more when I looked this morning. I think I’ll try to bake some tomorrow, perhaps. I’ll let you know how it goes.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Zilla on March 22, 2013, 09:02:16 AM
I made the dough last night, but it wasn’t nearly as wet as the pictures on their website (in fact, I had to add another half cup of water, because it was so dry, I couldn’t incorporate all the flour at first, and I know I measured the flour properly). It also didn’t seem to rise very well in the two hours I had it on the counter.

I stuck it in the fridge overnight, and it did seem to have risen a bit more when I looked this morning. I think I’ll try to bake some tomorrow, perhaps. I’ll let you know how it goes.

The flour in bread recipes are an estimate. you might use more or less.  it sounds like your flour had humidity or you packed the flour too densely. I dump half the flour into a gallon sized baggie and fluff it by rotating the bag.  then I scoop lightly keeping the fluffiness.  As for rising, did yoy proof the yeast?  and inside a warm draft free area?  I turn on the light in my oven and let it rise by the heat of the bulb.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on March 22, 2013, 09:25:16 AM
I’m not sure what "proof the yeast" means.

I just followed the recipe on their site (http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/2010/02/09/back-to-basics-tips-and-techniques-to-create-a-great-loaf-in-5-minutes-a-day), using Active-Dry yeast (because that is what the store had), but with a bit of extra water. They have a video somewhere on the site or their Youtube channel that addresses scooping and measuring the flour, which I followed.

It’s completely plausible that my flour has seen humidity… I bake and cook so little that it has been sitting in the pantry for about 8 months.

ETA: I poked around their site a bit more this morning. Their FAQs mention that certain flours need more water, including the King Arthur I used (but only 1/4 cup, not the half I added which still didn’t bring it to the pictured consistency). If the bread doesn’t bake well, perhaps I’ll try again with newly purchased flour and the guidelines on the FAQ
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Zilla on March 22, 2013, 09:44:53 AM
I’m not sure what "proof the yeast" means.

I just followed the recipe on their site (http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/2010/02/09/back-to-basics-tips-and-techniques-to-create-a-great-loaf-in-5-minutes-a-day (http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/2010/02/09/back-to-basics-tips-and-techniques-to-create-a-great-loaf-in-5-minutes-a-day)), using Active-Dry yeast (because that is what the store had), but with a bit of extra water. They have a video somewhere on the site or their Youtube channel that addresses scooping and measuring the flour, which I followed.

It’s completely plausible that my flour has seen humidity… I bake and cook so little that it has been sitting in the pantry for about 8 months.

ETA: I poked around their site a bit more this morning. Their FAQs mention that certain flours need more water, including the King Arthur I used (but only 1/4 cup, not the half I added which still didn’t bring it to the pictured consistency). If the bread doesn’t bake well, perhaps I’ll try again with newly purchased flour and the guidelines on the FAQ


You can proof the yeast in the recipe specified warm water beforehand for 10 minutes.  It should be creamy and frothy and emitting a yeasty scent.  If it isn't, then the yeast isn't good.  I have had this happen to me many times with a brand new yeast packet/container.


Bread recipes, it's better to stick with the exact water but lessen the flour.  Recipes that call for 4 1/2 cups, I have used 3 1/2 cups to 5 cups depending on the weather, day etc.  So I would put in 3 cups and stir and then add a tad more flour in 1/2 cup intervals stirring after each one to gauge the wetness/doughiness.  In your recipe, you want it sticky and shaggy.  When you stir it it should remain formed but stringy.  But when you tilt the bowl, it shouldn't move or pour out.


ETA I see the recipe calls for 6 1/2 cups, start with 5.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Sophia on March 22, 2013, 09:50:18 AM
Do you have a kitchen scale?  Flour is best weighed.  It is amazing the differences even the same cook using the same technique with the same flour will have.  An experienced cook can use a cup because they can adjust things as they go along based on the consistency.  Newbies can't.  You can find conversions online. 
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on March 22, 2013, 09:54:30 AM
Ok, I follow you now. My yeast was in the water for about 5 min. before I added the flour, and it was bubbling a bit and smelling yeasty, so I think it was fine.

I’ll try the less flour to recommended water way next time I make it.

Thanks!

Further reading about bread-making in general (I’m a pro at procrastination), makes me think that 2 hours in my house wasn’t going to cut it anyhow… we keep our thermostat at 62. On the bright side, I have read that the bread should continue to rise in the fridge, just slowly, so I’ll just leave it alone and let it do its own thing for a day or two.

Sophia—no scale. I really don’t want to get into crazy bread making, which is why this bread in five min. a day thing appeals.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: Zilla on March 22, 2013, 09:57:49 AM
Ok, I follow you now. My yeast was in the water for about 5 min. before I added the flour, and it was bubbling a bit and smelling yeasty, so I think it was fine.

I’ll try the less flour to recommended water way next time I make it.

Thanks!

Further reading about bread-making in general (I’m a pro at procrastination), makes me think that 2 hours in my house wasn’t going to cut it anyhow… we keep our thermostat at 62. On the bright side, I have read that the bread should continue to rise in the fridge, just slowly, so I’ll just leave it alone and let it do its own thing for a day or two.

Sophia—no scale. I really don’t want to get into crazy bread making, which is why this bread in five min. a day thing appeals.


Yep, cold house-no rising. :)  I keep my house colder too.  I turn on the oven for a few minutes  on 300, turn it off.  Then leave the light on.  It seem to be a perfect rising temp for those 2 hours before the fridge.  The room temperature rising will develop the larger gas bubbles which will "knead" the bread internally and give it a airier texture. 
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on March 25, 2013, 10:43:38 AM
First baking—resounding failure.  It was really dense and clearly hadn’t properly risen (but tasted okay otherwise, so at least I know the recipe is worth making again).

The next batch of dough I make, I’ll see if I can get the toaster oven to hold a low temp for better rising before I refrigerate it.
Title: Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
Post by: CakeBeret on March 25, 2013, 12:56:13 PM
I tried the 5-minutes-a-day artisan bread over the weekend. I accidentally let the dough sit out overnight Saturday before refrigerating it. I made a loaf Sunday night and it was lovely. The crust was a little thick for my preference, but the interior was soft and fluffy, and it had a bit of a sourdough-like tang. My husband and our roommate are very excited about the prospect of having fresh bread four nights a week. :)

Stitchygrey, did you proof your yeast before using it? I don't think the recipe said to, but I always do to make sure my yeast is active. When I want something to rise nicely and promptly, I turn my oven on to 350 for one minute only, then shut it off and put the dough inside. It makes a good warm environment to foster rising.