Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Time For a Coffee Break! => Topic started by: reflection5 on March 31, 2013, 11:14:24 AM

Title: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on March 31, 2013, 11:14:24 AM
There’s thrifty, or frugal, which is fine.  Nothing wrong with saving money or getting something for a reduced price or even free.  But then there are situations which cross the line into cheapskate territory.  (I want to make it clear that I’m not making fun of people who can’t afford (whatever) or people who are struggling and going thru tough times, so let’s not go there.)

I saw a TV show last year called “Extreme Cheapskates”.  I don’t know anyone that extreme, but I have a story:

Soy sauce:  I was at a gathering recently and a friend had the rest of us laughing and shaking our heads about her brother.  He’s a single guy, has a good job, car, dresses nice, and lives in a nice apartment.  She stopped over to visit him, and he asked if she would like some leftover take out from a Chinese restaurant.  After she took a bite, she asked if he had any soy sauce.  He handed her a bottle and she noticed the label had been removed (scraped and washed off).  She asked him “What kind of soy sauce is this?”  He reached into the bottom compartment of his refrigerator and pulled out a plastic grocery bag full of packets of soy sauce and various other condiments.  He told her he never bought condiments (including salt, pepper, and sugar).  Instead, he always took handfuls from fast food and other take out places, then took time to squeeze the contents into bottles or other containers.

If I have leftover packets of ketchup or soy sauce I toss them into the frig, then if I forget to use them within a few weeks I throw it out.  I can’t imagine saving s bunch then ‘squeezing’ them into a bottle.  :-\

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: NyaChan on March 31, 2013, 11:20:21 AM
Ah I've got lots of these.  Here's one from my Dad's side of the family:

My uncle went out one morning to pick a few items from Costco or Sam's.  He came back close to lunch time - this side of the family is obsessed with food!  But when his wife asked him what he wanted for lunch he just started laughing.  Then comes out the story of the "Treasure Hunt Buffet," as he called it.  Apparently he just went around the store trying every sampling station they had and then went around again until he wasn't hungry anymore.  He thought it was both funny and smart of him to get a meal out of it for free.

 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Thipu1 on March 31, 2013, 11:33:35 AM
The soy story is pretty extreme..  We keep good sized jars of condiments at home.  When we travel, we may try to bring a few extra packets of the things, just in case.

Soy does not enter into this equation.  The stuff is cheap and readily available.  We do refill the little table bottles of soy but we refill them from a half-gallon bottle we keep in the fridge.

MIL can save to the point of becoming a cheapskates.  We remember a family vacation.  We were staying at a time-share in Florida.  Every meal we ate in the apartment was accompanied by napkins with 'The Ten Safe Rules of Skiing' printed them in red. Every time they went skiing, MIL would open   a napkin dispenser and empty the thing.  It was a little surreal. 

When they retired, both my parents and Mr. Thipu's parents thought that they could make do with
one tea bag for two people.  Both sets of parents soon decided that wasn't the best of ideas.       
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on March 31, 2013, 11:35:02 AM
A couple of ex-coworkers bragged about how they would walk thru the lobby of a downtown hotel, find out of there was a convention with a buffet (at lunchtime) and somehow mingle and help themselves.  (I remember thinking: This is something to brag about?  :-\ )  I don’t know if they every got confronted or tossed out; if so, they would never admit it.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RingTailedLemur on March 31, 2013, 11:36:57 AM

When they retired, both my parents and Mr. Thipu's parents thought that they could make do with
one tea bag for two people.  Both sets of parents soon decided that wasn't the best of ideas.     

We do that.  It's fine.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on March 31, 2013, 11:41:26 AM
I once read that the difference between cheapness and thrift is:  does your behaviour cause physical discomfort for yourself or others?    If so, you're cheap.   In that case, my mum is cheap.   One winter the cost of heating her house went up by a few dollars per month, so - despite the fact that she and Dad could easily afford it - she set the thermostat to 16 Celsius.   I was freezing during my visit and begged her to turn it up; she refused.  "Just put on another sweater!"   "I'M ALREADY WEARING TWO!"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RingTailedLemur on March 31, 2013, 11:46:11 AM
I once read that the difference between cheapness and thrift is:  does your behaviour cause physical discomfort for yourself or others?    If so, you're cheap.   In that case, my mum is cheap.   One winter the cost of heating her house went up by a few dollars per month, so - despite the fact that she and Dad could easily afford it - she set the thermostat to 16 Celsius.   I was freezing during my visit and begged her to turn it up; she refused.  "Just put on another sweater!"   "I'M ALREADY WEARING TWO!"

Our house was like that, growing up - we didn't have any heating at all.  In the mornings you could tell when someone had sprayed their deodorant on in the freezing cold bathroom - you'd hear a shriek!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on March 31, 2013, 11:46:52 AM
Quote
16 Celsius

About 60 degrees F.  In winter, too cold for me, too.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Library Dragon on March 31, 2013, 11:53:48 AM
We refused to dine out with IL's friends. None of these people were hurting financially. One set insisted on buffets and brought plastic bags and would load up.  Others would have a melt down if you ordered anything not on the lunch or early bird list. 

One BIL was treating everyone to lunch and he was told by the friends that he couldn't order the artichokes because it wasn't on the lunch specials menu.  He politely explained that since he was paying he could order what he wanted.  You would have thought he wanted to steal the food off their plates!  We were taking care of the tip and had to take it out of one pair of hands because he thought it was too much.  We had to hand it directly to the waitress that had been run ragged during the lunch.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on March 31, 2013, 11:59:29 AM
One of my uncles had a neighbor who repeatedly had utility shut-offs.  The guy wasn’t poor or struggling; he just choose to spend money on other things.  He had 2 souped-up motorcycles, a truck, sat in his yard drinking beer, had 2 big dogs, and talked a lot about playing the lottery.

His water got shut off.  So he came over and asked uncle if he could get buckets of water from uncle’s outside faucet (“just for a couple weeks”) and then he would pay uncle for the courtesy.  Uncle was the type who found it difficult to say “No”.  But it went on for a couple months, and at my aunt’s insistence Uncle told him he could no longer get water.  The guy gave Uncle $2.00, and tried to shame Uncle about “not helping a neighbor”.   ::)

Quote
One set insisted on buffets and brought plastic bags and would load up.

I saw a couple do that at a buffet, and the manager apparently confronted them and explained that the food at the "all you can eat" buffet was to be eaten on site.  (vs "all you can bag up and take home")
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: AylaM on March 31, 2013, 12:16:37 PM
My grandmother likes/liked to go to buffets and she'd go in for lunch and pay the lunch fee, but would bring a book or something and would stick around until dinner.  And then she'd eat dinner there too.  She wanted the whole family to join her a couple of times.

Most places have regulations to prevent that kind of behavior now.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: gramma dishes on March 31, 2013, 12:36:50 PM
 :o

At any buffet I've ever gone to, if they catch you leaving with anything more than a partially eaten ice cream cone they will consider it theft.  It's been reported that there were some repeat offenders and that one buffet actually had police outside the establishment waiting for them to emerge with their stash. 

I think the restaurant declined to press charges against them, but did ban them from the restaurant 'forever'. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Adelaide on March 31, 2013, 12:59:05 PM
My grandparents have a lot of money but get mad if you don't use paper towels twice. If they've only been used to mop up water, they have to be set on the counter to dry and are used again.  ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on March 31, 2013, 01:26:57 PM
During my first week at my current job, I was invited to join a group at a buffet restaurant for lunch.   I was delighted to join them - less so when I saw one of the ladies surreptitiously filling up Tupperware containers she'd hidden in her purse.   I commented on it to a coworker later; she shrugged "Eh, that's just something she does." 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on March 31, 2013, 03:41:01 PM
We refused to dine out with IL's friends. None of these people were hurting financially. One set insisted on buffets and brought plastic bags and would load up.  Others would have a melt down if you ordered anything not on the lunch or early bird list. 

One BIL was treating everyone to lunch and he was told by the friends that he couldn't order the artichokes because it wasn't on the lunch specials menu.  He politely explained that since he was paying he could order what he wanted.  You would have thought he wanted to steal the food off their plates!  We were taking care of the tip and had to take it out of one pair of hands because he thought it was too much.  We had to hand it directly to the waitress that had been run ragged during the lunch.

I would have a real problem with someone telling me what I could order, particularly if I was picking up THEIR tab.  Your brother was kind for trying. :/

Also, we have learned not to trust certain family members to determine the appropriate tip.  One particular uncle thinks a quarter is an excellent tip no matter what the bill total.  He's older and I think he's still in the mind-set where a nickel would get you a cup of coffee and a sandwich.  Another is just cheap.  She thinks that any tip over two dollars "spoils" wait staff.  So even if the bill is $50+, the waiter is going to get $2. And if she catches you trying to supplement the tip to an appropriate amount, she will scold you and give your money back.  (One notable time she kept it.)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Octavia on March 31, 2013, 03:46:41 PM
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on March 31, 2013, 03:50:06 PM
Quote
One particular uncle thinks a quarter is an excellent tip no matter what the bill total.  He's older and I think he's still in the mind-set where a nickel would get you a cup of coffee and a sandwich.

Yeah, I've seen this.  Or people who just empty (most of) the change in their pocket.   35 cents, a dollar and 7 cents, whatever.  On a $40 tab.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on March 31, 2013, 03:54:22 PM
- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

- A former friend who thought she was terribly clever to order just a small side salad and water, then she would ask to try "just a bite" of everybody else's dinner. She would find something she liked on the table and say, "Oh, it's so good, could I try just one tiny bit more?"   Before you knew it, you'd shared half of your meal with her. 

- I have various elderly relatives who will re-use coffee filters, tea bags, paper towels, ziplock bags, and bacon grease (not that unusual, but it doesn't seem healthy to leave a constantly circulating batch of it sitting in an open coffee can at room temperature by your stove.)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Jocelyn on March 31, 2013, 03:58:10 PM
My mother will use one end of a tissue, then save it to use the other end later.
And she wonders why colds last so much longer for her than for people who dispose of the tissue instead of using it twice.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: faithlessone on March 31, 2013, 04:07:37 PM
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

My parents used to do it - and I'm only 24. I remember it was particularly at a local tourist attraction that would let you in for free if you were under 10. I was small for my age, and my parents were still blagging me in when I was 14! I know that my aunts and uncles did it/still do it, and several of my parents' friends have done it.

I suspect it's a far more widespread practice than people might imagine.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: FauxFoodist on March 31, 2013, 04:10:15 PM
My mother will use one end of a tissue, then save it to use the other end later.
And she wonders why colds last so much longer for her than for people who dispose of the tissue instead of using it twice.

Okay, call me cheap, but I'm regularly in the habit of tearing the tissue in half and using just one half and putting the other back on top of the box (I don't do this with tissue boxes other than the ones at my house or on my desk at work -- the tissue box at work isn't readily accessible by anyone else).  I learned this years ago as a way to be "thrifty," and I've found I typically really only need half a tissue.  Community tissue boxes I will just take the entire tissue as I'm sure others wouldn't feel comfortable about getting someone else's half-tissue (even if it's unused since the other person touched it).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on March 31, 2013, 04:11:13 PM
Quote
- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

Oh for goodness sakes.   ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on March 31, 2013, 04:13:35 PM
Quote
- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

Oh for goodness sakes.   ::)

Yep, she really gripes about hotels that fix it so you can't open the back of the remote to remove the batteries, "Like they don't trust their customers, how rude!"   ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on March 31, 2013, 04:16:43 PM
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

My parents used to do it - and I'm only 24. I remember it was particularly at a local tourist attraction that would let you in for free if you were under 10. I was small for my age, and my parents were still blagging me in when I was 14! I know that my aunts and uncles did it/still do it, and several of my parents' friends have done it.

I suspect it's a far more widespread practice than people might imagine.

Both of our kids are very tall for their age.  We give their real ages at attractions where you get a discount for younger kids and get the stinkeye from the staff.  You can tell they're reluctant to believe us because they've been lied to before.  :(
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on March 31, 2013, 04:18:45 PM
weeblewobble, I am cracking up!  My eyes rolled out of their sockets a few minutes ago.

Batteries from remote.  That's as bad as taking lightbulbs and rolls of toilet paper.  And please don't tell me she takes those.  :D

I do know of a guy who took a huge roll of toilet paper from a public rest room, then swore he bought it.  Yeah. Sure.  As if people don't know the difference.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: andi on March 31, 2013, 04:54:47 PM
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

I was in a playgroup where several of the moms would do this.  Drove me batty.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CakeEater on March 31, 2013, 05:35:27 PM
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

My parents used to do it - and I'm only 24. I remember it was particularly at a local tourist attraction that would let you in for free if you were under 10. I was small for my age, and my parents were still blagging me in when I was 14! I know that my aunts and uncles did it/still do it, and several of my parents' friends have done it.

I suspect it's a far more widespread practice than people might imagine.

Both of our kids are very tall for their age.  We give their real ages at attractions where you get a discount for younger kids and get the stinkeye from the staff.  You can tell they're reluctant to believe us because they've been lied to before.  :(

I remember my mother taking my brother's and my birth certificates to a theme park once when we were kids for this reason. I might need to do the same for my kids in a couple of years' time.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Library Dragon on March 31, 2013, 05:39:35 PM
The first Christmas after MIL died FIL came for a visit.  DS1 went into the kitchen and asked what are all these paper things on the counter?  FIL washed all the paper plates from a litte gathering the night before.  I would have chalked it up to just wing helpful, but it was a constant disagreement about washing disposable cups, forks, etc.  I figure its my once a year decadence. 

People who steal toilet paper is a big complaint in libraries.  It comes up a lot on listservs. We put up a nice holder for plastic bags by the baby changing table.  It lasted a day.  Now we have an empty tissue box screwed onto the wall.  It looks strange, but no one steals it.

I am cheap in certain areas.  It equalizes out my splurges.  I make my own dish washing and laundry detergents, body scrubs, shave cream, etc.  I still cut up old tshirts for rags.  All my last bits of yarn are saved for random projects.  Many times people think we're not home because there is only 1 light on. 

Add me to the list of young looking kids passed as off as younger for discounts at "smorgasbord" (the height of good eating in S. California when I was young *** years ago), movies, theme parks. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: kherbert05 on March 31, 2013, 05:54:39 PM
Personally I think the hotels should charge the credit card of people that take things from the room.


One time in San Antonio we were staying in a nice midrange hotel. We had gone swimming and hung the swimsuits and towels on the shower curtain rod to dry while we were at lunch. Don't remember how but they all ended up in the tub soaked and we needed to pack. Mom sent me to the front desk to buy towels to wrap the wet mess in - hurt their brains. The manager let us buy some towels - but he was stunned we didn't just steal them.


I had a relative who used to reuse food containers for food storage. Used to drive my Mom batty because many of the containers were not meant for reuse. You never knew what a contain might contain or how long it had been in the frig or pantry. (Mom was a stickler for food safety only containers meant for reuse were reused and everything was labeled and dated. )


Loren and Brett are tall for their age. We have run into the "s/he isn't really (real age)" problem.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: snappylt on March 31, 2013, 05:56:11 PM
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

This bothers me on two levels.  One, it is stealing a service by paying less than the posted price, so it is wrong because it is theft.  Two, it's teaching children by example that lying and stealing are OK.

One of our children was smaller than many his age and there was a time or two many years ago that my wife suggested we should pay less than the correct price for his true age.  I said no, because I wanted to make a point teaching honesty by example.  (Our boys were very observant; they'd have noticed and remembered if we had lied about their ages.)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Mad Goat Woman on March 31, 2013, 06:43:06 PM
Oh boy have I been waiting for a thread like this! I've got a lifetime's worth of cheapskate stories courtesy of my grandmother's friend Pam.

Amongst the highlights of Pam's cheapskatedness are the following:

• Bringing over rissoles that my mother had to reshape in the kitchen because Pam had made them with barely any meat. We suspect that the meat was fairly old and didn't use much binding. She also served my mother this memorable dish of peas in white sauce, while the adults had a yabby, peas and white sauce. My mother has never forgotten this. I was a child when Pam did this to us.

• Then there was the more recent examples--such as giving my grandmother these really cheap and nasty candles for her 80th birthday, not to her taste or to her style of decor. Serving old scones that were smothered with old jam, (we suspect she took them home after a function, put them in the fridge, and served them with old jam past its prime). Her long-suffering husband who has had a triple-bypass is not allowed to sleep in a warm room where it would be far more comfortable for him. She only heats a small part of her house, and it's always quite cold.

I think those are the only things that come to mind, aside from a lot of gossip that I can't quite remember all of it. This woman was a bridesmaid in my grandparent's wedding, over fifty years ago. She really should know better!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on March 31, 2013, 06:55:43 PM
I went to Disney World with my parents and brother when I was a couple months short of 13 and I think food was free at this hotel for kids under 12.  The waitress asked me how old I was and I told her the truth and I remember my dad teasing me about being so honest as I think he'd hoped he could have passed me off as younger to get my meal free. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on March 31, 2013, 08:31:18 PM
We don't really "do" Easter at our house, but MIL came over with a giant wrapped basket for Babybartfast and Bittybartfast earlier this week so I figured it wouldn't hurt to open it up today.  I think she said it was from her MIL (DH's grandmother).  It was a beautiful basket, stuffed to the brim . . . with ratty, nasty, cheap stuffed animals.  I think she bought a small commercial basket with (cheap) candy in it, then added a bunch of stuffed rabbits and ducks she found at thrift stores or that people left behind at her rental properties and repackaged the whole thing into a bigger basket.  Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Jocelyn on March 31, 2013, 08:34:00 PM
My mother will use one end of a tissue, then save it to use the other end later.
And she wonders why colds last so much longer for her than for people who dispose of the tissue instead of using it twice.

Okay, call me cheap, but I'm regularly in the habit of tearing the tissue in half and using just one half and putting the other back on top of the box (I don't do this with tissue boxes other than the ones at my house or on my desk at work -- the tissue box at work isn't readily accessible by anyone else).  I learned this years ago as a way to be "thrifty," and I've found I typically really only need half a tissue.  Community tissue boxes I will just take the entire tissue as I'm sure others wouldn't feel comfortable about getting someone else's half-tissue (even if it's unused since the other person touched it).
I have no problem with someone doing this. However, what my mother does is carry the used tissue around with her until she needs to use the other half.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: FauxFoodist on March 31, 2013, 08:50:52 PM
My mother will use one end of a tissue, then save it to use the other end later.
And she wonders why colds last so much longer for her than for people who dispose of the tissue instead of using it twice.

Okay, call me cheap, but I'm regularly in the habit of tearing the tissue in half and using just one half and putting the other back on top of the box (I don't do this with tissue boxes other than the ones at my house or on my desk at work -- the tissue box at work isn't readily accessible by anyone else).  I learned this years ago as a way to be "thrifty," and I've found I typically really only need half a tissue.  Community tissue boxes I will just take the entire tissue as I'm sure others wouldn't feel comfortable about getting someone else's half-tissue (even if it's unused since the other person touched it).
I have no problem with someone doing this. However, what my mother does is carry the used tissue around with her until she needs to use the other half.

I haven't thought about the continuing-one's-illness aspect of it, but I'll admit to not yet throwing out a tissue if I've only used part of it (although I'll more likely tear off the used part and discard that).  It isn't to cut down on cost though; I'm reluctant to increase my use of disposable items if I don't have to (and I use a lot of paper products, like tissues and napkins).  That's a practice I don't do in front of others though.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on March 31, 2013, 09:02:00 PM
I know an older man living alone who keeps the house at 50 F. I could almost, deal with 60, but 50 is just too low. His sister wouldn't stay with him after he had surgery unless he put the house up to at least 65. He had to think long and hard about that.

He also only uses night lights except for maybe one reading light sometimes, even in the dead of winter. We worry that he may fall, and we worry that it so much looks like no one is home that someone may break in, be surprised by his presence and hurt him.

Once, years ago, we were having a staffing at the nursing home for his mother. Since Walgreen's was having a sale on soap and another store was having a sale on pizza, and both were on his way, he stopped and held up 3 family members and 2 professionals for 1/2 hour. Cost to the county? No idea. (I don't remember why he couldn't do those errands on the way home.)

He wears all of his clothing 3 days and only does the laundry once a month.

Worst, worst: he only flushes the toilet every couple of days. No one drops by to see him anymore, of course.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BatCity on March 31, 2013, 09:08:07 PM
Many years ago, my parents passed my little brother as a baby so they didn't have to buy him a plane ticket. He was three. In their defense, they weren't being cheap as much as desperate, as for some long-forgotten reason the trip was an emergency that they couldn't afford and they had three small kids.

What really made it a bummer is that my older brother and I got to visit the cockpit and the captain gave us flight wings. Little bro has never forgotten this.

This must have been around 1972 or so. dingdangity, I feel old.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on March 31, 2013, 09:08:32 PM
Quote
Personally I think the hotels should charge the credit card of people that take things from the room.
It's my understanding that some hotels DO, especially when it's discovered the guest stole things ike towels and bed linen.  I hear they charge a pretty penny.

Mad Goat Woman, love the "Pam" stories.  More, please!   :D

Pam sounds like my ex-friend “V”.  She was a very calculating cheapskate and a manipulative liar (which is one of many reasons she is an ex-friend).  She still owes me a total of almost $200 for two separate not-so-slick tricks she pulled several years ago.  One had to do with non-refundable air fare (long convoluted story).  The other was an event where she claimed to have no money (although she had bought a brand new car the week before and still kept her mani-pedi appointment the next day).  I steered her to an ATM but she “forgot” her code, and it was one excuse after another.  I wrote off the $200 and our so-called friendship.


Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Bijou on March 31, 2013, 09:09:16 PM
Reusing dental floss.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: gramma dishes on March 31, 2013, 09:12:31 PM
I know an older man living alone who keeps the house at 50 F. I could almost, deal with 60, but 50 is just too low. His sister wouldn't stay with him after he had surgery unless he put the house up to at least 65. He had to think long and hard about that.

He also only uses night lights except for maybe one reading light sometimes, even in the dead of winter. We worry that he may fall, and we worry that it so much looks like no one is home that someone may break in, be surprised by his presence and hurt him.

Once, years ago, we were having a staffing at the nursing home for his mother. Since Walgreen's was having a sale on soap and another store was having a sale on pizza, and both were on his way, he stopped and held up 3 family members and 2 professionals for 1/2 hour. Cost to the county? No idea. (I don't remember why he couldn't do those errands on the way home.)

He wears all of his clothing 3 days and only does the laundry once a month.

Worst, worst: he only flushes the toilet every couple of days. No one drops by to see him anymore, of course.

This is just so incredibly sad.

I think it's just that he's so afraid that he's going to run out of money.  I've heard of this and seen it for myself before. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on March 31, 2013, 09:14:15 PM
Reusing dental floss.

Oh no.  Just nooooooooo. :o
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Bijou on March 31, 2013, 09:54:04 PM
Reusing dental floss.

Oh no.  Just nooooooooo. :o
My sentiments, exactly... :o
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Jules1980 on March 31, 2013, 10:18:39 PM
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

This bothers me on two levels.  One, it is stealing a service by paying less than the posted price, so it is wrong because it is theft.  Two, it's teaching children by example that lying and stealing are OK.

One of our children was smaller than many his age and there was a time or two many years ago that my wife suggested we should pay less than the correct price for his true age.  I said no, because I wanted to make a point teaching honesty by example.  (Our boys were very observant; they'd have noticed and remembered if we had lied about their ages.)

I was small for my age and though my parents didn't lie about my age, there were a few times they were given the discount and didn't realize it until smaller plates of food came out.  One restuarant was just determined that I was not 10 and that I couldn't eat an adult portion of boiled shrimp and would bring me the kid's fried plate.  Not cool.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Paper Roses on March 31, 2013, 10:38:25 PM
. . . Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

So they aren't good enough for you or your child, but they're good enough for Goodwill?  Why do you think Goodwill would want them?

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on March 31, 2013, 10:41:50 PM
. . . Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

So they aren't good enough for you or your child, but they're good enough for Goodwill?  Why do you think Goodwill would want them?

Agree.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jedikaiti on March 31, 2013, 10:45:58 PM
Quote
- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

Oh for goodness sakes.   ::)

Yep, she really gripes about hotels that fix it so you can't open the back of the remote to remove the batteries, "Like they don't trust their customers, how rude!"   ::)

How many hotels has she been banned from?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: kckgirl on March 31, 2013, 11:30:02 PM
Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

I think you should reconsider going to Goodwill and trash the ratty, smelly toys.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 01, 2013, 12:06:19 AM
Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

I think you should reconsider going to Goodwill and trash the ratty, smelly toys.

The smoky one and the particularly grungy ones are getting trashed, don't worry  :)  Most of the rest of the stuff in the basket is going to Goodwill just because I don't need it in the house - some of it was new still-wrapped things like cardboard easter-themed puzzles (it's not like we need more puzzle pieces in the house) and most of it was not appropriate for a nine-month-old baby to get her hands on.  I'll freely admit I'm extra-picky about secondhand stuffed animals - I don't mind grunge when it's our grunge, know what I mean?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: nuit93 on April 01, 2013, 12:14:25 AM
Reusing dental floss.

*shudder*
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hillia on April 01, 2013, 12:27:00 AM
My great-great grandfather was legendary for his extreme cheapness (my grandmother called it being 'mean'). She was born in 1905 and was raised by her grandparents from a very young age.  One story says that he bought a barrel of apples for the family to eat through the winter.  Once they'd gotten past the first layer, most of the apples were rotten, but he refused to throw  them away and it fell to my great-great grandmother to find a way to make them edible (lots of applesauce, I think).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Iris on April 01, 2013, 12:47:49 AM
. . . Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

So they aren't good enough for you or your child, but they're good enough for Goodwill?  Why do you think Goodwill would want them?

Agree.

I don't know. Things that are worn or ratty or smoky have no place being donated, but things that would be alright after a wash? I used to be time rich but cash poor and I would pick up slightly dirty but otherwise fine toys at garage sales or wherever and soak them in nappy sanitiser, wash them, hang them on the line in the sun and air to dry and they'd be good as new. Now I have the presence of money and absence of time and don't have the time to a) find and b) clean toys I wouldn't consider it and would pass on toys like that to the next person who may want them.

In other words, just because *I* don't want something, or don't have the time/inclination to return it to a usable state doesn't mean that noone would. I'm not familiar with Goodwill as such so I can't comment as to what they specifically would accept but I don't think that in general things should be trashed just because I, personally, don't have the time and energy to restore them to their former glory.

OTOH when MIL tried to give us some sheets that we didn't want on the basis that they were "too good to donate" - THEN I saw red.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: girlysprite on April 01, 2013, 02:36:18 AM
I once read a story of a woman who was in a relationship with a cheapskate. When she wanted a vacation on the beach, he booked a ratty hotel 2 miles away, while they could afford much better. He would be very PA if she wanted to eat at a restaurant instead of a cheap cafee of macdonalds. The death of the relation was when he proposed to try to have a baby...because the baby of his niece had outgrown her babyroom, so he could get the babystuff really cheap!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 01, 2013, 04:43:41 AM
Quote
- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

Oh for goodness sakes.   ::)

Yep, she really gripes about hotels that fix it so you can't open the back of the remote to remove the batteries, "Like they don't trust their customers, how rude!"   ::)

How many hotels has she been banned from?


None that she has told us about, but I sincerely doubt she would tell us if she was banned.  She's very proud of her "thrifty and clever" behavior and doesn't know why we're so wasteful and indulgent with our crazy spending.  (i.e. paying for shampoo or towels when we could get them for free)  So telling us she'd been banned would ruin her "image" in her mind.

ETA: Another one of her favorite tricks is to find a gift for free for someone else's birthday or Christmas, etc.  For example, if there is a gift with purchase for perfume or cosmetics (and she doesn't want to keep it for herself.  She's one of those lovely people whose cheapness only extends to items she doesn't want to pay for - like household goods and other people) she will save it for months and give it to my friend for her birthday or Christmas.  Or she will save up the tiny trial size samples of lotion, perfume, detergent, etc., that come in the mail or magazines and put them in a regifted basket and say, "Oh, I put together this care package for your birthday!"  It might sound like a thoughtful gesture but some of the samples can be years old before she uses them.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: iridaceae on April 01, 2013, 06:28:19 AM
Hotels will charge if the theft is hefty enough. The problem is thieves will contest their charges and claim it's illegal because they didn't agree to it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Snowy Owl on April 01, 2013, 07:08:23 AM

It's fascinating to see what people feel they can take from a hotel room.  I did often wonder why hotel tv remotes had tape on the back.  I'd no idea it was because people would take the batteries  :o.  Ehell is educational.   

In terms of extreme thrift I had an elderly great-aunt who became paranoid she didn't have enough money and wouldn't put the heating on or the hot water because she thought it was expensive.  We had a regular fear of turning up to find her dead of hypothermia.  She used to give some interesting presents, ranging from the top of a salad crisper (for reasons we couldn't fathom) to a second hand wok with a lid that didn't fit.   The odd thing was she was a wealthy lady who actually could afford to live very comfortably and just wouldn't. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jaxsue on April 01, 2013, 08:28:28 AM
We refused to dine out with IL's friends. None of these people were hurting financially. One set insisted on buffets and brought plastic bags and would load up.  Others would have a melt down if you ordered anything not on the lunch or early bird list. 

One BIL was treating everyone to lunch and he was told by the friends that he couldn't order the artichokes because it wasn't on the lunch specials menu.  He politely explained that since he was paying he could order what he wanted.  You would have thought he wanted to steal the food off their plates!  We were taking care of the tip and had to take it out of one pair of hands because he thought it was too much.  We had to hand it directly to the waitress that had been run ragged during the lunch.

I've told this story in an earlier thread. A friend's father is just like this. When he takes you out, he presents you with a coupon. He also expects you to order water only. And if you want to order an appetizer (stating that you're paying for it), he gets very upset. I have paid for meals out with them, and he's just as controlling!  ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jaxsue on April 01, 2013, 08:30:03 AM
Quote
One particular uncle thinks a quarter is an excellent tip no matter what the bill total.  He's older and I think he's still in the mind-set where a nickel would get you a cup of coffee and a sandwich.

Yeah, I've seen this.  Or people who just empty (most of) the change in their pocket.   35 cents, a dollar and 7 cents, whatever.  On a $40 tab.

When I was a teenager my family went out to a nice dinner with an older family friend. She offered to pay the tip. When it was done, the tab came to about $60. She pulled a quarter out of her purse and said, "It was worth it!" My parents quietly left a decent tip.  :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jaxsue on April 01, 2013, 08:35:18 AM
We don't really "do" Easter at our house, but MIL came over with a giant wrapped basket for Babybartfast and Bittybartfast earlier this week so I figured it wouldn't hurt to open it up today.  I think she said it was from her MIL (DH's grandmother).  It was a beautiful basket, stuffed to the brim . . . with ratty, nasty, cheap stuffed animals.  I think she bought a small commercial basket with (cheap) candy in it, then added a bunch of stuffed rabbits and ducks she found at thrift stores or that people left behind at her rental properties and repackaged the whole thing into a bigger basket.  Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

Playing devil's advocate here. If most of the stuffed toys were in very bad shape (not to mention smelly), does Goodwill want them? IIRC they end up throwing away a lot of donations due to conditions like this. Honestly, I'd just toss them.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jaxsue on April 01, 2013, 08:41:32 AM
Reusing dental floss.

Ewwww
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jaxsue on April 01, 2013, 08:45:46 AM
My X was a cheapskate. That's one reason he's an X! He wouldn't spend money on pest control, and we lived in Florida, so we had a roach problem (we were clean - roaches are a fact of life there). I finally had enough, and he grudgingly gave in.

He could also be cruel with his cheapness. One time I was out antiquing with my mom and sister - we were on vacation. I spent $25 on a pretty Victorian bowl. He was very upset with me. His words: "I was going to buy you something, but since you spent that money, now I'm not." Just one more nail in the coffin.

FTR, he's made well into 6-figures for almost 30 yrs.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 01, 2013, 08:55:14 AM
We don't really "do" Easter at our house, but MIL came over with a giant wrapped basket for Babybartfast and Bittybartfast earlier this week so I figured it wouldn't hurt to open it up today.  I think she said it was from her MIL (DH's grandmother).  It was a beautiful basket, stuffed to the brim . . . with ratty, nasty, cheap stuffed animals.  I think she bought a small commercial basket with (cheap) candy in it, then added a bunch of stuffed rabbits and ducks she found at thrift stores or that people left behind at her rental properties and repackaged the whole thing into a bigger basket.  Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

Playing devil's advocate here. If most of the stuffed toys were in very bad shape (not to mention smelly), does Goodwill want them? IIRC they end up throwing away a lot of donations due to conditions like this. Honestly, I'd just toss them.

I agree.  Why subject another child to germs or second-hand smoke?  Goodwill may throw them out anyway and it may cost them money depending on how much stuff they need to toss each week.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: SiotehCat on April 01, 2013, 09:01:18 AM
We don't really "do" Easter at our house, but MIL came over with a giant wrapped basket for Babybartfast and Bittybartfast earlier this week so I figured it wouldn't hurt to open it up today.  I think she said it was from her MIL (DH's grandmother).  It was a beautiful basket, stuffed to the brim . . . with ratty, nasty, cheap stuffed animals.  I think she bought a small commercial basket with (cheap) candy in it, then added a bunch of stuffed rabbits and ducks she found at thrift stores or that people left behind at her rental properties and repackaged the whole thing into a bigger basket.  Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

Playing devil's advocate here. If most of the stuffed toys were in very bad shape (not to mention smelly), does Goodwill want them? IIRC they end up throwing away a lot of donations due to conditions like this. Honestly, I'd just toss them.

I agree.  Why subject another child to germs or second-hand smoke?  Goodwill may throw them out anyway and it may cost them money depending on how much stuff they need to toss each week.

On Post #47, Slartibartfast said she was going to toss the gross ones.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

I think you should reconsider going to Goodwill and trash the ratty, smelly toys.

The smoky one and the particularly grungy ones are getting trashed, don't worry  :)  Most of the rest of the stuff in the basket is going to Goodwill just because I don't need it in the house - some of it was new still-wrapped things like cardboard easter-themed puzzles (it's not like we need more puzzle pieces in the house) and most of it was not appropriate for a nine-month-old baby to get her hands on.  I'll freely admit I'm extra-picky about secondhand stuffed animals - I don't mind grunge when it's our grunge, know what I mean?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 01, 2013, 09:08:33 AM
My X was a cheapskate. That's one reason he's an X! He wouldn't spend money on pest control, and we lived in Florida, so we had a roach problem (we were clean - roaches are a fact of life there). I finally had enough, and he grudgingly gave in.

He could also be cruel with his cheapness. One time I was out antiquing with my mom and sister - we were on vacation. I spent $25 on a pretty Victorian bowl. He was very upset with me. His words: "I was going to buy you something, but since you spent that money, now I'm not." Just one more nail in the coffin.

FTR, he's made well into 6-figures for almost 30 yrs.

I don't blame you.  I wouldn't have been able to live with someone who believed he alone controlled the purse strings.  (Really?  He set aside money for a treat for you?  Like an allowance?  You got no input?  Jerk.) 

My DH has always handled our family finances, but due to some changes in my career path over the last few years, I consistently earn more than he does.  Our lifestyle hasn't changed much.  We drive the same cars and live in the same house, just without debt.  I don't go out on spending sprees.  But in the last few months, I have dropped a considerable amount of weight.  So I went shopping for a new spring wardrobe and shoes, after budgeting with DH for the expense.  (Seriously, the most fun shopping I've ever had.) Some friend of DH saw me out at the mall, weighed down with multiple shopping bags and immediately called DH to "tattle" on me.

"I just thought you should know you're wife is out here spending your paycheck on shoes," he told DH.

"I don't see how this is any of your business," said DH. 

This friend, of course, is a notorious cheapskate, who flips out anytime his wife makes a purchase he doesn't approve of.

(Have I mentioned DH is awesome?)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jaxsue on April 01, 2013, 09:10:37 AM
Siotecat, We were responding to the OP about the stuffed animals:

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.


It seems the story changed after the comments, but I'll give her credit if she tosses the worst toys.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jaxsue on April 01, 2013, 09:13:05 AM
My X was a cheapskate. That's one reason he's an X! He wouldn't spend money on pest control, and we lived in Florida, so we had a roach problem (we were clean - roaches are a fact of life there). I finally had enough, and he grudgingly gave in.

He could also be cruel with his cheapness. One time I was out antiquing with my mom and sister - we were on vacation. I spent $25 on a pretty Victorian bowl. He was very upset with me. His words: "I was going to buy you something, but since you spent that money, now I'm not." Just one more nail in the coffin.

FTR, he's made well into 6-figures for almost 30 yrs.

I don't blame you.  I wouldn't have been able to live with someone who believed he alone controlled the purse strings.  (Really?  He set aside money for a treat for you?  Like an allowance?  You got no input?  Jerk.) 

My DH has always handled our family finances, but due to some changes in my career path over the last few years, I consistently earn more than he does.  Our lifestyle hasn't changed much.  We drive the same cars and live in the same house, just without debt.  I don't go out on spending sprees.  But in the last few months, I have dropped a considerable amount of weight.  So I went shopping for a new spring wardrobe and shoes, after budgeting with DH for the expense.  (Seriously, the most fun shopping I've ever had.) Some friend of DH saw me out at the mall, weighed down with multiple shopping bags and immediately called DH to "tattle" on me.

"I just thought you should know you're wife is out here spending your paycheck on shoes," he told DH.

"I don't see how this is any of your business," said DH. 

This friend, of course, is a notorious cheapskate, who flips out anytime his wife makes a purchase he doesn't approve of.

(Have I mentioned DH is awesome?)

For years I thought I was the problem. I wasn't a good enough wife or person. I know ehell isn't a therapy session, and I apologize for going off-topic a bit. I finally saw the abuse for what it was.

As for your DH's friend...sheesh...what a piece of work! Your DH rocks.  :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 01, 2013, 09:17:44 AM
"I just thought you should know you're wife is out here spending your paycheck on shoes," he told DH.

This friend, of course, is a notorious cheapskate, who flips out anytime his wife makes a purchase he doesn't approve of.

Does his wife work or is it a case of "No wife of mine will ever work" so the can control the purse strings?  I bet he longs for the days when all women have no say.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: fountainsoflettuce on April 01, 2013, 09:19:00 AM
Even if she tosses the worst toys, isn't she just like her MIL when she gives the rest of the ratty toys to Goodwill?   Really, why not just throw all of them out?   A person doesn't need to donate brand new items to Goodwill, just those in good condition.  To me, "good condition" is defined as "the same condition I would accept for used goods in my home." 

Sorry for the tangent - to get back on track:  I don't mind some of the used toys my MIL picks up for the grandkids.  Most are in really good condition and easy to clean.  I do not accepted used stuffed toys b/c I can't get them clean enough for my standards.  I did object to the used car seat.  I don't think she was really a cheapskate but frugal - why spend lots of money that will be used for a short time. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 01, 2013, 09:41:30 AM
I hereby nominate my friend's DH. I posted about him and his tantrum to my mechanic, who I had recommended to him, recently.  Some other examples of his cheapness include:

Wearing his undies even though they are holey and stained;
Only getting a haircut when he has a coupon, and said haircut WIHTOUT is $10
Has a coniption if she or their son need to go to the dr., since their copay is $30. HE never goes, and HIS parents don't even have health insurance, so he doesnt get the need for it 
He also had a fit when she bought their son his first pair of shoes, saying the $30 or $40 was unnecesasry, that she could yave gotten cheaper ones at Walmart.

He is beyond cheap, irrationally and obessively so. He refused to entertain the notion of buying a new car until they could pay cash. NO ifs, ands, or buts. Which is his choice, but by doing that, chose to pour $$ into an old car that eventually died (which was the subject of his childish tirade), because he REFUSED to have anything to do with a car loan.  Nevermind they HAD the $$ to buy one, but as it would have drained most of their savings, he refused. And now is going around saying "we should have gotten rid of it a long time ago" yes due to his stubborness and cheap ways, he didn.t

He also doesn't know very much either; he is convinced that the mechanic caused their elderly car's transmission to fail, simply by replacing the starter the day before. and nothing you say to him will convince him that is not the case. nevermind the car was pushing 14, and already had a replacement tranny. Oh no. in his mind, since the mechanic was the last to touch it, it was HIS fault.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 01, 2013, 09:47:17 AM
For years I thought I was the problem. I wasn't a good enough wife or person. I know ehell isn't a therapy session, and I apologize for going off-topic a bit. I finally saw the abuse for what it was.

If it's brief, fits the topic, and might be a gentle warning or quiet encouragement for others, I don't consider it a therapy session - it just happens to have a small bonus.

And it's reasonably priced!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RebeccainGA on April 01, 2013, 10:00:03 AM
My grandmother had a 'friend' like this - her ACTUAL friend, Miss Betty, had passed away, and this woman, I'll call her Edna, was attached to Miss Betty like a barnacle. When Miss Betty died, my grandmother inherited Edna. Edna would seem nice - she was always giving out 'homemade jam' to people (we found out later that she would buy commercial vats of jelly or jam at the salvage store and repackage it into canning jars). She gave us Christmas gifts, of course (all of us!) after we chipped in and bought her a couple of cases of canning jars and some nice labels and boxes for them. The gifts ranged from (long expired - 3-4 years old) "Swiss Colony" gift sets of meat and cheese to an old, pilled, faded polyester muumuu.

My grandmother went to her house once. She had tinfoil on all the windows (she said for insulation). She always took every napkin, condiment packet, and plastic container she could get her hands on when my grandmother would take her to lunch on their 'errand day' - when Gran saw the YEARS worth of them piled up in the lady's kitchen, she stopped enabling her to do it. Gran said there were literally enough salt and pepper packets, in big bags, to start a restaurant supply house.

Edna passed away about two years after my grandmother started carting her around. We were told, by her son, that she'd left an estate worth at least six figures, not counting the house and contents. She left it all to charity, as far as we know, except the house. Her kids were furious!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 10:08:02 AM
I hereby nominate my friend's DH. I posted about him and his tantrum to my mechanic, who I had recommended to him, recently.  Some other examples of his cheapness include:

Wearing his undies even though they are holey and stained;
Only getting a haircut when he has a coupon, and said haircut WIHTOUT is $10
Has a coniption if she or their son need to go to the dr., since their copay is $30. HE never goes, and HIS parents don't even have health insurance, so he doesnt get the need for it 
He also had a fit when she bought their son his first pair of shoes, saying the $30 or $40 was unnecesasry, that she could yave gotten cheaper ones at Walmart.

He is beyond cheap, irrationally and obessively so. He refused to entertain the notion of buying a new car until they could pay cash. NO ifs, ands, or buts. Which is his choice, but by doing that, chose to pour $$ into an old car that eventually died (which was the subject of his childish tirade), because he REFUSED to have anything to do with a car loan.  Nevermind they HAD the $$ to buy one, but as it would have drained most of their savings, he refused. And now is going around saying "we should have gotten rid of it a long time ago" yes due to his stubborness and cheap ways, he didn.t

He also doesn't know very much either; he is convinced that the mechanic caused their elderly car's transmission to fail, simply by replacing the starter the day before. and nothing you say to him will convince him that is not the case. nevermind the car was pushing 14, and already had a replacement tranny. Oh no. in his mind, since the mechanic was the last to touch it, it was HIS fault.

I’ll fight you for that nomination;

My (ex)BFF’s husband (with 6 figure salary):

1) Only showered every other day.
2) Refused to buy deodorant (and got mad at her because she bought some from the dollar store).
3) Used bars of generic brand soap until the slivers were barely visible.
4) Refused to get internet at home, so she had to go to library
5) In the summer only allowed SC to be turned on for 2 hours a day
6) Made her get a job at Burger King (after he retired) even though she got a large inheritance when her mother passed away (which he controlled)

Her defensiveness (of him) contributed to the erosion of relationships with her family and our friendship.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CharlieBraun on April 01, 2013, 10:26:16 AM
I'll play.

My friend Chip inherited a duplex house - full apartment on each of two floors.  His dream was to never have a job and live off the rent from one of the apartments while occupying the other.

He lives in upstate NY and refuses to turn on the heat.  He lives on the second floor and said that the lower floor tenant's heat is "enough."  Last I visited him, there was ice on the inside of his windows.

He converted his auto to run on oil.  Vegetable oil.  He used to buy the fryer oil from various restaurants in his town, sequentially.  If you drove behind his car, depending on the day, you might be treated to the odor of egg rolls/dim sum, french fries, or cannoli.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 01, 2013, 10:28:48 AM
Somewhat off-topic, but the discussion of tips reminds me of when I was having dinner at a diner with my two daughters, who were pretty young at the time (8 and 6).  My 6-year-old got a bit bored waiting for us to finish our meal, and she started playing with some pennies that she had in her pocket.  Just as we were about to leave the table, she dropped the pennies in her water glass, where they sank to the bottom.  I didn't think anything of it and went to pay.  I added a 20% tip for our waitress at the cash register, and we left.  On our way to the car, I suddenly remembered that a favorite passive-aggressive trick of people who thought they got lousy service was to leave several pennies in their water glass, and I thought with horror "Oh  no - she's going to think that's her tip!"  I ran back with the girls in tow, and sure enough, the poor waitress was staring in dismay at the five lonely pennies sitting at the bottom of the glass.   I said "I'm so sorry - my daughter was playing with those - that's not your tip!  I left the real one at the cash register!"  She was very relieved.  :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 01, 2013, 10:30:53 AM
Even if she tosses the worst toys, isn't she just like her MIL when she gives the rest of the ratty toys to Goodwill?   Really, why not just throw all of them out?   A person doesn't need to donate brand new items to Goodwill, just those in good condition.  To me, "good condition" is defined as "the same condition I would accept for used goods in my home." 

Sorry for the tangent - to get back on track:  I don't mind some of the used toys my MIL picks up for the grandkids.  Most are in really good condition and easy to clean.  I do not accepted used stuffed toys b/c I can't get them clean enough for my standards.  I did object to the used car seat.  I don't think she was really a cheapskate but frugal - why spend lots of money that will be used for a short time.

Some are grungy and have been thrown out.

Some are too grungy for my taste and are being given to Goodwill - I assume Grandma got at least some of them at Goodwill in the first place, so obviously they're not too grungy for Goodwill's standards.

Some are brand-new but cheap toys which are not appropriate for a baby (very small plastic figures, cardboard puzzles) and are also going to Goodwill.

We're keeping the board book, the Easter maraca (?!), and one of the nicer stuffed rabbits.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: artk2002 on April 01, 2013, 10:46:24 AM
. . . Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

So they aren't good enough for you or your child, but they're good enough for Goodwill?  Why do you think Goodwill would want them?

Agree.

I don't know. Things that are worn or ratty or smoky have no place being donated, but things that would be alright after a wash? I used to be time rich but cash poor and I would pick up slightly dirty but otherwise fine toys at garage sales or wherever and soak them in nappy sanitiser, wash them, hang them on the line in the sun and air to dry and they'd be good as new. Now I have the presence of money and absence of time and don't have the time to a) find and b) clean toys I wouldn't consider it and would pass on toys like that to the next person who may want them.

In other words, just because *I* don't want something, or don't have the time/inclination to return it to a usable state doesn't mean that noone would. I'm not familiar with Goodwill as such so I can't comment as to what they specifically would accept but I don't think that in general things should be trashed just because I, personally, don't have the time and energy to restore them to their former glory.

OTOH when MIL tried to give us some sheets that we didn't want on the basis that they were "too good to donate" - THEN I saw red.

If we take the attitude put forth by Luci and PaperRoses to its extreme end, then nobody would ever donate anything at all.  "Not right for me" is not the same as "not right for anyone."
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: DaisyG on April 01, 2013, 10:55:24 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hillia on April 01, 2013, 11:05:22 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

I've seen this tip on several frugal living sites.  I don't think it's cheap at all - you're not stealing, you're not affecting quality of life, you're just not wasting usable soap.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Carotte on April 01, 2013, 11:06:29 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

I don't thin it's cheap, we do the same thing, it gets fused with a new one. Why waste it when you can still use it. On it's own it would be too small to use it but not if it's fused to a bigger one.

Now collecting all your slivers until you can make a new soap would be too much for me, you either use it now or you throw it away.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: GreenHall on April 01, 2013, 11:09:52 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?
Hope not, since I do the same thing  :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jaxsue on April 01, 2013, 11:10:15 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

Not cheap; it's smart. I seldom use bars of soap, but when I do I use them until they virtually disappear.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jaxsue on April 01, 2013, 11:11:39 AM
For years I thought I was the problem. I wasn't a good enough wife or person. I know ehell isn't a therapy session, and I apologize for going off-topic a bit. I finally saw the abuse for what it was.

If it's brief, fits the topic, and might be a gentle warning or quiet encouragement for others, I don't consider it a therapy session - it just happens to have a small bonus.

And it's reasonably priced!

I need a "like" button.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Roe on April 01, 2013, 11:15:01 AM
. . . Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

So they aren't good enough for you or your child, but they're good enough for Goodwill?  Why do you think Goodwill would want them?

Agree.

I don't know. Things that are worn or ratty or smoky have no place being donated, but things that would be alright after a wash? I used to be time rich but cash poor and I would pick up slightly dirty but otherwise fine toys at garage sales or wherever and soak them in nappy sanitiser, wash them, hang them on the line in the sun and air to dry and they'd be good as new. Now I have the presence of money and absence of time and don't have the time to a) find and b) clean toys I wouldn't consider it and would pass on toys like that to the next person who may want them.

In other words, just because *I* don't want something, or don't have the time/inclination to return it to a usable state doesn't mean that noone would. I'm not familiar with Goodwill as such so I can't comment as to what they specifically would accept but I don't think that in general things should be trashed just because I, personally, don't have the time and energy to restore them to their former glory.

OTOH when MIL tried to give us some sheets that we didn't want on the basis that they were "too good to donate" - THEN I saw red.

If we take the attitude put forth by Luci and PaperRoses to its extreme end, then nobody would ever donate anything at all.  "Not right for me" is not the same as "not right for anyone."

Pod.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Snowy Owl on April 01, 2013, 11:17:09 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

No I don't think that's cheap, it's frugal.  Besides it's your soap, you've paid for it and it's not like you're depriving other people of anything.  I think the difference between being cheap and being frugal is that being frugal is doing things to save money where you can but not to the detriment of others.  For example, being frugal is eating from the set menu or using a coupon to save money.  Being cheap is taking your own containers to a buffet and loading them up.

Not sure I'm explaining this right. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: dawbs on April 01, 2013, 11:18:06 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?
even better, when they're thin enough to be pliable, you can make them into weird shapes  ;D
We always made them into circles and hung them on the towel rack, which pissed off mom  :-[
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Black Delphinium on April 01, 2013, 11:28:39 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

No I don't think that's cheap, it's frugal.  Besides it's your soap, you've paid for it and it's not like you're depriving other people of anything.  I think the difference between being cheap and being frugal is that being frugal is doing things to save money where you can but not to the detriment of others.  For example, being frugal is eating from the set menu or using a coupon to save money.  Being cheap is taking your own containers to a buffet and loading them up.

Not sure I'm explaining this right.
That's a pretty good handle on it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Moray on April 01, 2013, 11:30:12 AM
Even if she tosses the worst toys, isn't she just like her MIL when she gives the rest of the ratty toys to Goodwill?   Really, why not just throw all of them out?   A person doesn't need to donate brand new items to Goodwill, just those in good condition.  To me, "good condition" is defined as "the same condition I would accept for used goods in my home." 

Sorry for the tangent - to get back on track:  I don't mind some of the used toys my MIL picks up for the grandkids.  Most are in really good condition and easy to clean.  I do not accepted used stuffed toys b/c I can't get them clean enough for my standards.  I did object to the used car seat.  I don't think she was really a cheapskate but frugal - why spend lots of money that will be used for a short time.

Some are grungy and have been thrown out.

Some are too grungy for my taste and are being given to Goodwill - I assume Grandma got at least some of them at Goodwill in the first place, so obviously they're not too grungy for Goodwill's standards.

Some are brand-new but cheap toys which are not appropriate for a baby (very small plastic figures, cardboard puzzles) and are also going to Goodwill.

We're keeping the board book, the Easter maraca (?!), and one of the nicer stuffed rabbits.

Your heart is in the right place, but as someone who has volunteered heavily for their local Goodwill for a few years now, I'm asking you nicely to reconsider. Our volunteers try really, really hard to weed out the nasty, grungy stuff, but sometimes the volume just prohibits a really close inspection. To be frank, we spend a lot of time sorting through things people donate that really should have gone in the trash, and then we have the pleasure of using our time and financial resources hauling them away. Please do not donate anything you consider too gross for your own consumption. It really would be kinder to just put it in the trash rather than hoping it gets carefully scrutinized by our volunteers.

We would, however, welcome your donation of the puzzles and plastic toys that you feel don't fit your child's needs at this time.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: hermanne on April 01, 2013, 11:35:33 AM
Loving this thread! A lot of these stories sound so familiar.

And I like the idea of bringing a tall child's birth certificate to places like buffets and amusement parks. I was a tall child and my parents sometimes got the stinkeye from staff who thought we were trying to get in on the cheep. DD is 6 years old but looks closer to 8.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RebeccainGA on April 01, 2013, 11:35:51 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

No I don't think that's cheap, it's frugal.  Besides it's your soap, you've paid for it and it's not like you're depriving other people of anything.  I think the difference between being cheap and being frugal is that being frugal is doing things to save money where you can but not to the detriment of others.  For example, being frugal is eating from the set menu or using a coupon to save money.  Being cheap is taking your own containers to a buffet and loading them up.

Not sure I'm explaining this right. 

You sound right on to me.

For example - taking the bone out of a ham, freezing it until later, and using it for soup instead of buying tinned soup - frugal.
Being served ham at an event, and sneaking the ham bone out in your purse - cheap.

Repairing your clothes instead of discarding them because of a small tear - frugal
Taking things out of the lost and found bin because they are your size - cheap

Washing your own car instead of taking it someplace - frugal
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

Cheap is mean spirited, taking advantage, using most people's good manners to get away with something outrageous because you know that no one will challenge you.
Frugal is that old WWII era saying "Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without" - not buying or using unnecessary things because you want your money to go to something else.

My dad always complains about cheap people. His definition is a bit skewed, I think - he calls people cheap who won't spend money the way HE would spend it, not just people that are taking advantage - but I agree with the general spirit of what he says. Frugal people are frequently quite generous - with their time, their talents, and sometimes with their money, when it's for a good reason. Cheap people aren't generous. It's not in their nature.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Bijou on April 01, 2013, 11:36:09 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?
Not cheap!  Smart, is more like it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Bijou on April 01, 2013, 11:39:00 AM

When they retired, both my parents and Mr. Thipu's parents thought that they could make do with
one tea bag for two people.  Both sets of parents soon decided that wasn't the best of ideas.     

We do that.  It's fine.
We do, too.  My husband just dips he bag in and out of his hot water.  He likes tea so weak that it hardly has a flavor.  If I don't use the bag he'll save it for next time.  He hangs it up on a cup hook and dries it out.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 01, 2013, 11:39:53 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

I've seen this tip on several frugal living sites.  I don't think it's cheap at all - you're not stealing, you're not affecting quality of life, you're just not wasting usable soap.

Not at all.  I do something similar with my favorite hand cream. it's pricy, $12 for 2.5 oz tube. I will buy with coupons, promos, and always have a stash of 8-10. But when it gets down to where its hard to squeeze anymore out, i cut the top of the tube off, and use my finger to scoop out what's left. then put it in a jar.  However, only I use it, since my fingers have been all over it. Any guest who wants/needs lotion gets a full tube to use.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Virg on April 01, 2013, 11:41:49 AM
CharlieBraun wrote:

"He converted his auto to run on oil.  Vegetable oil.  He used to buy the fryer oil from various restaurants in his town, sequentially.  If you drove behind his car, depending on the day, you might be treated to the odor of egg rolls/dim sum, french fries, or cannoli."

I don't think this particular suggestion belongs in the cheapskate thread.  If he's buying the oil instead of begging or stealing it, then more power to him (pun intended) if he can run his car on an alternative fuel.  The fact that he uses "scented gasoline" isn't enough of a problem to push it over the edge for me.  In fact, I think it's pretty ingenious.

Virg
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: hermanne on April 01, 2013, 11:42:16 AM

When they retired, both my parents and Mr. ThipRTu's parents thought that they could make do with
one tea bag for two people.  Both sets of parents soon decided that wasn't the best of ideas.     

We do that.  It's fine.
We do, too.  My husband just dips he bag in and out of his hot water.  He likes tea so weak that it hardly has a flavor.  If I don't use the bag he'll save it for next timetime.  He hangs it up on a cup hook and dries it out.

And a "scecond run" of tea is decaf. :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Bijou on April 01, 2013, 11:43:22 AM
At work we were collecting for a food drive at Christmas and someone donated swollen, rusted cans of food.  I was shocked.  Who does stuff like this? 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RingTailedLemur on April 01, 2013, 11:44:23 AM

When they retired, both my parents and Mr. Thipu's parents thought that they could make do with
one tea bag for two people.  Both sets of parents soon decided that wasn't the best of ideas.     

We do that.  It's fine.
We do, too.  My husband just dips he bag in and out of his hot water.  He likes tea so weak that it hardly has a flavor.  If I don't use the bag he'll save it for next time.  He hangs it up on a cup hook and dries it out.

I get the tea bag first because I like tea quite strong.  Mr Lemur likes his quite weak - he describes it as "just wave the tea bag in the direction of the cup".  We don't save any/dry them out though.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 11:46:45 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

I've known of people who do this; even did it myself a few times if it doesn't break first.  Not cheap.  (The slivers of soap I referred to (exBFF's DH) were not large enough to attach to another bar of soap.)

When I was little I remember my grandma used to save soap slivers, put them in a jar with water, soaked it till it got really gooey, and made kind of a detergent to use.  I used to know of people who did this a long time ago, but haven't seen it recently.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: darling on April 01, 2013, 11:51:21 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

I've seen this tip on several frugal living sites.  I don't think it's cheap at all - you're not stealing, you're not affecting quality of life, you're just not wasting usable soap.

Not at all.  I do something similar with my favorite hand cream. it's pricy, $12 for 2.5 oz tube. I will buy with coupons, promos, and always have a stash of 8-10. But when it gets down to where its hard to squeeze anymore out, i cut the top of the tube off, and use my finger to scoop out what's left. then put it in a jar.  However, only I use it, since my fingers have been all over it. Any guest who wants/needs lotion gets a full tube to use.

Thank you for the lotion tip! I forgot my new tube of hand lotion at home, and was really regretting it. Then I saw your post, grabbed the old tube, cut it open, and YAY, DRY HAND RELIEF!!!!  ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: lady_disdain on April 01, 2013, 11:53:04 AM
Washing your own car instead of taking it someplace - frugal
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

As long as the soap is the right kind (which also applies to washing on your own), I don't see a problem. You are not harming anyone by standing out in the rain and, excepting extreme weather, won't harm you either. So what's the problem?

Now, if the person were pushing for all of us to do the same...
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Twik on April 01, 2013, 11:55:16 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

"Cheap" is doing something that is overly time-consuming, complicated, or that results in a vastly degraded experience that isn't worth the few pennies saved. Your example is fine - it's thrifty, not cheap.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: heartmug on April 01, 2013, 11:55:44 AM
My in-laws.  We don't exchange anniversary gifts, though we have thrown them 2 anniversary parties.  After one of those parties they gave us an anniversary card with $20 in it.  They owed us $30 from a month before, but DH didn't want to make an issue out of it.

Last time we went on vacation with them (in which they will do NOTHING unless it is free) we had gone to a museum and they skipped it.  We met them for lunch.  When the check came FIL excused himself to go to the bathroom and MIL looked away.  Seriously.  DH waited for a few minutes to see if she would reach for the check.  So he picked it up, read it over, asked me if I had $15 to leave the tip in cash, and she offered nothing the whole time.  FIL took his leftover pasta back to the hotel.  I didn't think it was enough for a meal but whatever.The next morning we met up for brunch and asked them what they did for dinner.  They split the cold pasta (no microwave).

They gave us a painting for Christmas one year that was rescused from their neighbor's "who were just going to throw it away."  Yes, that was our "gift."

My birthday card is a smaller card that comes inside of DH's birthday card each year, even though my birthday is before his.  If we are visiting them near my birthday, then I get handed a full size card.

Almost forgot:  my DH's favorite one to tell.  It was our 25th anniversary.  Usually we just get a card from them, so here in our mail is a card and a gift card!  Wow.  But on closer inspection, it looked like a gift card but the large "$20" at the top had fine print under it that it was $20 off a purchase of $50 or more.  And it expired in 3 months.  So it really was a coupon.  But it was to our favorite store.  MIL called and asked if we got the gift card.  DH said she didn't sound happy when he corrected her and told her it was a coupon.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 01, 2013, 12:09:33 PM
A story above reminded me of one. 

I used to know a guy who, when he was little, his parents sent him out to neighbors to ask for their used cooking oil/grease to make soap with.  It was really gross because his parents didn't strain the oil and the soaps would still have bits of bacon and such. 

I've heard of saving your own to make soap, but it wasn't common to ask neighbors where he lived and he was very embarrassed begging for grease.  Looking back, he realised the neighbors must have felt sorry for him but was kind enough to save the used oil/grease for when he came around.

The parents are those who can spend a lot on some unnecessary things, but will bend over backwards to find basic necessities for free if they can.  There were other stories about their cheapness, but that one stuck with me.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: EmmaJ. on April 01, 2013, 12:16:30 PM
At work we were collecting for a food drive at Christmas and someone donated swollen, rusted cans of food.  I was shocked.  Who does stuff like this?

My church has a bin in the narthex for food donations which is passed on to the local homeless shelter.  Every few months, Pastor has to make an announcement "Please, no expired items!"

The last time he made the announcement, I heard someone behind me muttering, "Since when are homeless people picky?"

 >:(  :o  :'(
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 12:20:12 PM
Quote
When the check came FIL excused himself to go to the bathroom and MIL looked away.  Seriously. 

ooohh boy, that brought back a memory.

This crosses the line from cheapskate to scammer, imo.  I worked for an organization and for functional reasons our small section was located in a different part of town than the main office.  There were 8 of us, and we fell into a habit of going to lunch together every Friday.  The check plus tip was always split 8 ways (or 6 or however many people came).  One young woman (relatively new hire) had a habit of getting up to go to the rest room as soon as the check came.  She would watch for just the right time when several people were engaged in lively conversation and laughing, etc.  I noticed it, as did a co-worker. (She/cheapskate was not a kid - about 28 yrs old)  The boss would just go ahead and collect from everyone then toss in some extra.

Errant co-worker would stay in the rest room until we were ready to leave, and I never saw her give money to anyone.  It was hard to decide what, if anything, to do.  So, after several weeks of this, a co-worker said to boss “I’ll pay X’s share and she can pay me back when she comes out of the rest room.”  Well, when X came out of the rest room, co-worker said “They already collected and paid.  Since you weren’t here, I paid your share.”  X looked at coworker like she had two heads and did nothing.  Next day, co-worker asked X for the money and X said “Oh, I have to go to the bank”.  She gave several excuses over several days and actually started treating co-worker rather cool and avoiding her.   I don’t know if X ever paid up, but I continued to notice that X did her disappearing act when it was time to pay.  So, two of us started asking for separate checks and just paid for our own lunches.  If boss wanted to pay for X’s lunches, fine, but I didn’t want to.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: EmmaJ. on April 01, 2013, 12:22:51 PM
Oh, and I wanted to chime in on the stuffed animals.  I used to go to Goodwill and buy stuffies by the barrel.  My dog's quirk was to destroy - no, anniliate - them down to little inch square pieces of fabric. 

I would wash and dry everything I purchased but honestly didn't care what it looked like.  Pooch was just so happy with a new toy every couple days.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Thipu1 on April 01, 2013, 12:25:05 PM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

 Back in the 1980s, catalogues such as Lilian Vernon offered a 'soap press'.  The idea was that you would save slivers of soap, pack them into a mold and make them into a new bar of soap.  It didn't often work well but the idea wasn't bad. I would consider that thrifty rather than cheap. 

In a similar vein, I buy large bottles of shampoo, pour half out into another bottle and fill up the bottle with water.  This gives me plenty of good shampoo and, since I wash my hair every day, I really don't need the concentrated stuff.  I consider that thrifty.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 12:29:00 PM
Quote
The last time he made the announcement, I heard someone behind me muttering, "Since when are homeless people picky?"

 >:(
And this was said in church.   ::)
As if being down on your luck and not having a place to live means you should be gtateful for spoiled food (what can make you sick).

I worked at a food pantry several yrs ago (filled in for a friend who had surgery).  I was spleased they bought really goos stuff from the grocary store (nice, fresh bakary items, etc.) for people who needed some help.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 01, 2013, 12:38:37 PM
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

This bothers me on two levels.  One, it is stealing a service by paying less than the posted price, so it is wrong because it is theft.  Two, it's teaching children by example that lying and stealing are OK.

One of our children was smaller than many his age and there was a time or two many years ago that my wife suggested we should pay less than the correct price for his true age.  I said no, because I wanted to make a point teaching honesty by example.  (Our boys were very observant; they'd have noticed and remembered if we had lied about their ages.)

My parents did this with all three of us, making us squat to pass as shorter. I do not and have not done this with DS, and it would be very hard to now as he is 6'1" and not quite 15 yet.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 01, 2013, 12:42:51 PM

Soy sauce:  I was at a gathering recently and a friend had the rest of us laughing and shaking our heads about her brother.  He’s a single guy, has a good job, car, dresses nice, and lives in a nice apartment.  She stopped over to visit him, and he asked if she would like some leftover take out from a Chinese restaurant.  After she took a bite, she asked if he had any soy sauce.  He handed her a bottle and she noticed the label had been removed (scraped and washed off).  She asked him “What kind of soy sauce is this?”  He reached into the bottom compartment of his refrigerator and pulled out a plastic grocery bag full of packets of soy sauce and various other condiments.  He told her he never bought condiments (including salt, pepper, and sugar).  Instead, he always took handfuls from fast food and other take out places, then took time to squeeze the contents into bottles or other containers.

If I have leftover packets of ketchup or soy sauce I toss them into the frig, then if I forget to use them within a few weeks I throw it out.  I can’t imagine saving s bunch then ‘squeezing’ them into a bottle.  :-\

A year or two ago Dr Phil devoted a show to Cheapskate Husbands where one of them not only did this, but stripped the grapes off the stem so that the stem would not be included in the weight when he was paying for the grapes.  Dr Phil had his staff do a cost/benefits analysis on this guy's behavior and came to the conclusion that he spent x minutes to save 11 cents on the stem.  Even at minimum wage that was too much time.  There was a similar analysis done on the soy sauce and ketchup packets.

A story from my mother:

The last man she was involved with was a notorious cheapskate.  Over the years she had known him (about 12 years) he inherited various pieces of real estate from childless and child-free relatives in addition to being well-employed.  He sold every property he ever inherited and was fortunate enough to be able to do so during a booming market.  She was pleased when he offered to take her to Las Vegas for a vacation.

Until she found out they were flying on Standby, which is cheaper than any advance booking.  She had to allow a 48-hour window for the outgoing flight.  My mother hated the travel process because she found it unduly stressful and this added to it exponentially.

During the five days of their stay they only ate free buffets or inexpensive food.  He never took her to any shows, so she never got to see Siegfried and Roy, David Copperfield, or any other famous entertainers who were Vegas mainstays.  He didn't like being in the casino or near anything where there was a normal number of people for such an area.   He didn't even rent a car.

The final straw was the morning he didn't feel like going downstairs for breakfast and balked at the room service menu price of $6.50 for coffee.  That made my mother promise herself never to travel with him again.

The kicker:  Their room was free because his son was on staff at the hotel.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Yvaine on April 01, 2013, 12:44:04 PM
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

This bothers me on two levels.  One, it is stealing a service by paying less than the posted price, so it is wrong because it is theft.  Two, it's teaching children by example that lying and stealing are OK.

One of our children was smaller than many his age and there was a time or two many years ago that my wife suggested we should pay less than the correct price for his true age.  I said no, because I wanted to make a point teaching honesty by example.  (Our boys were very observant; they'd have noticed and remembered if we had lied about their ages.)

My parents did this with all three of us, making us squat to pass as shorter. I do not and have not done this with DS, and it would be very hard to now as he is 6'1" and not quite 15 yet.

My dad always did this too. And then at one attraction, years later when my youngest sister was about 14, he started to announce "7 adults..." and my heart sank because I knew there were 8 of us there and I was sure he was about to try to pretend one of us was under 10 or 12 or whatever...and then he followed that up with "and one senior!" I always forget his age because he won't let anyone mention it and insists on claiming he's younger...but when there's a discount involved, he's all over it.  ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: snowflake on April 01, 2013, 12:52:00 PM
Not the worst examples here but here is my Aunt and Uncle (I'll call them Bob and Jane.)

Jane not go to the doctor because she refused to "give in" when her co-pay was raised from $10 to $20.  She wouldn't go even though she kept swelling up and soon couldn't even put on her clothes.  It was a kidney infection that could have been treated if caught early, but she is now minus one kidney.  (And is lucky she still has that.)  Would you know that even if you have insurance (and don't need a transplant) hospital stays are lots and lots of money?

Bob was mad about the price of gasoline was going up.  So he decided that the car would just have to "make do" without maintenance.  I guess the car missed the memo about sucking it up because they had to buy a whole new car after scrimping on oil changes and brake jobs.

They both have gone on for years about how they don't see why people waste their money on marital counseling.  When their child (my cousin) talked about buying a book on learning to communicate they said, "Save your money!" and jeered at her. They are now in the middle of a very expensive divorce.  Each one believes that they should get the lion's share of the assets because the other one is responsible for spending all the money.  As a result, most of their retirement savings are going to the lawyers.

Like I said, not the most unethical or gross story.  But their brand of cheapness always makes me look at the sky and scream, "WHY?????"  (And this is coming from a woman who at one point only owned washcloths made out of old clothes.)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 12:56:32 PM
Quote
He didn't like being in the casino

Oh, no.  I would think a casino (gambling, with MONEY) or even buying a lottery ticket would be off-limits to a cheapskate.

Odd that he even went to Vegas, a place where it's almost a guarantee you have to spend some money.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BabyMama on April 01, 2013, 12:59:30 PM
When I was growing up, my mom's family would joke that my great-grandma (deceased) would steal the sugar/jam/condiment packets when they went out to eat. Now that I'm an adult, I notice that this attribute must have rubbed off on her grandchildren...

I remember going to a pizza buffet with one of my aunts. She wrapped at least an entire pizza's worth of pizza in napkins. That's what we ate for dinner.

Growing up, I ate off the kids' menu until I was a late teenager. Sometimes I would have to split a meal with my sister. (And my parents are very, very well off, it wasn't a money issue.) When I got old enough to pay for my own meals, I had a hard time figuring out what to eat because I was so used to having to eat the kid portions.

My other aunt thinks dish detergent is too expensive (and not hygienic because she lets her dogs eat off the plates) so she washes her dishes with bleach. Unfortunately the bleach water that splashes onto her shirt ends up eating the shirts, so she has many, many shirts with holes worn in the lower abdomen area. She still wears them though, and won't let my mom toss them because they're "fine." She also reuses paper towels until they disintegrate.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BabyMama on April 01, 2013, 01:00:54 PM
My mother will use one end of a tissue, then save it to use the other end later.
And she wonders why colds last so much longer for her than for people who dispose of the tissue instead of using it twice.

My father (a doctor!) does this. I always hated getting a runny nose as a kid because he'd pull the grubby Kleenex out of his pocket for us to use. No thanks, I'll just have boogers running down my face...
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: snowflake on April 01, 2013, 01:02:51 PM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

There is a distinct difference between taking some simple cost-saving (or other resource-saving) measures and being unethical, insensitive, or not thinking about whether the practice actually saves money or not.  I tear my kleenex in half, buy used clothes on ebay, reuse my aluminum foil (depending on the first usage), stick the soaps together, water down my shampoo, and do many other things that are fairly simple. Doing this hurts no one and takes little time.

There are some people who think that any visible cost-saving measures are "tacky" because they imply that the owner does not have unlimited resources.  I have never tried to impress such people because that's a losing battle.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CharlieBraun on April 01, 2013, 01:04:07 PM
CharlieBraun wrote:

"He converted his auto to run on oil.  Vegetable oil.  He used to buy the fryer oil from various restaurants in his town, sequentially.  If you drove behind his car, depending on the day, you might be treated to the odor of egg rolls/dim sum, french fries, or cannoli."

I don't think this particular suggestion belongs in the cheapskate thread.  If he's buying the oil instead of begging or stealing it, then more power to him (pun intended) if he can run his car on an alternative fuel.  The fact that he uses "scented gasoline" isn't enough of a problem to push it over the edge for me.  In fact, I think it's pretty ingenious.

Virg

A case of.....YMMV?   ;D  (couldn't resist)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 01, 2013, 01:08:02 PM
. . . Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

So they aren't good enough for you or your child, but they're good enough for Goodwill?  Why do you think Goodwill would want them?

Agree.

I don't know. Things that are worn or ratty or smoky have no place being donated, but things that would be alright after a wash? I used to be time rich but cash poor and I would pick up slightly dirty but otherwise fine toys at garage sales or wherever and soak them in nappy sanitiser, wash them, hang them on the line in the sun and air to dry and they'd be good as new. Now I have the presence of money and absence of time and don't have the time to a) find and b) clean toys I wouldn't consider it and would pass on toys like that to the next person who may want them.

In other words, just because *I* don't want something, or don't have the time/inclination to return it to a usable state doesn't mean that noone would. I'm not familiar with Goodwill as such so I can't comment as to what they specifically would accept but I don't think that in general things should be trashed just because I, personally, don't have the time and energy to restore them to their former glory.

OTOH when MIL tried to give us some sheets that we didn't want on the basis that they were "too good to donate" - THEN I saw red.

If we take the attitude put forth by Luci and PaperRoses to its extreme end, then nobody would ever donate anything at all.  "Not right for me" is not the same as "not right for anyone."

Pod.

If it isn't good enough for me, it isn't good enough for anyone else. I did not say 'not right' and after rereading this all, I missed that statement.

I donate towels that I have been given and hate. Towels that are only half used but don't match my decore.

I donate scraps of fabric and yarn because many people know how to use small amounts. I won't donate the same stuff caught in a flood or sewer disaster.

I donate stuff from my cutlery drawer because it is still usable but I now have better.

I donated clothing the children had outgrown and there was no one else in the family in the immediate future that could use it. I donate my fat clothes that are still usable but I will never wear again.

I donate old curtains washed and labeled because I know that someone else can use them or know how to resew them for their own uses.

We donate lamps that we have replaced and are still usable as lamps - and know that parts may be used for someone else's project.

We only discard things totally filthy - flood mentioned above - mouse eaten, and otherwise totally contaminated.

I did a major purge last year, and by IRS had a $700 deduction. All stuff I would not mind having in my home but knew someone else might need or like. There was a lot of other stuff that I donated to specific charities that I didn't deduct.

Please don't criticize me for being selective about my donations and not wanting to burden others with my garbage.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Amara on April 01, 2013, 01:15:43 PM
Heartmug, that is ... beyond weird. At least it sounds like you can laugh at it.


Quote
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

Cheap is mean spirited, taking advantage, using most people's good manners to get away with something outrageous because you know that no one will challenge you.

I disagree and would call this smart--and fun! It's not mean-spirited, it's just taking advantage of a good thing.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Emmy on April 01, 2013, 01:28:12 PM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

There is a distinct difference between taking some simple cost-saving (or other resource-saving) measures and being unethical, insensitive, or not thinking about whether the practice actually saves money or not.  I tear my kleenex in half, buy used clothes on ebay, reuse my aluminum foil (depending on the first usage), stick the soaps together, water down my shampoo, and do many other things that are fairly simple. Doing this hurts no one and takes little time.

There are some people who think that any visible cost-saving measures are "tacky" because they imply that the owner does not have unlimited resources.  I have never tried to impress such people because that's a losing battle.

I do some of these things as well.  I think that is being frugal or thrifty.  The word 'cheap' has a more negative connotation and I think of being cheap as acting in a way that puts other people out in order to save money. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: gramma dishes on April 01, 2013, 01:34:07 PM


Odd that he even went to Vegas, a place where it's almost a guarantee you have to spend some money.

But the room was FREE!!    ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: wolfie on April 01, 2013, 01:36:40 PM
Heartmug, that is ... beyond weird. At least it sounds like you can laugh at it.


Quote
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

Cheap is mean spirited, taking advantage, using most people's good manners to get away with something outrageous because you know that no one will challenge you.

I disagree and would call this smart--and fun! It's not mean-spirited, it's just taking advantage of a good thing.

I am sorry, I don't think I understand what you mean. You think that using someone's good manners against them is smart and fun? I can assure you might be able to get away with it the first time, but you won't be welcome in my life to try it a second time.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 01, 2013, 01:37:59 PM
I will admit to using my tissues twice, but only when I'm not actually sick. I have major allergies, so I blow my nose, snuffle etc. all year round. But I only use one end normally, and then the other. And relaly only when I run low  at work and forget to bring in another box!  At home I have one in every room, so I just blow and throw.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Amara on April 01, 2013, 01:39:55 PM
No, no. Never, Wolfie.

I meant that running out to wash the car in the rain is not taking advantage of good manners but of nature. Taking advantage of the rain to wash the car.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: gramma dishes on April 01, 2013, 01:41:28 PM
I thought she meant going out into the rain to wash the car.  I agree with her.  Well, as long as there's no lightning!   :-\
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Cami on April 01, 2013, 01:44:59 PM
1. We had a relative who was so cheap, he

-- Made his kids get the grilled cheese sandwich at a local restaurant instead of the hamburger, because the grilled cheese sandwich was 5 cents cheaper. The fact that neither of his kids liked the grilled cheese sandwich was irrelevant. It was 5 cents per person!

--Refused to bail his teen daughter out of a rural southern jail in which she'd been incarcerated for speeding. (Seriously, the whole thing was like that song, When the Lights Went Out in Georgia. Very scary.) Another relative who had heretofore been known for his own cheapskate qualities was appalled and promptly bailed her out.


2. Had another relative who

--Stole anything not nailed down from any hotel in which she ever stayed. This included EVERYTHING at a hotel breakfast bar, including on one occasion, more than 30 donuts. (She would eat this stolen food even after it had grown mold on it.) 
--Kept the house so cold that her kids wore their winter coats, hats and gloves indoors.
--Stole food from restaurant buffets, would ask for basket after basket of free breads that went into her purse, stole paper napkins/straws/plastic utensils/condiments.
--Convinced her husband she had no choice but to behave this way since he didn't earn enough money to allow them to "live like normal
people". She kept control of the finances and her husband believed her and had low self esteem for decades as a result.  In reality, upon her death, he discovered that they had millions in the bank.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Paper Roses on April 01, 2013, 01:53:33 PM
. . . Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

So they aren't good enough for you or your child, but they're good enough for Goodwill?  Why do you think Goodwill would want them?

Agree.

I don't know. Things that are worn or ratty or smoky have no place being donated, but things that would be alright after a wash? I used to be time rich but cash poor and I would pick up slightly dirty but otherwise fine toys at garage sales or wherever and soak them in nappy sanitiser, wash them, hang them on the line in the sun and air to dry and they'd be good as new. Now I have the presence of money and absence of time and don't have the time to a) find and b) clean toys I wouldn't consider it and would pass on toys like that to the next person who may want them.

In other words, just because *I* don't want something, or don't have the time/inclination to return it to a usable state doesn't mean that noone would. I'm not familiar with Goodwill as such so I can't comment as to what they specifically would accept but I don't think that in general things should be trashed just because I, personally, don't have the time and energy to restore them to their former glory.

OTOH when MIL tried to give us some sheets that we didn't want on the basis that they were "too good to donate" - THEN I saw red.

If we take the attitude put forth by Luci and PaperRoses to its extreme end, then nobody would ever donate anything at all.  "Not right for me" is not the same as "not right for anyone."

Pod.

If it isn't good enough for me, it isn't good enough for anyone else. I did not say 'not right' and after rereading this all, I missed that statement.

I donate towels that I have been given and hate. Towels that are only half used but don't match my decore.

I donate scraps of fabric and yarn because many people know how to use small amounts. I won't donate the same stuff caught in a flood or sewer disaster.

I donate stuff from my cutlery drawer because it is still usable but I now have better.

I donated clothing the children had outgrown and there was no one else in the family in the immediate future that could use it. I donate my fat clothes that are still usable but I will never wear again.

I donate old curtains washed and labeled because I know that someone else can use them or know how to resew them for their own uses.

We donate lamps that we have replaced and are still usable as lamps - and know that parts may be used for someone else's project.

We only discard things totally filthy - flood mentioned above - mouse eaten, and otherwise totally contaminated.

I did a major purge last year, and by IRS had a $700 deduction. All stuff I would not mind having in my home but knew someone else might need or like. There was a lot of other stuff that I donated to specific charities that I didn't deduct.

Please don't criticize me for being selective about my donations and not wanting to burden others with my garbage.

Pod.

And if we took the attitude put forth by Slartibartfast to the extreme, Goodwill centers would be nothing but trash dumps.

I do not donate anything I would not use myself.  I donate things because they are usable, possibly even brand new, I just don't need them. 

But if it's "too grungy for me" then it's too grungy to donate.

And I really don't see why "taking the attitude put forth to the extreme" has any relevance whatsoever. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CakeBeret on April 01, 2013, 02:02:00 PM
Oh, boy.

When I was a kid, my dad reused dental floss. He kept a long string hanging from the rearview mirror of his truck and would floss with it and put it back whenever the mood struck him. :-X

My mom reuses ziplock bags all the time. They are really not meant to be washed, and so often have a film of leftover food clinging to the inside.

Recently, a relative gave my son a birthday gift. She used a typical girl baby gift bag--decorated in pink flowers and ribbons, and said "It's a Girl!" in big pink letters. Relative crossed out Girl, wrote Boy, and then wrote my son's name--misspelled--underneath. DH and I got a good laugh out of that one.



I use a lot of thrifty tricks and some people might call me a cheapskate, but IMO I never cross that line. :) One of my proudest achievements is 3-stage vegetable usage. When we buy veggies, I save the scraps in the freezer and then cook them into broth. Then, I take the scraps and pass them along to my brother to use as compost.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 01, 2013, 02:02:51 PM
Can I respectfully request we get off the Goodwill donating aspect of this thread?  It's become contentious on here before and it's looking to do so again.  We're all just going to have to agree to disagree - some people think there's a category of items which are "too old/grubby/etc. for me to choose to use but still have plenty of life left in them" and other people think there isn't.  I highly doubt an argument on the internet is going to change anyone's opinion on that.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Twik on April 01, 2013, 02:03:21 PM
Oh, and I wanted to chime in on the stuffed animals.  I used to go to Goodwill and buy stuffies by the barrel.  My dog's quirk was to destroy - no, anniliate - them down to little inch square pieces of fabric. 

I bought a used stuffie for the Cairn Terrorist - once. He started to rip at it, and then a look of sheer disgust came over his face, and he spit it out. I didn't know dogs could spit like that. Then he stalked away and sulked the rest of the day.

He most definitely did NOT approve of frugality when it came to his comforts.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Yvaine on April 01, 2013, 02:04:07 PM
My rule for donation is that the quality should be good enough for me. It's obviously not going to be something I'm actually using, or else I'd still be using it instead of donating it, but the dealbreaker is something other than quality. Doesn't fit. Needs alterations I don't have the skill to do myself. Color/pattern I hate. No space to keep it. Etc. Just not ratty rags.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 02:04:28 PM
Also, this is an enjoyable thread.  Please, I don't want it to get locked because some are going off on tangents and getting contentious.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: magician5 on April 01, 2013, 02:31:40 PM
When I was little I remember my grandma used to save soap slivers, put them in a jar with water, soaked it till it got really gooey, and made kind of a detergent to use.  I used to know of people who did this a long time ago, but haven't seen it recently.

They charge a fortune for it and call it "body wash" these days.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: White Dragon on April 01, 2013, 02:38:29 PM
I recently stayed in a hotel that promptly went on my "Didn't care for, won't revisit" list. (Didn't care for the level of cleanliness, food and service lacking etc.)

One quirk I did notice was that the hotel did offer complimentary shampoo and soap - but in large dispensers fastened to the wall of the shower. Perfectly hygienic and all, and no doubt cheaper than providing individually wrapped items, but I did find it a bit off putting in a stingy sort of way.
But I may be biased because by this time I was already less than impressed with the place.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 01, 2013, 02:41:04 PM
"I just thought you should know you're wife is out here spending your paycheck on shoes," he told DH.

This friend, of course, is a notorious cheapskate, who flips out anytime his wife makes a purchase he doesn't approve of.

Does his wife work or is it a case of "No wife of mine will ever work" so the can control the purse strings?  I bet he longs for the days when all women have no say.

Oh, no, his wife works.  I work, too, for that matter, but he doesn't see it as real work because I work from home. (He doesn't think I make any money at what I do, which is kind of funny since a lot of people grossly over-estimate what I make.)  So he thinks DH earns the majority of our income and therefore should determine how all funds are spent.  He is the same way about his household's income.  His wife earns a decent living, but he earns more so he thinks he should determine how the money is spent.  I think it's a combination of factors:

1) He wants to feel in control because it makes him feel like "the man."

2) He doesn't want her to know how much he spends on stuff for himself, including tools, fishing equipment, and "big
boy toys." 

3) If something isn't of direct use to him (i.e. clothes/shoes for the wife, clothes/shoes for the kids, decorations for the house, perfume or make-up for the wife, craft supplies) he doesn't consider it a necessary purchase, and therefore, something to be avoided or skimped on.

Her shoes or the kids' shoes? 
"You couldn't have bought a cheaper pair at Walmart?"

Clothes for her or the kids?
"I don't remember us talking about buying you a new dress."

Make-up or perfume?
"You don't need all of that stuff."

Craft supplies or decorative stuff?
"Ugh, great, more %^& to clutter up our house."

From what I could tell when we were spending time together, the wife is not a shopaholic by any means.  Unfortunately, his tactics work against her more often than not.  She'd return the decorative stuff or the perfume or shoes she bought just to make herself feel good.  (She's more resistant to returning stuff for the kids.  If they need shoes and clothes, they keep them.)  From some comments she's made, I get the impression that she grew up in a household where whatever the husband said was law and she thinks this is normal behavior.

DH slowly realized what a jerk this guy is a few years after we got married and he recognized the disparity in how friend treated his wife and DH treats me.  He has all but written off the friendship except for the occasional call and facebook post for old time's sake.  Or friend calling to tattle to my husband about yours truly, DH's shoe-fiend wife.   ::) 

It was two pairs!!

Even though I grit my teeth at almost every word that comes out of this guy's mouth, I try to remember that if nothing else, he serves as a wonderful example of how NOT to treat one's wife.  DH has learned a lot from him as an opposite role model.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 01, 2013, 02:41:10 PM
At work we were collecting for a food drive at Christmas and someone donated swollen, rusted cans of food.  I was shocked.  Who does stuff like this?

For two years 2010-2011, I headed our Scouting for food checkpoint, where we would check for dates before boxing the food and loading the truck.

People donated the following items:

*Cream of Broccoli soup that expired in 1986.
*Nutri-system food packets with no dates or information on them other than the brand name.
*Opened packages of hot dogs.
*Odds and ends from gift baskets with no expiration dates or nutritional information.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Ticia on April 01, 2013, 02:41:29 PM
Please stop with the goodwill tangent. It's derailing the thread and causing contention.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: magician5 on April 01, 2013, 02:42:02 PM
Last time we went on vacation with them (in which they will do NOTHING unless it is free) we had gone to a museum and they skipped it.  We met them for lunch.  When the check came FIL excused himself to go to the bathroom and MIL looked away.  Seriously.  DH waited for a few minutes to see if she would reach for the check....

My father used to get red-in-the-face angry (a rare thing) when thinking of the number of relatives he had invited for a weekend or a week at our beach cottage. "They brought a tiny bag of peaches for a gift, and when we'd go out to dinner and the check would come [the husband] would say 'I'll get it, pal, I'll get it' and his hand would ... neeever ... quiiiite get as far as his pocket. And then when we were out on our little boat, of course I'd pay for the gas, and once [the wife] would lay back on the front and say 'I wonder what the poor people are doing today' like it was a big joke." And the relatives wondered why they were never invited back. Dad worked an incredibly hard physical job and saved all his life for those things.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hillia on April 01, 2013, 02:43:18 PM
Oh, and I wanted to chime in on the stuffed animals.  I used to go to Goodwill and buy stuffies by the barrel.  My dog's quirk was to destroy - no, anniliate - them down to little inch square pieces of fabric. 

I bought a used stuffie for the Cairn Terrorist - once. He started to rip at it, and then a look of sheer disgust came over his face, and he spit it out. I didn't know dogs could spit like that. Then he stalked away and sulked the rest of the day.

He most definitely did NOT approve of frugality when it came to his comforts.

We used to buy the 'dollar a bag' stuffed animals and use them for target practice.  Elmo was particularly satisfying to hit.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 01, 2013, 02:44:05 PM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

No, that's frugal and smart.  Not using or not letting anyone else use new soap because you could possibly get some use out of the old bar, that's cheap.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 01, 2013, 02:44:37 PM
Oh, and I wanted to chime in on the stuffed animals.  I used to go to Goodwill and buy stuffies by the barrel.  My dog's quirk was to destroy - no, anniliate - them down to little inch square pieces of fabric. 

I bought a used stuffie for the Cairn Terrorist - once. He started to rip at it, and then a look of sheer disgust came over his face, and he spit it out. I didn't know dogs could spit like that. Then he stalked away and sulked the rest of the day.

He most definitely did NOT approve of frugality when it came to his comforts.

We used to buy the 'dollar a bag' stuffed animals and use them for target practice.  Elmo was particularly satisfying to hit.

Because of all the tickling?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 02:44:52 PM
Quote
'I wonder what the poor people are doing today' like it was a big joke."
Sounds like something Leona Helmsley would say.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 01, 2013, 02:49:19 PM
When ordering Chinese food, I'm disappointed if it comes in paper or styrofoam containers because then I don't get the plastic resusable ones.  I haven't brought lunch containers in years. ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CakeBeret on April 01, 2013, 02:49:52 PM
I recently stayed in a hotel that promptly went on my "Didn't care for, won't revisit" list. (Didn't care for the level of cleanliness, food and service lacking etc.)

One quirk I did notice was that the hotel did offer complimentary shampoo and soap - but in large dispensers fastened to the wall of the shower. Perfectly hygienic and all, and no doubt cheaper than providing individually wrapped items, but I did find it a bit off putting in a stingy sort of way.
But I may be biased because by this time I was already less than impressed with the place.

I personally would love to see that in hotels. I find those little bottles so dang annoying. They have more shampoo than I need for one use, but not enough for two uses. Plus they're often difficult to get the product out of.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: wolfie on April 01, 2013, 02:50:49 PM
No, no. Never, Wolfie.

I meant that running out to wash the car in the rain is not taking advantage of good manners but of nature. Taking advantage of the rain to wash the car.

Oh thank god I misunderstood you! I think I misread the quote tree.

I am wondering though - is there dirt and stuff in rain? So would you need to clean the car again afterwards? I hardly ever wash mine as it is.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 01, 2013, 02:58:22 PM

Almost forgot:  my DH's favorite one to tell.  It was our 25th anniversary.  Usually we just get a card from them, so here in our mail is a card and a gift card!  Wow.  But on closer inspection, it looked like a gift card but the large "$20" at the top had fine print under it that it was $20 off a purchase of $50 or more.  And it expired in 3 months.  So it really was a coupon.  But it was to our favorite store.  MIL called and asked if we got the gift card.  DH said she didn't sound happy when he corrected her and told her it was a coupon.

I think this is the crux of what bothers me about cheapskates' behavior: Treating me as if I am too stupid to recognize what they are doing.  Yes, I notice that you aren't reaching for the check.  Yes, I notice that you re-gifted me a bottle of lotion so old that it has crusted over the top and formed a sort of lotion-wax.   Yes, I notice that you served me expired food when I was a guest in your home. To pretend that I don't notice these things implies a pretty low opinion of my intelligence.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RebeccainGA on April 01, 2013, 02:58:56 PM
No, no. Never, Wolfie.

I meant that running out to wash the car in the rain is not taking advantage of good manners but of nature. Taking advantage of the rain to wash the car.

Oh thank god I misunderstood you! I think I misread the quote tree.

I am wondering though - is there dirt and stuff in rain? So would you need to clean the car again afterwards? I hardly ever wash mine as it is.

If you wash your car in the rain 1) the continued rain will keep the finish wet, so that when it stops, the finish will spot - thereby negating the washing you did and 2) if you do it in a rainstorm, you are adding surfactants (the stuff that breaks the surface tension of water, making it soak into your clothes/dirt/etc. better) to the ground at a time that there's a lot of water being added, making it more likely that the rain will soak down into the earth around you, making mud worse. It's not just cheap, but can be foolish (and you'd go through an awful lot of soap, since your rags would be constantly being rinsed out).

Now, if you want to go DANCE in the rain, that's a whole other thing. Nothing cheap about that - just good, free fun!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 01, 2013, 03:04:25 PM


My other aunt thinks dish detergent is too expensive (and not hygienic because she lets her dogs eat off the plates) so she washes her dishes with bleach. Unfortunately the bleach water that splashes onto her shirt ends up eating the shirts, so she has many, many shirts with holes worn in the lower abdomen area. She still wears them though, and won't let my mom toss them because they're "fine." She also reuses paper towels until they disintegrate.

Wasn't there a story here about a woman whose mother refused to put detergent in the dishwasher, so the plates just got "rinsed."  The first time the poster's husband ate at the in-laws house, he got sick as a dog from the leftover residue/germs on the plates?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: EmmaJ. on April 01, 2013, 03:07:51 PM
Oh, and I wanted to chime in on the stuffed animals.  I used to go to Goodwill and buy stuffies by the barrel.  My dog's quirk was to destroy - no, anniliate - them down to little inch square pieces of fabric. 

I bought a used stuffie for the Cairn Terrorist - once. He started to rip at it, and then a look of sheer disgust came over his face, and he spit it out. I didn't know dogs could spit like that. Then he stalked away and sulked the rest of the day.

He most definitely did NOT approve of frugality when it came to his comforts.

Hahaha - I wonder where it had been!  I swear I washed and dried all the stuffies before giving them to Pooch!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Twik on April 01, 2013, 03:09:55 PM
At work we were collecting for a food drive at Christmas and someone donated swollen, rusted cans of food.  I was shocked.  Who does stuff like this?

Some are just mean people, but I think some are borderline hoarders. They can't put something in the garbage, because that's "wasteful". By giving it to charity, they reassure themselves that "maybe someone else can get some use out of it". Even if they learned the charity threw it out, they'd feel OK, because *they* didn't throw it out themselves.

Unfortunately, I think a lot of advice on frugality and/or waste reduction is harmful to the psyches of these people. I'm a bit of a hoarder myself, and sometimes I have to bite the bullet and say, "this may end up going to the dump, but that's better than sitting in my apartment, then going to the dump when I die."
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 01, 2013, 03:10:39 PM
Oh, boy.


Recently, a relative gave my son a birthday gift. She used a typical girl baby gift bag--decorated in pink flowers and ribbons, and said "It's a Girl!" in big pink letters. Relative crossed out Girl, wrote Boy, and then wrote my son's name--misspelled--underneath. DH and I got a good laugh out of that one.

I will admit to keep an enormous tub of used gift bags in my garage, but I will not re-use them if they have someone's name written on them already, if they are in poor condition, or if they are inappropriate for the occasion. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: gramma dishes on April 01, 2013, 03:15:58 PM

...   Wasn't there a story here about a woman whose mother refused to put detergent in the dishwasher, so the plates just got "rinsed."  The first time the poster's husband ate at the in-laws house, he got sick as a dog from the leftover residue/germs on the plates?

Disgusting to be sure!   :o

But the water in a dishwasher is so incredibly hot and makes so much steam that it would seem that that alone should at least kill most of the germs. 

I think I'd almost take my chances on eating from one of her plates than what my MIL used to do.  She didn't have a dishwasher.  She did her dishes all by hand.  She would run out of whatever her current dishwashing liquid might be and instead of going to the store and buying a new bottle, she'd use Tide or some other laundry detergent.  Then she'd never rinse them off really thoroughly, so next time you ate off one of her plates, you got a little detergent with your green beans and mashed potatoes.  It did not enhance the flavor.   :-\
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: heartmug on April 01, 2013, 03:18:55 PM

Almost forgot:  my DH's favorite one to tell.  It was our 25th anniversary.  Usually we just get a card from them, so here in our mail is a card and a gift card!  Wow.  But on closer inspection, it looked like a gift card but the large "$20" at the top had fine print under it that it was $20 off a purchase of $50 or more.  And it expired in 3 months.  So it really was a coupon.  But it was to our favorite store.  MIL called and asked if we got the gift card.  DH said she didn't sound happy when he corrected her and told her it was a coupon.

I think this is the crux of what bothers me about cheapskates' behavior: Treating me as if I am too stupid to recognize what they are doing.  Yes, I notice that you aren't reaching for the check.  Yes, I notice that you re-gifted me a bottle of lotion so old that it has crusted over the top and formed a sort of lotion-wax.   Yes, I notice that you served me expired food when I was a guest in your home. To pretend that I don't notice these things implies a pretty low opinion of my intelligence.

Well said.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 03:25:38 PM
Sometimes I think cheapskates DO know that others are aware of what they're doing, but they just don't care.

To me it's often a case of "You are not worthy of me going to the dollar store to buy you a (new) $5/$10 gift, so here, take this (used thing that I don't want)".

Cheapskates, by their very nature, are usually selfish and lazy unless the situation benefits them in some way.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: artk2002 on April 01, 2013, 03:27:16 PM
I recently stayed in a hotel that promptly went on my "Didn't care for, won't revisit" list. (Didn't care for the level of cleanliness, food and service lacking etc.)

One quirk I did notice was that the hotel did offer complimentary shampoo and soap - but in large dispensers fastened to the wall of the shower. Perfectly hygienic and all, and no doubt cheaper than providing individually wrapped items, but I did find it a bit off putting in a stingy sort of way.
But I may be biased because by this time I was already less than impressed with the place.

Now, I'd prefer this (although I like to collect the little amenity bottles.) It's far more environmentally sound do do it this way. The little bottles create a very large amount of waste.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 03:31:52 PM
Am I the only one who has gotten very little done today because of this addictive thread?  :( >:( ;D  The stories are so good. I've created a monster!  >:D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: VorFemme on April 01, 2013, 03:43:17 PM
I like the dispenser bottles - I hate running out of either conditioner or body wash in the shower!  But I don't like the scent of the stuff in the gym shower - so I take my own body wash that doubles as hair shampoo.

I use the thin slivers of soap to mark fabrics that I am sewing - the soap washes out quickly when I run the garment through a rinse cycle or dab it with a very wet washcloth (depends on the size of the marks and the color of the fabric).

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 01, 2013, 03:44:30 PM
Diswashing liquid reminds me of a guy who use it as shampoo.  It works pretty well, so for the cost of one bottle (about $1), it does two jobs.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Paper Roses on April 01, 2013, 03:49:35 PM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

I grew up thinking everyone did this too.  I was shocked that my husband would throw away the small slivers.  I promptly broke him of that habit.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 01, 2013, 03:50:30 PM


My other aunt thinks dish detergent is too expensive (and not hygienic because she lets her dogs eat off the plates) so she washes her dishes with bleach. Unfortunately the bleach water that splashes onto her shirt ends up eating the shirts, so she has many, many shirts with holes worn in the lower abdomen area. She still wears them though, and won't let my mom toss them because they're "fine." She also reuses paper towels until they disintegrate.

Wasn't there a story here about a woman whose mother refused to put detergent in the dishwasher, so the plates just got "rinsed."  The first time the poster's husband ate at the in-laws house, he got sick as a dog from the leftover residue/germs on the plates?

My husband's great grandparents never washed a dish or pot. When he would go to visit, he would pre-wash everything he used.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: SiotehCat on April 01, 2013, 03:55:03 PM
No, no. Never, Wolfie.

I meant that running out to wash the car in the rain is not taking advantage of good manners but of nature. Taking advantage of the rain to wash the car.

Oh thank god I misunderstood you! I think I misread the quote tree.

I am wondering though - is there dirt and stuff in rain? So would you need to clean the car again afterwards? I hardly ever wash mine as it is.

If you wash your car in the rain 1) the continued rain will keep the finish wet, so that when it stops, the finish will spot - thereby negating the washing you did and 2) if you do it in a rainstorm, you are adding surfactants (the stuff that breaks the surface tension of water, making it soak into your clothes/dirt/etc. better) to the ground at a time that there's a lot of water being added, making it more likely that the rain will soak down into the earth around you, making mud worse. It's not just cheap, but can be foolish (and you'd go through an awful lot of soap, since your rags would be constantly being rinsed out).

Now, if you want to go DANCE in the rain, that's a whole other thing. Nothing cheap about that - just good, free fun!

I haven't washed my car in over 6 years. I just don't see the point.

So,if I went out and washed my car in the rain, even with water spots, it would still look so much better than it does now.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 01, 2013, 03:55:17 PM
Am I the only one who has gotten very little done today because of this addictive thread?  :( >:( ;D  The stories are so good. I've created a monster!  >:D

My rule: Never post without reading the thread to the end!

Broken: you are not alone

(now must go back!)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: magicdomino on April 01, 2013, 03:57:00 PM
I thought she meant going out into the rain to wash the car.  I agree with her.  Well, as long as there's no lightning!   :-\

Washing the car in the pouring rain -- frugal, if not reliably efficient

Taking off your clothes to wash the car and yourself at the same time -- cheapskate, especially if the neighbors aren't happy with the view.   ;)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Lynn2000 on April 01, 2013, 03:58:11 PM
My friend's dad, though a really nice guy, was very frugal and occasionally veered into being a cheapskate. The funniest story was when he reused the envelope that his electricity bill had come in, to send a check to his ex (friend's mom). He had re-addressed it to his ex, but it ended up going back to the electric company (return address or barcode or whatever). Fortunately it was a small town and they were able to figure it out, and got a big chuckle out of it. ;)

My co-worker Grace is also very cheap about certain things. She is always getting after people for throwing something away at work that she would have reused, and has been known to pick containers and even food out of the garbage. :X She scrapes the mold off her bread and eats it anyway--I almost lost my lunch when I saw her doing that (at work!). She'll save small amounts of the leftover coffee in a jar in the fridge--this is either "fresh" coffee that was just in the pot, or coffee from her own mug that she just didn't get around to drinking--then heat it up in the microwave days later and drink it. She is also a champion of scraping every last molecule of food out of a container and then reusing the container--she has one plastic butter tub she brings to work that she says is twenty years old. She rinses/washes plastic spoons and uses them again--fortunately she puts them in a little cup off to the side in the break room for her own use, not in the main cup of utensils, so the rest of us can avoid them if we want. Note that some of those things don't affect other people, at least.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 01, 2013, 03:59:22 PM
Quote
When ordering Chinese food, I'm disappointed if it comes in paper or styrofoam containers because then I don't get the plastic resusable ones.  I haven't brought lunch containers in years.

Not to mention that styrofoam isn't recyclable (at least, not where I live).  I love those plastic containers from Chinese restaurants, too - I use those until they fall apart, and it's amazing how many dishwasher cycles they'll stand up to until that happens.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: magicdomino on April 01, 2013, 04:08:54 PM
My friend's dad, though a really nice guy, was very frugal and occasionally veered into being a cheapskate. The funniest story was when he reused the envelope that his electricity bill had come in, to send a check to his ex (friend's mom). He had re-addressed it to his ex, but it ended up going back to the electric company (return address or barcode or whatever). Fortunately it was a small town and they were able to figure it out, and got a big chuckle out of it. ;)

My co-worker Grace is also very cheap about certain things. She is always getting after people for throwing something away at work that she would have reused, and has been known to pick containers and even food out of the garbage. :X She scrapes the mold off her bread and eats it anyway--I almost lost my lunch when I saw her doing that (at work!). She'll save small amounts of the leftover coffee in a jar in the fridge--this is either "fresh" coffee that was just in the pot, or coffee from her own mug that she just didn't get around to drinking--then heat it up in the microwave days later and drink it. She is also a champion of scraping every last molecule of food out of a container and then reusing the container--she has one plastic butter tub she brings to work that she says is twenty years old. She rinses/washes plastic spoons and uses them again--fortunately she puts them in a little cup off to the side in the break room for her own use, not in the main cup of utensils, so the rest of us can avoid them if we want. Note that some of those things don't affect other people, at least.

Okay, I hereby confess to washing plastic spoons and forks, at least the ones that I personally use.  I run them through the dishwasher, and reserve them for eating lunches and snacks at work.  Like the plastic Chinese containers, they go through the dishwasher remarkably well, and if they get lost, grungy, or damaged, there's plenty more where they came from.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Lynn2000 on April 01, 2013, 04:13:33 PM
Oh, AND... my friend's husband is kind of cheap. A great guy overall, but he doesn't always see the value in spending more upfront to get something that lasts longer, and he can "get by" with less stuff/more inconvenience than my friend, so sometimes they clash about stuff. I remember when he was single and could survive on just 2-liters of soda and loaves of white bread from the cheapest grocery store. Also he would take cold showers, with something in the pipe leaking and spraying him at a weird spot, rather than pay to have the plumbing fixed. And when he worked the night shift, he would rather sleep on a cot in his closet, than pay for curtains to put over his bedroom windows to block out the daylight.

More recently, his wife was discussing buying a new carseat for their child, who had outgrown his first one. The model she wanted was a bit expensive and she wanted to get two, one for each of their cars. At first he suggested only having one, in her car; and she said that would be really inconvenient, because that meant she would always have to be the one to pick up the child, or they would have to do an awkward vehicle swap. Then he suggested getting the expensive one for her car, and a "cheap" carseat for his car. Oh, boy. That works for so many things, but not carseats.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 01, 2013, 04:19:08 PM
Am I the only one who has gotten very little done today because of this addictive thread?  :( >:( ;D  The stories are so good. I've created a monster!  >:D

Don't you just love when that happens?   8)  I read the first eight pages over the phone to a friend who found these stories appalling (but was amused in a disgusted way if that's possible).

A certain ex boyfriend whom I've mentioned before once invited me, a mutual friend, and another couple to dinner at his apartment.  His behavior was so abominable I never wanted to speak to him again but fortunately I don't run into him often.

We were told he was going to make a shrimp and pasta dish.  As usual, the two guys footed most of the alcohol bill (one fronted the case of beer, the other two bottles of wine and assorted chips and stuff.)  I brought a bottle of red wine, raw veggies, a bag of chips, a tub of guacamole, and a cold bottle of Green Goddess dressing because this is what I do.  He greeted us, thanked me for the stuff, and plated and served it immediately. 

Somehow during the four hours we were there he neglected to make dinner.  There were numerous other etiquette violations during the evening; the entire description is here:  http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=58660.0 .

This guy was a serious cheapskate during our relationship.  I have often wondered whether he issued the invitation and somehow decided he could avoid serving dinner.

Magicdomino:

When I shopped for St Patrick's Day at a Going Out of Business sale I picked up some beautiful -- and substantial -- plastic cutlery in gold color.  Eunice tells her guests to just drop those in the sink rather than toss them.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Jules1980 on April 01, 2013, 04:35:01 PM
Heartmug, that is ... beyond weird. At least it sounds like you can laugh at it.


Quote
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

Cheap is mean spirited, taking advantage, using most people's good manners to get away with something outrageous because you know that no one will challenge you.

I disagree and would call this smart--and fun! It's not mean-spirited, it's just taking advantage of a good thing.

I am sorry, I don't think I understand what you mean. You think that using someone's good manners against them is smart and fun? I can assure you might be able to get away with it the first time, but you won't be welcome in my life to try it a second time.

I think she meant washing the car in the rain would be fun, not the second part.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 04:40:43 PM
Quote
My co-worker Grace is also very cheap about certain things. She is always getting after people for throwing something away at work that she would have reused, and has been known to pick containers and even food out of the garbage. :X She scrapes the mold off her bread and eats it anyway--I almost lost my lunch when I saw her doing that (at work!).

 :o  Oh, noooooo.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: magicdomino on April 01, 2013, 04:46:11 PM
I may have told this story before, but it fits this thread so well.

My mother, bless her heart, was a cheapskate.  She got this way honestly, starting as a middle kid in a large family, on a tiny Appalachian farm during the Depression.  Add in a spendthrift first husband, and small children, in an era where the good-paying jobs went to men, and one understands how she got into the habit.  Doubtless, there was a time when a Styrofoam meat tray would have indeed been a much valued item. 

Unfortunately, she could never stop saving every penny.  One winter will go down in infamy as the Winter of the Kerosene Stove.    Using a long stick, my mother had measured the level in the fuel oil tank and it was too low.  Convinced that it had sprung a leak, and would have to be replaced, she turned off the boiler completely, and put a portable kerosene stove in the living room.  Yes, boys and girls, she was going to heat an entire 1100 square foot house through a mid-Atlantic winter with one kerosene stove.  Did I mention that the hot water for the house was heated by the same boiler?  No boiler, no hot water.  Just a big stock pot on top of the portable stove.  Ventilation wasn't a problem because the steel casement windows leaked like sieves, but the bedrooms got ice on the windows and mildew on the walls. 

Then a baseboard pipe froze and burst.  Time to give up on this experiment, right?  Nope.  Mother turned the water off.  It was turned on once a day to fill the bathtub and buckets, then turned off.  No indication whatsoever that she would ever get this fixed.  (Up until this point, I had been living there.  No rent was cheap enough to put up with this nonsense, so I temporarily moved in with a sympathetic friend.)   I swear, the only reason the pipe was fixed was that my sister was dating a plumber.

The situation continued at least a month more, when the oil supply company called and asked why the tank was still full.  That's right, boys and girls, the tank never had a leak; Mother had mis-measured.  In fact, it still didn't have a leak when I replaced it 15 years later.   ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Jules1980 on April 01, 2013, 04:51:17 PM
No, no. Never, Wolfie.

I meant that running out to wash the car in the rain is not taking advantage of good manners but of nature. Taking advantage of the rain to wash the car.

Oh thank god I misunderstood you! I think I misread the quote tree.

I am wondering though - is there dirt and stuff in rain? So would you need to clean the car again afterwards? I hardly ever wash mine as it is.

If you wash your car in the rain 1) the continued rain will keep the finish wet, so that when it stops, the finish will spot - thereby negating the washing you did and 2) if you do it in a rainstorm, you are adding surfactants (the stuff that breaks the surface tension of water, making it soak into your clothes/dirt/etc. better) to the ground at a time that there's a lot of water being added, making it more likely that the rain will soak down into the earth around you, making mud worse. It's not just cheap, but can be foolish (and you'd go through an awful lot of soap, since your rags would be constantly being rinsed out).

Now, if you want to go DANCE in the rain, that's a whole other thing. Nothing cheap about that - just good, free fun!

I've never broken out the soap and washed my car in rain, but during pollen season, I have backed my car out of the carport into the rain to wash off the pollen.  Otherwise, it's just not worth it pay for the soap to wash your car or for it to be done when it'll be yellow again the next morning.  Of course, I live in Louisiana so maybe other states don't have the pollen problems we have.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: snappylt on April 01, 2013, 04:55:54 PM
I'm not sure this exactly fits here, but I keep thinking of it as I read these stories.

When I was a teenager I visited my first cousin "Jan" and her family for a week each summer.  (Jan was older than I; her own kids were my age.)  Jan was a kind and generous person, so I was surprised - and I particularly noticed it - when she made an unkind remark about her own father (my elderly uncle) taking his wife (Jan's stepmother) our for supper at a nice restaurant.

It was so unlike Jan to make unkind remarks that I asked her about it.  (Looking back, I was probably rude to have asked her, but I am glad I did because I learned something important.)

Jan explained to me that truly, she did not begrudge her stepmother a nice meal at a nice restaurant.  She said her stepmother was, as far as Jan could tell, good to her father, and Jan was thankful that as her father got older that his wife took good care of him.  But, Jan explained to me, "Snappy, you have no idea how hard it is for me to see Dad doing nice things for her.  It is because he never, ever did nice things for my own (bio)mother.  I've asked my sisters and brothers, and they all remember it the same: Dad never bought flowers or jewelry for our mother.  He never took our mother out for a restaurant meal - ever.  Our stepmother deserves nice things - but it hurts so much seeing him treat her kindly when he would never show our own mother those kindnesses."
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 04:58:58 PM
I heard a story today (after telling someone about some of the other stories), and I had to really think about telling it.  Here goes:

A woman who is not poor, not impaired in any way (just cheap) has a unique way on conserving toilet paper.  She never flushes “gently used” tp.  Instead, she puts it into the waste basket in her bathroom.  Then, she later folds it over and uses it again.  She says most people tear off too much tp anyway and can’t see making companies richer if it’s not necessary.  She also refuses to buy tissues or paper towels.  (I know, I don’t even want to think about what she uses instead.)  Good thing she lives alone.

I have to admit I have never heard of this.  I’ll let the reader figure out what “gently used” means.

edited to cottect typo ("lives" not leaves)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: kckgirl on April 01, 2013, 04:59:52 PM
Am I the only one who has gotten very little done today because of this addictive thread?  :( >:( ;D  The stories are so good. I've created a monster!  >:D

It's like a train wreck!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 05:02:38 PM
Am I the only one who has gotten very little done today because of this addictive thread?  :( >:( ;D  The stories are so good. I've created a monster!  >:D

It's like a train wreck!

We all should write a book, start a TV show, or something! ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 01, 2013, 05:04:15 PM

I heard a story today (after telling someone about some of the other stories), and I had to really think about telling it.  Here goes:

A woman who is not poor, not impaired in any way (just cheap) has a unique way on conserving toilet paper.  She never flushes “gently used” tp.  Instead, she puts it into the waste basket in her bathroom.  Then, she later folds it over and uses it again.  She says most people tear off too much tp anyway and can’t see making companies richer if it’s not necessary.  She also refuses to buy tissues or paper towels.  (I know, I don’t even want to think about what she uses instead.)  Good thing she leaves alone.

I have to admit I have never heard of this.  I’ll let the reader figure out what “gently used” means.

Just when you thought you've heard it all....
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 01, 2013, 05:19:29 PM

I heard a story today (after telling someone about some of the other stories), and I had to really think about telling it.  Here goes:

A woman who is not poor, not impaired in any way (just cheap) has a unique way on conserving toilet paper.  She never flushes “gently used” tp.  Instead, she puts it into the waste basket in her bathroom.  Then, she later folds it over and uses it again.  She says most people tear off too much tp anyway and can’t see making companies richer if it’s not necessary.  She also refuses to buy tissues or paper towels.  (I know, I don’t even want to think about what she uses instead.)  Good thing she leaves alone.

I have to admit I have never heard of this.  I’ll let the reader figure out what “gently used” means.

Just when you thought you've heard it all....

That's the grossest thing I ever heard.  I'm pretty cheap.  I reuse plastic silverware and baggies, only drink free water at restaurants, and cut open tubes/bottles to get the last drop.  But a line must be drawn!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Outdoor Girl on April 01, 2013, 05:22:43 PM
I live alone so I subscribe to the adage, 'If it's yellow, let it mellow.  If it's brown, flush it down.'  It does save money but I do it more for environmental reasons because it saves a lot of water.  I don't do this when I have people over, unless it is family because we all do the same thing.  Except after eating asparagus...   :P

But even I draw the line at reusing toilet paper!  Gross...
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: FauxFoodist on April 01, 2013, 05:32:30 PM
Oh, I have one!

I used to work in a pharmacy, and a woman came in to return a partially-used tube of an expensive medication claiming it stopped coming out when the tube was squeeze so she wanted a new tube.  The tech took out a new tube, squeezed it a little until some medication came out to prove that it worked then handed it to the woman (really, very little came out -- like maybe a 1/2 cm or less).  The woman then said, "Well, may I have one that's unopened since you just squeezed out some of it?"  The tech replied, "No because you used some of the medication in the other tube before it stopped working so you aren't being shorted anything."  She then asked the tech what would happen to the other one.  The tech said it would be discarded since it was damaged so the woman asked if she could have it back!  Yeah, the tech said no, since it was not good enough for you to keep as it was then it needs to be recorded as damaged and discarded (if anyone's wondering, it was Retin-A when it first came out so I think the woman paid about $20 for the tube).  I think both the tech and I were just incredulous.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: baglady on April 01, 2013, 05:36:40 PM
On that show "Extreme Cheapskates" there was a family that didn't use TP at all. They used cloth rags that got washed and reused. Part of me says that the average cloth diaper contains a higher volume of ... well, you know, and people used those for eons before Pampers were invented, and some families still do, for ecological reasons, so what's the big deal?

But another, larger part of me just says, "Ewwww!"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: daen on April 01, 2013, 05:56:09 PM
I recall a tabloid article about "Millionaire Cheapskates" back in the day. The visual accompanying the article was of one of the featured millionaire cheapskates and a number of his grandchildren having a toilet paper party.
A toilet paper party, for the unintiated, involved unrolling double-ply toilet paper from the original core, separating the plies as you go, and rolling them onto two other cores. Voila! two rolls of TP for the price of one.

This is a little too work-intensive for me. Besides, where do you get your initial supply of toilet paper tubes?
Actually, now that I think about it, I know enough people who save the tubes for crafts, or some unspecified future date. I'm sure they could give me a few...
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Nikko-chan on April 01, 2013, 06:08:58 PM
Oooh! I have one! SunshineSister's friend, we will call her Natasha, and her mother are cheapskates. One notable example? They would take meat they bought, like say a roast or something, and wrap it in an old bread bag, tie it up, and place it in the freezer. It would get freezer burned. And they would till serve it up!  :o

SunshineSister lived there for a short time, so this is how she knows this. She refused to eat it I think, and opted to buy her own fresh stuff, but they would eat it, which is another story entirely.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 01, 2013, 06:23:41 PM
I'm not sure this exactly fits here, but I keep thinking of it as I read these stories.

When I was a teenager I visited my first cousin "Jan" and her family for a week each summer.  (Jan was older than I; her own kids were my age.)  Jan was a kind and generous person, so I was surprised - and I particularly noticed it - when she made an unkind remark about her own father (my elderly uncle) taking his wife (Jan's stepmother) our for supper at a nice restaurant.

It was so unlike Jan to make unkind remarks that I asked her about it.  (Looking back, I was probably rude to have asked her, but I am glad I did because I learned something important.)

Jan explained to me that truly, she did not begrudge her stepmother a nice meal at a nice restaurant.  She said her stepmother was, as far as Jan could tell, good to her father, and Jan was thankful that as her father got older that his wife took good care of him.  But, Jan explained to me, "Snappy, you have no idea how hard it is for me to see Dad doing nice things for her.  It is because he never, ever did nice things for my own (bio)mother.  I've asked my sisters and brothers, and they all remember it the same: Dad never bought flowers or jewelry for our mother.  He never took our mother out for a restaurant meal - ever.  Our stepmother deserves nice things - but it hurts so much seeing him treat her kindly when he would never show our own mother those kindnesses."

That makes a lot of sense.  This makes me think of the "Christmas disappointment" thread from a few years ago in which several husbands forgot or didn't bother buying Christmas gifts for their wives.  If I grew up seeing my dad treat my mom in such a callous, indifferent manner, and then treat his second wife like a precious treasure, I could see misdirecting my resentment at the stepmom.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Julian on April 01, 2013, 06:42:30 PM

Washing your own car instead of taking it someplace - frugal
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.



Unless you're living under extreme water rationing and it's illegal to use town water to wash the car.  Been there, done that.  The neighbours laughed, then thought about it and ran in and grabbed their own buckets!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: TexasRanger on April 01, 2013, 07:01:33 PM
My one uncle, Bob, is has been a borderline cheapskate his whole life. He will scrap the mold of cheese (not just a spot, the whole thing will be a fuzzy green/grey/black brick) and bread and eat the cheese/bread.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: afbluebelle on April 01, 2013, 07:09:34 PM
No, no. Never, Wolfie.

I meant that running out to wash the car in the rain is not taking advantage of good manners but of nature. Taking advantage of the rain to wash the car.

Oh thank god I misunderstood you! I think I misread the quote tree.

I am wondering though - is there dirt and stuff in rain? So would you need to clean the car again afterwards? I hardly ever wash mine as it is.

If you wash your car in the rain 1) the continued rain will keep the finish wet, so that when it stops, the finish will spot - thereby negating the washing you did and 2) if you do it in a rainstorm, you are adding surfactants (the stuff that breaks the surface tension of water, making it soak into your clothes/dirt/etc. better) to the ground at a time that there's a lot of water being added, making it more likely that the rain will soak down into the earth around you, making mud worse. It's not just cheap, but can be foolish (and you'd go through an awful lot of soap, since your rags would be constantly being rinsed out).

Now, if you want to go DANCE in the rain, that's a whole other thing. Nothing cheap about that - just good, free fun!

I haven't washed my car in over 6 years. I just don't see the point.

So,if I went out and washed my car in the rain, even with water spots, it would still look so much better than it does now.

If you live in an area that salts the roads, regular washing keeps it from becoming a rust bucket.

http://www.detailxperts.net/blog/2012/10/15/cold-weather-car-care-how-to-wash-your-car-in-winter/

Other than that, I'm not really sure. I've definitely loved a couple vehicles that were held together by rust and mud, so they never saw a hose.  ;D

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Outdoor Girl on April 01, 2013, 07:10:59 PM
From what I've read, porous food items, like bread, are not safe to eat if they are mouldy.  But non-porous food items, like cheese, are safe to eat if the mould is cut (not scraped) off.

I will cut mould off of cheese, taking a fairly large margin around the mould.  But then I usually use that cheese shredded in something that will be cooked, rather than eating it uncooked.  I've never had an issue.

I'm frugal; I buy a lot of food when it is on sale and freeze it, where possible.  I save downspout water in a series of 6 rain barrels for watering my garden.  As I said upthread, I don't flush every time, if it is only yellow.  These last two are more environmental concerns with wasting water but it does save me quite a bit of money - $5 or $10 a month.  I gave up my cappuccino habit when I realized how much it was costing me in money and calories.  I will save the little condiment packages if I have extra when done my meal but I don't take extras just to save some.  The vinegar comes in handy when I'm travelling - if I ask for vinegar for my fries in California, I get looked at like I have three heads.   :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: SamiHami on April 01, 2013, 07:32:06 PM
No, no. Never, Wolfie.

I meant that running out to wash the car in the rain is not taking advantage of good manners but of nature. Taking advantage of the rain to wash the car.

Oh thank god I misunderstood you! I think I misread the quote tree.

I am wondering though - is there dirt and stuff in rain? So would you need to clean the car again afterwards? I hardly ever wash mine as it is.

If you wash your car in the rain 1) the continued rain will keep the finish wet, so that when it stops, the finish will spot - thereby negating the washing you did and 2) if you do it in a rainstorm, you are adding surfactants (the stuff that breaks the surface tension of water, making it soak into your clothes/dirt/etc. better) to the ground at a time that there's a lot of water being added, making it more likely that the rain will soak down into the earth around you, making mud worse. It's not just cheap, but can be foolish (and you'd go through an awful lot of soap, since your rags would be constantly being rinsed out).

Now, if you want to go DANCE in the rain, that's a whole other thing. Nothing cheap about that - just good, free fun!

I've never broken out the soap and washed my car in rain, but during pollen season, I have backed my car out of the carport into the rain to wash off the pollen.  Otherwise, it's just not worth it pay for the soap to wash your car or for it to be done when it'll be yellow again the next morning.  Of course, I live in Louisiana so maybe other states don't have the pollen problems we have.

I'm in SC and the pollen is one of the reasons I picked the car that I have. It's sort of a beige-y gold color, so the pollen doesn't show quite so much. My husband's red car, though...ugh.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Mel the Redcap on April 01, 2013, 07:48:24 PM
Quote
- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

Oh for goodness sakes.   ::)

Yep, she really gripes about hotels that fix it so you can't open the back of the remote to remove the batteries, "Like they don't trust their customers, how rude!"   ::)

Gee. I wonder why!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Roe on April 01, 2013, 07:55:55 PM
Flipping channels and came across Extreme Cheapskate and thought of this thread. 

A man took his wife to a movie (her idea) and took fruit as his snack as spending money at the theater is very expensive.  The wife wanted a drink and popcorn so he rummaged through the trash and found a popcorn bag and empty drink container.  He washed the drink cup in the bathroom and then took the items to the snack bar for free "refills."   


:o
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 01, 2013, 07:57:08 PM
From what I've read, porous food items, like bread, are not safe to eat if they are mouldy.  But non-porous food items, like cheese, are safe to eat if the mould is cut (not scraped) off.

I will cut mould off of cheese, taking a fairly large margin around the mould.  But then I usually use that cheese shredded in something that will be cooked, rather than eating it uncooked.  I've never had an issue.

I'm frugal; I buy a lot of food when it is on sale and freeze it, where possible.  I save downspout water in a series of 6 rain barrels for watering my garden.  As I said upthread, I don't flush every time, if it is only yellow.  These last two are more environmental concerns with wasting water but it does save me quite a bit of money - $5 or $10 a month.  I gave up my cappuccino habit when I realized how much it was costing me in money and calories.  I will save the little condiment packages if I have extra when done my meal but I don't take extras just to save some.  The vinegar comes in handy when I'm travelling - if I ask for vinegar for my fries in California, I get looked at like I have three heads.   :)

The mold on cheese can go down about an inch, so if you cut off more than that it's fine.  Most of the time, though, an inch is well past the "this looks good" line  :P
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: afbluebelle on April 01, 2013, 08:04:16 PM
Wow... and I used to clown on my dad for using the water cups at Taco Bell to get Sprite ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 01, 2013, 08:05:41 PM
Flipping channels and came across Extreme Cheapskate and thought of this thread. 

A man took his wife to a movie (her idea) and took fruit as his snack as spending money at the theater is very expensive.  The wife wanted a drink and popcorn so he rummaged through the trash and found a popcorn bag and empty drink container.  He washed the drink cup in the bathroom and then took the items to the snack bar for free "refills."   


:o

I saw this one too. he also re-uses dental floss, and his idea of going for ice cream is to go, and take 10+ samples and not buy!  but the movie thing squicked me out.  that's just nasty.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 01, 2013, 08:10:29 PM
Flipping channels and came across Extreme Cheapskate and thought of this thread. 

A man took his wife to a movie (her idea) and took fruit as his snack as spending money at the theater is very expensive.  The wife wanted a drink and popcorn so he rummaged through the trash and found a popcorn bag and empty drink container.  He washed the drink cup in the bathroom and then took the items to the snack bar for free "refills."   


:o

I think I saw that.  I forgot "Extreme Cheapskates" (repeat episodes) is on tonight on TLC.  But seeing those episodes once was enough, almost too much.  Those people are way "out there".
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Mel the Redcap on April 01, 2013, 08:17:18 PM

...   Wasn't there a story here about a woman whose mother refused to put detergent in the dishwasher, so the plates just got "rinsed."  The first time the poster's husband ate at the in-laws house, he got sick as a dog from the leftover residue/germs on the plates?

Disgusting to be sure!   :o

But the water in a dishwasher is so incredibly hot and makes so much steam that it would seem that that alone should at least kill most of the germs. 

Unless she was also running it on the 'economy' setting a lot of dishwashers have, which is a shorter run and sometimes also cooler water (good for more delicate items).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jaxsue on April 01, 2013, 08:48:17 PM
Oooh! I have one! SunshineSister's friend, we will call her Natasha, and her mother are cheapskates. One notable example? They would take meat they bought, like say a roast or something, and wrap it in an old bread bag, tie it up, and place it in the freezer. It would get freezer burned. And they would till serve it up!  :o

SunshineSister lived there for a short time, so this is how she knows this. She refused to eat it I think, and opted to buy her own fresh stuff, but they would eat it, which is another story entirely.

My late MIL was cheap and a hoarder, especially with food. She shopped almost every day and had 2 fridges and 2 freezers. The stuff in the freezers was so freezer-burned that it all tasted the same - it was gross!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 01, 2013, 08:49:34 PM
My in-laws are very cheap. FIL will not throw away medicine and food that is years out of date. He believes expiration dates are put on items so foolish and wasteful people will throw them out and buy more. He is very smart, but doesn't think of how medicine might break down over decades. PIL love to make pots of soup that they let sit out for 10-12 hours before putting away, well outside of food safety limits. Their home lost power over the Thanksgiving holidays (PIL were away) and both freezers were overflowing with containers of this soup. We found out the power was out three days after they left, and all of the food was thawing. FIL didn't want to throw anything away.

I try to be thrifty and conservative in my use of resources. However, I have my limits.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 01, 2013, 09:02:04 PM
Venus's story of the dinner party with no dinner reminds me of when my friend Maria and I decided to throw a surprise birthday party for our friend Susie.   We were teenagers and still living with our respective parents.  I offered to ask my folks if we could have the party at our house; Maria poo-pooed this and said "We'll have it at my house.   My mother is an amazing cook and will make a feast like you won't believe."   I was a little concerned about her just offering up her mother's services like that, so I offered to help prepare the meal - or at least pay for the ingredients.   No need, said Maria, she and her mum would do everything.     In despair, I offered to bring some chips and a cake.   Maria reluctantly allowed me to do that, saying that they wouldn't be necessary - we'd all be too stuffed by her mother's cooking to have room for such things.

Come the day of the party, I showed up at Maria's house with my chips and cake.   I discreetly sniffed the air - nothing.  No cooking smells.   The kitchen was obviously not being used, and it turned out that her mother wasn't even home.

It was a good thing I'd brought chips and cake, because those were the only things the party goers got to eat.   >:(
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Minmom3 on April 01, 2013, 09:36:47 PM

...   Wasn't there a story here about a woman whose mother refused to put detergent in the dishwasher, so the plates just got "rinsed."  The first time the poster's husband ate at the in-laws house, he got sick as a dog from the leftover residue/germs on the plates?

Disgusting to be sure!   :o

But the water in a dishwasher is so incredibly hot and makes so much steam that it would seem that that alone should at least kill most of the germs. 

I think I'd almost take my chances on eating from one of her plates than what my MIL used to do.  She didn't have a dishwasher.  She did her dishes all by hand.  She would run out of whatever her current dishwashing liquid might be and instead of going to the store and buying a new bottle, she'd use Tide or some other laundry detergent.  Then she'd never rinse them off really thoroughly, so next time you ate off one of her plates, you got a little detergent with your green beans and mashed potatoes.  It did not enhance the flavor.   :-\

The water is only that hot if a) your house water heater/tankless water heat is set to heat the water THAT HOT, or b) your washer heats the water that hot.  For a long time, our hot water just wasn't that killer hot because our children were the age where they ran their own tub water, and we didn't want them scalded.  Before that time and after that time, our water heater was set good and hot, for just that reason.  (Plus, DH takes cooler showers and never runs out of hot water, but I take HOT showers, and frequently run out of hot water when I wash my hair).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Miss Tickle on April 01, 2013, 11:05:26 PM
It's interesting to read the spectrum from illegal through mean and miserly to cheap, frugal, thrifty and on to practical and environmentally friendly reflected in these stories.

I don't know if it's strictly "cheapskate", but I can distinctly remember the first time my MIL pulled a bait and switch with regards to a dinner.  DH and I were invited out for FIL's birthday dinner to a "fancy" restaurant. Not the norm, but I thought it might be a special occasion. 

It was! It turned out this was the day MIL decided to make us pay our own way! Might have been nice to tell us it was self-host before we sat down or before we ordered drinks so we could have declined.

They had a coupon so MIL's dinner was free and #1 Son had a coupon too, so he could get his meal free as well (since DH and I would be paying full fare)! Well, wasn't that thrifty for them.

And they thought we'd all split FIL's dinner (to be fair), but FIL had the manners to decline that honour.

It was well worth the price to never have to accept a (restaurant) dinner invitation from my MIL again.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: StarFaerie on April 01, 2013, 11:12:47 PM

...   Wasn't there a story here about a woman whose mother refused to put detergent in the dishwasher, so the plates just got "rinsed."  The first time the poster's husband ate at the in-laws house, he got sick as a dog from the leftover residue/germs on the plates?

Disgusting to be sure!   :o

But the water in a dishwasher is so incredibly hot and makes so much steam that it would seem that that alone should at least kill most of the germs. 

I think I'd almost take my chances on eating from one of her plates than what my MIL used to do.  She didn't have a dishwasher.  She did her dishes all by hand.  She would run out of whatever her current dishwashing liquid might be and instead of going to the store and buying a new bottle, she'd use Tide or some other laundry detergent.  Then she'd never rinse them off really thoroughly, so next time you ate off one of her plates, you got a little detergent with your green beans and mashed potatoes.  It did not enhance the flavor.   :-\

The water is only that hot if a) your house water heater/tankless water heat is set to heat the water THAT HOT, or b) your washer heats the water that hot.  For a long time, our hot water just wasn't that killer hot because our children were the age where they ran their own tub water, and we didn't want them scalded.  Before that time and after that time, our water heater was set good and hot, for just that reason.  (Plus, DH takes cooler showers and never runs out of hot water, but I take HOT showers, and frequently run out of hot water when I wash my hair).

And I've learned something new, I thought all dishwashers heated the water internally to the temperature required. I know mine only has cold water input (I could choose hot water input to it but my hot water heater is inefficient and small) but gosh the clean dishes come out hot. I wonder if that is a US vs Australian thing.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: girlysprite on April 02, 2013, 12:05:00 AM
I also notice that cheapskates are more prone to bragging about their cheapness, and think badly of others for not being as cheap as they are ('they are so wasteful')
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: violinp on April 02, 2013, 12:08:46 AM

...   Wasn't there a story here about a woman whose mother refused to put detergent in the dishwasher, so the plates just got "rinsed."  The first time the poster's husband ate at the in-laws house, he got sick as a dog from the leftover residue/germs on the plates?

Disgusting to be sure!   :o

But the water in a dishwasher is so incredibly hot and makes so much steam that it would seem that that alone should at least kill most of the germs. 

I think I'd almost take my chances on eating from one of her plates than what my MIL used to do.  She didn't have a dishwasher.  She did her dishes all by hand.  She would run out of whatever her current dishwashing liquid might be and instead of going to the store and buying a new bottle, she'd use Tide or some other laundry detergent.  Then she'd never rinse them off really thoroughly, so next time you ate off one of her plates, you got a little detergent with your green beans and mashed potatoes.  It did not enhance the flavor.   :-\

The water is only that hot if a) your house water heater/tankless water heat is set to heat the water THAT HOT, or b) your washer heats the water that hot.  For a long time, our hot water just wasn't that killer hot because our children were the age where they ran their own tub water, and we didn't want them scalded.  Before that time and after that time, our water heater was set good and hot, for just that reason.  (Plus, DH takes cooler showers and never runs out of hot water, but I take HOT showers, and frequently run out of hot water when I wash my hair).

And I've learned something new, I thought all dishwashers heated the water internally to the temperature required. I know mine only has cold water input (I could choose hot water input to it but my hot water heater is inefficient and small) but gosh the clean dishes come out hot. I wonder if that is a US vs Australian thing.

I'm in the US, and our dishes are so hot when they come out that I have to wait quite a while to be able to even pick them up without burning myself (If they're too hot for me to handle, they could ruin our countertop because of the material out of which it's made).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Iris on April 02, 2013, 12:38:54 AM
I knew a guy who had been dating another guy for a few weeks when he said "Look, I've been doing all the organising and paying for our dates. I want you to take me out - doesn't matter where but you need to make the effort to plan, book etc." Well, he was a little surprised when the guy invited him to one of the more expensive restaurants in town, because it wasn't a money issue at all, rather a 'put some effort into the relationship' issue. Until he got there and was told that he could only order a main course, no starter no dessert.

"Odd", he thought, "but maybe he has something else planned and doesn't want me to fill up". Nope, it was so that his date's coupon would still be valid. As my friend said, he would have been fine with a much less expensive restaurant, but having his choices dictated to him to fit a coupon really didn't seem like the romantic evening he'd been hoping for.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 02, 2013, 04:48:37 AM
I also notice that cheapskates are more prone to bragging about their cheapness, and think badly of others for not being as cheap as they are ('they are so wasteful')

That only emphasizes the mean-spiritedness of these people.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: amylouky on April 02, 2013, 07:21:38 AM
I don't know if this makes me a cheapskate, but I generally "sneak" my dessert out from buffet places to eat later. If I eat it with my dinner it usually makes my blood sugar spike too much so I'll save it and eat it an hour or two later.

I used to have an aunt who would pull the "bad pizza" thing all the time so they could get a free one later.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Miss March on April 02, 2013, 07:51:59 AM
I used to have a friend who didn't like to pay the cost of making phone calls from her home phone (land line), so if she called you, she would immediately make an excuse like "The line is full of static on my end, can you try calling me back?" Then you would call her, and she'd be happy to talk for an hour, now that you were footing the cost of the call.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Thipu1 on April 02, 2013, 08:28:37 AM
Just remembered a sighting from a few years back. 

When a ship reaches port officials from Customs and Immigration come aboard.  Often, the clearance is done in a lounge and the visitors are treated to a nice spread of sandwiches and pastries. It never hurts to be nice to people who have to clear you.

  Once the ship is cleared,  the lounge is used as a place for passengers to wait until their debarkation group is called.  On one voyage, the room was opened to passengers before the left over food was removed.  Everybody else just ignored it or nibbled on a danish,but a pair of ladies decided that they would take home the two dozen or so sandwiches that were left. 

We were in the same debarkation group so we saw them get caught and their booty confiscated. 

On a nicer note, in Hawaii quite large arrangements of tropical flowers were sold in the terminal for 10 USD.  These we were permitted to take on the ship and they did dress up the cabin for the return voyage.  However, it was not allowed to take the arrangements off the ship in Dan Diego.  California is tough. 

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 02, 2013, 08:44:38 AM
That reminds me of my old job.   I worked in the head office for Safeway.  Every Wednesday, there would be a large delivery of baked goods from one of the stores for the office staff - doughnuts, bagels, and muffins.  We all loved Wednesdays and looked forward to a free baked goodie.  There were two cheapskate stories resulting from this:

Cheapskate #1 was the guy who, at the end of the day on Wednesday, grabbed all of the leftover stuff.  When our secretary caught him, he said defensively "I'm taking these home to my kids.  They're just going to go stale otherwise."  She said "Stale or not, they belong here.  PUT.  THEM.  BACK."  (For the record, all of the stuff got eaten by the next day.  People in I.T. don't care if a doughnut is a bit past its prime.)

Cheapskate #2 was another guy who bragged about how he was on a diet, and he never ate lunch, and that's why he was in such good shape, blah blah blah.  On Wednesdays, however, he gobbled down far more than his share of the free pastries like he was starving to death.  I once saw him eat five bagels in one sitting.   :o
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 02, 2013, 08:48:46 AM
I know two people that this happened to: The host at the bar-b-que bought steaks for himself and hot dogs for everyone else.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Thipu1 on April 02, 2013, 09:01:57 AM
Things like this happened often when I was a child. 

Certain people would be invited into the den for an alcoholic drink.  The other adults were graciously invited into the back yard for iced tea. 

The question always was, 'Did Dad get asked?'. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: o_gal on April 02, 2013, 09:10:22 AM
That reminds me of my old job.   I worked in the head office for Safeway.  Every Wednesday, there would be a large delivery of baked goods from one of the stores for the office staff - doughnuts, bagels, and muffins.  We all loved Wednesdays and looked forward to a free baked goodie.  There were two cheapskate stories resulting from this:

Cheapskate #1 was the guy who, at the end of the day on Wednesday, grabbed all of the leftover stuff.  When our secretary caught him, he said defensively "I'm taking these home to my kids.  They're just going to go stale otherwise."  She said "Stale or not, they belong here.  PUT.  THEM.  BACK."  (For the record, all of the stuff got eaten by the next day.  People in I.T. don't care if a doughnut is a bit past its prime.)

Cheapskate #2 was another guy who bragged about how he was on a diet, and he never ate lunch, and that's why he was in such good shape, blah blah blah.  On Wednesdays, however, he gobbled down far more than his share of the free pastries like he was starving to death.  I once saw him eat five bagels in one sitting.   :o

We used to have a Wednesday grill lunch at our old building. Grills would be set up and for a few bucks you could get a burger/hot dog/grilled chicken with a side dish, a dessert, and a can of soda/pop. There would always be some leftovers of the meat, which were left out for a half hour or so with the buns in case anyone wanted to grab one while the general cleanup was taking place. It would be cold but still edible.

Our cheapskate, Bob, had a large family. He started by asking if he could have the leftover meat to take home to feed his family. He would just keep it in his office until it was time to leave, so the meat would be sitting out uncovered and unrefridgerated for another 4 hours or so. Then he started just coming down and taking the meat, so that the people cleaning up would wonder where it went to. No one was bothered by this, we just kind of rolled our eyes at it.

Then after he voluntarily left the company, he would come back to our building and wander by about the time of cleanup, come back in the building, and take the meat (yes, that makes him a thief as well.) After a couple of weeks of that, they started automatically putting the meat in the fridge when the grill was over.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 02, 2013, 09:23:15 AM
Quote
Then after he voluntarily left the company, he would come back to our building and wander by about the time of cleanup, come back in the building, and take the meat (yes, that makes him a thief as well.) After a couple of weeks of that, they started automatically putting the meat in the fridge when the grill was over.

He did this after he left the company?  That takes nerve.

We had someone who left to go to another job a week before a large conference.  I think she timed it so she wouldn’t have to do any work (registration table, set ups, etc.).  She had a few days off before starting her new job.  At the buffet she showed up in shorts and flip flops, ate, then took a few plastic containers out of her totebag and filled up.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Margo on April 02, 2013, 09:32:20 AM
Wow. My cheapskate story seems quite mild after all these . And I'm nt sure it was cheapskate as much as entitled...

We had a launch party at our office - (change of name, so we were inviting other local businesses etc so they new we were still us, and hadn't been taken over) We have more than one location so there was a party at each location, and the senior managers attended both.

At each party, there was food - mainly canapes and cupcakes, plus wine and fruit juice, and there was a period of about 3 hours when the guests were welcome to drop in.

At party #1, at cheapskates office, when the party came to an end and we were starting to clear up, efforts were made to make sure that staff members who had not been able to come down to socialise got the chance to have some of the cupcakes etc which were left, and then the few leftovers were shared with lots of people taking 1 or 2 cupcakes home. No one took any until after the launch party was finished AND all staff members had had the opportunity to eat.
 

At party #2, cheapskate attended.  Unlike those of us who had attended 'her' party, she did not stay until the end and help clear up. She left about 45 minutes before the party was due to end (so when we might still have guests arriving) and before all members of staff at office #2 had had a chance to try the snacks. She took with her an entire plate full of cupcakes and one of canapes.
When challenged, she said she was planning to take them back to office #1 so they could have a share.. She was quite indignant when it was pointed out that they should be left for the guests who we were expecting during the last hour of the launch. She did eventually leave about half of what she'd planned to take, but carried on making comments about how greedy and selfish office #2 was for about a week afterwards.

(she also used to try to talk us into going to the cheapest possible restuarant / cafe whenever we (as business owners, of whom she was one) were paying for a meal, for instance when a staff member retired. She herself retired late last year, and selected the most expensive place in town for her own leaving do...)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Coralreef on April 02, 2013, 10:13:21 AM
My mother had really strong cheapskate tendencies :

- Softening butter to add milk to it, so that when it was solid again, there would be more butter.

- Snipping leaves or branches from plants instead of buying them.  She would replant/soak them so they would grow roots.

- Buying the cheapest snowsuit/snowboots. Hello frostbite.

- Grabbing every packet of condiments on restaurant tables.

- Lying about my age so I could get freebies.  Worse one was lying about my species: in order to avoid paying my ticket on a ferry, she wrapped me in a blanket, told me to curl up on the seat and shut up.  She told the ticket taker I was a dog.

- Tipping?  That was a town in China.

- When taking a bath, do not have more than half an inch of lukewarm water in that tub, missy!  And don't take too long, someone else is waiting to use it. 

- Present for a friend : an assortment of shampoo/cream samples is good enough.

- Food expiry dates are fake.  That mayo jar is only 5 years old.

- Paying for a haircut or coloring?  Nope... hack away and hope that Miss Clairol bottle wasn't on sale x years ago, because she probably cleaned out the store.  Good luck on mixing and matching those colours.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Yvaine on April 02, 2013, 10:14:26 AM
- Lying about my age so I could get freebies.  Worse one was lying about my species: in order to avoid paying my ticket on a ferry, she wrapped me in a blanket, told me to curl up on the seat and shut up.  She told the ticket taker I was a dog.


 ;D ;D ;D OK, you win.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Library Dragon on April 02, 2013, 10:17:09 AM
It's amazing that a sense of entitlement seems to go hand in hand with many cheapskates.

1. My late MIL's sister.  The one married to the lawyer (it came up every time we saw her), paying for their son's multi decade attendance at medical school in Bologna, and a second home in Florida. When Disney still had the A, B and C tickets for rides she gave MIL the left over ticket books for Disney World as a birthday gift. They wouldn't let ILs stay in the Florida house because "they wouldn't feel right charging them rent."
   
MILs sister and her oldest adult daughter weren't going to be able to attend MIL's funeral unless we provided a car. They both drive, frequently, and for far distances, and have cars.  We were told the price of gas was too high.  The youngest daughter disgraced them by marrying a public school teacher who didn't make enough money AND adopted a child from Romania.  Fortunately they had enough sense to be happy as their own family unit. 

2. My friends of 20+ years whose gifts are always cheap thrift store finds. The strange used book on a topic I've never cared about.  The makeup from a yard sale--shudder--The collection of hotel soaps.
Their 2 youngest sons asked them not to have graduation parties for them.  The odd assortment of dented canned food served at the oldest son's HS gradation was not a good track record. 

One year ths couple took a cruise.  Not a standard cruise. The supply ship that visited the private islands of the clipper cruise line.  They were given a discount coupon for a standard clipper cruise.  They gave it to us, but we were unable to use it before expiration.  The wife hounded us until we repaid her the money they "lost" from the coupon.  No, they weren't going to take another cruise, but she saw it as money out of her pocket. 

The husband just retired as a GS14 (15 is the highest pay grade civil service).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 02, 2013, 10:24:06 AM
Quote
She told the ticket taker I was a dog.

I think we have a winner here!   :o
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BabyMama on April 02, 2013, 10:28:24 AM
Just remembered a couple more about my aunt who washes her dishes with bleach.

She only has one lightbulb in the main part of her house. (I think she probably has another one in her bathroom.) Things get boring for visitors once it gets dark, I've been told! She raises a stink if you don't turn off the light when you leave the room.

She also doesn't like people to text her. We don't often because she has dyslexia, but sometimes it's a lot easier to send a text. She hates, hates, hates it when people reply things like "OK" or "Thanks!" and will scold you the next time she sees you, because each text costs her...a dime.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 02, 2013, 10:29:43 AM
- Lying about my age so I could get freebies.  Worse one was lying about my species: in order to avoid paying my ticket on a ferry, she wrapped me in a blanket, told me to curl up on the seat and shut up.  She told the ticket taker I was a dog.


 ;D ;D ;D OK, you win.

I agree.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 02, 2013, 10:56:28 AM
She also doesn't like people to text her. We don't often because she has dyslexia, but sometimes it's a lot easier to send a text. She hates, hates, hates it when people reply things like "OK" or "Thanks!" and will scold you the next time she sees you, because each text costs her...a dime.

I don't have a text plan so I was very annoyed when people text because it cost 20 cents each (it adds up!)  I've since turned off text so nothing can get through.  So I understand your Aunt's feeling about that although I don't scold. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RebeccainGA on April 02, 2013, 11:21:11 AM
She also doesn't like people to text her. We don't often because she has dyslexia, but sometimes it's a lot easier to send a text. She hates, hates, hates it when people reply things like "OK" or "Thanks!" and will scold you the next time she sees you, because each text costs her...a dime.

I don't have a text plan so I was very annoyed when people text because it cost 20 cents each (it adds up!)  I've since turned off text so nothing can get through.  So I understand your Aunt's feeling about that although I don't scold. 
See, that's what I'd do - turn them off if I don't have a text plan. Sounds like the Aunt just liked to complain.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: snowflake on April 02, 2013, 11:29:28 AM
I used to get annoyed at some friends of mine who were notorious for bullying cheapskates.

For instance, one of them got asked out by a guy who invited her to a certain restaurant.  They got there and he produced a coupon that allowed them to have a free appetizer.  No limitations were put on their ordering (he just needed to order one dinner.)  She went on and on about how cheap he was to not pay full price in her presence.  (He was in school.)

Another time I invited a guy out as a date and bought him dinner.  He brought me flowers (nice, not expected.)  Afterwards these people found out that I had paid and made a big deal about how cheap he was.  They then asked me where he had gotten the flowers and what kind.  (No, I didn't let them inspect them.  I suspect they came from the grocery store but who cares?  Once again, we were in school.)

There was another guy of our acquaintance who was out of school and working as a successful (but socially awkward) programmer.  He wasn't really the "nice nerd" type but was actually sort of a jerk.  He would put people down right to their faces with this smug expression and couldn't figure out why that was not socially accepted.  I turned down a date with him.  The same people asked me why when he was willing to go all out on his dates - he'd pull out the flowers, the drinks and the nice restaurants and even listen if you didn't want to sleep with him.  I said that no dinner was worth getting insulted for two hours.  They said, "Hey, but it's free dinner!"

That's when I realized that they were the cheap ones.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 02, 2013, 11:44:57 AM
- Lying about my age so I could get freebies.  Worse one was lying about my species: in order to avoid paying my ticket on a ferry, she wrapped me in a blanket, told me to curl up on the seat and shut up.  She told the ticket taker I was a dog.


 ;D ;D ;D OK, you win.

I agree.

Yup.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hillia on April 02, 2013, 11:54:30 AM
I used to have a friend who didn't like to pay the cost of making phone calls from her home phone (land line), so if she called you, she would immediately make an excuse like "The line is full of static on my end, can you try calling me back?" Then you would call her, and she'd be happy to talk for an hour, now that you were footing the cost of the call.

This reminds me of a TV commercial from back in the day when long distance charges were a Big Deal, and various companies competed for your business with various cheap rates, family plans, etc.  On one commercial, prospective grandparents are waiting by the phone for the big announcement.  Phone rings, Grandpa answers, listens for a minute and says, 'No, we won't accept charges'.  He sits back down and tells his wife, 'They had a boy'.  Cut to the new dad in a pay phone booth, telling the operator, 'Collect call from Mr. Wehadthebabyitsaboy'.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Yvaine on April 02, 2013, 11:55:52 AM
I used to have a friend who didn't like to pay the cost of making phone calls from her home phone (land line), so if she called you, she would immediately make an excuse like "The line is full of static on my end, can you try calling me back?" Then you would call her, and she'd be happy to talk for an hour, now that you were footing the cost of the call.

This reminds me of a TV commercial from back in the day when long distance charges were a Big Deal, and various companies competed for your business with various cheap rates, family plans, etc.  On one commercial, prospective grandparents are waiting by the phone for the big announcement.  Phone rings, Grandpa answers, listens for a minute and says, 'No, we won't accept charges'.  He sits back down and tells his wife, 'They had a boy'.  Cut to the new dad in a pay phone booth, telling the operator, 'Collect call from Mr. Wehadthebabyitsaboy'.

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: alkira6 on April 02, 2013, 12:03:09 PM
Regarding the soap, my grandmother used to keep all of the leftover slivers of soap in a giant pickle jar and when it was 2/3 full, cover it with boiling water and put a lid on it. After about a week she had a jar of soap goo that we used to wash with. She just filled a pump bottle (recyled) and put it in teh shower.  When the soap goo was gone we went back to the bar soap. not cheap

 - My dad used to make us claim to be younger to score freebies. As he was prematurely grey/balding he would also claim senior discouts at the same time.cheap and scammy

 - A former friend would find anything, anything at all to complain about in a restaurant in order to try to get a comp/discount.  The thing that made her a former friend was when she ran a waitress ragged asking for random things one at a time, trying to make her forget something or mess up so that she could complain. When she didn't mess up she flat out lied to the manager.  I defended the waitress, paid the bill and left her there.  cheap/horrible human being

 - Me- I keep all the soy sauce that we have ever gotten in a drawer in the kitchen. When we need soy sauce I will open enough packets to measure out what I need. cheap  In my defence, we only need it to cook with it 2-3 times a year and I always forget to actually buy it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Moray on April 02, 2013, 12:17:06 PM
Regarding the soap, my grandmother used to keep all of the leftover slivers of soap in a giant pickle jar and when it was 2/3 full, cover it with boiling water and put a lid on it. After about a week she had a jar of soap goo that we used to wash with. She just filled a pump bottle (recyled) and put it in teh shower.  When the soap goo was gone we went back to the bar soap. not cheap

 - My dad used to make us claim to be younger to score freebies. As he was prematurely grey/balding he would also claim senior discouts at the same time.cheap and scammy

 - A former friend would find anything, anything at all to complain about in a restaurant in order to try to get a comp/discount.  The thing that made her a former friend was when she ran a waitress ragged asking for random things one at a time, trying to make her forget something or mess up so that she could complain. When she didn't mess up she flat out lied to the manager.  I defended the waitress, paid the bill and left her there.  cheap/horrible human being

 - Me- I keep all the soy sauce that we have ever gotten in a drawer in the kitchen. When we need soy sauce I will open enough packets to measure out what I need. cheap  In my defence, we only need it to cook with it 2-3 times a year and I always forget to actually buy it.

Unless you're taking packets from your local Chinese restaurant for the express purpose of replenishing your stock, I don't see anything wrong with this. Every single time I order takeout, they send a handfull, which is way more than we'll actually use on the food. I have no compunction about throwing them in a drawer for future use in recipes or to take along for picnics or packed lunches.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Yvaine on April 02, 2013, 12:19:14 PM
Regarding the soap, my grandmother used to keep all of the leftover slivers of soap in a giant pickle jar and when it was 2/3 full, cover it with boiling water and put a lid on it. After about a week she had a jar of soap goo that we used to wash with. She just filled a pump bottle (recyled) and put it in teh shower.  When the soap goo was gone we went back to the bar soap. not cheap

 - My dad used to make us claim to be younger to score freebies. As he was prematurely grey/balding he would also claim senior discouts at the same time.cheap and scammy

 - A former friend would find anything, anything at all to complain about in a restaurant in order to try to get a comp/discount.  The thing that made her a former friend was when she ran a waitress ragged asking for random things one at a time, trying to make her forget something or mess up so that she could complain. When she didn't mess up she flat out lied to the manager.  I defended the waitress, paid the bill and left her there.  cheap/horrible human being

 - Me- I keep all the soy sauce that we have ever gotten in a drawer in the kitchen. When we need soy sauce I will open enough packets to measure out what I need. cheap  In my defence, we only need it to cook with it 2-3 times a year and I always forget to actually buy it.

Unless you're taking packets from your local Chinese restaurant for the express purpose of replenishing your stock, I don't see anything wrong with this. Every single time I order takeout, they send a handfull, which is way more than we'll actually use on the food. I have no compunction about throwing them in a drawer for future use in recipes or to take along for picnics or packed lunches.

Yeah, if they actually give it to you with your order, that's totally fine.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: alkira6 on April 02, 2013, 12:22:03 PM
- Me- I keep all the soy sauce that we have ever gotten in a drawer in the kitchen. When we need soy sauce I will open enough packets to measure out what I need. cheap  In my defence, we only need it to cook with it 2-3 times a year and I always forget to actually buy it.

Unless you're taking packets from your local Chinese restaurant for the express purpose of replenishing your stock, I don't see anything wrong with this. Every single time I order takeout, they send a handfull, which is way more than we'll actually use on the food. I have no compunction about throwing them in a drawer for future use in recipes or to take along for picnics or packed lunches.

No, there is a sushi place about 1/2 mile from our house that we order from. They always give us way too much wasabi and soy (never enough pickled ginger. There can NEVER be too much pickled ginger  >:D )
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: cicero on April 02, 2013, 12:30:33 PM
- Lying about my age so I could get freebies.  Worse one was lying about my species: in order to avoid paying my ticket on a ferry, she wrapped me in a blanket, told me to curl up on the seat and shut up.  She told the ticket taker I was a dog.


 ;D ;D ;D OK, you win.

I agree.

Sadly, I agree too.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 02, 2013, 12:44:13 PM
I used to have a friend who didn't like to pay the cost of making phone calls from her home phone (land line), so if she called you, she would immediately make an excuse like "The line is full of static on my end, can you try calling me back?" Then you would call her, and she'd be happy to talk for an hour, now that you were footing the cost of the call.

This reminds me of a TV commercial from back in the day when long distance charges were a Big Deal, and various companies competed for your business with various cheap rates, family plans, etc.  On one commercial, prospective grandparents are waiting by the phone for the big announcement.  Phone rings, Grandpa answers, listens for a minute and says, 'No, we won't accept charges'.  He sits back down and tells his wife, 'They had a boy'.  Cut to the new dad in a pay phone booth, telling the operator, 'Collect call from Mr. Wehadthebabyitsaboy'.

We  do keep packets of condiments given to us, keep them in the camper, and discard them when the new camping season beginns and we have a good start on the ones for this season.

I forgot the phone calls! That is probably the one cheapskate thing we did. Lucas was taking a summer course in college - a 2 hour trip, then stayed the week. He would make a person to person call, and I would know he had arrived safely and say the reciever of the call was not available. (Yeah, right - I'm sure the operators had not clue!)


(OT:  Once our 6 month old had an enormous fever that came on after he left, the doctor was at our house (yes!), and I accepted the call. Lucas was really scared! Baby had roseola, got a shot, Doc saw where we lived and we barely paid for the house call, told me I was doing well putting Baby on a pad in the living room and dabbing her with cool water; then Doc called me every day for 3 days asking how Baby was and if I was OK.)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Ms_Cellany on April 02, 2013, 12:48:46 PM
When I was in college, I would call home person-to-person "From Ms_Cellany to Murphy_Cellany."  Murphy was our dog. My parents would decline the call and call me back.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 02, 2013, 12:55:07 PM
When my parents got a computer in 2007 or thereabouts, they didn't really understand how e-mail worked.  I asked if I could borrow it for a minute so that I could check a couple of things on the 'Net, and my Mum said "Okay, but don't send any e-mails to Australia."  (They live in Canada.)  I laughed, thinking she was joking, then realized she was dead serious.  I had to explain that you didn't get charged long-distance for sending e-mails halfway across the world, but I'm pretty sure she didn't believe me.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: 25wishes on April 02, 2013, 01:19:47 PM
OK, maybe this can get second prize. It concerns friends of friends, let's call them John and Mary.

They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: NyaChan on April 02, 2013, 01:32:30 PM
OK, maybe this can get second prize. It concerns friends of friends, let's call them John and Mary.

They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her.

I don't know, I kind of feel for Mary here, though I would have requested the charge be removed rather than demanded a tea bag.  If she actually just had hot water and was charged for it (as opposed to using John's tea bag and hoping they would only charge for one), they should have told her ahead of time that they were going to charge her for a tea.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: snowflake on April 02, 2013, 01:33:59 PM
- Me- I keep all the soy sauce that we have ever gotten in a drawer in the kitchen. When we need soy sauce I will open enough packets to measure out what I need. cheap  In my defence, we only need it to cook with it 2-3 times a year and I always forget to actually buy it.

Unless you're taking packets from your local Chinese restaurant for the express purpose of replenishing your stock, I don't see anything wrong with this. Every single time I order takeout, they send a handfull, which is way more than we'll actually use on the food. I have no compunction about throwing them in a drawer for future use in recipes or to take along for picnics or packed lunches.

No, there is a sushi place about 1/2 mile from our house that we order from. They always give us way too much wasabi and soy (never enough pickled ginger. There can NEVER be too much pickled ginger  >:D )

I use far fewer condiments than I get.  I save the little packets for when I go camping.  It's very handy.

One thing I just thought of.  I keep seeing crafts on Pinterest for those paint chip samples.  I know you can get a stash when redecorating, but I keep seeing things like Valentines with the same paint sample used over and over again.  Um, so is the idea that you just go to Home Depot and grab a handful?  I keep thinking it's tacky every time I see them.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: 25wishes on April 02, 2013, 01:35:10 PM
OK, maybe this can get second prize. It concerns friends of friends, let's call them John and Mary.

They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her.

I don't know, I kind of feel for Mary here, though I would have requested the charge be removed rather than demanded a tea bag.  If she actually just had hot water and was charged for it (as opposed to using John's tea bag and hoping they would only charge for one), they should have told her ahead of time that they were going to charge her for a tea.

No, they did not share the tea bag - she just likes hot water.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: NyaChan on April 02, 2013, 01:36:06 PM
OK, maybe this can get second prize. It concerns friends of friends, let's call them John and Mary.

They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her.

I don't know, I kind of feel for Mary here, though I would have requested the charge be removed rather than demanded a tea bag.  If she actually just had hot water and was charged for it (as opposed to using John's tea bag and hoping they would only charge for one), they should have told her ahead of time that they were going to charge her for a tea.

No, they did not share the tea bag - she just likes hot water.

I do too actually  :)  Since she didn't try to game them, I don't think she is cheap for being irritated by the charge.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 02, 2013, 01:43:19 PM
OK, maybe this can get second prize. It concerns friends of friends, let's call them John and Mary.

They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her.

I don't know, I kind of feel for Mary here, though I would have requested the charge be removed rather than demanded a tea bag.  If she actually just had hot water and was charged for it (as opposed to using John's tea bag and hoping they would only charge for one), they should have told her ahead of time that they were going to charge her for a tea.

No, they did not share the tea bag - she just likes hot water.

I do too actually  :)  Since she didn't try to game them, I don't think she is cheap for being irritated by the charge.

I'm with Mary on this one too.

ETA: That actually reminds me of a story.  A coworker went to a restaurant who gives out free hot tea.  She asked for iced tea and they said there's a charge for that.  So she takes the hot tea, ask for a glass of ice, and made her own free iced tea.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 02, 2013, 01:49:59 PM
My MIL and several other people who, after acquiring a cell phone with nationwide calling, still tell people they are on a "long distance" call, so they shouldn't be disturbed.

Now, most people I know don't even change their numbers when they move, they keep the old area code and number, because it is the same charge to call local or out of the area.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: magicdomino on April 02, 2013, 01:53:34 PM
One thing I just thought of.  I keep seeing crafts on Pinterest for those paint chip samples.  I know you can get a stash when redecorating, but I keep seeing things like Valentines with the same paint sample used over and over again.  Um, so is the idea that you just go to Home Depot and grab a handful?  I keep thinking it's tacky every time I see them.

I'd agree.  It's possible that one might luck out and get a bunch of discontinued samples; no problem with that. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ScubaGirl on April 02, 2013, 02:12:09 PM
I had an uncle who was slightly eccentric and very cheap.  Some I remember off hand (all of these 20+ years ago):

1.  Had an old fishing boat but refused to take it to the marina for gas as it was more expensive than a typical gas station (true, but the operating costs are higher).  So he some how found a gas tank for a small plane and mounted it on an old snow mobile trailer.  He took it to a gas station to fill up and then drove that moving fire bomb down the road to the family cottage.  He would then use a garden house and gravity to run the gas from the tank on the bank down to the boat in the water.  What a smell - gas fumes every where. 

2.  He got it in his head one day to fly (he was a small plane pilot and owned a small plane) with one of my cousins to Mackinac Island (you can only get there by boat or plane).  They land and spend the day touring the town and the Island.  When they got back to the plane they were greeted by someone who worked there.  He informed my Uncle that there was a cost to landing and taking off (no problem, my Uncle expected that).  It cost $20/engine and since my Uncle had 2 props, the fee was $40.  My Uncle informed him that he can land and take off with just one engine so only gave the man $20 and proceeded to ignore him as they got into the plane and took off - with one engine.

3.  My (very rich) Uncle only bought used cars.  He kept an ancient Suburban to tow the fishing boat mentioned in #1.  The floor was rusted so much you could see the road beneath the passenger's seat.  He was once towing the boat from the family cottage to his old barn for storage when the hitch came lose (old, rusted hitch).  For a while the boat was riding side-by-side with the Suburban down the road.  It ended in a ditch (thankfully a seldom traveled country road).  Oh the pains he went through to get that boat back out.

4.  He became interested in building a single seat plane.  (Thank goodness that it was single seat because there was no way my mother would have let my father (Uncle's brother) fly with him as she knew he always cut too many corners.)  He died before the plane was finished.  He was building it in his living room with the idea that once it was ready for wings, he'd remove the picture window and push it out of the house that way.

5.  He also had an ancient fishing boat in Florida.  That boat had a double hull.  Well, he knew he had developed a hole in the outside hull but decided not to worry about it because there was the second hull.  He went out fishing with my Father and BIL (who doesn't swim).  They thankfully made it to shore before the boat sank.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 02, 2013, 02:42:46 PM
I must admit that we get a chuckle when someone with a $200K motorhome asks us about the gas prices in our state to decide whether to go or not. If you can't use the thing, downsize or quit traveling. There just seems to be an unbalance between the initial outlay and being able to support it.

We have a tiny unit, get 10 to 17 mpg (mountains, you know) and frankly, gas prices are the least of our worries. We took that all into account, plus insurance and motel prices vs. gas + campgrounds and our personal comfort, when we made the decision to by our little baby. I would like to think people who can afford the better unit are smarter than us.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Coralreef on April 02, 2013, 02:44:45 PM
Scubagirl, that uncle crossed the line from cheapskate to criminally insane!  Towing fuel? Unsafe hitch? Leaky boat? Rusted through car?  I'm not a religious person, but there were numerous dieties watching over that man if no one was killed or maimed!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ScubaGirl on April 02, 2013, 03:06:16 PM
Scubagirl, that uncle crossed the line from cheapskate to criminally insane!  Towing fuel? Unsafe hitch? Leaky boat? Rusted through car?  I'm not a religious person, but there were numerous dieties watching over that man if no one was killed or maimed!

I won't argue with you at all.  But somehow the entire family still has a soft spot for him in our hearts and "Uncle Tom" stories are often repeated.

I remembered another one.  This one got my mom madder than she had ever been at my Uncle:  Uncle Tom had 2 plane jacks that he sold to a buyer in Connecticut (he lived in Michigan).  He had them mounted to a small, old snow mobile trailer (that was not designed for the weight) and hired 2 of my brothers to drive them to the buyer.  The weight of the jacks slowly crushed the trailer springs and some where in Ohio it started to ride on the tires and eventually (inevitably) caused flat tires.  Once they got the tires replaced they found some wood blocks to jam up under the trailer where the springs had been so the tires would be safe.  Well, every so often one of these blocks would slip out so they'd have to pull over and fix it.  They were driving straight through and had little sleep and my one brother just started losing it.   Besides the blocks popping out, the weight of the trailer would actually control the car at times as opposed to the other way around.  In hindsight they know now they should have pulled off the road and refused to drive further but they were young, it was pre-cell phone days and they didn't have money for hotels.  So they trudged on with a very unsafe load, pulling over almost hourly to fix it, resting during the day so they could drive at night with less traffic and fewer police.  My other brother is rather pig headed and he got himself convinced he had to finish the trip.  Eventually they made it and eventually they made it home but when our mother heard about how unsafe it was and my brothers' lives were actually at risk, she had a word or two with my Uncle.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Garden Goblin on April 02, 2013, 03:13:33 PM
ETA: That actually reminds me of a story.  A coworker went to a restaurant who gives out free hot tea.  She asked for iced tea and they said there's a charge for that.  So she takes the hot tea, ask for a glass of ice, and made her own free iced tea.

I routinely do something similar.  A particular restaurant has a hot tea and an iced tea option, using different teas for each.  I dislike their iced tea, so I order their hot tea and a glass of ice.  Charge is the same for iced or hot.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Virg on April 02, 2013, 03:23:38 PM
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: squeakers on April 02, 2013, 03:41:24 PM
I recently stayed in a hotel that promptly went on my "Didn't care for, won't revisit" list. (Didn't care for the level of cleanliness, food and service lacking etc.)

One quirk I did notice was that the hotel did offer complimentary shampoo and soap - but in large dispensers fastened to the wall of the shower. Perfectly hygienic and all, and no doubt cheaper than providing individually wrapped items, but I did find it a bit off putting in a stingy sort of way.
But I may be biased because by this time I was already less than impressed with the place.

I loved the dispenser at the last hotel we stayed at so much that I bought one for our bathroom.  Those teeny bottles of shampoo barely get my waist length hair washed so being able to squirt as much as I needed was awesome.  And when we travel as a family the 2-4 tiny bottles are not enough for a family of 5 (we get 2 king/queen beds and either a suite with a couch or book a roll-away bed.  Then the boys fight over who gets to sleep on the couch/roll-away.) So we end up breaking out either multiple teeny bottles from our stash (DH travels a lot for work) or we go buy a big bottle that hopefully won't get spilled on the way home.  BTDT and at least it was all dirty clothes that got extra clean when washed.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BabyMama on April 02, 2013, 03:41:32 PM
She also doesn't like people to text her. We don't often because she has dyslexia, but sometimes it's a lot easier to send a text. She hates, hates, hates it when people reply things like "OK" or "Thanks!" and will scold you the next time she sees you, because each text costs her...a dime.

I don't have a text plan so I was very annoyed when people text because it cost 20 cents each (it adds up!)  I've since turned off text so nothing can get through.  So I understand your Aunt's feeling about that although I don't scold. 
See, that's what I'd do - turn them off if I don't have a text plan. Sounds like the Aunt just liked to complain.

She does (she's really not bad, but she does like to fret over things like dimes)--and she's willingly tech unsavvy. Last summer she was complaining about family members not friending her on Facebook. She doesn't have Internet at her house and uses the library because it's free--but she must not go over much because I'd sent her a friend request 11 months before that she still hadn't accepted  ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RubyCat on April 02, 2013, 03:43:10 PM
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

But I think she didn't pay for tea, she asked for and paid for hot water. There are still costs to the restaurant to provide the cup and the hot water. If she wanted tea in the first place, she should've ordered it. There are corners you can cut at home but are not proper to cut in a restaurant. She tried to pull a cheapie that didn't turn out the way she expected and got angry IMO.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: snowflake on April 02, 2013, 03:44:52 PM
I must admit that we get a chuckle when someone with a $200K motorhome asks us about the gas prices in our state to decide whether to go or not. If you can't use the thing, downsize or quit traveling. There just seems to be an unbalance between the initial outlay and being able to support it.

We have a tiny unit, get 10 to 17 mpg (mountains, you know) and frankly, gas prices are the least of our worries. We took that all into account, plus insurance and motel prices vs. gas + campgrounds and our personal comfort, when we made the decision to by our little baby. I would like to think people who can afford the better unit are smarter than us.

I know someone who makes lots of life choices that are not costly in money, but are very costly in time.  They own a large motor home.  They wish they could take it out more to make things "worth it."  I would point out the irony, but that would probably be just too rude.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Yvaine on April 02, 2013, 03:54:47 PM
I recently stayed in a hotel that promptly went on my "Didn't care for, won't revisit" list. (Didn't care for the level of cleanliness, food and service lacking etc.)

One quirk I did notice was that the hotel did offer complimentary shampoo and soap - but in large dispensers fastened to the wall of the shower. Perfectly hygienic and all, and no doubt cheaper than providing individually wrapped items, but I did find it a bit off putting in a stingy sort of way.
But I may be biased because by this time I was already less than impressed with the place.

I loved the dispenser at the last hotel we stayed at so much that I bought one for our bathroom.  Those teeny bottles of shampoo barely get my waist length hair washed so being able to squirt as much as I needed was awesome.  And when we travel as a family the 2-4 tiny bottles are not enough for a family of 5 (we get 2 king/queen beds and either a suite with a couch or book a roll-away bed.  Then the boys fight over who gets to sleep on the couch/roll-away.) So we end up breaking out either multiple teeny bottles from our stash (DH travels a lot for work) or we go buy a big bottle that hopefully won't get spilled on the way home.  BTDT and at least it was all dirty clothes that got extra clean when washed.

I've never seen the dispensers, but I would LOVE them. I too have a ton of hair, and so does my boyfriend, and the little bottles are often not enough. Plus it's got to be greener to not have all those little bottles to deal with.

Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

But I think she didn't pay for tea, she asked for and paid for hot water. There are still costs to the restaurant to provide the cup and the hot water. If she wanted tea in the first place, she should've ordered it. There are corners you can cut at home but are not proper to cut in a restaurant. She tried to pull a cheapie that didn't turn out the way she expected and got angry IMO.

She might well have been trying to pull a cheapie, but if I'm reading right, she did get charged for the tea.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: NyaChan on April 02, 2013, 03:56:16 PM
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

But I think she didn't pay for tea, she asked for and paid for hot water. There are still costs to the restaurant to provide the cup and the hot water. If she wanted tea in the first place, she should've ordered it. There are corners you can cut at home but are not proper to cut in a restaurant. She tried to pull a cheapie that didn't turn out the way she expected and got angry IMO.

What cheapie did she try to pull?  She wanted to drink hot water and ordered a mug of hot water.  She was not told that there would be a charge, yet she was billed as if she was served tea - which is fine, except they should have said that ahead of time. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Moray on April 02, 2013, 03:59:04 PM
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

Well, no, she paid for her hot water, which happened to be the same price as the tea. It's like if I order a slice of cheese pizza and my friend orders pepperoni. Do I get to ask for "my" pepperoni after the fact just because the slices are the same price?

Unless she specifically asked "Is there a charge for hot water?" and was told no, she had no reason to assume it would be free.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Daquiri40 on April 02, 2013, 04:04:40 PM
My one aunt is really cheap.
-- bought something at a garage sale for 50 cents.  She found out it didn't work so she took it back.  She is proud of this.
-- friends invite my aunt and uncle on a cruise and the friends were paying for it.  My aunt found out the airfare was $200 for both of them and told them no.  My aunt and uncle have money but my aunt does not like to part with it.  Way to tell your friends they aren't worth it.

A guy I worked with brought finger jello to every potluck because it was cheap and then complained someone did not bring brownies he liked.

Another aunt would argue and argue and argue to get a $10 discount at any hotel she stayed at.  The clerks would end up hating her.

My sister-in-law was queen of the regifters.  She gave me a make a potholder set (the colored loops and frame type thing) for my birthday when I turned 36.  She also gave me a plastic frame with dried grass glued on it on my next birthday.  Those were my gifts.  BUT if you didn't give her something expensive, she would pout. 


Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Yvaine on April 02, 2013, 04:05:48 PM
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

Well, no, she paid for her hot water, which happened to be the same price as the tea. It's like if I order a slice of cheese pizza and my friend orders pepperoni. Do I get to ask for "my" pepperoni after the fact just because the slices are the same price?

Unless she specifically asked "Is there a charge for hot water?" and was told no, she had no reason to assume it would be free.

Ah, gotcha. I was thinking they charged her for tea under the assumption that she was going to dunk her husband's tea bag in her water (but that the water would have been free if they hadn't made that assumption).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Chip2 on April 02, 2013, 04:08:02 PM
Loving this thread! A lot of these stories sound so familiar.

And I like the idea of bringing a tall child's birth certificate to places like buffets and amusement parks. I was a tall child and my parents sometimes got the stinkeye from staff who thought we were trying to get in on the cheep. DD is 6 years old but looks closer to 8.

I always got around that problem with my kids by pointing at the child in question and asking, "How old are you?"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bloo on April 02, 2013, 04:16:16 PM
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

Well, no, she paid for her hot water, which happened to be the same price as the tea. It's like if I order a slice of cheese pizza and my friend orders pepperoni. Do I get to ask for "my" pepperoni after the fact just because the slices are the same price?

Unless she specifically asked "Is there a charge for hot water?" and was told no, she had no reason to assume it would be free.

Is it because I worked in restaurants that this last post makes total sense to me? When I was bartending, anything that was a pain always costs more. So water, which should presumably be free, would cost something, if it had to be heated up. No drinks station I've ever worked with was set up for that (probably different now). Since I wasn't allowed near the stoves, I'd have to take a coffee mug and walk all the way back to the prep kitchens to use the microwave and sit there while it heated up. That meant no one was working the bar or only one bartender was at the bar working or making drinks for the bar/service station. We offered one type of tea. Could you tell this particular restaurant discouraged hot tea service?

Nowadays, I imagine, they'd have a hot water spigot for instant hot water since a lot of people really enjoy hot tea.

Hot tea and a basket selection of teas was ordered through the bar of one restaurant I worked in since only the bartender had access to exclusively hot water. Since an order had to be rang through the computer to get to the bar, there would be a charge for it.

Honestly, though, I would have just nuked some hot water in a cup in the prep kitchen there too if I'd ever been presented with that situation. I'd be embarrassed at charging a patron for hot water (and would assume it would affect my tip). It was beyond my capabilities of communication to explain to people why things that were more labor intensive, were more expensive, even if the materials themselves were cheap.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bloo on April 02, 2013, 04:22:03 PM
Loving this thread! A lot of these stories sound so familiar.

And I like the idea of bringing a tall child's birth certificate to places like buffets and amusement parks. I was a tall child and my parents sometimes got the stinkeye from staff who thought we were trying to get in on the cheep. DD is 6 years old but looks closer to 8.

I always got around that problem with my kids by pointing at the child in question and asking, "How old are you?"

This is a good one!

When my kids were younger, 8 and 6, we went to an all-you-can-eat Asian buffet. The type that had lots of seafood and the most amazing variety of sushi! The waitstaff asked how old my kids were and I told them and it turns out the had a discount by age. If your kid is 6 you pay X, if your kid is 8, you pay X+2 and so forth. I laughed and fully betted on them charging us full adult price for my son as he LOVES seafood and sushi.

They were nervous about handing us the bill, but we all burst out laughing when we saw he had, in fact, been charged for an adult plate. Since he ate twice as much as any of the adults, we absolutely did not quibble over the bill and tipped well!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Yvaine on April 02, 2013, 04:33:51 PM
Loving this thread! A lot of these stories sound so familiar.

And I like the idea of bringing a tall child's birth certificate to places like buffets and amusement parks. I was a tall child and my parents sometimes got the stinkeye from staff who thought we were trying to get in on the cheep. DD is 6 years old but looks closer to 8.

I always got around that problem with my kids by pointing at the child in question and asking, "How old are you?"

This is a good one!

When my kids were younger, 8 and 6, we went to an all-you-can-eat Asian buffet. The type that had lots of seafood and the most amazing variety of sushi! The waitstaff asked how old my kids were and I told them and it turns out the had a discount by age. If your kid is 6 you pay X, if your kid is 8, you pay X+2 and so forth. I laughed and fully betted on them charging us full adult price for my son as he LOVES seafood and sushi.

They were nervous about handing us the bill, but we all burst out laughing when we saw he had, in fact, been charged for an adult plate. Since he ate twice as much as any of the adults, we absolutely did not quibble over the bill and tipped well!

When I was about 10, one buffet started charging kids by their weight--1 cent per pound the kid weighed. My parents would take us there and not buy themselves anything but raid our plates. Well, the buffet got wise to that and started allowing the discount only with the purchase of an adult meal for each kids' meal.

I always joked that at least they weren't weighing us on the way out, too, and charging based on the difference.  ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: squeakers on April 02, 2013, 04:42:53 PM

I loved the dispenser at the last hotel we stayed at so much that I bought one for our bathroom.  Those teeny bottles of shampoo barely get my waist length hair washed so being able to squirt as much as I needed was awesome.  And when we travel as a family the 2-4 tiny bottles are not enough for a family of 5 (we get 2 king/queen beds and either a suite with a couch or book a roll-away bed.  Then the boys fight over who gets to sleep on the couch/roll-away.) So we end up breaking out either multiple teeny bottles from our stash (DH travels a lot for work) or we go buy a big bottle that hopefully won't get spilled on the way home.  BTDT and at least it was all dirty clothes that got extra clean when washed.

I've never seen the dispensers, but I would LOVE them. I too have a ton of hair, and so does my boyfriend, and the little bottles are often not enough. Plus it's got to be greener to not have all those little bottles to deal with.


http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001CD31XM/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 is the one I bought.  There are more expensive/fancy ones and cheaper ones but I really liked it having 4 dispensers.  We use 1 for shampoo, 1 for conditioner and 2 for body wash. The boys like Axe thus 2 different body washes  :P  It mounted easily and has had constant usage for 4 months now and still works great. I do think it should have been mounted a little further to the back of the tubstall but since middle son did it I won't complain.  He even marked all 4 dispensers with marker so I wouldn't end up using bodywash as shampoo accidentally  ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: 25wishes on April 02, 2013, 04:44:24 PM
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

Well, no, she paid for her hot water, which happened to be the same price as the tea. It's like if I order a slice of cheese pizza and my friend orders pepperoni. Do I get to ask for "my" pepperoni after the fact just because the slices are the same price?

Unless she specifically asked "Is there a charge for hot water?" and was told no, she had no reason to assume it would be free.

Ah, gotcha. I was thinking they charged her for tea under the assumption that she was going to dunk her husband's tea bag in her water (but that the water would have been free if they hadn't made that assumption).

I guess what got me about this is, we are talking about an item that you can replace for what, 3 cents or so? And she made someone go back and get her one, when she probably has a box of them at home.

I am all for "the principle of the thing"and even I wouldn't ask for the tea bag. And I am one cheap lady...

I am surprised no one has brought up a "make your own lemonade" scenario at a restaurant, involving free water, free sweetener, and a slice of lemon.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 02, 2013, 04:58:10 PM
Apparently, converting hot water and ketchup into tomato soup is another trick.  ???
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hillia on April 02, 2013, 05:05:58 PM
Apparently, converting hot water and ketchup into tomato soup is another trick.  ???

I've heard that called 'Depression soup' because it supposedly started back then.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MissRose on April 02, 2013, 05:23:27 PM
My mother, where can I start with her:

*I like going to yard sales, but step far from her when she negotiates on prices that she does a good amount of the time.  I rarely negotiate at yard sales.

*When I was 12 at the Land of the Mouse, I had to say I was 10 due the cost of the tickets if I was asked.  Good thing I looked young to pull it off but I hated doing that.

*The County Fair had a special for under 17s was a very cheap admission day when I was about 9 and my sister 6 so my mother took each of kids by the hand, and turned her wedding rings the other way, and my mother being looking young enough said I am the kids' sitter, and she got away with it!

*She doesn't tip waitstaff well.  Case in point, we had a discount voucher to a place while on vacation with her, and my sister's 2 kids to the land of the Mouse.  She was going to tip on what we actually paid for, even though the 4 people split 2 large meals, 1 of them that was free.  I ensured the waitstaff got the proper tip even though she objected (and my dad had given me cash to tip with ahead of time knowing his own wife doesn't tip well lol)

*She usually keeps her home cooler than normal in winter regarding the heat and warmer in the summer (not running much a/c), and tries to tell other family members we saved X amount doing it that way.  I have to adjust how I dress when going over there. 

I need to return later with more as I know she is one that even if she is given a few extra dollars and spend it on something fun, she won't really do it unless really pushed to do so....





Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 02, 2013, 05:56:06 PM
My dad haggles at garage sales too, but he haggles UP.   As in:  "you're only asking $1 for that?   C'mon, it's worth at least $5, and I refuse to pay a penny less!"   People think he's quite mad.   :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Susiqzer on April 02, 2013, 06:08:01 PM
Heartmug, that is ... beyond weird. At least it sounds like you can laugh at it.


Quote
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

Cheap is mean spirited, taking advantage, using most people's good manners to get away with something outrageous because you know that no one will challenge you.

I disagree and would call this smart--and fun! It's not mean-spirited, it's just taking advantage of a good thing.

I need to chime in on this one, because it truly is fun!

When I was a kid, my parents had little spare money and a really bad well. There was no way we could wash the car, if not for a good rainstorm.

But one of my fondest memories will always be goofing off in the rain with my normally stoic mother, laughing like nuts and washing the car!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: kckgirl on April 02, 2013, 06:12:11 PM
Quote
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

Not cheap at all, especially if water restrictions are in place with steep fines for washing cars and watering lawns. When I did it, I told my kids they couldn't fine me for using water that fell from the sky.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 02, 2013, 06:18:23 PM
@ Coralreef
Quote
Snipping leaves or branches from plants instead of buying them.  She would replant/soak them so they would grow roots.

I will overlook this one because I do it all the time!!   :D  Got most of my hanging plants this way.  But, I snip, root, and replant my own (I don't snip/pinch other people's plants.  My grandma used to do that).

@ Library Dragon

Quote
They wouldn't let ILs stay in the Florida house because "they wouldn't feel right charging them rent."   
??? ::) ::)

The "logic" boggles the mind.  How insulting. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: NyaChan on April 02, 2013, 06:48:21 PM
@ Coralreef
Quote
Snipping leaves or branches from plants instead of buying them.  She would replant/soak them so they would grow roots.

I will overlook this one because I do it all the time!!   :D  Got most of my hanging plants this way.  But, I snip, root, and replant my own (I don't snip/pinch other people's plants.  My grandma used to do that).

@ Library Dragon

Quote
They wouldn't let ILs stay in the Florida house because "they wouldn't feel right charging them rent."   
??? ::) ::)

The "logic" boggles the mind.  How insulting.

Ah but dontcha know, that was giving the ILs the perfect opportunity to say, "Oh no, we don't mind paying rent - what's your going rate?"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 02, 2013, 06:52:05 PM
NyaChan, of course!!!  The manipulation did not escape me.  (shaking my head)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 02, 2013, 07:56:41 PM
My dad haggles at garage sales too, but he haggles UP.   As in:  "you're only asking $1 for that?   C'mon, it's worth at least $5, and I refuse to pay a penny less!"   People think he's quite mad.   :)

That's kind of adorable.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Paper Roses on April 02, 2013, 07:56:52 PM
I will admit to keeping my house pretty cool in the winter (well, I mean, it's pretty cool all the time, but in a different way), but it's not just because I'm cheap - it's also because I find that between showers, appliances, (cooking and what not) and things in general that tend to generate heat, if the thermostat is set at a "normal" temperature, it actually gets too warm.  Plus, I like to snuggle up with blankets to watch TV, and that's more comfy when the air is cool.

But - that said, I don't freeze my family or friends just to save money!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: kareng57 on April 02, 2013, 11:00:56 PM
Late Dh and I attended an RV show (we were considering upgrading from a tent-trailer to a compact "real" trailer) and found a seminar called "RVing on a Shoestring".  Out of interest, we attended.

We found that the couple's main source of funding was in researching/attending Farmer's Markets at just about every destination they were planning on.  She did relishes/jams, and he did wood carvings.  Fair enough - but isn't the whole point of Farmer's Markets that the offerings are local?  I wondered how they got away with it, but who knows, maybe the town was willing to rent a table to just about anybody.

Plus, they had a tale about when their RV broke down completely.  Did they take their lumps and get it towed back to hometown? (We had to do that once - luckily we had insurance).  No - she called Daddy!  Honestly, these people seemed to be in their late 50s/early 60s, so let's assume that Daddy was probably around 85.  And they seemed to think that this was perfectly okay - let old Daddy bail you out and then get prepared for next summer's "free" RV adventure.

Again, I didn't know these people personally, but I can imagine how many elderly parents would react to a message of "we're stranded, we need you!"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CakeEater on April 02, 2013, 11:04:59 PM
Loving this thread! A lot of these stories sound so familiar.

And I like the idea of bringing a tall child's birth certificate to places like buffets and amusement parks. I was a tall child and my parents sometimes got the stinkeye from staff who thought we were trying to get in on the cheep. DD is 6 years old but looks closer to 8.

I always got around that problem with my kids by pointing at the child in question and asking, "How old are you?"

Except I'm sure there are plenty of parents who prep their kids to lie as well.

Late Dh and I attended an RV show (we were considering upgrading from a tent-trailer to a compact "real" trailer) and found a seminar called "RVing on a Shoestring".  Out of interest, we attended.

We found that the couple's main source of funding was in researching/attending Farmer's Markets at just about every destination they were planning on.  She did relishes/jams, and he did wood carvings.  Fair enough - but isn't the whole point of Farmer's Markets that the offerings are local?  I wondered how they got away with it, but who knows, maybe the town was willing to rent a table to just about anybody.

Plus, they had a tale about when their RV broke down completely.  Did they take their lumps and get it towed back to hometown? (We had to do that once - luckily we had insurance).  No - she called Daddy!  Honestly, these people seemed to be in their late 50s/early 60s, so let's assume that Daddy was probably around 85.  And they seemed to think that this was perfectly okay - let old Daddy bail you out and then get prepared for next summer's "free" RV adventure.

Again, I didn't know these people personally, but I can imagine how many elderly parents would react to a message of "we're stranded, we need you!"

There was an article in the Reader's Digest here a few years ago about living spend-free, that among all sorts of sensible money-saving tips, advocated:

-using your neighbours' unsecured wifi
-taking and reading your neighbours' newspapers early, then returning them to their footpaths before they wake up.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 02, 2013, 11:12:03 PM
I wonder whether the Dresser Queen wrote that one.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Iris on April 03, 2013, 01:32:18 AM


There was an article in the Reader's Digest here a few years ago about living spend-free, that among all sorts of sensible money-saving tips, advocated:

-using your neighbours' unsecured wifi
-taking and reading your neighbours newspapers early, then returning them to their footpaths before they wake up.

Did they also suggest saving on gas by taking your neighbour's car if it was unlocked? I'm sure they think that's fine aware long as you bring it back before neighbour wants it ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CakeEater on April 03, 2013, 01:41:19 AM


There was an article in the Reader's Digest here a few years ago about living spend-free, that among all sorts of sensible money-saving tips, advocated:

-using your neighbours' unsecured wifi
-taking and reading your neighbours newspapers early, then returning them to their footpaths before they wake up.

Did they also suggest saving on gas by taking your neighbour's car if it was unlocked? I'm sure they think that's fine aware long as you bring it back before neighbour wants it ::)

I believe that in the next edition, they had a stack of letters chastising the author of the article for suggesting stealing, so faith in humanity restored.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: zyrs on April 03, 2013, 03:49:47 AM
A woman was put into the hospital by her abusive boyfriend.

He came to visit her at the hospital.  He brought her flowers.  She noticed that there was dirt on the stems and asked him about it.  He had stopped at the local cemetery to gather flowers that had been left on graves.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: StarDrifter on April 03, 2013, 04:52:22 AM
Oh zyrs that's HORRIBLE.

I thought the story about the neighbours coming to my mothers' door after I'd been to visit and had secured her wi-fi (she was hitting her download limit suspiciously fast for a person who only used the internet for e-mail and Facebook) and demanded the password.

They were most put out when she refused - "But we need the internet!"
"So get your own!"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: kherbert05 on April 03, 2013, 05:12:44 AM
Oh zyrs that's HORRIBLE.

I thought the story about the neighbours coming to my mothers' door after I'd been to visit and had secured her wi-fi (she was hitting her download limit suspiciously fast for a person who only used the internet for e-mail and Facebook) and demanded the password.

They were most put out when she refused - "But we need the internet!"
"So get your own!"
Leo Laporte, The Tech Guy, has had people call into his show because their wifi quit working. Turned out they had been using neighbor's unsecured wifi. Some of them were just ignorant. They thought wifi was just there for everyone to use and didn't realize they were using their neighbor's wifi. (I ran into a colony of these people in a tech class for the district).

One famously demanded that Leo tell her how to hack back into the neighbor's wifi. Leo told her off.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 03, 2013, 06:46:40 AM
A member of my book club hosted our last meeting and a few of us used her wifi to look something up on our tablets/e-readers (with her permission.)  We noticed she had re-titled her server to something a little weird.  I asked her why and she said they had a problem with male neighbors coming over to "borrow a cup of wifi" and got quite ugly when friend refused to hand over her password.  She suspects that as a single woman living alone, they assumed that she would be too intimidated to say no to several big guys showing up to her door asking for her password. 

They were wrong.  She said no and changed the name of her server to "FBI Surveillance Van."  No one ever asks about it, she said.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 03, 2013, 06:52:39 AM
A woman was put into the hospital by her abusive boyfriend.

He came to visit her at the hospital.  He brought her flowers.  She noticed that there was dirt on the stems and asked him about it.  He had stopped at the local cemetery to gather flowers that had been left on graves.

Please tell me that she didn't go back to him. 

DH and I have a standing bet when we go to funerals re: whether we will see someone break off of the funeral party we're with and take flowers from the fresh grave to another grave in the cemetery.  They don't want to spend the money on flowers, but they want to "honor" someone they know in the cemetery.

It's happened more than you would think.  (We're weird.  It helps us cope.)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Coralreef on April 03, 2013, 08:01:35 AM
@ Coralreef
Quote
Snipping leaves or branches from plants instead of buying them.  She would replant/soak them so they would grow roots.

I will overlook this one because I do it all the time!!   :D  Got most of my hanging plants this way.  But, I snip, root, and replant my own (I don't snip/pinch other people's plants.  My grandma used to do that).

She got the snippings from store plants, not from friends or family or even outside.  I have no problems with snippings, it's just that you don't take things from stores without paying.  Even a leaf. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Coralreef on April 03, 2013, 08:04:46 AM
I will admit to keeping my house pretty cool in the winter (well, I mean, it's pretty cool all the time, but in a different way), but it's not just because I'm cheap - it's also because I find that between showers, appliances, (cooking and what not) and things in general that tend to generate heat, if the thermostat is set at a "normal" temperature, it actually gets too warm.  Plus, I like to snuggle up with blankets to watch TV, and that's more comfy when the air is cool.

But - that said, I don't freeze my family or friends just to save money!

I too keep my house cool, my bedroom is at 16 C year round, the rest of the house around 18 C.  Friends find it freezing, but darn, menopause is making me sweat just looking at a picture of a sunny field in summer.  I rise the thermostat when I have guests and I have an assortment of afghans to share.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Outdoor Girl on April 03, 2013, 08:07:11 AM
My Dad has planted and maintains a memorial garden for my mother at his local hospital.  He'd planted a miniature rose in the garden.  Came back a couple of days later to find it gone.

'Here, honey, I brought you these roses.  Never mind the dirt...'
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Thipu1 on April 03, 2013, 08:12:30 AM
My father used the cemetery as the main source of our flower garden but he never took anything from graves.  He'd take bulbs from the trash heap and plant those.

I don't consider this being cheap but, because we never really knew what colors  were going to come up, our garden was always a surprise. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: 25wishes on April 03, 2013, 08:29:19 AM
My father used the cemetery as the main source of our flower garden but he never took anything from graves.  He'd take bulbs from the trash heap and plant those.

I don't consider this being cheap but, because we never really knew what colors  were going to come up, our garden was always a surprise.

I have heard of people stealing stuffed animals off a child's grave. How cheap is that...
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RebeccainGA on April 03, 2013, 08:34:31 AM
My father used the cemetery as the main source of our flower garden but he never took anything from graves.  He'd take bulbs from the trash heap and plant those.

I don't consider this being cheap but, because we never really knew what colors  were going to come up, our garden was always a surprise. 
I think that falls squarely under 'thrifty' - like my grandmother, who whenever she sees someone digging out a flower garden asks if they are taking out anything that's alive, so she can 'rescue' it. She's got an amazing variety of stuff growing in her back yard, much of it rescued.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 03, 2013, 08:39:48 AM
Oh zyrs that's HORRIBLE.

I thought the story about the neighbours coming to my mothers' door after I'd been to visit and had secured her wi-fi (she was hitting her download limit suspiciously fast for a person who only used the internet for e-mail and Facebook) and demanded the password.

They were most put out when she refused - "But we need the internet!"
"So get your own!"
Leo Laporte, The Tech Guy, has had people call into his show because their wifi quit working. Turned out they had been using neighbor's unsecured wifi. Some of them were just ignorant. They thought wifi was just there for everyone to use and didn't realize they were using their neighbor's wifi. (I ran into a colony of these people in a tech class for the district).

One famously demanded that Leo tell her how to hack back into the neighbor's wifi. Leo told her off.

There is a town near where I live that has wi-fi access for the whole town. They were the first in the world to offer that!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 03, 2013, 08:42:11 AM
A member of my book club hosted our last meeting and a few of us used her wifi to look something up on our tablets/e-readers (with her permission.)  We noticed she had re-titled her server to something a little weird.  I asked her why and she said they had a problem with male neighbors coming over to "borrow a cup of wifi" and got quite ugly when friend refused to hand over her password.  She suspects that as a single woman living alone, they assumed that she would be too intimidated to say no to several big guys showing up to her door asking for her password. 

They were wrong.  She said no and changed the name of her server to "FBI Surveillance Van."  No one ever asks about it, she said.

So awesome!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: cicero on April 03, 2013, 09:36:35 AM
A woman was put into the hospital by her abusive boyfriend.

He came to visit her at the hospital.  He brought her flowers.  She noticed that there was dirt on the stems and asked him about it.  He had stopped at the local cemetery to gather flowers that had been left on graves.
not cheapskate related but ..... *that's* what bothered her?

OK, back to cheapskate stories...

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: alkira6 on April 03, 2013, 10:18:16 AM
I freely admit to taking any plant/cutting/bulb that is freely given.  I had quite a few amaryllis plants at one point because they were given out as gifts at school at Christmas as blooming plants and people would throw them away when the blooms died.  Most didn't care if I took them even though I tried to tell them how to replant them so they'd grow.

My hostas, 3 rose varieties, my peonies, tiger lilies, some variety of elephant ear type plant, and an Indian hawthorn bush were given to me by people thinning their plants.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: VorFemme on April 03, 2013, 10:23:22 AM
A member of my book club hosted our last meeting and a few of us used her Wi-Fi to look something up on our tablets/e-readers (with her permission.)  We noticed she had re-titled her server to something a little weird.  I asked her why and she said they had a problem with male neighbors coming over to "borrow a cup of Wi-Fi" and got quite ugly when friend refused to hand over her password.  She suspects that as a single woman living alone, they assumed that she would be too intimidated to say no to several big guys showing up to her door asking for her password. 

They were wrong.  She said no and changed the name of her server to "FBI Surveillance Van."  No one ever asks about it, she said.

Snerk.....

Last month our modem quietly started to go drop the signal, constantly.  The router worked, but was having trouble since there was no stable signal from the modem.

Took the modem back to Comcast and got a new modem (same lease fee) with built in wireless - only ONE piece of equipment to troubleshoot if the Wi-Fi drops out!

The only issue was that no one had done a factory image recovery on it from the time someone turned it in before it was handed out to me......so I had someone else's network name, unknown passwords, and their MAC strings for their computers.....I did a factory image reset very quickly!

FBI Surveillance Van does sound like an interesting idea for a name, though.......Evil & Snarky are wondering about one of the other alphabet agencies.  Maybe IRS Mobile Operations?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: nuit93 on April 03, 2013, 10:47:13 AM
A member of my book club hosted our last meeting and a few of us used her Wi-Fi to look something up on our tablets/e-readers (with her permission.)  We noticed she had re-titled her server to something a little weird.  I asked her why and she said they had a problem with male neighbors coming over to "borrow a cup of Wi-Fi" and got quite ugly when friend refused to hand over her password.  She suspects that as a single woman living alone, they assumed that she would be too intimidated to say no to several big guys showing up to her door asking for her password. 

They were wrong.  She said no and changed the name of her server to "FBI Surveillance Van."  No one ever asks about it, she said.

Snerk.....

Last month our modem quietly started to go drop the signal, constantly.  The router worked, but was having trouble since there was no stable signal from the modem.

Took the modem back to Comcast and got a new modem (same lease fee) with built in wireless - only ONE piece of equipment to troubleshoot if the Wi-Fi drops out!

The only issue was that no one had done a factory image recovery on it from the time someone turned it in before it was handed out to me......so I had someone else's network name, unknown passwords, and their MAC strings for their computers.....I did a factory image reset very quickly!

FBI Surveillance Van does sound like an interesting idea for a name, though.......Evil & Snarky are wondering about one of the other alphabet agencies.  Maybe IRS Mobile Operations?

I_can_hear_you_playing_scrabble is a fairly common I've seen in apartment buildings.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Coralreef on April 03, 2013, 10:59:58 AM
A woman was put into the hospital by her abusive boyfriend.

He came to visit her at the hospital.  He brought her flowers.  She noticed that there was dirt on the stems and asked him about it.  He had stopped at the local cemetery to gather flowers that had been left on graves.
not cheapskate related but ..... *that's* what bothered her?

OK, back to cheapskate stories...

On the other hand, if she keeps going back to the jerk, the cemetery may be the next place she gets flowers.

Corrected to point out that I do know how to spell (most of the time).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jedikaiti on April 03, 2013, 12:49:24 PM
<threadjack> I once had a neighbor knock on my door and ask if they could borrow my wifi for a week while they waited for their ISP to set up their new service. She was very polite, and brought over her laptop so I could enter the password, and I expect that she'd have simply said OK and asked someone else if I had said no. I don't know if it actually worked all that well for her, since the signal didn't carry far outside my apartment, but that's OK.

And, so everyone can get their giggles without totally derailing the thread, here's a page of funny wifi names... http://wifilol.com/ </threadjack>
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Twik on April 03, 2013, 01:10:27 PM
There was someone who used to post her who had lost a child. She said she had to start marking things on the grave with indelible ink, "THIS ITEM WAS STOLEN FROM A CHILD'S GRAVE," to keep everything from disappearing.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Emmy on April 03, 2013, 02:46:44 PM
Shortly after graduating college, I ran into a friend of a friend who lived in the same complex and we started hanging out.  We both were still members of the college gym and decided to go together with me driving.  On the way home, he asked me to pull into the bank, and then make two more stops and when I protested, he said "it will just take a minute".  He never mentioned running errands ahead of time.  I later told our mutual friend about it and he said that "Joe" tends to do this because he doesn't want to pay for gas to run his own errands.  I took my own car to the gym from that day forward.  Joe got to know some of my group of friends and would often announce that he had no money and needed to borrow some when we got to our destination instead of mentioning he needed to stop at the bank to get some cash.  My friends and I always insisted on getting paid back and making sure Joe either had cash or hit a MAC before getting to the destination.  Joe's way of thinking seemed to be that if he claimed to be broke when we got to the destination, it would be inconvenient for him to get the money so somebody would spot him (and later forget about it).  Fortunately Joe realized that we being a cheapskate wasn't going to fly, so he started having money on hand.

DH's uncle was traveling in a city about 45 minutes away from us and asked him to pick us up at the train station and drop him off at the hotel in the city.  Parking, gas, and tolls (not to mention the time factor of getting around in the city at rush hour) would have cost us more than it would it would have for DH's uncle to pay for a cab.  DH told him that wouldn't be possible and mentioned he could catch a cab to the hotel.

It is annoying when cheapskates are willing to have you spend time, money, or aggravation to save themselves money.  I don't think there is anything wrong with being thrifty and come from a thrifty family, but wouldn't expect anybody else to be inconvenienced by my choices.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: goodwillgal on April 03, 2013, 03:15:24 PM
2 stories about my mom- Mom has NEVER liked her SIL - always complained about how "cheap" she was -and admitingly aunt did some overly cheap things (like showing up with a bag of baking potato's at a family party and using the hostesses milk butter etc to make mashed potatoes at a party (and no, she didn't live a far distance from the party that prepping it at home was not possible )
 anyway mom complained that aunt left at moms house a coupon for a thrift store and told me "SIL shouldn't shop at stores "like that" there for people that "need them" I replied to mom - people like SIL - keep me in a job - and my outfit came from a thrift store  Mom was speechless for a minute....
other story - BG-  Mom worked at a company cafeteria and ALWAYS complained about "never seeing some people except when the company had there free Christmas dinner or their employee appreciation day dinner . but would complain about people coming down and stealing from the condiment bar individual packets of things or stealing lemon to make lemonade in their  offices . story - We were at Fuddruckers (a gourmet hamburger place known for its condiment bar ) Mom asked me what I was ordering -I said a small hamburger and a salad (instead of Fries) Mom said - don't' get a salad - just get stuff off the works bar to make your own salad - you just wont have dressing for it - I was flabbergasted
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Kimblee on April 03, 2013, 03:21:09 PM
I once read that the difference between cheapness and thrift is:  does your behaviour cause physical discomfort for yourself or others?    If so, you're cheap.   In that case, my mum is cheap.   One winter the cost of heating her house went up by a few dollars per month, so - despite the fact that she and Dad could easily afford it - she set the thermostat to 16 Celsius.   I was freezing during my visit and begged her to turn it up; she refused.  "Just put on another sweater!"   "I'M ALREADY WEARING TWO!"

Our house was like that, growing up - we didn't have any heating at all.  In the mornings you could tell when someone had sprayed their deodorant on in the freezing cold bathroom - you'd hear a shriek!

Our house doesn't have "heat" We have a couple space heaters but my room doesn't have one.

I sleep under three blankets, with three chihuahuas. They're pretty effective "space heaters"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Kimblee on April 03, 2013, 03:27:06 PM
The first Christmas after MIL died FIL came for a visit.  DS1 went into the kitchen and asked what are all these paper things on the counter?  FIL washed all the paper plates from a litte gathering the night before.  I would have chalked it up to just wing helpful, but it was a constant disagreement about washing disposable cups, forks, etc.  I figure its my once a year decadence. 

People who steal toilet paper is a big complaint in libraries.  It comes up a lot on listservs. We put up a nice holder for plastic bags by the baby changing table.  It lasted a day.  Now we have an empty tissue box screwed onto the wall.  It looks strange, but no one steals it.

I am cheap in certain areas.  It equalizes out my splurges.  I make my own dish washing and laundry detergents, body scrubs, shave cream, etc.  I still cut up old tshirts for rags.  All my last bits of yarn are saved for random projects.  Many times people think we're not home because there is only 1 light on. 

Add me to the list of young looking kids passed as off as younger for discounts at "smorgasbord" (the height of good eating in S. California when I was young *** years ago), movies, theme parks.

After I weave ends on a project, if ther "cut off" yarn is over five inches or so, i tie it into a ball of yarn I've been creating out of my ends.

I've used my "pioneer ball" (because my dad refers to all money saving things as my "hearty Pioneer spirit" for everything from potholders to dishcloths(the cotton) and a purse(the acrylic)

I think its pretty... its like getting a free ball of yarn every few months!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: GreenEyedHawk on April 03, 2013, 07:15:14 PM
Okay, I admit that I save the packets of ketchup/hot sauce/soy sauce because they're convenient to take in my lunch to work, but no way would I spend the time squeezing every packet into a bottle.  I also don't cram handfuls into my pockets whenever I go to Chinese food places/McDonalds/Taco Bell, whatever.  I keep any extras that are in the bag, toss them into a container I keep in the fridge, and grab as needed to go with lunches.

Even if I could save myself the cost of an occasional bottle of ketchup or soy sauce or whatever, it's just not worth the time and effort.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 03, 2013, 07:40:21 PM
[raising hand]

I squeeze the packets into the bottle.  I also combine the hot sauce and the soy sauce and julienne fresh ginger to put into it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 03, 2013, 07:52:50 PM
I've never thought the soy sauce that comes from the little packets was any good.  I don't even use it when I'm eating the Chinese food from that restaurant; I pull out my bottle of Kikkoman!  :)  We do, however, get lots of Arby's sauce and save any extra for the next time, because the stores vary on how much they'll give you when you ask for "lots," and my husband likes to use something like 11 packets per sandwich!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: gramma dishes on April 03, 2013, 07:56:46 PM
...  We do, however, get lots of Arby's sauce and save any extra for the next time, because the stores vary on how much they'll give you when you ask for "lots," and my husband likes to use something like 11 packets per sandwich!

My husband does the same with Arby's "horsey sauce".  We always ask for lots -- and he uses up as many as they'll give him.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: kckgirl on April 03, 2013, 08:10:49 PM
We do, however, get lots of Arby's sauce and save any extra for the next time, because the stores vary on how much they'll give you when you ask for "lots," and my husband likes to use something like 11 packets per sandwich!

I put one packet on the top, and another on the bottom. It oozes out, but it's oh, so yummy. You just have to use a lot of napkins. :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Curious Cat on April 03, 2013, 08:17:50 PM
I wonder whether the Dresser Queen wrote that one.

What is a dresser queen?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MNdragonlady on April 03, 2013, 08:25:31 PM
I wonder whether the Dresser Queen wrote that one.

What is a dresser queen?

She was a recurring character in a poster's life from a few years ago.

For your reading pleasure: a complete list of the stories (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=97289.msg2374570#msg2374570) (someone else put it together; I just searched and found it for you).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Curious Cat on April 03, 2013, 08:31:01 PM
I wonder whether the Dresser Queen wrote that one.

What is a dresser queen?

She was a recurring character in a poster's life from a few years ago.

For your reading pleasure: a complete list of the stories (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=97289.msg2374570#msg2374570) (someone else put it together; I just searched and found it for you).

Thanks, I'll have to check it out.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MNdragonlady on April 03, 2013, 08:33:47 PM
I wonder whether the Dresser Queen wrote that one.

What is a dresser queen?

She was a recurring character in a poster's life from a few years ago.

For your reading pleasure: a complete list of the stories (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=97289.msg2374570#msg2374570) (someone else put it together; I just searched and found it for you).

Thanks, I'll have to check it out.

Glad to help. Just be sure you've set aside a good chunk of time. The stories are pretty amazing, in a can't-stop-watching-the-train-wreck sort of way. :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: singingserpent on April 03, 2013, 09:24:08 PM
A few years ago IHOP had a special where kids got a free pancake. We went and DD got the free pancake (I think it had a smiley face made out of whipped cream), and DH and I got an entree each. So of course this is a way to get families into the restaurant, understandable gimmick.

While we were there a family of parents and 4 kids came in. The kids got the free pancakes, no drink and the adults got nothing. They left after the kids finished eating and didn't leave a tip for their waitress. While they technically didn't do anything wrong, they should have left something for the waitress.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 03, 2013, 09:28:26 PM
Quote
While they technically didn't do anything wrong, they should have left something for the waitress.
They also could have gotten the kids a small juice or milk to go with the free pancake.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: katycoo on April 03, 2013, 09:30:54 PM
When a ship reaches port officials from Customs and Immigration come aboard.  Often, the clearance is done in a lounge and the visitors are treated to a nice spread of sandwiches and pastries. It never hurts to be nice to people who have to clear you.

  Once the ship is cleared,  the lounge is used as a place for passengers to wait until their debarkation group is called.  On one voyage, the room was opened to passengers before the left over food was removed.  Everybody else just ignored it or nibbled on a danish,but a pair of ladies decided that they would take home the two dozen or so sandwiches that were left. 

We were in the same debarkation group so we saw them get caught and their booty confiscated. 

Customs can be suprising.

Last year I travelled to the USA.  We were entering via Hawaii.  We took ham sandwiches on board the flight from Oz to Hawaii as its a decent length and we weren't sure how much food would be provided. 
Coming into Australian customs, there are large waste bins for disposal of foods which you know you cannot bring into the country.  We assumed there would be somewhere to throw any uneaten sandwiches before going trough customs in Hawaii - we were wrong.

So we get to the desk, and I declare the sandwiches saying "We know we can't have them, we just expectd to be able to throw them away somewhere."  Nope.  Fresh deli ham and salad.  Approved for entry.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Bluenomi on April 03, 2013, 09:37:38 PM
I will admit to keeping my house pretty cool in the winter (well, I mean, it's pretty cool all the time, but in a different way), but it's not just because I'm cheap - it's also because I find that between showers, appliances, (cooking and what not) and things in general that tend to generate heat, if the thermostat is set at a "normal" temperature, it actually gets too warm.  Plus, I like to snuggle up with blankets to watch TV, and that's more comfy when the air is cool.

But - that said, I don't freeze my family or friends just to save money!

I too keep my house cool, my bedroom is at 16 C year round, the rest of the house around 18 C.  Friends find it freezing, but darn, menopause is making me sweat just looking at a picture of a sunny field in summer.  I rise the thermostat when I have guests and I have an assortment of afghans to share.

See that's frugal not cheap. My ex's mother refused to pay to run her ducted heating so only heated the room she was in. When she was the only person there, that was fine. But she refused to turn the heating on when she had visitors. So every other room in the house bar the one she was in was freezing and she didn't give a rats if everyone else was cold. Even in the heated room it was cold because she's bundle up in jumpers, blankets and slippers and put the heater right next to her so she was warm but nobody else got any heat. I'd be sitting there in my winter coat and gloves and still be cold. It was warmer outside during the day!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jedikaiti on April 03, 2013, 10:12:41 PM
I wonder whether the Dresser Queen wrote that one.

What is a dresser queen?

She was a recurring character in a poster's life from a few years ago.

For your reading pleasure: a complete list of the stories (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=97289.msg2374570#msg2374570) (someone else put it together; I just searched and found it for you).

Thanks, I'll have to check it out.

Was there ever any final update on the Dresser Queen saga?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: The Opinionator on April 03, 2013, 10:30:47 PM
I wonder whether the Dresser Queen wrote that one.

What is a dresser queen?

She was a recurring character in a poster's life from a few years ago.

For your reading pleasure: a complete list of the stories (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=97289.msg2374570#msg2374570) (someone else put it together; I just searched and found it for you).

Thanks, I'll have to check it out.

Was there ever any final update on the Dresser Queen saga?
She moved out a while ago (taking all her dressers with her).  :D

Edited to add a link to the final thread: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=57212.msg1352519#msg1352519
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MNdragonlady on April 03, 2013, 11:09:35 PM
I wonder whether the Dresser Queen wrote that one.

What is a dresser queen?

She was a recurring character in a poster's life from a few years ago.

For your reading pleasure: a complete list of the stories (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=97289.msg2374570#msg2374570) (someone else put it together; I just searched and found it for you).

Thanks, I'll have to check it out.

Was there ever any final update on the Dresser Queen saga?
She moved out a while ago (taking all her dressers with her).  :D

Edited to add a link to the final thread: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=57212.msg1352519#msg1352519

Thank you! I couldn't exactly remember the final episode, so I missed it in my search.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: zyrs on April 04, 2013, 12:36:32 AM
Please tell me that she didn't go back to him. 

DH and I have a standing bet when we go to funerals re: whether we will see someone break off of the funeral party we're with and take flowers from the fresh grave to another grave in the cemetery.  They don't want to spend the money on flowers, but they want to "honor" someone they know in the cemetery.

It's happened more than you would think.  (We're weird.  It helps us cope.)


not cheapskate related but ..... *that's* what bothered her?

OK, back to cheapskate stories...

I honestly do not know if she broke up with him.


Another cheapskate story.  I have a relative who does his own dental work.  He is not a dentist.  I'm not going to get any more specific than that because I want to sleep tonight and it freaks me out.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RingTailedLemur on April 04, 2013, 04:00:33 AM

Another cheapskate story.  I have a relative who does his own dental work.  He is not a dentist.  I'm not going to get any more specific than that because I want to sleep tonight and it freaks me out.

That has allegedly been happening here, because it's not easy in some places to get an NHS dentist and private dental treatment is too expensive for a lot of people to afford :(
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: littlelauraj on April 04, 2013, 07:23:01 AM
My uncle is the notorious family cheapskate.  His house is just about falling down from lack of maintenance.  When a hole wears in the carpet, he throws a remnant over the hole.  Why pay for new carpet?  His best trick, though, is that he buys old, going in the bin ground beef.  He lives in a very small town, and the manager at the grocery store knows that once the ground beef is so old they are pulling it back out of the case, if they toss it in the freezer my uncle will come in and buy it for something like a buck a pound.  Then he makes big batches of chili with it.  He's been doing it for years.  And yes, he does occasionally try to feed it to a guest.  The smell is supposed to be tremendous.

To give him credit, though, he is generous to a fault with his daughter and her children.  He has scrimped and saved his entire life and now she spends his money like it's going out of style.  ("Dad, can I get a ride over with you?  Can we stop at the grocery store on the way home?  Oops, I don't have the money for that.  You're buying?  Good!")  Even my kids see through her shenanigans, but he just won't let his grand kids go without.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bopper on April 04, 2013, 09:27:39 AM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?
Not cheap!  Smart, is more like it.

Cheap is asking everyone else to give you their slivers so you can make your own bar of soap.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 04, 2013, 09:37:16 AM
A friend of mine had parents who grew up during the Great Depression and were *very* poor.  In the winter, her mother apparently would go from house to house, go to the coal bin, and scoop up the leftover coal dust at the bottom of the coal bin.  She'd then go knock on the door, tell them she'd scraped up this coal dust at the bottom of their bin, and ask if she might have it.  If they said no, she'd hand it to them (well, poured it into whatever container they grabbed), but if they said yes, she'd take it home and the family would use it to get a little heat.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 04, 2013, 09:41:05 AM
A few years ago IHOP had a special where kids got a free pancake. We went and DD got the free pancake (I think it had a smiley face made out of whipped cream), and DH and I got an entree each. So of course this is a way to get families into the restaurant, understandable gimmick.

While we were there a family of parents and 4 kids came in. The kids got the free pancakes, no drink and the adults got nothing. They left after the kids finished eating and didn't leave a tip for their waitress. While they technically didn't do anything wrong, they should have left something for the waitress.

The cheap coworker I mentioned before goes to those free pancake day at IHOP.  There are typically long lines and she waits about two or more hours.  She never orders anything else or leave a tip either.  I know because she brags about free food.  I feel sorry for the waiters and cooks on those days dealing with cheapskates all day long with little or no tip, while working harder than usual.  I'm sure regular customers avoids those days.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 04, 2013, 10:09:34 AM
A few years ago IHOP had a special where kids got a free pancake. We went and DD got the free pancake (I think it had a smiley face made out of whipped cream), and DH and I got an entree each. So of course this is a way to get families into the restaurant, understandable gimmick.

While we were there a family of parents and 4 kids came in. The kids got the free pancakes, no drink and the adults got nothing. They left after the kids finished eating and didn't leave a tip for their waitress. While they technically didn't do anything wrong, they should have left something for the waitress.

The cheap coworker I mentioned before goes to those free pancake day at IHOP.  There are typically long lines and she waits about two or more hours.  She never orders anything else or leave a tip either.  I know because she brags about free food.  I feel sorry for the waiters and cooks on those days dealing with cheapskates all day long with little or no tip, while working harder than usual.  I'm sure regular customers avoids those days.

I'm surprised you don't have to buy an adult meal to get the free pancake! And not leaving a tip is just wrong. whether or not you pay for something at a restaurant, the servers still have to do the same amount of work.  Same thing as people who have BOGOs or Groupons or things like that, and only tip on the amount they actualky pay, not what their actual check would have been.

I had a Groupon last year for a restaurant. what was nice is they brought the check, listed the actual price, and then the Groupon price. Made it much easier for me to figure out how much to tip!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 04, 2013, 10:14:00 AM
I'm surprised you don't have to buy an adult meal to get the free pancake!

IHOP gives out free pancakes on "pancake day" Feb. 5.  I just looked at their website and they ask guests to make donation to charity, but I wonder how many actually does (I hope I'm just being cynical). 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 04, 2013, 10:34:17 AM
A friend of mine had parents who grew up during the Great Depression and were *very* poor.  In the winter, her mother apparently would go from house to house, go to the coal bin, and scoop up the leftover coal dust at the bottom of the coal bin.  She'd then go knock on the door, tell them she'd scraped up this coal dust at the bottom of their bin, and ask if she might have it.  If they said no, she'd hand it to them (well, poured it into whatever container they grabbed), but if they said yes, she'd take it home and the family would use it to get a little heat.

This is just people doing their best to get thru hard times.  Not cheapskates.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Garden Goblin on April 04, 2013, 11:02:40 AM
A friend of mine had parents who grew up during the Great Depression and were *very* poor.  In the winter, her mother apparently would go from house to house, go to the coal bin, and scoop up the leftover coal dust at the bottom of the coal bin.  She'd then go knock on the door, tell them she'd scraped up this coal dust at the bottom of their bin, and ask if she might have it.  If they said no, she'd hand it to them (well, poured it into whatever container they grabbed), but if they said yes, she'd take it home and the family would use it to get a little heat.

A couple years ago there was a gentleman who would walk through a stand of trees on my property and find the hidden nests from my chickens.  He'd then ask if he could have the eggs.  It took me a week or so to realize what his situation was, and then I'd let him have the 'unsellable' eggs and veggies (translation - whatever happened to be on my counter top when he dropped by).  Fortunately the VA was able to get some resources for him and he isn't on the street anymore.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 04, 2013, 11:06:03 AM
A friend of mine had parents who grew up during the Great Depression and were *very* poor.  In the winter, her mother apparently would go from house to house, go to the coal bin, and scoop up the leftover coal dust at the bottom of the coal bin.  She'd then go knock on the door, tell them she'd scraped up this coal dust at the bottom of their bin, and ask if she might have it.  If they said no, she'd hand it to them (well, poured it into whatever container they grabbed), but if they said yes, she'd take it home and the family would use it to get a little heat.

This is just people doing their best to get thru hard times.  Not cheapskates.

Oh, I'm sorry, I didn't meant to say they were cheapskates, just that the story sort of reminded me of the people collecting slivers of soap to make a new bar of soap or soap liquid.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Lynn2000 on April 04, 2013, 11:33:18 AM
A friend of mine had parents who grew up during the Great Depression and were *very* poor.  In the winter, her mother apparently would go from house to house, go to the coal bin, and scoop up the leftover coal dust at the bottom of the coal bin.  She'd then go knock on the door, tell them she'd scraped up this coal dust at the bottom of their bin, and ask if she might have it.  If they said no, she'd hand it to them (well, poured it into whatever container they grabbed), but if they said yes, she'd take it home and the family would use it to get a little heat.

This is just people doing their best to get thru hard times.  Not cheapskates.

Maybe my confusion is just because I'm not familiar with how coal bins work, but her actions sound shady to me. First, she goes onto someone's property and collects their belongings (the coal dust), without their permission. Then she knocks on someone's door and says, "Can I have this? If not, scramble around for a container to put it in right now, possibly making a mess of your house and ending up with coal dust where you don't want it." It sounds like she's setting up a situation where if people don't want her to have their own property, they have to do some work to stop her. I think she should have started by asking if she could sweep up and keep the coal dust, not collected it first and then asked.

Now, if it's her job to clean the coal bins, and so she would have swept the dust up anyway with people knowing she's doing that and approving of it, and she's just asking to take it home instead of trashing it, that would be okay. Kind of like asking if you can take food home from the restaurant where you work, if you know it's otherwise going to be thrown out.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Twik on April 04, 2013, 11:36:17 AM
Anyone desperate enough to do this probably didn't worry about the etiquette of the situation.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: EmmaJ. on April 04, 2013, 12:55:07 PM
A friend of mine had parents who grew up during the Great Depression and were *very* poor.  In the winter, her mother apparently would go from house to house, go to the coal bin, and scoop up the leftover coal dust at the bottom of the coal bin.  She'd then go knock on the door, tell them she'd scraped up this coal dust at the bottom of their bin, and ask if she might have it.  If they said no, she'd hand it to them (well, poured it into whatever container they grabbed), but if they said yes, she'd take it home and the family would use it to get a little heat.

This is just people doing their best to get thru hard times.  Not cheapskates.

Maybe my confusion is just because I'm not familiar with how coal bins work, but her actions sound shady to me. First, she goes onto someone's property and collects their belongings (the coal dust), without their permission. Then she knocks on someone's door and says, "Can I have this? If not, scramble around for a container to put it in right now, possibly making a mess of your house and ending up with coal dust where you don't want it." It sounds like she's setting up a situation where if people don't want her to have their own property, they have to do some work to stop her. I think she should have started by asking if she could sweep up and keep the coal dust, not collected it first and then asked.

Now, if it's her job to clean the coal bins, and so she would have swept the dust up anyway with people knowing she's doing that and approving of it, and she's just asking to take it home instead of trashing it, that would be okay. Kind of like asking if you can take food home from the restaurant where you work, if you know it's otherwise going to be thrown out.

This just breaks my heart.  I hope that, somewhere along the line, a kind homeowner also gave her actual coal to take home along with the coal dust.   :'(
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: PeterM on April 04, 2013, 02:19:17 PM
The cheap coworker I mentioned before goes to those free pancake day at IHOP.  There are typically long lines and she waits about two or more hours.  She never orders anything else or leave a tip either.  I know because she brags about free food.  I feel sorry for the waiters and cooks on those days dealing with cheapskates all day long with little or no tip, while working harder than usual.  I'm sure regular customers avoids those days.

If I managed an IHOP I think I'd have the syrup and other condiments removed from the table of anyone who did this. No water, either. Eat your free pancake and get out so paying customers can come in.

I suppose it would be rude not to provide utensils and a napkin. And a plate.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: GoTwins on April 04, 2013, 02:56:14 PM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?
When my soap bars get too small I put them in one of these and hang it in the shower: http://www.amazon.com/Woodlink-Home-ProductS-Thistle-Feeder/dp/B000L0ICEA/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1365105252&sr=8-4&keywords=thistle+sock
It makes a great "scrubby"!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: IWish on April 04, 2013, 04:55:07 PM
In the category of "Selective Cheapness": A former boss was EXTREMELY wealthy, as in multiple homes, over twenty Maseratis and Rolls Royces, and a private jet. He would go out shopping at lunch sometimes and buy two or three Rolex watches on a whim. Or two more cars.

However, there were certain things that he was maddeningly cheap about including making me spend an hour on the phone with the cable t.v. provider to get a $4.99 refund on a pay per view movie he ordered but did not watch. This was a regular occurrence. Since my pay rate was significantly over $4.99 an hour he was actually losing money by making me do this. Sometimes I would just put $5 of my own money into the petty cash till and save myself an hour of aggravation fighting with the cable company.  ::)

I'll have to post more examples later when I have more time. There were some doozies!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Amara on April 04, 2013, 04:58:41 PM
I have something like that soap thing but it's made of loofah. Put all the slivers in and use it to scrub your skin until it is glowing.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jedikaiti on April 04, 2013, 05:43:59 PM
I've heard a sock can work well, too.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CakeEater on April 04, 2013, 05:55:50 PM
A few years ago IHOP had a special where kids got a free pancake. We went and DD got the free pancake (I think it had a smiley face made out of whipped cream), and DH and I got an entree each. So of course this is a way to get families into the restaurant, understandable gimmick.

While we were there a family of parents and 4 kids came in. The kids got the free pancakes, no drink and the adults got nothing. They left after the kids finished eating and didn't leave a tip for their waitress. While they technically didn't do anything wrong, they should have left something for the waitress.


The cheap coworker I mentioned before goes to those free pancake day at IHOP.  There are typically long lines and she waits about two or more hours.  She never orders anything else or leave a tip either.  I know because she brags about free food.  I feel sorry for the waiters and cooks on those days dealing with cheapskates all day long with little or no tip, while working harder than usual.  I'm sure regular customers avoids those days.

I wouldn't do this myself, but surely this is a business decision by the business. They're hoping people will buy something else, sure, but if they're not requiring it, that's the risk they take. I don't think the customers are doing anything wrong by not buying something else. If the restaurant is offering a free pancake, they're not doing anything wrong by walking in and having a free pancake.

Tips are another issue. If it's normally expected that a tip should be left, then it should. But for 4 pancakes, at $2 each (?), tip would be, what, $2?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 04, 2013, 06:03:52 PM
The loofah for soap slivers: http://www.amazon.com/Saver-POUCH-loofah-SCRUBBER-polisher/dp/B006UH214U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1365115541&sr=8-1&keywords=mesh+loofah+put+soap+in (http://www.amazon.com/Saver-POUCH-loofah-SCRUBBER-polisher/dp/B006UH214U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1365115541&sr=8-1&keywords=mesh+loofah+put+soap+in)

I haven't used bar soap in over a decade, since a $2 bottle of body wash lasts me two months and I dislike sharing soap with anyone.

I work with a man, K, who is the cheapest person I have ever known. The sheer amount of effort he invests in saving small amounts of money baffles me. When he got married, his wife insisted on buying furniture. K was very upset, and wanted to get the furniture second hand, which did not go over well with his wife. He went on a conference trip, and came back to furniture from a very expensive firm. K threw a fit. There are enough K cheap stories to fill a novel, so I will sum up the best ones here. K is wealthy.
*K was extremely angry on the day his wife took their daughter to get a haircut $8, and tipped the stylist $3. K went off about that for over a year.
*K decided his daughter's favorite juice was too expensive, and refused to buy it. He gave her powdered drink mix in water, and they had a standoff for a week.
*K bought passes to a theme park, and would buy one all you can eat wristband for his family, returning over and over to get food for his wife and daughter. He would try to determine the days and colors and reuse the wrist bands when they went.
*K brings a loaf of bread or bag of chips to pot luck lunches, then eats 4-5 plates of food.
*K loves to clip coupons, and track all of his spending in spreadsheets. He boasts constantly of his savings.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: dawnfire on April 04, 2013, 07:57:27 PM
I wonder whether the Dresser Queen wrote that one.

What is a dresser queen?

She was a recurring character in a poster's life from a few years ago.

For your reading pleasure: a complete list of the stories (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=97289.msg2374570#msg2374570) (someone else put it together; I just searched and found it for you).

Thanks, I'll have to check it out.

Glad to help. Just be sure you've set aside a good chunk of time. The stories are pretty amazing, in a can't-stop-watching-the-train-wreck sort of way. :)

about a day will do
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 04, 2013, 08:47:17 PM
Quote
*K loves to clip coupons, and track all of his spending in spreadsheets. He boasts constantly of his savings.

That's not being a cheapskate, unless of course he re-sells everything for a profit (I've heard that some extreme couponers do that).   The rest, though?   Oh, yeah.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 04, 2013, 08:52:38 PM
Quote
*K loves to clip coupons, and track all of his spending in spreadsheets. He boasts constantly of his savings.

That's not being a cheapskate, unless of course he re-sells everything for a profit (I've heard that some extreme couponers do that).   The rest, though?   Oh, yeah.

That sounds like a full-time job.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: lady_disdain on April 04, 2013, 09:02:56 PM
When he got married, his wife insisted on buying furniture. K was very upset, and wanted to get the furniture second hand, which did not go over well with his wife. He went on a conference trip, and came back to furniture from a very expensive firm. K threw a fit.

If my new spouse acted behind my back to do something I disagreed with, I would throw a fit, regardless of the cost of the furniture.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 04, 2013, 09:07:23 PM
He had literally no furniture in his house. One futon, a mattress, and an office chair. She paid for everything on her own, and he was still mad.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jedikaiti on April 04, 2013, 11:03:49 PM
I'm just kinda baffled at marrying someone with whom finances are pretty much guaranteed to be a constant source of tension, to say the least. For the longevity of the marriage, you should probably marry someone with similar notions on household finance, or at least negotiate terms before the wedding.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Elfmama on April 04, 2013, 11:42:12 PM
When a bar of soap is too small to use, I wet both the old and the new soaps and stick them together to avoid throwing away the sliver of soap. I grew up thinking everyone did this. Please let me know if you think this is cheap?

I don't thin it's cheap, we do the same thing, it gets fused with a new one. Why waste it when you can still use it. On it's own it would be too small to use it but not if it's fused to a bigger one.

Now collecting all your slivers until you can make a new soap would be too much for me, you either use it now or you throw it away.
Depends on your definition of "use".  Too small to wash with, or too small to do anything with?

I regularly liberate slivers of soap from the bathroom and take them to sanctuary in my sewing room.  There they are used as markers on dark fabrics.  I've tried all kinds of other made-for-quilters marking things, but nothing beats soap.  It doesn't rub off easily, but does wash off leaving nothing behind.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Elfmama on April 05, 2013, 12:18:26 AM
I know two people that this happened to: The host at the bar-b-que bought steaks for himself and hot dogs for everyone else.
When my daughters were staying with DH's parents for a week, MIL and FIL ate lobster two nights, and gave the girls hot dogs.  Lobsters that they were GIVEN, 4 of them.  So it wasn't a case of "I don't want to buy lobster for kids that might not eat them."  And my girls were 9 and 12, old enough to be adventurous about eating all kinds of things, not just PBJ and cold cereal. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 05, 2013, 05:41:33 AM
I'm just kinda baffled at marrying someone with whom finances are pretty much guaranteed to be a constant source of tension, to say the least. For the longevity of the marriage, you should probably marry someone with similar notions on household finance, or at least negotiate terms before the wedding.

It has frequently been said that differences over money are the primary cause of marital discord.

Having said that, there is a story relating to the furniture purchase.  My friend's in-laws had a situation early in their marriage where her MIL bought an item of furniture and her husband threw a fit.  He then took away all her signing power over their joint finances and she had to almost beg for grocery money after that.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Emmy on April 05, 2013, 06:07:16 AM
I'm just kinda baffled at marrying someone with whom finances are pretty much guaranteed to be a constant source of tension, to say the least. For the longevity of the marriage, you should probably marry someone with similar notions on household finance, or at least negotiate terms before the wedding.

It has frequently been said that differences over money are the primary cause of marital discord.

Having said that, there is a story relating to the furniture purchase.  My friend's in-laws had a situation early in their marriage where her MIL bought an item of furniture and her husband threw a fit.  He then took away all her signing power over their joint finances and she had to almost beg for grocery money after that.

Did friend's MIL discuss this purchase ahead of time?  furniture is often pretty expensive and both members of the household should like it.  Making a major purchase without consulting your marriage partner seems rude (unless you use your own funds and not the joint account).  DH had a co-worker whose wife purchased a new living room set without so much as a word to her husband.  She also complained when DH's co-worker went golfing, out to lunch, or wanted to do anything he enjoyed yet she budgeted for mommy and me classes and extras for herself and kids.  (She was a stay at home mom and his was the only income at the time).

I do think it is rude to make her beg for grocery money, but I can see why he'd be upset at her bringing home a surprise furniture purchase paid by their joint account.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 05, 2013, 06:40:49 AM
If I recall correctly, she made more money than he did at the time of the marriage, inherited some, and then stayed home to raise their children (which my friend suspects he never wanted).

I don't know how long they were married before she became pregnant the first time or at what stage she decided to stay home with her child, so I don't know whether she was working at the time of the purchase.

This man had cheapskate tendencies in other areas (I don't know the details) and my friend's wasband developed them as well.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Corvid on April 05, 2013, 06:43:15 AM
I haven't used bar soap in over a decade, since a $2 bottle of body wash lasts me two months and I dislike sharing soap with anyone.

I haven't used bar soap since my college microbiology class had us culture used bars of soap.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on April 05, 2013, 08:17:32 AM
I know two people that this happened to: The host at the bar-b-que bought steaks for himself and hot dogs for everyone else.
When my daughters were staying with DH's parents for a week, MIL and FIL ate lobster two nights, and gave the girls hot dogs.  Lobsters that they were GIVEN, 4 of them.  So it wasn't a case of "I don't want to buy lobster for kids that might not eat them."  And my girls were 9 and 12, old enough to be adventurous about eating all kinds of things, not just PBJ and cold cereal.

I think your in laws may be related to my sister in law!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RingTailedLemur on April 05, 2013, 09:47:23 AM
There is a story on A Bad Case Of The Dates today written by a girl whose date wanted her to jump out of his moving car when they got to her house because braking uses more petrol, which costs money...
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: selkiewoman on April 05, 2013, 10:01:40 AM
I too use soap slivers for marking quilts - best marking tool ever!  However, make sure tit,s not the fancy stuff with lotions and skin creams - that can leave a greasy residue.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: darling on April 05, 2013, 11:36:43 AM
There is a story on A Bad Case Of The Dates today written by a girl whose date wanted her to jump out of his moving car when they got to her house because braking uses more petrol, which costs money...

Wha? Just... what the heck???? I'd give him a buck to stop, then tell him off and never see him again. That is just crazy.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Amara on April 05, 2013, 11:50:48 AM
Quote
I haven't used bar soap since my college microbiology class had us culture used bars of soap.

Is there any way to make sure you get "clean" soap if you do use the bars? I am wondering if agitating the bar in your hands for a given amount of time (30 seconds?) helps to "cleanse" it so you can wash your hands with a clean bar?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Jones on April 05, 2013, 12:07:12 PM
My first job was in a grocery store. One night, very late, a couple came in and slowly went through a freezer full of concentrated frozen fruit juices. They managed to find some that had a little concentrate on the outside, either they had leaked or been leaked on.  They took the cans to be marked down at customer service, then came to pay. The rest of their items were reduced and/or couponed. My coworkers and I were glad they came when it was late and quiet so noone had to wait behind them in line.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 05, 2013, 12:39:56 PM
Quote
I'd give him a buck to stop, then tell him off and never see him again.

Actually, the guy asked her to provide two bucks, and then he'd stop.  :o  She was smart, thoguh - she said "How am I going to kiss you if you don't stop?", so - thinking he was about to get a little somethin'-something' - he stopped the car.  Whereupon she jumped out. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: lady_disdain on April 05, 2013, 12:56:48 PM
Quote
I'd give him a buck to stop, then tell him off and never see him again.

Actually, the guy asked her to provide two bucks, and then he'd stop.  :o  She was smart, thoguh - she said "How am I going to kiss you if you don't stop?", so - thinking he was about to get a little somethin'-something' - he stopped the car.  Whereupon she jumped out. 

I like her!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: alkira6 on April 05, 2013, 12:58:35 PM
I've never thought the soy sauce that comes from the little packets was any good.  I don't even use it when I'm eating the Chinese food from that restaurant; I pull out my bottle of Kikkoman!  :)  We do, however, get lots of Arby's sauce and save any extra for the next time, because the stores vary on how much they'll give you when you ask for "lots," and my husband likes to use something like 11 packets per sandwich!

Exactly!  The little packets of 'soy sauce' from the chinese restaurant are just salty colored water.  I just throw them away and get out my bottle of 'real brewed soy sauce' and use that.   It's much better.

Back to reading...I'm almost done!.

The ones we get are Kikkoman so I'm perfectly happy with them. I wish they had wasabi in those little packets, I'd keep them. I love wasabi on fries.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: alkira6 on April 05, 2013, 01:25:54 PM
I've never thought the soy sauce that comes from the little packets was any good.  I don't even use it when I'm eating the Chinese food from that restaurant; I pull out my bottle of Kikkoman!  :)  We do, however, get lots of Arby's sauce and save any extra for the next time, because the stores vary on how much they'll give you when you ask for "lots," and my husband likes to use something like 11 packets per sandwich!

Exactly!  The little packets of 'soy sauce' from the chinese restaurant are just salty colored water.  I just throw them away and get out my bottle of 'real brewed soy sauce' and use that.   It's much better.

Back to reading...I'm almost done!.

The ones we get are Kikkoman so I'm perfectly happy with them. I wish they had wasabi in those little packets, I'd keep them. I love wasabi on fries.

The packets are Kikkoman?  Lucky you!  All I've ever seen in packets is generic salty colored water.  (read the ingredients).  If they gave out Kikkoman, i'd keep it!
I have a squeeze bottle of wasabi in my fridge.   ;D

Lucky you! I've seen a couple different kinds, but they boil down to horseradish "sauce" with natural colerant.  The kind served at my sushi place is the common american horseradish/mustard paste, but they occassionally get the real root in and prepare it right before serving. It is GOOD! it tastes different and will cure any sinus issues immediately.  I wish I could grow real wasabi root, but it's too hot and dry where I live for it to grow outside and I can't afford a hydroponic setup. And yes, I try to grow all sorts of weird stuff.  I tried to grow a corpse flower, but it died at about three inches.  When I told DH what it was, he looked and me like this  :o and this  ??? and asked me "why".  Why not?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 05, 2013, 02:03:39 PM
DH loves horseradish, wasabi, spicy mustard, etc. and was complaining that we were out and have been out for ages.  I never touch the stuff so I didn't realize - we had my generic yellow mustard and I like that just fine thankyouverymuch  :P  I've been vaguely keeping an eye out for it at the grocery store, but they don't stock any spicy mustard near the ketchup and regular mustard, so I kept forgetting about it.

Last week, though, I finally asked an employee to show me.  Turns out it's all in the ethnic foods section (WHY?) - even the brands that aren't terribly ethnic.  Coincidentially, the German section is right next to the Asian section.

I came home with eight different brands/types of condiments in the mustard/horseradish/wasabi family.  DH can be picky about his spicy mustard, so he doesn't get to complain anymore - this should last us for at least a few weeks  :P  I just went to the fridge and added it up - 34.5 ounces, so just over two pounds of spiciness I won't eat taking up space on the fridge door  ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Thipu1 on April 05, 2013, 02:13:29 PM
For many years, MIL did something that wasn't cheap.  She would wash bags from Wonder Bread and use them to pack lunches.

That was thrifty but it was also dangerous because certain colors used on the bags contained lead.  It was perfectly safe on the original loaf of bread.  However, once the wrapper was washed, turned inside-out, dried and used over and over, bits of lead could begin to leach into the food.  It took a long time to convince her that buying a box of sandwich bags was a healthier choice. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 05, 2013, 02:14:06 PM
We have at least 8 varieties of mustard in our refrigerator at all times.  8)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 05, 2013, 02:16:51 PM
DH loves horseradish, wasabi, spicy mustard, etc. and was complaining that we were out and have been out for ages.  I never touch the stuff so I didn't realize - we had my generic yellow mustard and I like that just fine thankyouverymuch  :P  I've been vaguely keeping an eye out for it at the grocery store, but they don't stock any spicy mustard near the ketchup and regular mustard, so I kept forgetting about it.

Last week, though, I finally asked an employee to show me.  Turns out it's all in the ethnic foods section (WHY?) - even the brands that aren't terribly ethnic.  Coincidentially, the German section is right next to the Asian section.

I had to get horseradish the other day for Passover.  I wandered the store, completely lost as to where it would be, then finally I called my mom (late at night, so it wasn't as easy to find an employee as usual).  Turns out that horseradish is with the hotdogs!  Who woulda thunk?  Well, maybe all of you smart eHellions, but not me.  I was very disappointed to discover that it wasn't pink.  We always used to get the pink one that is colored with beet juice, but apparently this store only carried plain white.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: FauxFoodist on April 05, 2013, 02:19:11 PM
I used to have a friend who didn't like to pay the cost of making phone calls from her home phone (land line), so if she called you, she would immediately make an excuse like "The line is full of static on my end, can you try calling me back?" Then you would call her, and she'd be happy to talk for an hour, now that you were footing the cost of the call.

Years ago, I worked in an office where the manager was incredibly cheap (and he was pretty well-off having made very good money in his field).  That manager then transferred from our office to another office in the same county but different area code (so any calls from our area to that area would be toll calls).  I remember answering the phone in our office once, and it was his daughter.  She immediately asked to be transferred to the office where her father was working so I transferred her (not thinking anything of it).  She called again a few minutes later and immediately asked me to transfer her again.  That was when I realized that she was calling from their home (which was in our area code) and calling our office to be transferred so their phone bill wouldn't reflect the toll charge (it would be billed to the company).  I thought that little trick our old manager taught his daughter was really rather beyond cheap.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 05, 2013, 02:42:53 PM
DH loves horseradish, wasabi, spicy mustard, etc. and was complaining that we were out and have been out for ages.  I never touch the stuff so I didn't realize - we had my generic yellow mustard and I like that just fine thankyouverymuch  :P  I've been vaguely keeping an eye out for it at the grocery store, but they don't stock any spicy mustard near the ketchup and regular mustard, so I kept forgetting about it.

Last week, though, I finally asked an employee to show me.  Turns out it's all in the ethnic foods section (WHY?) - even the brands that aren't terribly ethnic.  Coincidentially, the German section is right next to the Asian section.

I had to get horseradish the other day for Passover.  I wandered the store, completely lost as to where it would be, then finally I called my mom (late at night, so it wasn't as easy to find an employee as usual).  Turns out that horseradish is with the hotdogs!  Who woulda thunk?  Well, maybe all of you smart eHellions, but not me.  I was very disappointed to discover that it wasn't pink.  We always used to get the pink one that is colored with beet juice, but apparently this store only carried plain white.

Horseradish is also in the refrigerated section, near the pickles. I have seen the pink version there.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bansidhe on April 05, 2013, 03:07:58 PM
- Lying about my age so I could get freebies.  Worse one was lying about my species: in order to avoid paying my ticket on a ferry, she wrapped me in a blanket, told me to curl up on the seat and shut up.  She told the ticket taker I was a dog.

OK...I realize this has been quoted and commented on before, but daaaaaang!  :D

/ Now back to catching up on this thread.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Amara on April 05, 2013, 06:21:02 PM
Quote
For many years, MIL did something that wasn't cheap.  She would wash bags from Wonder Bread and use them to pack lunches.

That was thrifty but it was also dangerous because certain colors used on the bags contained lead.  It was perfectly safe on the original loaf of bread.  However, once the wrapper was washed, turned inside-out, dried and used over and over, bits of lead could begin to leach into the food.  It took a long time to convince her that buying a box of sandwich bags was a healthier choice.

Okay, now this I have never understood. Why turn the bag inside out? Why even wash it? It was fine the way it was for holding the food so why not just shake it out and re-use it with the sandwich on the inside?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BarensMom on April 05, 2013, 06:44:24 PM
I've never thought the soy sauce that comes from the little packets was any good.  I don't even use it when I'm eating the Chinese food from that restaurant; I pull out my bottle of Kikkoman!  :)  We do, however, get lots of Arby's sauce and save any extra for the next time, because the stores vary on how much they'll give you when you ask for "lots," and my husband likes to use something like 11 packets per sandwich!

Exactly!  The little packets of 'soy sauce' from the chinese restaurant are just salty colored water.  I just throw them away and get out my bottle of 'real brewed soy sauce' and use that.   It's much better.

Back to reading...I'm almost done!.

The ones we get are Kikkoman so I'm perfectly happy with them. I wish they had wasabi in those little packets, I'd keep them. I love wasabi on fries.

Wasabi on fries actually sounds good.

MommyPenguin, your DH sounds like a man after my own heart.  The only proper way to eat a Arby's RB sandwich is to open the sandwich, put 3 packets on the top bun, 3 on the bottom, and 3 on the meat, then add more as needed.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 05, 2013, 08:30:59 PM
Quote
The only proper way to eat a Arby's RB sandwich is to open the sandwich, put 3 packets on the top bun, 3 on the bottom, and 3 on the meat, then add more as needed.

And never wear a blouse you really love while doing this.   :(
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 05, 2013, 08:56:15 PM
I prefer ketchup on my Arby's roast beef, and there's no end to the grief I get over this.  I don't dislike Arby's sauce, I just don't think it adds quite the flavor I want.

Oh, and the horseradish that was near the hotdogs, that was also where the refrigerated pickles were, too.  So I think they just didn't have the pink one.  My mom tried to suggest that I get some beets and follow some recipe... I have 4 kids under 7, not happening.  White horseradish will do.  :)

My assumption with turning the bread packaging inside out and washing it was that it wasn't necessarily being used right away, and was maybe being used multiple times, so eventually any bread crumbs on the inside of the bag would get moldy and you'd need to wash it.

Personally, we do wash Ziplock bags (my husband insists), but I usually just toss the little sandwich bags that just have the flip over.  And I never wash bags that held raw meat or anything that went yucky.  I do turn the good bags inside out to wash them, though, so I can make sure to get all the way into the corners, etc.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 05, 2013, 09:21:56 PM
I would rather use containers and lids than wash a zipper lock plastic bag, even once.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Sirius on April 05, 2013, 09:29:27 PM
Washing your own car instead of taking it someplace - frugal
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

As long as the soap is the right kind (which also applies to washing on your own), I don't see a problem. You are not harming anyone by standing out in the rain and, excepting extreme weather, won't harm you either. So what's the problem?

Now, if the person were pushing for all of us to do the same...

Where I live, there are certain times of the year where you either wash your car in the rain or don't wash it at all. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: mbbored on April 05, 2013, 10:34:30 PM
Quote
I haven't used bar soap since my college microbiology class had us culture used bars of soap.

Is there any way to make sure you get "clean" soap if you do use the bars? I am wondering if agitating the bar in your hands for a given amount of time (30 seconds?) helps to "cleanse" it so you can wash your hands with a clean bar?

The purpose of most bar soaps is to help lift off particles on your skin that aren't water soluble, like oils. Removing the bacteria is best done by friction, which is 30 seconds of actively scrubbing.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Elfmama on April 05, 2013, 10:36:19 PM
I too use soap slivers for marking quilts - best marking tool ever!  However, make sure tit,s not the fancy stuff with lotions and skin creams - that can leave a greasy residue.
That's why I liberate DH's soap, not mine! :D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Amara on April 05, 2013, 11:38:43 PM
Quote
The purpose of most bar soaps is to help lift off particles on your skin that aren't water soluble, like oils. Removing the bacteria is best done by friction, which is 30 seconds of actively scrubbing.

Ah, thank you. I do 30 seconds of hard scrubbing as a minimum and most of the time it is 45 seconds per area (like left arm, right arm, and hands when I clean the litter box. (Yes, it takes me a while to wash up. Mom would be proud.) Much appreciated!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: 25wishes on April 06, 2013, 10:50:16 AM
This did not happen to me personally but it is worth repeating ( I think it may have come from Reader's Digest).

A woman is having a yard sale, a customer comes up to her with a whatever, saying "This is marked $.75 -- would you take 50 cents for it?'

Woman looks at it, "Oh, it is actually marked $.25."

"Well, then, would you take ten cents for it?"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Cami on April 06, 2013, 12:03:13 PM
This did not happen to me personally but it is worth repeating ( I think it may have come from Reader's Digest).

A woman is having a yard sale, a customer comes up to her with a whatever, saying "This is marked $.75 -- would you take 50 cents for it?'

Woman looks at it, "Oh, it is actually marked $.25."

"Well, then, would you take ten cents for it?"

I was having a garage sale. My goal with garage sales is to GET THE STUFF OUT OF MY HOUSE and make a little money on it. My dd's clothes were all on a table and they were all 25 cents per piece. That meant a tee shirt was 25 cents, a nightgown was 25 cents, and a pair of nearly new jeans were 25 cents. It was a bargain and I knew it, but it made pricing easy (no stickers or tags) and it pretty much guaranteed that every item would be bought. I had signs up that read, "25 cents per piece. No exceptions. No haggling." I also had separate signs up that read, "No haggling on anything $1 or less."

So this woman rolls up in a gold Cadillac Escalade -- brand new. Gets ouf of the car wearing designer shoes, carrying designer bag, with designer sunglasses on her coiffed head. Makes a beeline for the 25 cents table. Pulls out a brand new pajama top and brand new pajama bottom. Both are in their original sealed packaging. Separate packaging. They were never ever a set.
She says to me, "Will you take 25 cents for both?"
I said, "No. As the signs say, it's '25 cents per piece. No exceptions.'"
"But it's a pair of pajamas!" she shrieks.
I shake my head, "They were packaged separately -- as you can see. I bought them separately. It's 25 cents per item."
"I'll give you 25 cents for them both."
I shake my head again and point to the sign, "See that? It says no haggling. I mean it."

She tries to keep arguing with me. Over 25 cents. I finally told her to leave my property. And Ms-Too-Cheap-To-Spend-25-Cents stomps off in her designer shoes, slamming her designer sunglasses down on her face and peels out leaving the rubber of her expensive tires behind. Everyone else burst out laughing.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: twilight on April 06, 2013, 04:10:01 PM
I used to work for 2 brothers who were millionaires many times over.  They were obsessed with stamps. Everyday they would check the incoming mail to see if any stamps had accidentally not been cancelled and then they would spend hours carefully steaming and soaking off the stamps for reuse.  They got very upset at me one day when I let a stamp get past me.

However it is my father that takes the cake.  Although he was a cheapskate extraordinaire he was outrageously extravagant when it came to things he wanted to buy for himself.  It always had to be the biggest, best, and most expensive item and he was a big show off to friends and neighbors.  It was a different story behind closed doors where his family was concerned. To keep the electric bill down he instituted a rule that we were not allowed to open up the refrigerator and look.  We had to know exactly what we wanted and had about 3 seconds to open the door, retrieve the item, and slam the door shut.  On several occasions he even timed us. 

He was so obsessed with wasting electricity that without telling me he took my goldfish, which I had bought myself and had for 10 years, and threw them in the brook by our country house (or so he claims- I have a feeling they may have met a more dire fate).  His reason was that the water filter was using too much electricity.

The worst was the toilet paper.  In his mind we were just wasting too much toilet paper so when we would go to the bathroom he would barge in and grab the roll before you could use it.  You got one sheet of toilet paper for #1 and 2 sheets for #2.  A terrible invasion of privacy (especially for a teenage girl) and utterly ridiculous.  My siblings and I had to resort to secretly hoarding and hiding toilet paper.

Even though he could well afford it he refused to get a dishwasher and clothes dryer (as he drove around in his shiny new Mercedes) despite my mother asking repeatedly.  Funny that when she finally did divorce him and he had to do his own laundry and dishes the first thing he did was run right out and get a clothes dryer and dishwasher, both top of the line and insanely expensive of course.

If I take him out for dinner I have to make sure I hand the tip directly to the waitress after I once caught him pocketing the tip I left on the table.  When I confronted him about it he refused to give me back my money so I had to shell out again for the tip.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 06, 2013, 04:23:13 PM
It’s strange how people will scrimp on very small things (toilet paper) then be extravagant on others, especially for their own benefit.  This also happens in business (making people count paper clips but paying huge salaries).  I guess sometimes (aside from selfishness) the rationale is that pennies add up to dollars.

Glad your mother divorced your father, twilight.  He was abusive, and I don't think I could stand taking him out to dinner - especially in light of the tip incident. 

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Iris on April 06, 2013, 04:49:35 PM
It’s strange how people will scrimp on very small things (toilet paper) then be extravagant on others, especially for their own benefit.  This also happens in business (making people count paper clips but paying huge salaries).  I guess sometimes (aside from selfishness) the rationale is that pennies add up to dollars.

Glad your mother divorced your father, twilight.  He was abusive, and I don't think I could stand taking him out to dinner - especially in light of the tip incident.

This. A few of the stories here have had me thinking about this but this is a perfect, textbook example of what (in my country at least) is now recognised as spousal/child abuse. About 30 years ago or so when they investigated the matter it was found that women in one very wealthy area had one of the lowest levels of personal income in the country because of this sort of thing. You are obviously a very gracious and forgiving person because I don't know that I could go to dinner with someone like that.

Reminds me of a woman I knew who complained that she was tired but needed to go home and make sausage rolls to take to a church function that night. When I suggested that she just buy some she said "oh, but then my husband would ask what I did with my time to justify spending the money". Without thinking I replied "So? Tell him you needed a rest." She looked quite surprised and never discussed matters with me again, so I wonder if she were a similar case.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: twilight on April 06, 2013, 05:05:51 PM
I think my dad's brand of cheapskateism had a lot to do about controlling those around him.  When I was younger I really thought everyone had a homelife like mine.  I truly thought it was completely normal.  It was really only when I hit my early 30's and had some distance from those events that I fully realized how completely screwed up things had been.   But it also taught to be financially self reliant as I learned from that experience that whoever pays your bills is the one who has control.

However, my father has tremendously mellowed over the years, now being in his 70's. As an adult I have learned to humor or bean dip some of his more outrageous viewpoints.  Still, I try to limit visits to once a year around his birthday/fathers day and some years not even that.   
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: GreenEyedHawk on April 06, 2013, 08:00:17 PM
Before he moved in with me, Anthony lived in a house with three other guys, one of which was the owner of the house.

He refused to turn up the heat so Anthony's tiny little room was always freezing...I loaned him one of my space heaters(I sympathise greatly with this; my old apartment was always freezing no matter what I did) and Richard (the house's owner) promptly took it away because it used too much electricity.  If anyone in the house...besides Richard of course, was taking a shower, Richard would turn the water completely off..not just the hot water but all of it...if anyone took longer than ten minutes. 

Even I was surprised at how much Anthony's health improved when he moved here...at Richard's he never had the chance to be properly clean, nor was he able to get a decent night's sleep, nor did sleeping in a freezing cold room every night do him any good.

I can't even imagine what a relief it was for him to get out of there.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: TootsNYC on April 06, 2013, 08:15:46 PM
I would rather use containers and lids than wash a zipper lock plastic bag, even once.

Yeah! Me, too!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BabyMama on April 06, 2013, 08:21:18 PM
A woman was put into the hospital by her abusive boyfriend.

He came to visit her at the hospital.  He brought her flowers.  She noticed that there was dirt on the stems and asked him about it.  He had stopped at the local cemetery to gather flowers that had been left on graves.

A relative was having her boyfriend's baby--they had broken up because he was dating another gal (and who knows how many others) at the same time, didn't pay child support on his other kid, and was in jail/rehab, although they were pretty on and off the whole time.

He didn't show up until the day she left the hospital. All he brought was a package of diapers. He said, "So...I'll just keep these at my house then."

Sigh. She went back to him at least once, I'm not sure if they're together now, but she did just see him and brought their daughter along a few weeks ago.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MOM21SON on April 06, 2013, 08:22:24 PM
Before he moved in with me, Anthony lived in a house with three other guys, one of which was the owner of the house.

He refused to turn up the heat so Anthony's tiny little room was always freezing...I loaned him one of my space heaters(I sympathise greatly with this; my old apartment was always freezing no matter what I did) and Richard (the house's owner) promptly took it away because it used too much electricity.  If anyone in the house...besides Richard of course, was taking a shower, Richard would turn the water completely off..not just the hot water but all of it...if anyone took longer than ten minutes. 

Even I was surprised at how much Anthony's health improved when he moved here...at Richard's he never had the chance to be properly clean, nor was he able to get a decent night's sleep, nor did sleeping in a freezing cold room every night do him any good.

I can't even imagine what a relief it was for him to get out of there.

What a horrible situation!  I am glad you rescued him.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: catbug on April 06, 2013, 10:12:58 PM
My grandma was a well known cheapskate when it came to spending on others, and totally selfish with purchases for herself. My grandad is blind and has very simple needs. If the food he is served doesn't taste good he just won't eat anything since he doesn't want to put anyone out. When grandma was alive she would read out the supermarket catalogues for grandad to see if she could entice him with anything. Funnily enough she would "forget" to read out the things he liked. Since they lived in a unit at the back of my parents place we could hear grandma telling grandad that his favourite ice creams weren't on special this week. That really upset mum and me so we would make a habit of looking through the catalogues for things grandad would like, then going in and telling him that they were on special, and did he want us to pick any up for him. He would be confused as grandma would tell him they weren't in the catalogue, but we were saying they were. Took a few months of this before grandma would read out the catalogue in full. But if you look in their fridge or pantry you would see brand name liver pate, smoked salmon, water crackers, etc that grandma liked (she liked to eat well), and cheap brand chocolate biscuits, cheap (no taste) ice creams and cheap cereals for grandad.

But it would appear she had been like that all her life. Mum used to tell stories about how grandma would buy clothes for her four girls (mum is the middle child of four girls and one boy, the boy is the oldest), particularly underwear. Four teenage girls of varying ages were made to wear the same size bra, because grandma didn't have time to get everyone fitted properly. So if it was on special and looked like it would fit the average sized girl, they all had to wear it. Problem was mum's youngest sister had implants in her late 20's, and mum has been through 2 reductions and is possibly going to have a 3 at some point. Do you really think these 2 girls would be wearing the same size in their teen years. Mum said when she got fitted for her first bra, she didn't know they were supposed to feel that comfortable after all the years of wearing the wrong size.

Grandma wouldn't spend any money, as she was saving it for a rainy day. Both her and grandad needed knee replacements (both knees for both of them). They got put on a waiting list, but it was going to be a very long wait (probably up to 2 years). It took a month for my aunties and mum (not my uncle) to convince them that the rainy day money that was in the bank (almost 6 figures) should be used. Grandma didn't realise this was what rainy day money was for. She always said she was saving for a rainy day, so that was why they bought things on special, and frequented the op-shop (thrift or charity shops), and used coupons for cheap holidays. In the last couple of years of her life she and grandad (after waiting 3 months for their knee operations instead of 2 years) went on holidays every 6 months, bought air conditioners for each room in the unit, bought new televisions that were big enough for grandad to see something, and also had subtitles for grandma to read (deaf as a post). They improved their lives, like rainy day money is supposed to do. When grandma died, they still had a large sum in the rainy day account, plus still had investments, so grandad can live comfortably for the rest of his life, even if he does have simple needs.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Elfmama on April 06, 2013, 10:40:05 PM
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 06, 2013, 10:48:09 PM
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

 :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 07, 2013, 10:59:36 AM
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

good for your mom! 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: VorFemme on April 07, 2013, 02:05:33 PM
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

Flabbered my ghast that he hadn't realized that he'd reached "old age" by then......
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 07, 2013, 02:08:32 PM
A woman was put into the hospital by her abusive boyfriend.

He came to visit her at the hospital.  He brought her flowers.  She noticed that there was dirt on the stems and asked him about it.  He had stopped at the local cemetery to gather flowers that had been left on graves.

A relative was having her boyfriend's baby--they had broken up because he was dating another gal (and who knows how many others) at the same time, didn't pay child support on his other kid, and was in jail/rehab, although they were pretty on and off the whole time.

He didn't show up until the day she left the hospital. All he brought was a package of diapers. He said, "So...I'll just keep these at my house then."

Sigh. She went back to him at least once, I'm not sure if they're together now, but she did just see him and brought their daughter along a few weeks ago.

That's pretty horrid. It reminds me of a former coworker who attended her daughter's baby shower helped her daughter "sort through" the gifts.  What she actually did was take a layette's worth of baby staples home because she planned on setting up a full nursery at her house.*  She took cute baby outfits, diapers, blankets, burp cloths, baby shampoo/ointments and tried to make off with the second car seat that the parents had planned to install in the husband's car so the parents could drive the baby around in both cars before her daughter told her to knock it off and stop ransacking her gifts.

Coworker was highly offended by her daughter's behavior and nothing we said could convince her that taking the gifts from her daughter's shower was rude.  She was entitled to those gifts, too, she insisted, afterall, the gifts were for the BABY and it didn't matter where they were used.

*She planned on the baby sleeping at her house frequently, for no reason, just because grandma wanted the baby there.  This was something she hadn't discussed with her daughter. She was definitely one of those grandparents who saw grandbabies as her "second chance" to be a parent.  And she didn't want to pay for it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: TootsNYC on April 07, 2013, 02:10:17 PM
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

Flabbered my ghast that he hadn't realized that he'd reached "old age" by then......

I'm not surprised, though. My grandpa was once talking to my dad about "those old guys" at church. Which ones? dad asked. "Oh, you see them--they sit in a row at the back." Dad looked, and did a double-take. They were about HIS age--roughly 70 or so. Grandpa was 90.

He just didn't FEEL old.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hillia on April 07, 2013, 02:25:00 PM

That's pretty horrid. It reminds me of a former coworker who attended her daughter's baby shower helped her daughter "sort through" the gifts.  What she actually did was take a layette's worth of baby staples home because she planned on setting up a full nursery at her house.*  She took cute baby outfits, diapers, blankets, burp cloths, baby shampoo/ointments and tried to make off with the second car seat that the parents had planned to install in the husband's car so the parents could drive the baby around in both cars before her daughter told her to knock it off and stop ransacking her gifts.

Coworker was highly offended by her daughter's behavior and nothing we said could convince her that taking the gifts from her daughter's shower was rude.  She was entitled to those gifts, too, she insisted, afterall, the gifts were for the BABY and it didn't matter where they were used.


The bolded I would be OK with IF the actual parents were ok with setting up a secondary nursery at Grandma's house. But the first move should come from the parents...'Here, Mom, take these extra onesies/diapers/powder/whatever so Baby has enough stuff at both houses'.  But for Grandma to just start rummaging?  No, no, no.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: 25wishes on April 07, 2013, 02:53:13 PM
I think a lot of these cases are a product of growing up without enough, as in the Depression. Case in point - DH and I went to visit his aunt and uncle who lived 2000 miles away. While there, aunt cooked a dinner for us, her kids, their kids, must have been 10 people around the table. She made one of those stirfrys that you get in a large bag from the warehouse club and just add your own meat.

 BEFORE anyone ate anything, she set aside a portion for her lunch at work the next day. And no, there was not so much that there would have been leftovers. And these were people who were not hurting for money at all.

In DH's family, birthdays were usually celebrated with a Carvel ice cream cake. His mom would get rather upset if there was not enough left over for her to take home. Didn't matter whose b'day it was, SHE had to have some to take home. Got some dirty looks when I asked for seconds. Again, they had enough to buy their own ice cream cake any time they wanted.

Both products of growing up in the 30's.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 07, 2013, 03:02:15 PM
Quote
I think a lot of these cases are a product of growing up without enough, as in the Depression.
While that may apply to your story, and it might apply to some of the others, many posts are about younger people who didn't grow up deprived or during the Depression.  Some people are just stingy and cheap.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MissRose on April 07, 2013, 03:55:39 PM
My mother did not grow up during the Depression but her parents did.  Not sure where some of her attitudes came from but the need for control of the finances is something she said she learned from her dad.  When I was growing up, my dad worked full time and she managed the money, and went out to pay the bills with money he gave for them.  Now with help from the phone company etc, they have automatic withdrawals done so no need to go to the bank to pay most of their bills.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 07, 2013, 04:02:16 PM
To me, growing up during the Great Depression (or being born during it and learning household stuff from a mom who lived through it) is more like my grandmother.  She will dig through the trash and rescue plastic silverware to wash and reuse, save plastic tubs to use again, get all the coupons she can and go to several different grocery stores to shop, buy things used when possible, keep her house cold (and keep an accordion door at the top of her stairs closed so that the heat doesn't go upstairs until she's ready for bed), things like that.  But she also doesn't deny people things that are normal (she buys treats for her family when they go on sale, she turns up the heat for family events at her house, etc.).  I think there's a big difference between trying not to waste money and being stingy, especially as it affects others.  She also doesn't show up at other relatives' houses with storage containers to take food home, and takes food only when it's freely offered.  She *does*, at her house, use all of her saved plastic tubs to send food home with everybody else.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 07, 2013, 04:53:40 PM
To me, growing up during the Great Depression (or being born during it and learning household stuff from a mom who lived through it) is more like my grandmother.  She will dig through the trash and rescue plastic silverware to wash and reuse, save plastic tubs to use again, get all the coupons she can and go to several different grocery stores to shop, buy things used when possible, keep her house cold (and keep an accordion door at the top of her stairs closed so that the heat doesn't go upstairs until she's ready for bed), things like that.  But she also doesn't deny people things that are normal (she buys treats for her family when they go on sale, she turns up the heat for family events at her house, etc.).  I think there's a big difference between trying not to waste money and being stingy, especially as it affects others.  She also doesn't show up at other relatives' houses with storage containers to take food home, and takes food only when it's freely offered.  She *does*, at her house, use all of her saved plastic tubs to send food home with everybody else.

Yes. my grandmother, and my mom, to some extent are like this. Grandmas was a teacher, but lived frugally, and invested wisely. At age 97, when she went into a nursing home, she had enough $$$ to pay for 5+ years in a private pay home (about 70K per year) for 5 years. When she passed away at 102, she had enough for another year and a half.  She saved, and very rarely spent "frivolously" but she did help me pay for college, and after she broke her hip, and spent several months at my parents, with me helping her daily, she paid of my remaining student loans, several thousand worth.

My mom is the same way; if she wants something, and she feels she can afford it, she will get it. If not, she will pass, or wait until she can pay for it "comfortably"{ she isn't wealthy, but has enough to live on, with some left over for fun and treats. But she's not stingy. She helped me out when my transmission blew up and I had to shell out over 3K to replace it.

I never ask, and don't expect anything, but its nice when she does offer nad help out. I don't refuse, and now that I'm in a better financial position, i will buy her things "just because" nothing major, but she always tells me to stop :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 07, 2013, 05:37:37 PM
My grandparents were very frugal, but my parents are not. They do many things that actually cost them more in the long run, using paper plates to save from having to wash, refuse to recycle anything, and dispose of perfectly good items. I see myself and my family as being between the two, and leaning toward more frugal living.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: JoW on April 07, 2013, 05:48:06 PM
Frugal
I re-use large zip lock bag, but there is a specific order and I don’t wash them.   First use is dry food – cookies, bread, or similar.   Shake out the dry crumbs after use.   Second use is wet food – typically meat.  Third use is trash – use the zipper bag to hold other trash.   

I take home condiments and napkins, but only the few that came with my meal.  When my sub sandwich came with 2 napkins and I only used one the extra went in my pocket and got used at home.

I don’t buy garbage bags.  My garbage goes in cat food bags, grocery bags, or any other bag that enters the house full of something else.

Cheap

A few days after we got married DH and I were in FILs town and he took the extended family out to dinner – 8 people.   He told the relatives that the meal was going on DH’s credit card because FIL didn’t have one.  All true.  He also said he would be paying DH cash for the meal at home.  FIL gave DH cash for 6 of the 8 meals.  He expected DH to cover our food.

The water supply to my house is a well with an electric pump.   So my water is, for all practical purposes, free.  I don’t use paper plates at home.  I don’t like the way they feel and I don’t like the environmental impact.   Mom loves paper plates.  She came to visit and bought paper plates for me.  She served sandwiches on those plates, then wiped the crumbs off them and put them back in the cupboard to be used for another meal while I objected.  I pulled them out, tore them in half and threw them out.  Mom was not happy.  She’s worried about the cost of the water I use by running the dish washer twice each week. 

City water does not reach my neighborhood.  Each house has a well and electric pump.  I supplied one neighbor with water for 3 days, even let her come over and shower in my house, when her pump malfunctioned and her husband was too cheap to hire the well service to repair it. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: wheeitsme on April 07, 2013, 06:02:34 PM
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

Flabbered my ghast that he hadn't realized that he'd reached "old age" by then......

Eh, when my Dad was 78 (he turned 80 this year), he went to look at a couple of those places.  I asked him how he liked them.  His response?  "They're all full of old people!"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: DoubleTrouble on April 07, 2013, 06:55:17 PM
I thought she meant going out into the rain to wash the car.  I agree with her.  Well, as long as there's no lightning!   :-\
Washing the car in the pouring rain -- frugal, if not reliably efficient

Taking off your clothes to wash the car and yourself at the same time -- cheapskate, especially if the neighbors aren't happy with the view.   ;)

Ow, liquid out the nose hurts! LOL.

My grandparents weren't necessarily cheapskates but they did grow up in the Great Depression & had the mentality of don't throw anything away unless totally necessary. I think it took about 3 of those huge dumpsters to clean out their house, Mom & her brother were just chucking stuff out the window into them.

I do remember once when my grandma was switched to a new medication & her doctor mentioned that it could be gotten free if your income level was low enough. Mom spotted the forms on a visit & asked Grandma why she didn't mention all their savings/retirement/etc when filling out the form. Grandma said it was none of the drug company's business & it wasn't really income! *facepalm* She got the meds for free but really could have afforded it with no problem since they were considered upper-upper middle class.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Library Dragon on April 07, 2013, 07:23:52 PM
Oh DoubleTrouble you triggered the SafeLink nightmares from a few years ago.  SafeLink (https://www.safelinkwireless.com/Enrollment/Safelink/en/Public/NewHome.html (https://www.safelinkwireless.com/Enrollment/Safelink/en/Public/NewHome.html)) is this grand plan to provide US residents "free" cell phones.  The plans are not good and people often spend more than another no contract plan. 

Anyway......we had hundreds of people coming to the library to sign-up.  The TV commercial even said to go to the library and sign-up. I almost threw something at the TV when I saw that.  Of course we were never asked to help, provided info, etc. 

We have some patrons with MONEY who use the public computers.  No problem.  Of this group were the ones coming and calling demanding to know where their phones were.  (They also wanted their free digital TV converters.) They are quite capable of buying their own cell phones, but only pull out their own cash when the property tax certificates are auctioned.  In one case a woman was most displeased when we wouldn't write a letter attesting to her low income status.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 07, 2013, 07:28:50 PM
Oh DoubleTrouble you triggered the SafeLink nightmares from a few years ago.  SafeLink (https://www.safelinkwireless.com/Enrollment/Safelink/en/Public/NewHome.html (https://www.safelinkwireless.com/Enrollment/Safelink/en/Public/NewHome.html)) is this grand plan to provide US residents "free" cell phones.  The plans are not good and people often spend more than another no contract plan. 

Anyway......we had hundreds of people coming to the library to sign-up.  The TV commercial even said to go to the library and sign-up. I almost threw something at the TV when I saw that.  Of course we were never asked to help, provided info, etc. 

 

If it makes you feel any better, the FCC is really cracking down on abusers of the program, and trying to eliminate a lot of the fraud associated with the program. i work in the telecom industry, so I see all the info. Apparently it was like a free for all, with very few checks and balances, and Lifeline program costs began to skyrocket.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Library Dragon on April 07, 2013, 07:32:22 PM
I hope so.  There are people with legitimate needs and safety concerns that get shoved aside in these type of freebie grabs.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Elfmama on April 07, 2013, 07:38:23 PM
Quote
I think a lot of these cases are a product of growing up without enough, as in the Depression.
While that may apply to your story, and it might apply to some of the others, many posts are about younger people who didn't grow up deprived or during the Depression.  Some people are just stingy and cheap.
I know it certainly applied to my father.  He was the son of a sharecropper in Dustbowl Oklahoma.  He has very strong memories of the Great Depression, and growing up with dingdangity near nothing.  The last time we visited, he and Mom were talking about their childhoods.  He pointed out that compared to his family, Mom's family was rich.  Why, they could afford to buy cornflakes for breakfast!  His usual breakfast was eggs, and sometimes bacon, because they kept chickens and sometimes had a pig. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 07, 2013, 07:40:13 PM
I hope so.  There are people with legitimate needs and safety concerns that get shoved aside in these type of freebie grabs.

Yes, I can assure you they are.  Slightly OT - but there are more stringent certification requirements in place, and if customers fail to certify, they are dropped from the program. also, states are doing away with their programs, and the FCC will have control over them all.  Sadly, its like anything that's "free" no matter what it is. there will always be those who take advantage, when they don't need to.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: mbbored on April 07, 2013, 10:58:33 PM
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

Flabbered my ghast that he hadn't realized that he'd reached "old age" by then......

I'm not surprised, though. My grandpa was once talking to my dad about "those old guys" at church. Which ones? dad asked. "Oh, you see them--they sit in a row at the back." Dad looked, and did a double-take. They were about HIS age--roughly 70 or so. Grandpa was 90.

He just didn't FEEL old.

My 92 year old grandmother talks about her little old ladies: she picks them up, takes them to church, the doctor, bridge games, etc. The oldest one of those little old ladies? 75.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: katycoo on April 07, 2013, 11:28:04 PM
When he got married, his wife insisted on buying furniture. K was very upset, and wanted to get the furniture second hand, which did not go over well with his wife. He went on a conference trip, and came back to furniture from a very expensive firm. K threw a fit.

If my new spouse acted behind my back to do something I disagreed with, I would throw a fit, regardless of the cost of the furniture.

Sometimes this is a 'pick your battles' thing.  My DH does up cars for a hobby.  I really really wish he would work on only one car at a time.  He's bought cars before without telling me (the expenses isn't great).  I choose my own hobbies without consulting him, and its not fair for me to throw a tanty without changing my own habits.  If I don't want him to pitch a fit hen I tell him I've enrolled in ballet classes, I must show him the same courtesy.

I did however pitch a minor fit when he purchased a brand new work ute without consulting me.  His argument was it was a work related expense, and I am was involved in the business (true).  My position was that it was a $25K vehicle and if the business went down, his personal assets would go too and that affected our joint financial position.  The whole thing was a non-event in terms of problems, but I can guarantee that won't be happening again.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: DoubleTrouble on April 08, 2013, 11:12:30 AM
When I was about 10, one buffet started charging kids by their weight--1 cent per pound the kid weighed. My parents would take us there and not buy themselves anything but raid our plates. Well, the buffet got wise to that and started allowing the discount only with the purchase of an adult meal for each kids' meal.

I always joked that at least they weren't weighing us on the way out, too, and charging based on the difference.  ;D

That was the joke/reason why I've never taken the boys to a U-Pick farm, knowing my eldest he would eat 3x what we would bring up to the counter to pay for & I couldn't figure out how that would be fair to the farm. Then I found out that some places charge a fee to get in so I think I'm OK with taking him now :)

Oh DoubleTrouble you triggered the SafeLink nightmares from a few years ago.  SafeLink (https://www.safelinkwireless.com/Enrollment/Safelink/en/Public/NewHome.html (https://www.safelinkwireless.com/Enrollment/Safelink/en/Public/NewHome.html)) is this grand plan to provide US residents "free" cell phones.  The plans are not good and people often spend more than another no contract plan. 

Anyway......we had hundreds of people coming to the library to sign-up.  The TV commercial even said to go to the library and sign-up. I almost threw something at the TV when I saw that.  Of course we were never asked to help, provided info, etc. 

We have some patrons with MONEY who use the public computers.  No problem.  Of this group were the ones coming and calling demanding to know where their phones were.  (They also wanted their free digital TV converters.) They are quite capable of buying their own cell phones, but only pull out their own cash when the property tax certificates are auctioned.  In one case a woman was most displeased when we wouldn't write a letter attesting to her low income status.

Well, at least I know Grandma would never have done that, cell phones were a big mystery to her & she couldn't see why anyone would want one. Sorry you had to deal with that, should have sent them a bill for all the consulting work you did on behalf of their service!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 08, 2013, 11:34:15 AM
I knew a gal who was so proud of how much money she saved when doing her grocery shopping that I don't think she realized that she was negating her savings by driving around. 

For example for her family of 5 she'd crow that she spent about 100 at the grocery store what with watching sales and stacking coupons, then she'd drive over to Alco which was not right next door to the market.  Then if she heard that one store had a good deal on fruit but the other had a good deal on meat, she'd go from one to the next.   

As she was lecturing me about the value of coupons and stacking (which I'll be honest, I still don't understand) and how much it can save you, I was thinking that I hoped those savings was going towards gas.

I use coupons too which helps to save indeed, especially when there's a sale on the items as well, but I don't drive around to get the deals.  The only time I'll get groceries anywhere but Martin's is when I want a corned beef brisket because except for St. Patrick's Day sales, they're usually cheaper at Walmart.

And I'll admit I can be a cheapskate as well.  Or rather a recovering cheapskate.  Used to buy all clothes at Walmart and thrift stores. Or rather all my clothes.  Boy clothes were bought at Target cause frankly, I like their selection better for boys clothes.   A friend teased me constantly about being such a cheapskate and convinced me that it was actually less money spent to get a pair of pants or shoes for $30 than to be constantly replacing $10 shoes or pants.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 08, 2013, 11:44:52 AM
I knew a gal who was so proud of how much money she saved when doing her grocery shopping that I don't think she realized that she was negating her savings by driving around. 

For example for her family of 5 she'd crow that she spent about 100 at the grocery store what with watching sales and stacking coupons, then she'd drive over to Alco which was not right next door to the market.  Then if she heard that one store had a good deal on fruit but the other had a good deal on meat, she'd go from one to the next.   

As she was lecturing me about the value of coupons and stacking (which I'll be honest, I still don't understand) and how much it can save you, I was thinking that I hoped those savings was going towards gas.

I use coupons too which helps to save indeed, especially when there's a sale on the items as well, but I don't drive around to get the deals.  The only time I'll get groceries anywhere but Martin's is when I want a corned beef brisket because except for St. Patrick's Day sales, they're usually cheaper at Walmart.

I was just having a discussion over email about teh show extreme couponers with a friend, who just watched a whole bunch of episodes for the first time. She thought it was soooo fabulous they saved so much and gave it all away. i told her do't kid yourself, MANY but not all, are hoarders and aren't saving anything by buyying stuff they don't need.

Coupons don't always work for me since many are buy two get x off. I live alone so unless its something that will keep or isn't too pricy, it does me no good.

Someone who does use coupons, shops sales and only buys enough for them and their family, that's a whole other ball of wax. but she is insistent she is right so I just let it go.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 08, 2013, 11:48:22 AM
I used to buy a $15-20 purse at one of the discount stores 3-4 times a year. I then realized these purses weren't made well and I was tired of repairing or discarding them. I now buy one or two well made purses a year for $30-40 and they last. I just change them out if I get bored. Same with shoes, if they aren't made well then they aren't worth a dollar, if you have to keep replacing them.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 08, 2013, 11:51:05 AM
A few weeks ago Brunhilde and I were in Target with 50-cent coupons for Cuties Mandarin Oranges.  The deadline on them was three weeks later and the store had none left.  We asked two store employees who found out they had no more and couldn't predict the arrival of the next shipment.  They said that they could check the Brooklyn store but we told them not to bother.

Really, it would have cost her two subway fares (now $5) and and hour and a half to save 50 cents?  Some people just can't do math.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Moray on April 08, 2013, 11:54:39 AM
A few weeks ago Brunhilde and I were in Target with 50-cent coupons for Cuties Mandarin Oranges.  The deadline on them was three weeks later and the store had none left.  We asked two store employees who found out they had no more and couldn't predict the arrival of the next shipment.  They said that they could check the Brooklyn store but we told them not to bother.

Really, it would have cost her two subway fares (now $5) and and hour and a half to save 50 cents?  Some people just can't do math.

Which people? Was Brunhilde acting like she was considering it? Surely you can't mean the store employees; after all, how would they know where either of you lived or what your transportation plans were?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: EmmaJ. on April 08, 2013, 12:02:14 PM
<snip>
Coupons don't always work for me since many are buy two get x off. I live alone so unless its something that will keep or isn't too pricy, it does me no good.


Yes!  This is one of my biggest peeves.  My pantry is about the size of a shoebox so I certainly don't have the room to store all those extra products.

If a coupon is $1.00 off for two products, I wish the store would allow $0.50 off for one.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 08, 2013, 12:07:36 PM
Brunhilde didn't even consider this.  The store we were in was a long subway ride away from the other Targets in NYC (the Manhattan one is not accessible by subway).

I realize I forgot to mention that Brunhilde lives within walking distance from the Target we shop in and I take the subway to Brunhilde's neighborhood.  We both have large bag carts with us when we shop there; nobody who drives there needs to have those.

Besides, driving wouldn't solve this problem because the cost of the gas would far exceed the coupon savings.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: otterwoman on April 08, 2013, 12:12:38 PM
I knew a gal who was so proud of how much money she saved when doing her grocery shopping that I don't think she realized that she was negating her savings by driving around. 

For example for her family of 5 she'd crow that she spent about 100 at the grocery store what with watching sales and stacking coupons, then she'd drive over to Alco which was not right next door to the market.  Then if she heard that one store had a good deal on fruit but the other had a good deal on meat, she'd go from one to the next.   

As she was lecturing me about the value of coupons and stacking (which I'll be honest, I still don't understand) and how much it can save you, I was thinking that I hoped those savings was going towards gas.

I use coupons too which helps to save indeed, especially when there's a sale on the items as well, but I don't drive around to get the deals.  The only time I'll get groceries anywhere but Martin's is when I want a corned beef brisket because except for St. Patrick's Day sales, they're usually cheaper at Walmart.

And I'll admit I can be a cheapskate as well.  Or rather a recovering cheapskate.  Used to buy all clothes at Walmart and thrift stores. Or rather all my clothes.  Boy clothes were bought at Target cause frankly, I like their selection better for boys clothes.   A friend teased me constantly about being such a cheapskate and convinced me that it was actually less money spent to get a pair of pants or shoes for $30 than to be constantly replacing $10 shoes or pants.


I do follow the store sales, but Walmart will price match other stores, even on groceries. I just bring the other stores flyers with me and get all the sales, but only have to go to the one store.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: DoubleTrouble on April 08, 2013, 12:32:35 PM
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

Flabbered my ghast that he hadn't realized that he'd reached "old age" by then......

Took my cousins' great-grandma until about 98 to realize it ;) She was still cheating at cards too.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Virg on April 08, 2013, 12:39:31 PM
Piratelvr1121 wrote:

"As she was lecturing me about the value of coupons and stacking (which I'll be honest, I still don't understand) and how much it can save you, I was thinking that I hoped those savings was going towards gas."

If she's paying enough attention to sales to stack coupons, it's very likely she's saving more than the gas that she's using to travel.  Even in a low mileage vehicle, saving ten dollars in coupons will pay for more than fifty miles of driving, and it's not that hard to save ten bucks off a week's groceries by shopping around.

As to understanding coupon stacking, the bottom line is to figure out how to use multiple coupons on the same purchase to save extra money.  One has to pay attention to restrictions, but done properly it can be a real money saver.  Just as a very simple example, if you buy a tube of toothpaste at a pharmacy, and you have a manufacturer's coupon for the item and a generic savings coupon for the pharmacy, you can use both on the one purchase to save more money.  In one extreme case, I saw someone who was able to use stacking and other stuff like loyalty cards and promotions to get "paid" to take stuff out of the store.  That is, she got some items for free due to sales and overlapping coupons and got store credit through a loyalty program for the original purchase price, which she could use to buy other items.  Doing it to that level can take as much work as a full time job, but considering that she regularly got hundreds of dollars of stuff essentially for free every month, I don't see it as much different from working any other job and it made her happy.

Virg
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Coralreef on April 08, 2013, 12:39:43 PM
A few weeks ago Brunhilde and I were in Target with 50-cent coupons for Cuties Mandarin Oranges.  The deadline on them was three weeks later and the store had none left.  We asked two store employees who found out they had no more and couldn't predict the arrival of the next shipment.  They said that they could check the Brooklyn store but we told them not to bother.

Really, it would have cost her two subway fares (now $5) and and hour and a half to save 50 cents?  Some people just can't do math.

Which people? Was Brunhilde acting like she was considering it? Surely you can't mean the store employees; after all, how would they know where either of you lived or what your transportation plans were?

Actually, the employee may not be thinking "coupon/rebate", she/he may be thinking "customer wants Cuties". 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 08, 2013, 12:42:43 PM
<snip>
Coupons don't always work for me since many are buy two get x off. I live alone so unless its something that will keep or isn't too pricy, it does me no good.


Yes!  This is one of my biggest peeves.  My pantry is about the size of a shoebox so I certainly don't have the room to store all those extra products.

If a coupon is $1.00 off for two products, I wish the store would allow $0.50 off for one.

Or when the item in question is $3 or $4. If its on sale say for 2.99, a $1 off one might entice me to try it, but $1 off $6 for two, nope, not happening.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: wheeitsme on April 08, 2013, 12:47:40 PM
I used to buy a $15-20 purse at one of the discount stores 3-4 times a year. I then realized these purses weren't made well and I was tired of repairing or discarding them. I now buy one or two well made purses a year for $30-40 and they last. I just change them out if I get bored. Same with shoes, if they aren't made well then they aren't worth a dollar, if you have to keep replacing them.

 ;)

“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that'd still be keeping his feet dry in ten years' time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes 'Boots' theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”


― Terry Pratchett, Men at Arms
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 08, 2013, 12:57:08 PM
As to understanding coupon stacking, the bottom line is to figure out how to use multiple coupons on the same purchase to save extra money.  One has to pay attention to restrictions, but done properly it can be a real money saver.  Just as a very simple example, if you buy a tube of toothpaste at a pharmacy, and you have a manufacturer's coupon for the item and a generic savings coupon for the pharmacy, you can use both on the one purchase to save more money.  In one extreme case, I saw someone who was able to use stacking and other stuff like loyalty cards and promotions to get "paid" to take stuff out of the store.  That is, she got some items for free due to sales and overlapping coupons and got store credit through a loyalty program for the original purchase price, which she could use to buy other items.  Doing it to that level can take as much work as a full time job, but considering that she regularly got hundreds of dollars of stuff essentially for free every month, I don't see it as much different from working any other job and it made her happy.

Stacking in a nutshell: there are three types of coupons.  You can usually use one of each on the same item, if the stars happen to align:

1) manufacturer coupons - the usual kind you see in the newspaper.  The manufacturer pays the store back for the face value of the coupon.  These are almost always for specific brands - $1 off X Brand Deodorant, or $1/2 Suchandsuch Brand Crackers.

2) store coupons - stores put these out to entice you to shop there.  They don't get reimbursed for them.  Sometimes these are for specific brands, but sometimes they're for anything in a particular category - $1 off any toothpaste, or $2/3 frozen vegetables.

3) not really a coupon, but function like one - loyalty programs with cash back.  CVS has the easiest one, in my opinion  :)  The "sale" price is actually the regular price, but then you get a printout on your receipt good for money off your next visit.  So it may be "$2 back on Crest toothpaste" - you pay the normal $4 for the tube (or less, if you stack it with other coupons!) and then you get a $2 coupon for a future visit.  Drugstores love these because they can restrict it per loyalty account, which means they can give away things free (usually something small, like a candy bar) and nobody will come in and buy them out.

I actually get things for "better than free" pretty frequently - about once a week - but that's ONE item out of however many is in my cart that day.  People who go in and get a cart full of groceries for pennies a) have to spend TONS of time chasing deals, and b) don't have much choice in what they buy.  Most couponers happily brag about their "more than free" bargains but quietly pay regular price for the things that aren't available with coupons the rest of the time  :)  Oh, and c) don't have sales tax on groceries.  Some places do and some don't, and those of us who pay 8.5% on everything aren't even getting our "free" items free  :P
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Cami on April 08, 2013, 12:59:03 PM
I knew a gal who was so proud of how much money she saved when doing her grocery shopping that I don't think she realized that she was negating her savings by driving around. 

For example for her family of 5 she'd crow that she spent about 100 at the grocery store what with watching sales and stacking coupons, then she'd drive over to Alco which was not right next door to the market.  Then if she heard that one store had a good deal on fruit but the other had a good deal on meat, she'd go from one to the next.   

As she was lecturing me about the value of coupons and stacking (which I'll be honest, I still don't understand) and how much it can save you, I was thinking that I hoped those savings was going towards gas.


I knew someone like that. She spent hours every Sunday "getting ready to go shopping." She then would drive around cherrypicking the specials at each store -- also more hours, plus gas. I asked her to calculate how much time she was spending  and how much  money she was saving on products she ACTUALLY liked and wanted (versus products she bought only because they were on sale/coupon).  She was actually losing money on the enterprise. I also pointed out that if she worked more hours at her job (which was totally possible) at $15 per hour, less the taxes, she'd recoup what she "saved" in less than 2 hours of work. She kept on with the couponing and driving. Oh well.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Carotte on April 08, 2013, 01:03:10 PM
Wheeitsme, I thought about the same extract!

I'm actually facing this right now with the purchase of an electric kettle.
I don't really have money to throw around, I would rather not spend more than the minimum, but this could potentially be the kettle I would keep for years and years, so I have to kick myself to go for the middle price range/ good construction and not the cheapy one.
Plus it will be a 100% my kettle (until SO realize that heating water is soooo much faster this way) even if it's not at my place.
Next 'battle', a toaster! Actually, next battle is having my SO do something about kitchen storage place, then buying myself a toaster.

I would call myself a frugal person, but with no personal income and not wanting to clutter myself with knickknacks, it's not a bad thing :).
I do have to remember to allow myself to spend on myself sometimes..
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Virg on April 08, 2013, 01:06:50 PM
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Black Delphinium on April 08, 2013, 01:10:20 PM
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg
Yeah. I know from experience that I wear through $80 Birkenstock sandals at pretty much the same rate as I wear through $10 Walmart sandals. I stopped buying $80 sandals.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 08, 2013, 01:10:48 PM
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg

I make that argument about bras - you can go through a lot of $8 K-mart Specials before you approach the price of a $60 good one - and the good ones can get ruined in the dryer just as easily.  I'd rather have cheap ones I don't have to take such good care of  :P  (Of course, that's all moot if you're a hard-to-find size . . . then you buy what fits and wear it forever!)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: alkira6 on April 08, 2013, 01:11:49 PM
I have actually had a harder time using coupons in past few years because of extreme couponers.  I can't get the stupid coupons!  My DH gets the coupons that get left behind from the papers people read on sunday, but I never get my circulars with coupons anymore and buying a paper is iffy is you use a machine because someone will buy one paper and while the door is open steal all of the coupons from the rest.

That being said, when I coupon, I coupon. I usually collect coupons from the stacks that DH brings me from work, the ones I get in the mail, the ones my relatives give me (they just shove them all in a bag and give it to me, I clip the ones I want and pass them on).  When the perfect sale comes along, I do get things for free or nearly free.  Detergent for between $1 - $1.50 a bottle, toothbrushes for a dime, frozen veggies for free, lotion, shampoo, conditioner for nearly free.  I fortunately have room to store things, and when I can get things that I don't need, the local food bank will take them.  I gave them almost a case of deodorant, 100 toothbrushes, and a case of shampoo/conditioner that I paid less than $20 for.

Cheapness - Was in a coffee shop with DH using a groupon on Saturday.  Our total after coupon came to $3.  I tip on the original amount and service was awesome, so I threw in a little extra.  The couple behind and to the side of us was using the same deal. They milked it for all it was worth, stole an entire container of raw sugar packets, a whole packs worth a napkins, argued over the total, and left a .50 tip.  Wow.  I can see now why there are less and less groupons for restaurants in my area. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: wheeitsme on April 08, 2013, 01:12:10 PM
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg

This is true.  And I think that a truly frugal person thinks about that balance.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 08, 2013, 01:22:13 PM
Wheeitsme, I thought about the same extract!

I'm actually facing this right now with the purchase of an electric kettle.
I don't really have money to throw around, I would rather not spend more than the minimum, but this could potentially be the kettle I would keep for years and years, so I have to kick myself to go for the middle price range/ good construction and not the cheapy one.
Plus it will be a 100% my kettle (until SO realize that heating water is soooo much faster this way) even if it's not at my place.
Next 'battle', a toaster! Actually, next battle is having my SO do something about kitchen storage place, then buying myself a toaster.

I would call myself a frugal person, but with no personal income and not wanting to clutter myself with knickknacks, it's not a bad thing :).
I do have to remember to allow myself to spend on myself sometimes..

I know how you feel. I do the same thing. If i can get away with soemthing on the less pricy side, i got fo rthat. but if its something I know I will use on a regular basis, i will spend a bit more.

Case in point: i wanted a new crockpot but i really don't use it all that often. so I got a rather inexpensive one, with no timer, and minimal settings.

I also wanted a new teakettle. I know i could have gotten a cheapo one, but i use it every day for both tea and coffee, so I got a very nice Chantal one, at TJ Maxx so discounted ,but still wasn't cheap. But I use it and need it to hold up.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 08, 2013, 01:45:40 PM
Well the reason the stacking perplexed me is because while I was shopping at Weis the only store coupons I got were for Weis brands.  The ones that were printed up at the register were labeled as manufacturer coupons.  So I wasn't sure how people were able to stack store coupons with mfr. coupons when the mfr. coupons were for name brands and the Weis store coupons were for just the store brands.

I wonder if the coupons printed at the register are considered store coupons even if they say manufacturer coupons on them?

I have store cards for both Weis and Martin's, so the club savings is also beneficial.  I like Martin's circulars though since they have worthwhile coupons and not just the pharmacy coupons every week which doesn't always do us much good since I get mine at Target.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Amara on April 08, 2013, 01:56:28 PM
I almost never pay attention to coupons because I don't get newspapers and the stuff that comes in the mail just hits the recycle bin as soon as it can. However, I like bargains like anyone but don't think of myself as cheap either. For me, it's not just the money but the time and effort and product.

I buy 40-roll packs of toilet paper; the quality is good but not of the ultra- soft variety brand names boast about. However, having traveled in Europe (including Eastern Europe at the time) and having experienced various types I have to say any American type is preferable. I also buy oversized packs of paper towels. I buy these crazy sizes because not because they are less expensive overall, though they are and that does matter, but because I hate to shop, I hate to run out of essentials, and I like having a couple of overflowing cabinets of these things.

But for me, "cheapskate" or "bargain hunter" refers to more than money. It's quality of life, however each of us defines that. I am a fan of Amazon where I can get my toothpaste and bar soap less expensively than in the stores--and have it delivered for no shipping cost! A major WOOHOO. I save in more ways than one. But I would never, ever drive around to multiple stores to "save" money. I consider that a complete loss.

ETA: At least fifteen years ago, possibly twenty, when Lands' End was still an independent retailer, I purchased a pair of leather rain boots lined in fake fur. They had been heavily discounted at the end of the season, down, if I remember correctly, from $140 to about $65. I kept watching them come down and at this point I feared I would lose out if I waited any longer. So I bought them. They have been the most comfortable shoes I think I have ever worn. And they are still good. They do need a bit of repair to the top but the bottoms are still in perfect condition. A few years ago I was talking with someone at work who believes in the cheap method. She was horrified to think I paid that much and boasted that she got hers for maybe $20. I did point out how old mine were at that point and that in terms of money I was far ahead. (In fact, I think they may last another twenty years with another trip to the shoe repair shop.) Different ways of thinking. Interesting that.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Ms_Cellany on April 08, 2013, 01:57:33 PM

The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg


I have an $85 pair of Teva sandals that I've worn almost daily for 13 years. I had to replace the Velcro at one point, but the soles are barely worn.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bloo on April 08, 2013, 02:26:37 PM
I almost never pay attention to coupons because I don't get newspapers and the stuff that comes in the mail just hits the recycle bin as soon as it can. However, I like bargains like anyone but don't think of myself as cheap either. For me, it's not just the money but the time and effort and product.

I buy 40-roll packs of toilet paper; the quality is good but not of the ultra- soft variety brand names boast about. However, having traveled in Europe (including Eastern Europe at the time) and having experienced various types I have to say any American type is preferable. I also buy oversized packs of paper towels. I buy these crazy sizes because not because they are less expensive overall, though they are and that does matter, but because I hate to shop, I hate to run out of essentials, and I like having a couple of overflowing cabinets of these things.

But for me, "cheapskate" or "bargain hunter" refers to more than money. It's quality of life, however each of us defines that. I am a fan of Amazon where I can get my toothpaste and bar soap less expensively than in the stores--and have it delivered for no shipping cost! A major WOOHOO. I save in more ways than one. But I would never, ever drive around to multiple stores to "save" money. I consider that a complete loss.

I'm right there with you. I like a deal as much as the next person, but my time is worth a lot to me. I do the exact same things with toilet paper and paper towels ("...but because I hate to shop, I hate to run out of essentials, and I like having a couple of overflowing cabinets of these things.")

Generally, we don't eat processed food and the last time I checked a newspaper for coupons, they still weren't giving coupons for things like meat, cheese, produce or milk. These things go on sale or they don't and I try to plan menus around what's on sale, if I can.

My daughter is really into makeup now and is quite an artist at applying it. I've been purchasing cheaper eyeshadow sets for her to practice with, but when it comes to buying foundation and concealer and primer, I spring for quality brands I like. I buy Wet-'n-Wild's lip glosses at $1.68 each (gorgeous colors with a good deal of pigment that feel great on my lips), but it goes over a $10 primer and $8 lip pencil. With my makeup I do weird combos of cheap/pricey. I told my DD that the primers and foundation and mineral veils are what you spend your money on and then the inexpensive colors will look beautiful on top. Kind of like how a cheap paint looks great over the best quality primer or discount carpet performs well on a high-quality underlayment.

As far as clothes, I do a combo of thrift stores for dresses and blouses/skirts and jeans (you can find amazing stuff if you're an odd size) but my 'play clothes' usually come from Gander Mtn. All my Columbia clothes are in excellent condition, some more than 10 years old. My snowboarding pants, $150 ten years ago, look brand-new and now my 14 year old daughter is wearing them! I invested in a lot of Under Armour when I took up running and it looks great, fits great and I can't destroy it. I always snag shorts, running pants or a top on clearance when I can. My DD and I share a Columbia jacket that is a shell/liner combo that retailed for $190 at the beginning of the season and was on clearance for $45 when I bought it. We can't ruin it and we are hard on clothes. Bought it 4 years ago.

I try to be frugal in the sense that I try not to spend money unless I need to, but when I need to, I want to get the best quality I can afford so that it will last. We just spent $300 on a cooler. A cooler, I tell you. The same size in an igloo brand that went for $70. But for what my DH will use it for, it'll need to be replaced every year, whereas the $300 can probably be handed down to my grandkids.

Financial Advice Columnist Liz Pulliam Weston had an article on stinginess. There was a quote from it that I'm not sure is hers or someone else but I thought it quite profound:

Frugality is what you are willing to do to save money.
Stinginess is what you are willing to do to others to save money.

My own cheapskate story is about my friends Rick and Dina. Normally when they went out to eat, they'd share a meal, an appetizer and an alcoholic beverage. In the US food portions in a lot of restaurants make this quite doable even if there's a share charge. They always did this.

When we were going out with them we made it clear we were treating them to dinner to thank them for something and you'd have thought they won the lottery. Dina said to Rick, right in front of us, "Order whatever you want, they're paying." They each had a couple of drinks and each ordered the most expensive meals on the menu and each got dessert.

Now, I was unaware that when someone else is paying, it's not out of the norm that they might order for you. We never handled treating someone else that way. But for people so frugal when the bill was on them, to become quite lavish when your friends are paying...it just left a bad taste in my mouth. When someone is treating me I always go inexpensive to middle-of-the-line (and that's after asking them to recommend something). This is on top of the fact that they used to not tip and no one wanted to go out to eat with them so one of our other friends had to sit down with them and explain the importance of tipping. Dina was also the type to 'forget' her wallet...a lot. Throw that all together and they just left the impression of being cheapskates. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: *new*mommyagain36 on April 08, 2013, 02:42:41 PM
My DH has an older family member who does exhibit many cheapskate traits.
She is known as the "kooky" one and we all love her but she:
 - carries own tea bags and sweeteners in her purse (it's a large, sectioned tote).  These items she has taken from restaurants and put in the back pocket of her tote bag.  She will literally empty the sweetener dispenser into her bag and take 6 teabags from the chest every restaurant, every time.
 - rinses paper towels and pins them to an indoor clothesline in her basement.  Uses them when dried.  Same for plastic baggies.
 - saves every plastic bag she gets while shopping.  She has 1000's of them, tucked into other bags, in her pantry.
 - bathes once a week, shampoos once a week (even in the summer months)
 - only flushes once a day, regardless of what's in the toilet, she "saves up" and flushes before she goes to bed.
 - stockpiles hotel toiletries and asks you to do the same when you go on vacation, then bring them to her
 - there are stories of her taking 1-2 rolls of TP from the Wal Mart bathroom on several occasions.  She carries a large tote bag and family members have witnessed this.
 - her magazine basket contains only those sample magazines that you can pick up in Dr waiting rooms.  They all say "sample copy - take one!"
 - she includes a "holiday wishlist" in her Christmas Card every year.  It includes toiletries, deoderant, toothpaste, etc, non perishable and canned food items, household paper goods.  You feel like it's the church food bank wishlist not a personal gift list.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jedikaiti on April 08, 2013, 02:50:52 PM
For clothes, I buy new. At my size, there's only so many places I can shop, and even fewer that I like. I am, however, very good at milking discounts - buying on clearance, sales, coupons, rewards certificates, you name it. I routinely pay half or less for my clothes.

I looooooooove purses. Mega love. I have quite the collection. And I recently learned that someone keeps donating really awesome, expensive purses to my local Goodwill store. If I ever find out who, I am sending them a thank-you card!

Coupons I don't do much - as a PP said, they tend to involve a lot of processed foods, and not much meats/fruits/veggies. But there are some that I can use, and thankfully I get those via my store loyalty card - Kroger makes it very easy by mailing me out coupons every quarter or so, and you can load electronic coupons onto your loyalty card via their website or phone app. Those I like!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Twik on April 08, 2013, 02:53:18 PM
This is acceptable:

Quote
her magazine basket contains only those sample magazines that you can pick up in Dr waiting rooms.  They all say "sample copy - take one!"

This is theft:

Quote
- there are stories of her taking 1-2 rolls of TP from the Wal Mart bathroom on several occasions.

Theft goes beyond kooky and into criminal, or at least mental illness which drives someone to commit criminal acts.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: nuit93 on April 08, 2013, 02:55:08 PM
My DH has an older family member who does exhibit many cheapskate traits.
She is known as the "kooky" one and we all love her but she:
 - carries own tea bags and sweeteners in her purse (it's a large, sectioned tote).  These items she has taken from restaurants and put in the back pocket of her tote bag.  She will literally empty the sweetener dispenser into her bag and take 6 teabags from the chest every restaurant, every time.
 - rinses paper towels and pins them to an indoor clothesline in her basement.  Uses them when dried.  Same for plastic baggies.
 - saves every plastic bag she gets while shopping.  She has 1000's of them, tucked into other bags, in her pantry.
- bathes once a week, shampoos once a week (even in the summer months)
 - only flushes once a day, regardless of what's in the toilet, she "saves up" and flushes before she goes to bed.
- stockpiles hotel toiletries and asks you to do the same when you go on vacation, then bring them to her
 - there are stories of her taking 1-2 rolls of TP from the Wal Mart bathroom on several occasions.  She carries a large tote bag and family members have witnessed this.
 - her magazine basket contains only those sample magazines that you can pick up in Dr waiting rooms.  They all say "sample copy - take one!"
 - she includes a "holiday wishlist" in her Christmas Card every year.  It includes toiletries, deoderant, toothpaste, etc, non perishable and canned food items, household paper goods.  You feel like it's the church food bank wishlist not a personal gift list.

Ewww!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 08, 2013, 03:03:20 PM
I'm kind of the opposite of some folks who'll gladly drive all over the place to save money - if I could find one store, ONE, that stocks every single grocery item I'm looking for so that I don't have to drive a lot, I'd be more than happy to pay a bit extra. 

My daughters are vegan and vegetarian, and I can't find all the stuff I'm looking for at my neighborhood grocery store, so I usually end up having to go to at least two different places.  When I'm tired and grumpy, I always find myself thinking "Man, I'd pay 10% more if I could only find all this stuff under one roof."
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Emmy on April 08, 2013, 03:27:20 PM
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg

This is true.  And I think that a truly frugal person thinks about that balance.

If those boots have a famous logo on them, I imagine most of the cost is for that particular brand name instead of quality.

The best way to shop is for value in my opinion.  In other words, I like to get the most use/enjoyment for the price. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: lady_disdain on April 08, 2013, 03:30:29 PM
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg

This is true.  And I think that a truly frugal person thinks about that balance.

If those boots have a famous logo on them, I imagine most of the cost is for that particular brand name instead of quality.

The best way to shop is for value in my opinion.  In other words, I like to get the most use/enjoyment for the price. 

Very true!

The idea behind Terry Pratchett's story remains: the rich have the option to buy the best value (whether $50 boots or $75  hiking shoes) while the poor have to make due with the cheapest, even if it isn't the best value and they know it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: finecabernet on April 08, 2013, 03:35:10 PM
The ex-friend who, when we were throwing a bridal shower for our mutual friend, wanted to charge the guests for their lunch. I was completely horrified at the thought, and the other bridesmaid (the bride's SIL) and I put our foot down against that idea. The ex-friend stomped out of our meeting and she and the SIL hated each other throughout the rest of the wedding festivities.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CrazyDaffodilLady on April 08, 2013, 03:41:14 PM
My great uncle Tyrone was a notorious cheapskate.

Whenever there was a potluck family gathering, he’d announce that he was going hunting or fishing to provide the meat.  He’d show up with a couple of dead song birds :o or a few minnow-sized fish.  The womenfolk were expected to clean and cook his contribution.

He borrowed a significant sum from his parents.  When his father died, the widow and 14-year-old son were left with less than $10 in the bank.  Tyrone never repaid the loan.

He did loan money to his daughter to buy a house, but the first month she received a bill with an exorbitant interest charge.  His daughter called her mom in tears, and Aunt Ethel quickly put an end to the interest fees.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Dr. F. on April 08, 2013, 04:00:59 PM
I used to have a friend who didn't like to pay the cost of making phone calls from her home phone (land line), so if she called you, she would immediately make an excuse like "The line is full of static on my end, can you try calling me back?" Then you would call her, and she'd be happy to talk for an hour, now that you were footing the cost of the call.

Years ago, I worked in an office where the manager was incredibly cheap (and he was pretty well-off having made very good money in his field).  That manager then transferred from our office to another office in the same county but different area code (so any calls from our area to that area would be toll calls).  I remember answering the phone in our office once, and it was his daughter.  She immediately asked to be transferred to the office where her father was working so I transferred her (not thinking anything of it).  She called again a few minutes later and immediately asked me to transfer her again.  That was when I realized that she was calling from their home (which was in our area code) and calling our office to be transferred so their phone bill wouldn't reflect the toll charge (it would be billed to the company).  I thought that little trick our old manager taught his daughter was really rather beyond cheap.

A former boss' wife used to come into his office every day after work and call her daughter from there. When he was finally fired, the overall phone bill for the institution went down about $400/month.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 08, 2013, 04:29:41 PM
Well the reason the stacking perplexed me is because while I was shopping at Weis the only store coupons I got were for Weis brands.  The ones that were printed up at the register were labeled as manufacturer coupons.  So I wasn't sure how people were able to stack store coupons with mfr. coupons when the mfr. coupons were for name brands and the Weis store coupons were for just the store brands.

I wonder if the coupons printed at the register are considered store coupons even if they say manufacturer coupons on them?

I have store cards for both Weis and Martin's, so the club savings is also beneficial.  I like Martin's circulars though since they have worthwhile coupons and not just the pharmacy coupons every week which doesn't always do us much good since I get mine at Target.

This is my main issue with couponing.  The store brand is cheaper than the name brands even with coupons, so what's the point?  It might be different at another store that doesn't have good store brands of everything.  Also, the store (Meijer) often prints out coupons with your receipt for things like $2 off your next bread purchase of $15 or more! (good for anything in the bread aisle), which are awesome.  I love those.  Meijer does it for dairy products, bread products, frozen foods, produce, and a few others.  No problems spending $15 in any of those aisles here!  I love it.

With the spending more for quality, I also agree that the opposite is often true.  I'm perfectly happy buying certain kids' clothes, particularly, in cheap fabrics, because expensive clothing doesn't seem any better against stains or certain kinds of wear.  Some items of clothing it does make a difference, admittedly, but it depends on the kind of clothing.  I buy the cheapest sweater tights that I can because those things wear through no matter what (probably comes from having very active little girls who like to climb and play rough but also wear skirts with sweater tights all winter).  They're practically a consumable item around here and rarely get handed down to the next kid.  However, I have found that for schoolbooks, new is often better, as the books need to survive through 4 kids and they take a lot of love and wear!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Tai on April 08, 2013, 05:06:53 PM
I'm one of the people that will go to various stores to get the sales.  The difference is, that I make it on the way to or from something else, and almost all of the stores we go to are for a specific item.  For example, Aldi is about 5 minutes from DH's work, so the days I pick him up after work are the days we shop there.  We usually make it to Aldi once every week-week and a half for bread, produce, eggs, snacks, Sam's once a week for samples (lol), milk, and rotisserie chicken, Price Rite every couple of weeks for meat and produce, Trader Joe's for convenience foods and work lunch stuff, etc. 

It works out that we never have a grocery bill more than $30-40, and rarely more than one trip out to the van to bring it all in.  Everything is also grouped with other trips, like at Sam's we'll fill the gas tank and Price Rite is next to the pharmacy. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Jones on April 08, 2013, 05:36:25 PM
I have been unsuccessful so far in attempting to stack coupons. All the stores in my area have a one-coupon-per-item rule; one store accepts manufacturer coupons but doesn't put out any of their own. Tragic.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Outdoor Girl on April 08, 2013, 05:38:45 PM
I have three major grocery stores all on the same strip.  I usually peruse the flyers every week, writing down everything on sale that I might be interested in.  Then I write my grocery list.  I go to the store that covers off the most items on my grocery list.  If a particular sale is really good at another store, I might hit a second store.  I hit Costco for staples about once every three months.

I'm due - I'm out of rice and kitty litter.

I'm not able to stack coupons here in Canada.  They don't allow it.  Plus, the only coupons I tend to get are for packaged foods that I just don't buy anymore.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: VorFemme on April 08, 2013, 06:03:27 PM
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg

I make that argument about bras - you can go through a lot of $8 K-mart Specials before you approach the price of a $60 good one - and the good ones can get ruined in the dryer just as easily.  I'd rather have cheap ones I don't have to take such good care of  :P  (Of course, that's all moot if you're a hard-to-find size . . . then you buy what fits and wear it forever!)

Which is why my engineered 40DDD bras never see the inside of a dryer.  Heat kills the elastic - drip drying easily doubles the life span of your bra.

Mom wears a 34B.  Her bras go through the dryer - partly because Dad is "helping" do the laundry and Dad does not understand drip drying.....forty-two years ago, he didn't understand "Dry Clean Only" either, but I say that only to make the point that Dad never has learned to read care labels to this day.

We're lucky - his mother used to have to boil clothes clean and run them through a wringer before hanging them on a clothes line.  He has learned to use the washer & dryer with hot, warm, and cold water - as well as a low heat on the dryer instead of EVERTHING going in on "High heat".  He has learned something since he first helped his mother with laundry in the forties (before his baby sister was old enough to do chores).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 08, 2013, 06:13:27 PM
I have three major grocery stores all on the same strip.  I usually peruse the flyers every week, writing down everything on sale that I might be interested in.  Then I write my grocery list.  I go to the store that covers off the most items on my grocery list.  If a particular sale is really good at another store, I might hit a second store.  I hit Costco for staples about once every three months.

I'm due - I'm out of rice and kitty litter.

I'm not able to stack coupons here in Canada.  They don't allow it.  Plus, the only coupons I tend to get are for packaged foods that I just don't buy anymore.

I'm lucky in that I have a plethora of grocery and other stores in my general area. I shop at whichever one I'm near when I'm out and about. 4.5 miles from me is a target where I buy a lot of groceries, Costco and supermarket. Trader Joes is closer to my office in the other direction from home so I don't get there as often as I'd like. they are, however, breaking ground on a new shopping center in a matter of weeks, which will have a TJ, and if not for the lack of sidewalks, i could walk to it!  so I normally don't have to run around like crazy to get the best deals.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 08, 2013, 06:54:35 PM

The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg


I have an $85 pair of Teva sandals that I've worn almost daily for 13 years. I had to replace the Velcro at one point, but the soles are barely worn.

Me too! They were my mother's day gift to myself three years ago. I love them.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 08, 2013, 07:16:30 PM
This is my main issue with couponing.  The store brand is cheaper than the name brands even with coupons, so what's the point?  It might be different at another store that doesn't have good store brands of everything. 

This is not universally true - generic is usually cheaper if you don't have a coupon, but I'd say a good 75% of the time, regular price brand name plus a run-of-the-mill coupon makes it the same price or cheaper than the generic.  If you can stack the coupon and a sale, there's really no comparison.  (There are still things I actually prefer the Publix brand, though!)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 08, 2013, 07:26:38 PM
This is my main issue with couponing.  The store brand is cheaper than the name brands even with coupons, so what's the point?  It might be different at another store that doesn't have good store brands of everything. 

This is not universally true - generic is usually cheaper if you don't have a coupon, but I'd say a good 75% of the time, regular price brand name plus a run-of-the-mill coupon makes it the same price or cheaper than the generic.  If you can stack the coupon and a sale, there's really no comparison.  (There are still things I actually prefer the Publix brand, though!)

Oh, I realize that, but I was speaking specifically... so many times I would be there with my coupon looking at the price, and it just didn't work out.  *Maybe* when the item was on sale, but I never seemed to run into sales during the life of the coupon, anyway.  And with only one coupon per item, the time I was spending on clipping coupons and trying to time them to sales just wasn't end up working out, as the coupons were rarely on stuff I would have bought anyway and never on the stuff that I spend a *lot* of money on (our biggest expenses are produce, dairy (especially yogurt, but store brand is cheaper than name brand even when I have a name brand coupon, and store brand is even on sale a lot, bread, and sometimes meat.  It was a bit easier when we had a chest freezer, as I could buy stuff when there was a good coupon/sale matchup, but as it is, I need stuff when I need it, a lot of the stuff needs refrigeration or freezing (lack of space) or doesn't last.  I can't buy enough yogurts when they're on sale to last us until the next sale because I don't have the storage space, etc.  I even tried making yogurt at home, but the kids wouldn't eat it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 08, 2013, 07:39:59 PM
I would love if Thomas would put out coupons for their bagels.  DH likes bagels in the morning because they're a quick and easy thing to grab and eat while driving.  And I've tried getting the store brand before but he said they were tough and tasted stale.   But Thomas bagels are about $5 a bag and seldom on sale. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 08, 2013, 08:03:16 PM
They have Thomas bagels and bagel thins at Sam's club, where 2 packages are under $4.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Minmom3 on April 08, 2013, 08:55:33 PM
I used to buy a $15-20 purse at one of the discount stores 3-4 times a year. I then realized these purses weren't made well and I was tired of repairing or discarding them. I now buy one or two well made purses a year for $30-40 and they last. I just change them out if I get bored. Same with shoes, if they aren't made well then they aren't worth a dollar, if you have to keep replacing them.

My current purse is a beautiful, heavy and soft leather item that cost me $120.  My most expensive bag ever...  It's now 3 years old, and that's young for me and my leather bags.  Most of them get used for 10+ years.  I had a nice pair of good leather flats that were $105 new.  I wore them for 12 years.  I resoled them 5 times, and re heeled them another 3 or so on top of that.  I probably spent another $100 over the years, spiffing them up.  But, $200 over 10 years, with no problems caused by ill fitting shoes, breaks down to $20 a year - and I have NEVER had a $20 pair of shoes that fit me or would last more than a few months.  There are quite a few things that are expensive up front, but will pay for themselves many times over in length of use time. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Minmom3 on April 08, 2013, 09:02:01 PM
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg

I make that argument about bras - you can go through a lot of $8 K-mart Specials before you approach the price of a $60 good one - and the good ones can get ruined in the dryer just as easily.  I'd rather have cheap ones I don't have to take such good care of  :P  (Of course, that's all moot if you're a hard-to-find size . . . then you buy what fits and wear it forever!)

They also last a LOT longer if they don't go through the dryer at all.  I wash mine in a lingerie bag, so they no longer get twisted and mangled, and then they line dry (on a rack in winter, outdoors in summer) and they last years longer than they used to...  And I'm large; I call my bras War Bras, because they aren't small and dainty, and they have all KINDS of buttressing!   ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: EveLGenius on April 08, 2013, 10:07:55 PM
My uncle was one of those people who was penny wise and pound foolish.  He would buy ANYTHING, if it were on sale, whether he needed it or not.  I think he's the reason grocery stores started posting "Limit 3" signs, and he was the guy who'd buy 3, take them to the car, and come back for another 3 of whatever they were.  At one time, we cousins counted over 80 cases of pop (at this time, a case was 8 glass bottles) in his basement.  Equally, if a thing was not on sale, it was almost impossible to convince him to buy it.  Fortunately, underwear and dish soap do occasionally go on sale.  He took his dates to the hospital cafeteria, because the food was cheaper there than any other restaurant in town.

But the best story about his cheapness is his gasoline story.  When he moved to Washington, DC, someone told him that the taxi drivers knew where the cheapest gas was.  So one Saturday soon after he moved, he picked a cab at random and started following it.  He followed that cab all day long, and sure enough, in the late afternoon, the cab headed down a small residential street and suddenly turned down one of those driveways that leads to an underground garage.  Uncle followed, and sure enough, there was the cabbie getting gas.  Uncle pulled up to the pump, and even though he had no cab license and very obviously was in a private car, the guy pumping gas (this was in the early 60s) filled his tank and took his money.  It definitely wasn't a public gas station- from the description, it might even have been black market.  But for as long as he lived in DC, that's where Uncle got his gas, at lower prices than anywhere else in town.

I have no idea how much money he saved on gas, or how much he spent following a cab around all day.  I don't know how he didn't get beat up by a cabbie who didn't want to be followed.  I'm just glad that when he left DC, he moved to a very rural town, where all of the gas stations were clearly marked.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: magician5 on April 08, 2013, 10:24:56 PM
Generally, we don't eat processed food and the last time I checked a newspaper for coupons, they still weren't giving coupons for things like meat, cheese, produce or milk. These things go on sale or they don't and I try to plan menus around what's on sale, if I can.

Precisely. I almost never find any national "big-name brands" that are worth the higher price over generics, even with coupons. And I'm never thrilled with "10 cents off" a product that costs a dollar more.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: kareng57 on April 08, 2013, 10:52:27 PM
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg

I make that argument about bras - you can go through a lot of $8 K-mart Specials before you approach the price of a $60 good one - and the good ones can get ruined in the dryer just as easily.  I'd rather have cheap ones I don't have to take such good care of  :P  (Of course, that's all moot if you're a hard-to-find size . . . then you buy what fits and wear it forever!)

Which is why my engineered 40DDD bras never see the inside of a dryer.  Heat kills the elastic - drip drying easily doubles the life span of your bra.

Mom wears a 34B.  Her bras go through the dryer - partly because Dad is "helping" do the laundry and Dad does not understand drip drying.....forty-two years ago, he didn't understand "Dry Clean Only" either, but I say that only to make the point that Dad never has learned to read care labels to this day.

We're lucky - his mother used to have to boil clothes clean and run them through a wringer before hanging them on a clothes line.  He has learned to use the washer & dryer with hot, warm, and cold water - as well as a low heat on the dryer instead of EVERTHING going in on "High heat".  He has learned something since he first helped his mother with laundry in the forties (before his baby sister was old enough to do chores).


Yes - my bras and panties started lasting a lot longer once I started washing the bras in a bag (albeit in the machine) and hanging all the lingerie to dry, about 10 years ago.  Apparently most European women would be aghast at the idea of machine-washing any of their lingerie.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: NyaChan on April 08, 2013, 10:54:31 PM
I went to a lunch with the office where I was doing an internship.  It was one of the manager's birthday and the supervisor bought a cake for the office to have for dessert at the restaurant.  Sounds nice right?  Well the cake had a thick layer of frosting + flowers.  The woman next to me ate the cake out of the shell of frosting (does that make sense?) because there was simply too much on there for that amount of cake with the flowers on top.  I saw the supervisor gesture towards her plate and then say something like "don't throw it away."  Then when the waitress brought containers for leftovers, the supervisor took the woman's plate, put the leftover, partially eaten frosting into the styrofoam container, and took it back to the office with her. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jedikaiti on April 08, 2013, 11:05:58 PM
I used to buy a $15-20 purse at one of the discount stores 3-4 times a year. I then realized these purses weren't made well and I was tired of repairing or discarding them. I now buy one or two well made purses a year for $30-40 and they last. I just change them out if I get bored. Same with shoes, if they aren't made well then they aren't worth a dollar, if you have to keep replacing them.

My current purse is a beautiful, heavy and soft leather item that cost me $120.  My most expensive bag ever...  It's now 3 years old, and that's young for me and my leather bags.  Most of them get used for 10+ years.  I had a nice pair of good leather flats that were $105 new.  I wore them for 12 years.  I resoled them 5 times, and re heeled them another 3 or so on top of that.  I probably spent another $100 over the years, spiffing them up.  But, $200 over 10 years, with no problems caused by ill fitting shoes, breaks down to $20 a year - and I have NEVER had a $20 pair of shoes that fit me or would last more than a few months.  There are quite a few things that are expensive up front, but will pay for themselves many times over in length of use time.

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Nemesis on April 08, 2013, 11:36:21 PM
My uncle's family would only flush the toilet if they did a No. 2. You are not allowed to flush for No. 1! They had 7 people living in that house. They only use one of the toilets despite having 3 toilets in their house to save water and cleaning agents. Sometimes by the time it was flushed, the toilet paper was so much that it would not flush down.

The stink from that toilet was so bad that we had to stopped using their toilet when we visit. Even if we had to hold it for an hour. It was truly awful.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Iris on April 09, 2013, 01:54:29 AM
My uncle's family would only flush the toilet if they did a No. 2. You are not allowed to flush for No. 1! They had 7 people living in that house. They only use one of the toilets despite having 3 toilets in their house to save water and cleaning agents. Sometimes by the time it was flushed, the toilet paper was so much that it would not flush down.

The stink from that toilet was so bad that we had to stopped using their toilet when we visit. Even if we had to hold it for an hour. It was truly awful.

I once stayed with a friend whose flatmates were saving the world one flush at a time. Fine, except that they didn't close the lid of the toilet OR the bathroom door. The whole house stank of stale No. 1. Extremely unpleasant.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: cicero on April 09, 2013, 03:26:18 AM
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"
lol

we tried to convince my 82 YO father to move into a retirement home. (he is beyond unbelievably stubborn). he is pretty much but not entirely independent but we are concerned that he is living alone, doing a lo t of driving, and lives about 20 minute drive from the city (his town has medical clinics, stores, etc but not the same as in the city). we finally convinced him "just to go and see". when he told his "younger" sister about this (i think she is 80), she said "why do you want to go live there? it's full of old people"... ::) thanks auntie... ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: RingTailedLemur on April 09, 2013, 04:06:34 AM
I used to buy a $15-20 purse at one of the discount stores 3-4 times a year. I then realized these purses weren't made well and I was tired of repairing or discarding them. I now buy one or two well made purses a year for $30-40 and they last. I just change them out if I get bored. Same with shoes, if they aren't made well then they aren't worth a dollar, if you have to keep replacing them.

My current purse is a beautiful, heavy and soft leather item that cost me $120.  My most expensive bag ever...  It's now 3 years old, and that's young for me and my leather bags.  Most of them get used for 10+ years.  I had a nice pair of good leather flats that were $105 new.  I wore them for 12 years.  I resoled them 5 times, and re heeled them another 3 or so on top of that.  I probably spent another $100 over the years, spiffing them up.  But, $200 over 10 years, with no problems caused by ill fitting shoes, breaks down to $20 a year - and I have NEVER had a $20 pair of shoes that fit me or would last more than a few months.  There are quite a few things that are expensive up front, but will pay for themselves many times over in length of use time.

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.

Oh yeah!  The only time I replaced a pair was because I wanted a different colour, and the time I came off my motorbike wearing them and shredded the tops.  Still didn't go through the leather though - I wore them as bike boots for years!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: DaisyG on April 09, 2013, 05:18:27 AM

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.

Oh yeah!  The only time I replaced a pair was because I wanted a different colour, and the time I came off my motorbike wearing them and shredded the tops.  Still didn't go through the leather though - I wore them as bike boots for years!

I must wear out footwear quickly - I've had 2 pairs of Doc Marten's and wore through the soles (which are not replaceable due to their technology) in 2 years (each pair) of almost everyday wear.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: esteban on April 09, 2013, 07:32:34 AM

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.

Oh yeah!  The only time I replaced a pair was because I wanted a different colour, and the time I came off my motorbike wearing them and shredded the tops.  Still didn't go through the leather though - I wore them as bike boots for years!

I must wear out footwear quickly - I've had 2 pairs of Doc Marten's and wore through the soles (which are not replaceable due to their technology) in 2 years (each pair) of almost everyday wear.

I have no idea how you can manage that.  I am seriously impressed.  I can wear out a pair of tennis shoes in 3-6 months (fat guy plus being hard on them with disc golf and such).  I had a pair of Doc Martens that I wore 5 days a week for 6 years, and they still aren't worn out.  The soles have lost traction in a couple spots, and they don't look perfect anymore, but not worn out at all.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hazmat on April 09, 2013, 08:34:24 AM

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.

Oh yeah!  The only time I replaced a pair was because I wanted a different colour, and the time I came off my motorbike wearing them and shredded the tops.  Still didn't go through the leather though - I wore them as bike boots for years!

I must wear out footwear quickly - I've had 2 pairs of Doc Marten's and wore through the soles (which are not replaceable due to their technology) in 2 years (each pair) of almost everyday wear.

I have no idea how you can manage that.  I am seriously impressed.  I can wear out a pair of tennis shoes in 3-6 months (fat guy plus being hard on them with disc golf and such).  I had a pair of Doc Martens that I wore 5 days a week for 6 years, and they still aren't worn out.  The soles have lost traction in a couple spots, and they don't look perfect anymore, but not worn out at all.
I just retired a pair of steel toed, waterproof, US Navy flight deck boots that I wore almost everyday for four years.  There was nothing wrong with them except the soles are too slick for the kind of work I do (scrubbing, buffing, stripping & waxing floors),  so I bought a new pair just like them, and use my old pair for everyday riding boots.  They are $180 a pair, but they last more than a year, which was how long the $60 boots I was wearing before lasted, 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 09, 2013, 08:40:16 AM
They have Thomas bagels and bagel thins at Sam's club, where 2 packages are under $4.

Sweet!! All the more reason to join and I found out it's a very reasonable price to join. $100 for a year. 

The only truly useful coupons I find are ones for glade/air wick plug in oil, toilet paper and paper towels.  Most times I can't find coupons for other stuff I get.  Sometimes I'll get lucky and they'll be offering a coupon for hygeine products when I need them but most of the time the coupons are for junk food and prepackaged meals which I admit I will get now and then but I think I end up using at most 5.  Which generally only saves me about $10 at most.  And don't get me wrong, that $10 is nice and enough that I can treat us to a bottle of cheap hooch, but I am amazed by the people who can whittle a $200 grocery tab to $10.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bloo on April 09, 2013, 08:44:17 AM
They have Thomas bagels and bagel thins at Sam's club, where 2 packages are under $4.

Sweet!! All the more reason to join and I found out it's a very reasonable price to join. $100 for a year. 

The only truly useful coupons I find are ones for glade/air wick plug in oil, toilet paper and paper towels.  Most times I can't find coupons for other stuff I get.  Sometimes I'll get lucky and they'll be offering a coupon for hygeine products when I need them but most of the time the coupons are for junk food and prepackaged meals which I admit I will get now and then but I think I end up using at most 5.  Which generally only saves me about $10 at most.  And don't get me wrong, that $10 is nice and enough that I can treat us to a bottle of cheap hooch, but I am amazed by the people who can whittle a $200 grocery tab to $10.

Hijack: Wait...what? I've paid $35 a year since 1997 or so. If I let my membership lapse, will it go up to around that?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Black Delphinium on April 09, 2013, 08:49:16 AM
They have Thomas bagels and bagel thins at Sam's club, where 2 packages are under $4.

Sweet!! All the more reason to join and I found out it's a very reasonable price to join. $100 for a year. 

The only truly useful coupons I find are ones for glade/air wick plug in oil, toilet paper and paper towels.  Most times I can't find coupons for other stuff I get.  Sometimes I'll get lucky and they'll be offering a coupon for hygeine products when I need them but most of the time the coupons are for junk food and prepackaged meals which I admit I will get now and then but I think I end up using at most 5.  Which generally only saves me about $10 at most.  And don't get me wrong, that $10 is nice and enough that I can treat us to a bottle of cheap hooch, but I am amazed by the people who can whittle a $200 grocery tab to $10.

Hijack: Wait...what? I've paid $35 a year since 1997 or so. If I let my membership lapse, will it go up to around that?
Do you get your membership through work? My mother used to, and her rates were lower for it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 09, 2013, 08:49:37 AM
I don't know.  I've never had a membership with them before. Maybe it's a locational thing?  I'm in the Midatlantic and even in this lower income area, I've found things are still pricier here than where my friend lives in the Midwest.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hillia on April 09, 2013, 08:51:54 AM
Right out of college i decided I wanted a pair of leather hightop Pony sneakers - don't know why, since I've never been particularly active and certainly never played a sport requiring good shoes.  I paid I think $65 for them - a ton in 1985 - and wore them for about 5 years, at which point I was sick to death of them.  They were heavy and clunky, although pretty comfortable, and they would not show any wear at all to justify ditching them.  I finally took them to Goodwill, and have no doubt that somewhere in the universe those darn shoes are still in existence.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bloo on April 09, 2013, 08:57:02 AM
Black Delphinium: No, my husband and I simply purchased one as 'Business Members' as we owned our own business, which we 'proved' by simply telling them that. :o The only benefit to 'Business Membership' that I could see is that we get to walk in the store earlier.

Every late September, I'm reminded at the checkout that my membership is expiring in October and do I want to renew and I always do. It's been $35/year for as long as I can remember.

Used to be a member of Costco & BJ's when I lived in SW FL and I seem to remember the membership fees being comparable but this was in 2004 & 2005.

Piratelvr1121: I would guess it would have to be regional. I've never lived in such of large collective of tight-fisted peoples and they would squawk bloody murder at $100/year. :)

ETA: Ah I just googled it and saw that Advantage Plus or Business Plus is $100/year. Advantage is $40 an Business is $35. For some reason I can't login to Sam's Club's website so I can't see what the differences are.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 09, 2013, 09:29:10 AM
Black Delphinium: No, my husband and I simply purchased one as 'Business Members' as we owned our own business, which we 'proved' by simply telling them that. :o The only benefit to 'Business Membership' that I could see is that we get to walk in the store earlier.

Every late September, I'm reminded at the checkout that my membership is expiring in October and do I want to renew and I always do. It's been $35/year for as long as I can remember.

Used to be a member of Costco & BJ's when I lived in SW FL and I seem to remember the membership fees being comparable but this was in 2004 & 2005.

Piratelvr1121: I would guess it would have to be regional. I've never lived in such of large collective of tight-fisted peoples and they would squawk bloody murder at $100/year. :)

ETA: Ah I just googled it and saw that Advantage Plus or Business Plus is $100/year. Advantage is $40 an Business is $35. For some reason I can't login to Sam's Club's website so I can't see what the differences are.

I just logged in. The Business membership is $35 for a primary + one secondary, and you can buy up to 8 more for addional unmentioned fees. It says nothing about having a business!

We would have a card, but our closest stores are nearly 2 hours away, so we go about 3 times a year as our son's guests. We probably save enough in one visit to on Advil and glucosimine to pay for the card, not to mention the paper goods and electronic supplies. We used to save a lot in one visit a month when we lived in City to be well worth.

They only take cash and Discover cards (as of last fall, anyway), and maybe checks - I don't know about that.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: amylouky on April 09, 2013, 09:45:11 AM

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.

Oh yeah!  The only time I replaced a pair was because I wanted a different colour, and the time I came off my motorbike wearing them and shredded the tops.  Still didn't go through the leather though - I wore them as bike boots for years!

I must wear out footwear quickly - I've had 2 pairs of Doc Marten's and wore through the soles (which are not replaceable due to their technology) in 2 years (each pair) of almost everyday wear.

I have no idea how you can manage that.  I am seriously impressed.  I can wear out a pair of tennis shoes in 3-6 months (fat guy plus being hard on them with disc golf and such).  I had a pair of Doc Martens that I wore 5 days a week for 6 years, and they still aren't worn out.  The soles have lost traction in a couple spots, and they don't look perfect anymore, but not worn out at all.

My DH had club feet when he was born. He had corrective surgery, but his feet still aren't shaped right. He goes through shoes FAST.. the soles wear unevenly so if he tries to make them last too long, he's walking at an angle and gets bad back pain. He likes Doc Martens but if he wears them daily he'll go through the soles in about six months.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CakeBeret on April 09, 2013, 09:46:08 AM
I used to buy a $15-20 purse at one of the discount stores 3-4 times a year. I then realized these purses weren't made well and I was tired of repairing or discarding them. I now buy one or two well made purses a year for $30-40 and they last. I just change them out if I get bored. Same with shoes, if they aren't made well then they aren't worth a dollar, if you have to keep replacing them.

My current purse is a beautiful, heavy and soft leather item that cost me $120.  My most expensive bag ever...  It's now 3 years old, and that's young for me and my leather bags.  Most of them get used for 10+ years.  I had a nice pair of good leather flats that were $105 new.  I wore them for 12 years.  I resoled them 5 times, and re heeled them another 3 or so on top of that.  I probably spent another $100 over the years, spiffing them up.  But, $200 over 10 years, with no problems caused by ill fitting shoes, breaks down to $20 a year - and I have NEVER had a $20 pair of shoes that fit me or would last more than a few months.  There are quite a few things that are expensive up front, but will pay for themselves many times over in length of use time.

May I ask where you found your good leather flats? I've never found a pricey pair of flats that felt much better than cheap flats, but perhaps I've been looking in the wrong places.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Twik on April 09, 2013, 12:17:42 PM
I bought flats by Rieker, and have had several strangers come up to me and tell me how much they liked them!  ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: mharbourgirl on April 09, 2013, 01:07:32 PM
Oh, and the horseradish that was near the hotdogs, that was also where the refrigerated pickles were, too.  So I think they just didn't have the pink one.  My mom tried to suggest that I get some beets and follow some recipe... I have 4 kids under 7, not happening.  White horseradish will do.  :)

You are most wise, MommyPenguin.  My family always loved pickled horseradish, and I still do.  So one year Mom decided to add horseradish to the giant vegetable garden she put in to make her own.  Come late August, we go and pull the horseradish - they look like giant brown carrots, 1-2ft long.  Take them in, clean them and start peeling.

The house emptied instantly of all but Mom and unlucky me, who was helping and so couldn't leave.  The fumes from those roots will make your eyes water, your nose run, and the smell is horrendous.

We did have a pantry shelf full of lovely pickled horseradish when we were done, but once it was gone we went back to buying it at the grocery store. 

Mom is wonderfully frugal and made almost everything from scratch because it was much cheaper when you've got a big family to feed, but she could go too far sometimes.  That was one of those times.  I can still taste the fumes in the back of my throat when I remember it, and that was almost 30 years ago!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jedikaiti on April 09, 2013, 01:33:28 PM

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.

Oh yeah!  The only time I replaced a pair was because I wanted a different colour, and the time I came off my motorbike wearing them and shredded the tops.  Still didn't go through the leather though - I wore them as bike boots for years!

I must wear out footwear quickly - I've had 2 pairs of Doc Marten's and wore through the soles (which are not replaceable due to their technology) in 2 years (each pair) of almost everyday wear.

I have no idea how you can manage that.  I am seriously impressed.  I can wear out a pair of tennis shoes in 3-6 months (fat guy plus being hard on them with disc golf and such).  I had a pair of Doc Martens that I wore 5 days a week for 6 years, and they still aren't worn out.  The soles have lost traction in a couple spots, and they don't look perfect anymore, but not worn out at all.

Color me impressed, too - I wore my first pair daily for 5+ years. Wore off the tread in a few key spots, but not all over, and not through the whole sole.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 09, 2013, 02:01:53 PM

I just logged in. The Business membership is $35 for a primary + on secondary, and you can buy up to 8 more for addional unmentioned fees. It says nothing about having a business!

We would have a card, but our closest stores are nearly 2 hours away, so we go about 3 times a year as our son's guests. We probably save enough in one visit to on Advil and glucosimine to pay for the card, not to mention the paper goods and electronic supplies. We used to save a lot in one visit a month when we lived in City to be well worth.

They only take cash and Discover cards (as of last fall, anyway), and maybe checks - I don't know about that.

They take debit cards and checks, I have used visa and master card as well.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 09, 2013, 02:03:18 PM
Oh, and the horseradish that was near the hotdogs, that was also where the refrigerated pickles were, too.  So I think they just didn't have the pink one.  My mom tried to suggest that I get some beets and follow some recipe... I have 4 kids under 7, not happening.  White horseradish will do.  :)

You are most wise, MommyPenguin.  My family always loved pickled horseradish, and I still do.  So one year Mom decided to add horseradish to the giant vegetable garden she put in to make her own.  Come late August, we go and pull the horseradish - they look like giant brown carrots, 1-2ft long.  Take them in, clean them and start peeling.

The house emptied instantly of all but Mom and unlucky me, who was helping and so couldn't leave.  The fumes from those roots will make your eyes water, your nose run, and the smell is horrendous.

We did have a pantry shelf full of lovely pickled horseradish when we were done, but once it was gone we went back to buying it at the grocery store. 

Mom is wonderfully frugal and made almost everything from scratch because it was much cheaper when you've got a big family to feed, but she could go too far sometimes.  That was one of those times.  I can still taste the fumes in the back of my throat when I remember it, and that was almost 30 years ago!

Ha!  Yeah, I don't love horseradish *that* much.  Just for Passover, mostly.  We're planning to do a vegetable garden in our new house, but I think we'll stick to carrots and peas and cucumbers and the like.  :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: nayberry on April 09, 2013, 02:10:51 PM
>snip<

Yes - my bras and panties started lasting a lot longer once I started washing the bras in a bag (albeit in the machine) and hanging all the lingerie to dry, about 10 years ago.  Apparently most European women would be aghast at the idea of machine-washing any of their lingerie.

UK here,  i chuck my lingerie in the washing machine on a 30degC wash and drip dry,



when my dh and i were living in our old house, he rarely drank tea, whereas i can guzzle it by the gallon, so i would reuse teabags, but i had two normal teas and 1 with 2 teabags to get the most i could from it.  really did save us money.

we also have a costco membership and i make a list from our normal supermarkets online shopping website and when we go round, if it isn't cheaper we don't get it,  except for meat, costco meat is always fab.

We have within walking distance: Aldi, Lidl x 2, Tesco, Sainsbury x 2, Waitrose x 2, Marks & Spencer and a few smaller speciality stores such as bakers, butchers, polish deli's,    and i adore the Chorizo from lidl,  can make so many different meals from it.

ok, looking at that we are definitely spoilt for choice. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bloo on April 09, 2013, 02:19:52 PM

I just logged in. The Business membership is $35 for a primary + on secondary, and you can buy up to 8 more for addional unmentioned fees. It says nothing about having a business!

We would have a card, but our closest stores are nearly 2 hours away, so we go about 3 times a year as our son's guests. We probably save enough in one visit to on Advil and glucosimine to pay for the card, not to mention the paper goods and electronic supplies. We used to save a lot in one visit a month when we lived in City to be well worth.

They only take cash and Discover cards (as of last fall, anyway), and maybe checks - I don't know about that.

They take debit cards and checks, I have used visa and master card as well.

For many years the only credit card Sam's would take was Discover, but they'd always take checks. About 2-3 years ago the local Sam's here started taking MasterCard. I'd assume they take debit though I don't have a debit card.

Now Sam's has it's own credit card and that's the one I use for Sam's when I need to charge something. It's 'built-in' to my membership card.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hazmat on April 09, 2013, 03:27:38 PM

I just logged in. The Business membership is $35 for a primary + on secondary, and you can buy up to 8 more for addional unmentioned fees. It says nothing about having a business!

We would have a card, but our closest stores are nearly 2 hours away, so we go about 3 times a year as our son's guests. We probably save enough in one visit to on Advil and glucosimine to pay for the card, not to mention the paper goods and electronic supplies. We used to save a lot in one visit a month when we lived in City to be well worth.

They only take cash and Discover cards (as of last fall, anyway), and maybe checks - I don't know about that.

They take debit cards and checks, I have used visa and master card as well.

For many years the only credit card Sam's would take was Discover, but they'd always take checks. About 2-3 years ago the local Sam's here started taking MasterCard. I'd assume they take debit though I don't have a debit card.

Now Sam's has it's own credit card and that's the one I use for Sam's when I need to charge something. It's 'built-in' to my membership card.
They also have a Sam's Club Discover Card, which is also 'built-in' to your membership card.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: 25wishes on April 09, 2013, 04:35:20 PM
I don't know if this qualifies as cheapskate but I thought it was tacky.

My dad went into the hospital for cancer treatment and expected to be there for awhile. He put his (non-live-in) GF on his checking account so she could take care of his bills while he was in hospital.

He passed away after a very short time. My uncle, who was the executor of the estate, asked her for the money so he could at least get the funeral expenses paid. Nope, she was keeping it. He had to front the funeral money himself until the estate was settled.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 09, 2013, 04:44:23 PM
I don't know if this qualifies as cheapskate but I thought it was tacky.

My dad went into the hospital for cancer treatment and expected to be there for awhile. He put his (non-live-in) GF on his checking account so she could take care of his bills while he was in hospital.

He passed away after a very short time. My uncle, who was the executor of the estate, asked her for the money so he could at least get the funeral expenses paid. Nope, she was keeping it. He had to front the funeral money himself until the estate was settled.

Not just tacky, but illegal.  Hope the executor goes after her.

Condolences re: your father.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Carotte on April 09, 2013, 05:02:09 PM
I don't know if this qualifies as cheapskate but I thought it was tacky.

My dad went into the hospital for cancer treatment and expected to be there for awhile. He put his (non-live-in) GF on his checking account so she could take care of his bills while he was in hospital.

He passed away after a very short time. My uncle, who was the executor of the estate, asked her for the money so he could at least get the funeral expenses paid. Nope, she was keeping it. He had to front the funeral money himself until the estate was settled.

Not cheapstake, more like criminal or abuse of the situation...
I guess they didn't write anything down (who would think you need to with a relative or SO), so uncle can't prove she was only allowed to take care of his bills, not hers.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Gwywnnydd on April 10, 2013, 12:22:00 PM

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.

Oh yeah!  The only time I replaced a pair was because I wanted a different colour, and the time I came off my motorbike wearing them and shredded the tops.  Still didn't go through the leather though - I wore them as bike boots for years!

I must wear out footwear quickly - I've had 2 pairs of Doc Marten's and wore through the soles (which are not replaceable due to their technology) in 2 years (each pair) of almost everyday wear.

I have no idea how you can manage that.  I am seriously impressed. 

I managed it by gripping so much with my toes when I walk, that I popped the soles, from the inside. Very disappointing.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 10, 2013, 05:48:28 PM
I've lost a significant amount of weight since Christmas.   At a recent gathering, a friend, Rachelle, very graciously paid me a compliment and asked what I'd been doing different. I replied, WW and I just started with a personal trainer through my gym to "tone up" now that I've shed the dense protective layer of fluff.  This apparently, was a huge mistake.  Someone else at the party, Tony, foghorned across the room that using a trainer was WASTEFUL and if I wasn't so lazy and uninformed I could do the exercises on my own and save the trainer's fees.  He suggested that I just follow the trainer around while he works with another woman of my size, watch what exercises she does and copy her.

Cue this expression from me:  :o

There's a couple of things wrong with this:

1) It's a theft of the trainer's time and techniques.

2) What are the odds that the trainer would be working with a woman of my (far above average) height and build during the times I go to the gym?

3) The exercises the trainer would be doing with the other woman might not be the best exercises for me.  For all I know, the other woman might have a major injury she's recovering from.

4) Part of the reason I want to use a trainer is that I need someone to correct my form and make sure I'm not under/over-doing it.  I don't want to hurt myself.  Using the Peeping Tom method of trainer stalking would not accomplish this.

5) Following another person around the gym, copying them, is a little creepy.

I immediately thought of this thread and simply smiled at him, saying, "That's an interesting thought."

DH, however, has never been to ehell, and wanting to defend his wife, told Tony, "Weeble's doing great.  I'm really proud of how much progress she's made and if she wants to devote money to learning which exercises will work best for her goals, I'm all for it."

Tony grumbled that it must be nice to have "money to waste."
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 10, 2013, 05:54:04 PM
^Reminds me of a TV show (Will and Grace?  I'm not sure.) where Grace(?) followed a woman and her trainer.  Turned out the trainer was training the paying woman to have smaller b00bs and a bigger butt. >:D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Dazi on April 10, 2013, 05:59:40 PM
My gm was one of those people who would take anything not nailed down at a fast food place...napkins, plastic utensils, sweet n low, whatever.

Had another relative build an outside shower, cold water only, because he didn't want water going into his septic system.  It was completely functional and needed no repairs, he just didn't want to pay the guy to empty it.  In the same vain, he only flushed the toilet once a day and no one was allowed to flush any toilet paper (he kept a small, unlined, garbage can to place all used paper...even #2's). Yuck, yuck, yuck.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 10, 2013, 06:07:13 PM
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg

I make that argument about bras - you can go through a lot of $8 K-mart Specials before you approach the price of a $60 good one - and the good ones can get ruined in the dryer just as easily.  I'd rather have cheap ones I don't have to take such good care of  :P  (Of course, that's all moot if you're a hard-to-find size . . . then you buy what fits and wear it forever!)


My bras are also wonders of modern engineering.  I refuse to scrimp on them because 1) I can't find cheap bras in my size and 2) I want all of the preservative support I can get.  I will spend anywhere from $35 to $60 each, depending on if it's a "specialty" bra (strapless, backless, fires bullets like a Fembot.)  Up until recently, friend of mine (who is significantly smaller) thought this was a huge waste of money and told me I should just go to the discount store and buy a cheaper one. She simply refused to believe I could be that hard to fit.

Finally, I got her to understand.  She's an avid runner and spends quite a bit of money on quality running shoes. We were out shopping and she was looking at a very expensive pair of running shoes.  I scoffed and said, "Well, that's a huge waste of money, why don't you just go to the discount store and buy a $12 pair of sneakers?"

Friend's eyes went huge and she said, "That would kill my feet!  Those shoes offer no support."

"Really?" I asked.  "So, it's worth it to you, to spend your money on a well-made item, when that quality supports something that's important to you."  And I glanced down at my cleavage.

Friend's face flushed and said, "I got it, I got it."

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 10, 2013, 06:07:58 PM
^Reminds me of a TV show (Will and Grace?  I'm not sure.) where Grace(?) followed a woman and her trainer.  Turned out the trainer was training the paying woman to have smaller b00bs and a bigger butt. >:D

OK, that would be reason number 6!!  I do not need a bigger behind.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 10, 2013, 06:39:46 PM
Weeblewobble, that's creepy.

Dazi, that's sick.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Dazi on April 10, 2013, 06:47:03 PM
Weeblewobble, that's creepy.

Dazi, that's sick.

No kidding...just glad I don't have to deal with him often.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: HoneyBee42 on April 10, 2013, 11:10:16 PM
Finally reached the end of the thread ... and a few additions from me, now.

Relatives (husband and wife) who would do the two people/one teabag thing and then *reuse* said teabag the next day.  Not because that's the way they liked their tea, they were just cheap.

Some of the stories on my ex:

1)  Bringing home trash (literally picked up off the curb) for our use.  A chair, shelves, a propane-powered grill that was missing some of the wheels, a dresser with peeling veneer, toys for the children, bicycles (that were missing stuff or the chains were rusted to the point of irretrievable). 

2)  Not allowing the heat to be turned on before November 1 (in upstate NY where it usually involved snow on the ground in October) -- I would frequently "cheat" and turn it on and quickly turn it off if he came home unexpectedly just because I found it inhumane to live in a house where I could see my breath indoors.  He also didn't think it should be turned above 60 (Fahrenheit).

3) Buying the children shoes--he would never buy the right size, but something that was too big by about three sizes.  He'd holler about me being wasteful when I bought them shoes that were the right size because "they're just going to outgrow them before next year".  So what--properly fitting shoes are important, especially for children. 

4) He tried to refuse to allow oldest son to have braces because "my father [that is, my FIL, who was by then deceased] never paid for braces for any of his children and [one particular sister] got them when she was 30, he can wait".  We had enough money for the downpayment and the monthly (interest free loan) payment was only $133, which was pretty affordable.  I was sneaky and came up with a way to get the down payment made and got him the braces (I hid the tax refund check, did the "for deposit only" thing into our joint account and then paid the orthodontist).  After that, I had to make all the monthly payments from my check (that joint account was really "in name only"--he had his own separate account in his name) even though he was making 3x as much and I still had to come up with the groceries for 6 plus the "free dog" he insisted on getting.

5) When he delivered newspapers, there was one time when a cleaning product was given out as samples with the paper.  (Some Comet spray thing).  He later went through and cleared out a whole bunch of samples from the newspaper boxes (ok, the people hadn't taken them and had taken the paper, but seriously?) 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MerryCat on April 10, 2013, 11:50:22 PM
My mother had really strong cheapskate tendencies :

- Softening butter to add milk to it, so that when it was solid again, there would be more butter.



Does that actually work? What milk to butter ratio do you use? I'm really curious to try it.

I'm turning in myself and DH as cheapskates here. In our defense we were starving college students at the time and money was very tight even though we were living at home. For our dates we would sometimes go to Ikea for their cheap lunch deals and if that didn't fill us up, which it almost never did, we'd fill up on the free crackers and jam. Sometimes we'd even take extras for snacks later.

When we got our first apartment together after graduating we bought all our furniture, and even our curtains, towels and some of our dishes, at Ikea, so hopefully that made up for our earlier cheapness.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: AylaM on April 11, 2013, 12:57:41 AM
My grandmother's neighbor was cheap.  The husband had the wife on an unrealistic budget for the household - to the point where I was told they went to get it resolved legally.  I was told that he was forced to increase her allowance, but I am not sure that is true.  I don't know if there is any legal way for that to be done.

Before it was resolved, I can recall that on trash day she'd go through the cans on the curb open the bags and pick through them.

And it wasn't that they were really hurting for money.  He paid their 30 year mortgage off in under 10 years and bought all their cars and big expenses in cash.  Which is admirable...but his wife was picking through the neighbor's trash.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 11, 2013, 07:16:10 AM
My grandmother's neighbor was cheap.  The husband had the wife on an unrealistic budget for the household - to the point where I was told they went to get it resolved legally.  I was told that he was forced to increase her allowance, but I am not sure that is true.  I don't know if there is any legal way for that to be done.

Before it was resolved, I can recall that on trash day she'd go through the cans on the curb open the bags and pick through them.

And it wasn't that they were really hurting for money.  He paid their 30 year mortgage off in under 10 years and bought all their cars and big expenses in cash.  Which is admirable...but his wife was picking through the neighbor's trash.

I don't care what the motive is for being a skinflint; picking through trash should not be the result.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Coralreef on April 11, 2013, 07:41:30 AM
My mother had really strong cheapskate tendencies :

- Softening butter to add milk to it, so that when it was solid again, there would be more butter.



Does that actually work? What milk to butter ratio do you use? I'm really curious to try it.


She used 1 cup of milk to one pound of butter.  On a personal note, I found it disgusting on toast and useless in frying steak.  The only thing it was really good for was baking.  And it was a waste of time as it seemed to take forever to mix.  Although I was a child at the time; I haven't done that as an adult, so maybe there was something to it.  She later switched to margarine as it was cheaper than butter. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hillia on April 11, 2013, 07:49:25 AM
I lived in Monterey, CA for a while in the mid 80s and worked in a county office.  One of the men who worked there owned a home on 17 Mile Drive (very, very expensive real estate, at least back then there were several celebrities including Clint Eastwood who lived there).  Thinking back now, I can't remember the sacrifices this man and his wife made to be ablel to live there; I do remember him cutting coupons out of the office copy of the newspaper, and buying lunch at the grill at KMart on double hot dog days.  They basically poured every cent of their income into their house, which is certainly their choice, but it always seemed to me to be detrimental to their overall quality of life - sure, the house was great, but the furniture (I heard) was pretty sparse, they had one 15 year old car on its last legs, and of course there was no room at all for fun items in the budget.  Kind of a grim life, to me, but each to his own.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 11, 2013, 08:08:47 AM
I always kind of wondered what the point and purpose was to that.  So okay you have a huge great home to brag about but what are you going to do if people want to come see it? Sit them on shabby furniture? Feed them the cheap food you get for themselves?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 11, 2013, 08:28:35 AM
The resale value of the property?

Some people don't get that this is not a good way to live.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 11, 2013, 10:37:23 AM
I guess so.  I mean if someone has a huge house and have the finances to properly fund not only the house but the utilities, decent furniture, and to feed themselves, fine, why not? 

But as I said, I don't get buying a huge expensive house in a premium location just to sit on a hard wooden floor and stare at each other because they couldn't afford anything but bunny ears on their tv.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: heartmug on April 11, 2013, 10:59:39 AM
I lived in Monterey, CA for a while in the mid 80s and worked in a county office.  One of the men who worked there owned a home on 17 Mile Drive (very, very expensive real estate, at least back then there were several celebrities including Clint Eastwood who lived there).  Thinking back now, I can't remember the sacrifices this man and his wife made to be ablel to live there; I do remember him cutting coupons out of the office copy of the newspaper, and buying lunch at the grill at KMart on double hot dog days.  They basically poured every cent of their income into their house, which is certainly their choice, but it always seemed to me to be detrimental to their overall quality of life - sure, the house was great, but the furniture (I heard) was pretty sparse, they had one 15 year old car on its last legs, and of course there was no room at all for fun items in the budget.  Kind of a grim life, to me, but each to his own.

The view!  He must have bought it for the view and probably the re-sale value.  I know that area.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 11, 2013, 12:14:20 PM
That kind of reminds me of when my husband and I sold our starter home and bought a much bigger house in a nicer neighborhood for ourselves and our two daughters, who were toddlers at the time.  I often say that if I could go back in time, I wouldn't have done it.   The new house had a lot more room for all of us, true, and we loved it (still do) - but it ate up every last cent we had for a long time and put us into severe debt.  It's now paid off (thanks in large part to some help from my parents), but I would never do that again.

To add insult to injury, when we sold our starter home, we got less than we'd originally paid for it.  When the buyer sold it himself a few years later, he got double what we'd got.  Sigh!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 11, 2013, 12:24:05 PM
That kind of reminds me of when my husband and I sold our starter home and bought a much bigger house in a nicer neighborhood for ourselves and our two daughters, who were toddlers at the time.  I often say that if I could go back in time, I wouldn't have done it.   The new house had a lot more room for all of us, true, and we loved it (still do) - but it ate up every last cent we had for a long time and put us into severe debt.  It's now paid off (thanks in large part to some help from my parents), but I would never do that again.

To add insult to injury, when we sold our starter home, we got less than we'd originally paid for it.  When the buyer sold it himself a few years later, he got double what we'd got.  Sigh!

That's one thing I'm afraid of about moving from where we are.  True, it is a bit small for the 5 of us and will be even more when the two older ones are teens but then once they go off to college or whatever, it'll be less crowded and it'll just be DH, myself and our youngest.   

That and many of the homes around here that we like are not gas heat like this one is, but rather require oil which can be pricey, and the bigger the house the more oil to heat. Though on the other hand, the big Victorians around here tend to go for around $200-$300 thousand.   Which isn't too bad when I think that where I used to live they'd be closer to about 600,000
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Zenith on April 11, 2013, 11:38:54 PM
I used to buy a $15-20 purse at one of the discount stores 3-4 times a year. I then realized these purses weren't made well and I was tired of repairing or discarding them. I now buy one or two well made purses a year for $30-40 and they last. I just change them out if I get bored. Same with shoes, if they aren't made well then they aren't worth a dollar, if you have to keep replacing them.

My current purse is a beautiful, heavy and soft leather item that cost me $120.  My most expensive bag ever...  It's now 3 years old, and that's young for me and my leather bags.  Most of them get used for 10+ years.  I had a nice pair of good leather flats that were $105 new.  I wore them for 12 years.  I resoled them 5 times, and re heeled them another 3 or so on top of that.  I probably spent another $100 over the years, spiffing them up.  But, $200 over 10 years, with no problems caused by ill fitting shoes, breaks down to $20 a year - and I have NEVER had a $20 pair of shoes that fit me or would last more than a few months.  There are quite a few things that are expensive up front, but will pay for themselves many times over in length of use time.

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.

Careful with the new styles of Doc boots. My friend bought some black and white ones and the white flaked off almost instantly. Apparently the white had been painted on and not dyed and could not handle the natural creasing from walking. I bought a high heeled b & w womens version of the same thing and thankfully i got to treat them before any paint flecked off but they will need to be redone within a year or so. I also have a pair of bloodred traditional Doc which have no colour problems 5 years down the track. There is a problem with their white stuff though and it's not only Doc shoes with this problem. Still very hardy and comfortable boots but I have also noticed their soles are made of much softer rubber now then the ones from 10-15 years ago. I have more wear on my occasional wearing on my 2 year old red boots than my 20+ 4th hand black boots which have hardly any wear on the soles at all.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jedikaiti on April 11, 2013, 11:52:29 PM
That's too bad. Seems they may have succumbed to the lower quality = higher profits line of thinking.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: nuit93 on April 12, 2013, 12:05:12 AM
I used to buy a $15-20 purse at one of the discount stores 3-4 times a year. I then realized these purses weren't made well and I was tired of repairing or discarding them. I now buy one or two well made purses a year for $30-40 and they last. I just change them out if I get bored. Same with shoes, if they aren't made well then they aren't worth a dollar, if you have to keep replacing them.

My current purse is a beautiful, heavy and soft leather item that cost me $120.  My most expensive bag ever...  It's now 3 years old, and that's young for me and my leather bags.  Most of them get used for 10+ years.  I had a nice pair of good leather flats that were $105 new.  I wore them for 12 years.  I resoled them 5 times, and re heeled them another 3 or so on top of that.  I probably spent another $100 over the years, spiffing them up.  But, $200 over 10 years, with no problems caused by ill fitting shoes, breaks down to $20 a year - and I have NEVER had a $20 pair of shoes that fit me or would last more than a few months.  There are quite a few things that are expensive up front, but will pay for themselves many times over in length of use time.

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.

Careful with the new styles of Doc boots. My friend bought some black and white ones and the white flaked off almost instantly. Apparently the white had been painted on and not dyed and could not handle the natural creasing from walking. I bought a high heeled b & w womens version of the same thing and thankfully i got to treat them before any paint flecked off but they will need to be redone within a year or so. I also have a pair of bloodred traditional Doc which have no colour problems 5 years down the track. There is a problem with their white stuff though and it's not only Doc shoes with this problem. Still very hardy and comfortable boots but I have also noticed their soles are made of much softer rubber now then the ones from 10-15 years ago. I have more wear on my occasional wearing on my 2 year old red boots than my 20+ 4th hand black boots which have hardly any wear on the soles at all.

Are you ordering yours directly from the UK or from a US store?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: laud_shy_girl on April 12, 2013, 06:49:18 AM
I lived in Docs but they stopped making them the way they used to. The quality is just not there anymore.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Calistoga on April 12, 2013, 10:54:37 AM
Well. I'm guilty of a bit of my own cheapskateness I fear.

I have to wear khaki's to work. Without fail after about 6 months, I develop a tear in the crotch area of my pants. But instead of buying new ones, I take this one pair of old ones that I have, cut a patch, and hot glue it to the pants over the tear. Then I sew it later. I have two pairs of khakis that have 3 patches or more...the only reason I'll get a new pair is if I actually out grow the old ones.

BUT I think that some of DH's family is worse.

MIL in particular is obsessed with plastic take away cups. Not the thick, reasonably you could use this a few times kind, but the cheap clear plastic ones and even the paper ones. Woe on the person who tries to throw away a solo cup.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Carotte on April 12, 2013, 11:46:28 AM
I have to wear khaki's to work. Without fail after about 6 months, I develop a tear in the crotch area of my pants. But instead of buying new ones, I take this one pair of old ones that I have, cut a patch, and hot glue it to the pants over the tear. Then I sew it later. I have two pairs of khakis that have 3 patches or more...the only reason I'll get a new pair is if I actually out grow the old ones.


You should try putting up a patch before you get a hole, maybe some fusible fabric? That way it will last longer.
I wouldn't say it's being a cheapstake, just like mending socks, sometimes clothes have a lot more life in them if you just patch a small hole or two.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: alkira6 on April 12, 2013, 11:50:32 AM
I have to wear khaki's to work. Without fail after about 6 months, I develop a tear in the crotch area of my pants. But instead of buying new ones, I take this one pair of old ones that I have, cut a patch, and hot glue it to the pants over the tear. Then I sew it later. I have two pairs of khakis that have 3 patches or more...the only reason I'll get a new pair is if I actually out grow the old ones.


You should try putting up a patch before you get a hole, maybe some fusible fabric? That way it will last longer.
I wouldn't say it's being a cheapstake, just like mending socks, sometimes clothes have a lot more life in them if you just patch a small hole or two.


This is what I've learned to do with jeans. I have "thunder thighs" that rub against the seams on the inside leg and they wear harder than the rest of the jeans. I have some old jeans that I have cut into strips that I use fusable webbing to patch in and then sew in so that the inside legs are re-enforced for hard wear. For some reason I do not have this same issue with any other pants, just jeans.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Calistoga on April 12, 2013, 11:52:28 AM
Humm... I'll have to try that.

I'm also debating just getting some khaki colored jeans, since it makes no sense to me to wear these thin flimsy pants to work in a kitchen.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: alkira6 on April 12, 2013, 12:09:31 PM
This is what I've learned to do with jeans. I have "thunder thighs" that rub against the seams on the inside leg and they wear harder than the rest of the jeans. I have some old jeans that I have cut into strips that I use fusable webbing to patch in and then sew in so that the inside legs are re-enforced for hard wear. For some reason I do not have this same issue with any other pants, just jeans.

As a lifelong fat person, I have become quite the expert at patching the inner thighs of pants.  Nearly every pair of my pants has patches there, but since I made the pants, the patches are out of the exact same material.   As for jeans.....I've patched jeans for friends, but I don't wear them.

The pants that I make for myself already have a V shaped insert that is made of two pieces of fabric fused together and sewn into each leg.  I find that I have much less frustration doing it from the front end. That or making sundresses. Over the past few years the medium weight dress up/dress down sundress has become my friend.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Zenith on April 12, 2013, 10:48:41 PM
I used to buy a $15-20 purse at one of the discount stores 3-4 times a year. I then realized these purses weren't made well and I was tired of repairing or discarding them. I now buy one or two well made purses a year for $30-40 and they last. I just change them out if I get bored. Same with shoes, if they aren't made well then they aren't worth a dollar, if you have to keep replacing them.

My current purse is a beautiful, heavy and soft leather item that cost me $120.  My most expensive bag ever...  It's now 3 years old, and that's young for me and my leather bags.  Most of them get used for 10+ years.  I had a nice pair of good leather flats that were $105 new.  I wore them for 12 years.  I resoled them 5 times, and re heeled them another 3 or so on top of that.  I probably spent another $100 over the years, spiffing them up.  But, $200 over 10 years, with no problems caused by ill fitting shoes, breaks down to $20 a year - and I have NEVER had a $20 pair of shoes that fit me or would last more than a few months.  There are quite a few things that are expensive up front, but will pay for themselves many times over in length of use time.

Doc Marten's boots. I used to LIVE in those things, and never managed to wear a pair out. At worst, a pair might be downgraded to use for painting & such where I don't want to wear shoes that I care about getting paint-splattered.

Careful with the new styles of Doc boots. My friend bought some black and white ones and the white flaked off almost instantly. Apparently the white had been painted on and not dyed and could not handle the natural creasing from walking. I bought a high heeled b & w womens version of the same thing and thankfully i got to treat them before any paint flecked off but they will need to be redone within a year or so. I also have a pair of bloodred traditional Doc which have no colour problems 5 years down the track. There is a problem with their white stuff though and it's not only Doc shoes with this problem. Still very hardy and comfortable boots but I have also noticed their soles are made of much softer rubber now then the ones from 10-15 years ago. I have more wear on my occasional wearing on my 2 year old red boots than my 20+ 4th hand black boots which have hardly any wear on the soles at all.

Are you ordering yours directly from the UK or from a US store?

Sorry about the quote tree. I ordered from the US store but his pair of b&w shoes came from the UK and mine from the US. They were shipped from whoever had them in stock really. Mind you the pricing was fantastic. If I'd bought my shoes here in Australia they would have cost me over $300 and ordering from overseas cost me $130 inc shipping (on sale). I've been told painted white is a tricky thing to adhere properly to leather in any shoe brand. Any teeny imperfection can ruin the whole thing. Friend isn't too bothered by his 'mouldy' looking shoes and he couldn't be bothered sending them back for an obvious manufacturing defect. Shrug, his loss. If my white comes off like his has I'll just recover in fabric.

Just be aware of painted shoes vs dyed shoes (which is which isn't often mentioned). Dyed will hold up to creasing much better, painted often doesn't. Never knew that until I talked to a cobbler.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Library Dragon on April 12, 2013, 11:04:17 PM
Humm... I'll have to try that.

I'm also debating just getting some khaki colored jeans, since it makes no sense to me to wear these thin flimsy pants to work in a kitchen.

You may want to try Dickies (http://www.dickies.com/mens-clothing/mens-pants.jsp (http://www.dickies.com/mens-clothing/mens-pants.jsp)), they are made for more demanding wear.  Carhartt's are good, but expensive.  DH hates to buy clothes and I buy him Dickies because they last forever.  Their scrubs hold up well too. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: crella on April 13, 2013, 01:25:15 AM
I don't know if this qualifies as cheapskate but I thought it was tacky.

My dad went into the hospital for cancer treatment and expected to be there for awhile. He put his (non-live-in) GF on his checking account so she could take care of his bills while he was in hospital.

He passed away after a very short time. My uncle, who was the executor of the estate, asked her for the money so he could at least get the funeral expenses paid. Nope, she was keeping it. He had to front the funeral money himself until the estate was settled.

Not just tacky, but illegal.  Hope the executor goes after her.

Condolences re: your father.


It may not be illegal. We just found this out the hard way when my mother passed away in August. My mother was arguing with my sister about 8 months before she died, trying to get my sister's name off her bank accounts, with my sister refusing to sign the papers. My mother never did any of the banking, so when my sister told her that her name had to be on the accounts she believed her and evidently made all her accounts into joint accounts with my sister as soon as my father died.

When I asked my sister about it, she told me she was on only one checking account, the one my mother used at the local supermarket. After the will was read, and my brother and I went to the bank (he was executor and I was helping out) we found out that she was on everything, even my father's IRA, and there was nothing we could do about it. Joint accounts at the time of a death go directly to the other cosigner on the account, they are not considered a part of the estate. There was only some cash we found in the house to work with to clean out a packed 12-room house. My husband funded all the construction to get the house in shape to be sold. My brother had to give away all the furniture he inherited, because the funds (promised to him verbally by my mother, to be withdrawn from the IRA upon her death) to do it with had all gone to my sister.

The GF quite possibly knew this, and so  is keeping the money.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 13, 2013, 10:41:00 AM
We went through something similar when my GM died. She had remarried after buying the property she lived on and building the house, and the property and house was only in her name. The rule was that her widower could live there until he died, then the estate would sell the property to be divided amongst my mother and aunt.

However, GM's husband began moving in women to help him with cooking and cleaning, and eventually married one of them, W, before he died. W moved her son and his GF into the house, which they promptly trashed. They also sold many of my GM's possessions. It took us three months to get them out (legal process of eviction), and six months to clean the property before we could sell it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Jocelyn on April 13, 2013, 06:07:19 PM
"I just thought you should know you're wife is out here spending your paycheck on shoes," he told DH.

This friend, of course, is a notorious cheapskate, who flips out anytime his wife makes a purchase he doesn't approve of.

Does his wife work or is it a case of "No wife of mine will ever work" so the can control the purse strings?  I bet he longs for the days when all women have no say.
My parents were good friends with a man who had a similar attitude about his wife. One time Mom and the lady were shopping for a particular occasion. Now, Dad has always sort of liked going shopping with Mom, and the other man was there to keep an eye on his wife. The wife tried on two dresses, and she and my parents agreed that one was much more flattering than the other. The husband checked the tags, and then announced that his wife should buy the cheaper, less flattering one. My parents were appalled.

The husband died about 15 years ago and his widow is spending all his savings going out to eat, shopping as much as she pleases, and traveling....with her gentleman friend.  We could probably generate electricity from the spinning her husband is doing in his grave.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 13, 2013, 06:33:50 PM
Good for her!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: VorFemme on April 13, 2013, 07:22:14 PM
"I just thought you should know you're wife is out here spending your paycheck on shoes," he told DH.

This friend, of course, is a notorious cheapskate, who flips out anytime his wife makes a purchase he doesn't approve of.

Does his wife work or is it a case of "No wife of mine will ever work" so the can control the purse strings?  I bet he longs for the days when all women have no say.
My parents were good friends with a man who had a similar attitude about his wife. One time Mom and the lady were shopping for a particular occasion. Now, Dad has always sort of liked going shopping with Mom, and the other man was there to keep an eye on his wife. The wife tried on two dresses, and she and my parents agreed that one was much more flattering than the other. The husband checked the tags, and then announced that his wife should buy the cheaper, less flattering one. My parents were appalled.

The husband died about 15 years ago and his widow is spending all his savings going out to eat, shopping as much as she pleases, and traveling....with her gentleman friend.  We could probably generate electricity from the spinning her husband is doing in his grave.

Too bad she still has to pay for the electrical hookup - because I'm sure that she would relish the idea!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: cabbageweevil on April 14, 2013, 04:57:25 AM
I have a friend who is highly -- what Americans call "cheap", and Brits, "mean" (and he's always had very well-paying jobs).  He's a byword among his friends and family, for his extreme cheapskate-ishness. (He does also have some excellent qualities.)

Many instances of petty penny-pinching on his part over the years, come to mind. One IMO egregious one which sticks with me, is: I was staying at his home one time, and was making coffee for him, me, and I think another visitor. I put in the kettle, well over the necessary amount of water for three cups of coffee, and boiled it. Friend, finding the surplus hot water, insisted in putting it into a thermos flask to keep it hot until a future occasion when hot water would be wanted.

I can "see with my head", the point of trying to measure out the approximate amount of water that you'll need to boil -- though I'm just not capable of functioning that way; but the thermos-flask stunt, frankly struck me as -- to put it mildly, over-the-top.

I used to work for 2 brothers who were millionaires many times over.  They were obsessed with stamps. Everyday they would check the incoming mail to see if any stamps had accidentally not been cancelled and then they would spend hours carefully steaming and soaking off the stamps for reuse.  They got very upset at me one day when I let a stamp get past me.

My cheapskate friend is just the same with the business of soaking off and reusing accidentally-unfranked stamps -- he does it "religiously". The one time I tried to do the same thing: I somehow did not manage to glue the stamp successfully, to the envelope -- it clearly got detached in transit: I was told by the recipient of that letter, that I had forgotten to stamp it, and he had had to pay postage due. (I duly explained to him, and offered to reimburse him.) I took that incident as a message from on high, to the effect that I haven't got what it takes to be an effective cheapskate.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 14, 2013, 05:19:58 AM
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasn’t clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But I’ll bet she wishes she hadn’t bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Venus193 on April 14, 2013, 06:34:24 AM
I love that.

The stamp thing makes me remember a boss of a client of my first ad agency who nickel and dimed my company within an inch of his life.  That was back in the days before computers on every desk, the current quality of fax, e-mail, and the internet (sometime during the Roman Empire). 

One day my boss was giving a presentation at their office.  The documents were in duo-tang folders that had paper fasteners inside, a clear front cover, and a white rear cover.  The CEO of the client company took the papers out of it and put the folder in front of my boss asking "Am I paying for that?"

I had never met this man (who never came to our office) so I had no way of knowing whether this was pure rudeness, stinginess, or a power play.  I wasn't at the meeting so I couldn't make any assumptions.  However, the following two incidents told me he was cheap to the point of depravity:

1.  He got really weird about postage.  My firm's senior partner received a memo from him one day that contained cancelled postage ripped off of that week's mail (He opened all the mail in the company no matter whom it was addressed to).  The mail that week was all from different departments in our office and addressed to different people in different departments within the client's company, which was much larger than ours.  The memo -- written on a carbon form -- said "If you can waste this much money on postage maybe we should renegotiate the commission."  The entire office rolled their eyes at that.  My immediate boss -- who lived ten minutes away from the client -- then announced that he would collect every piece of correspondence every day and drop it off in person on his way home twice a week after that.

2.  Here is the kicker:  My then-boyfriend was an office supplies buyer for a banking chain.  His invitation to a vendor show included a free guest, so I went with him and picked up a huge shopping bag of new products that included vinyl-coated paper clips in assorted colors.  I brought this to the office and used them.  My boss told me one morning after dropping off an estimate to our client "Where did you get that red paper clip?  Harvey loved it."  I explained the source and he said.  "The other day his boss held a senior management meeting at which he announced that the company was no longer going to waste money on paper clips.  The meeting went on for an hour and a half in which he explained what documents were to be stapled instead of held together with paper clips.  Harvey wants to be able to identify his paper clips so he can get them back, so can we get him a box that are all one color, like blue?" 

I told him I'd ask our office manager, but also speculated on how this man could justify wasting 90 minutes of his highest-paid employees' time over an annual office expenditure that didn't equal the hourly wage of any of them.  My boss knew this didn't make any sense, but we didn't want to lose the account.

Our next CEO resigned the account three years later over a difference of opinion regarding how the client was handling a product's second year in the market.  That client is no longer in business.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 14, 2013, 01:07:32 PM
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasn’t clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But I’ll bet she wishes she hadn’t bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

I remember that one! She and the victim had matching luxury sedans and she was switching them out in the parking lot too.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: cabbageweevil on April 14, 2013, 02:23:37 PM
I love that.

The stamp thing makes me remember a boss of a client of my first ad agency who nickel and dimed my company within an inch of his life.  That was back in the days before computers on every desk, the current quality of fax, e-mail, and the internet (sometime during the Roman Empire). ..

1.  He got really weird about postage.  My firm's senior partner received a memo from him one day that contained cancelled postage ripped off of that week's mail (He opened all the mail in the company no matter whom it was addressed to).  The mail that week was all from different departments in our office and addressed to different people in different departments within the client's company, which was much larger than ours.  The memo -- written on a carbon form -- said "If you can waste this much money on postage maybe we should renegotiate the commission."  The entire office rolled their eyes at that.  My immediate boss -- who lived ten minutes away from the client -- then announced that he would collect every piece of correspondence every day and drop it off in person on his way home twice a week after that.

People can indeed be amazingly stingy over postal matters. It occurs to me that if cheapskatery were a more widespread human trait, perhaps the use of postage stamps would never have caught on. After all, we managed without them for very many centuries before their introduction in the 1840s...
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 14, 2013, 03:55:42 PM
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasn’t clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But I’ll bet she wishes she hadn’t bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

I remember that one! She and the victim had matching luxury sedans and she was switching them out in the parking lot too.

YES!  Must have been a rerun. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Twik on April 15, 2013, 09:55:49 AM
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasn’t clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But I’ll bet she wishes she hadn’t bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

Honestly, if you put that in a work of fiction, people would assume it could only be satire, not a realistic portrayal.

"Hmmm, I could disappear leaving no evidence of this purchase, or save 34 cents. Decisions, decisions...."
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 15, 2013, 10:57:22 AM
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasn’t clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But I’ll bet she wishes she hadn’t bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

Honestly, if you put that in a work of fiction, people would assume it could only be satire, not a realistic portrayal.

"Hmmm, I could disappear leaving no evidence of this purchase, or save 34 cents. Decisions, decisions...."

I think this is why its said there is not such thing as the perfect crime as the perp always slips up somehow, many times, without even realizing it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 15, 2013, 11:27:29 AM
My mother and sisters used to joke about Granddaddy being cheap.  Other than him telling people to keep the door shut because "I'm not gonna heat up/air condition the great outdoors!" I don't recall hearing him or witnessing him being all that cheap but they grew up with him.

The joke was that when he died, they were going to bury him with his hands in his pockets instead of crossed over his chest so he could keep on pinching pennies.   I once found a letter Grandma sent my aunt when my father asked Granddaddy for my mother's hand, reporting what he said.

Apparently his answer was, "How bout I give you a dollar to elope?" I laughed good and long at that one. Granddaddy didn't get off that easily though, poor guy.  He spent just as much on his youngest daughter's wedding but she divorced (for good reason, imo) before a year was up.  I never heard him complain about the amount he spent though. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: dawbs on April 15, 2013, 11:38:51 AM
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasn’t clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But I’ll bet she wishes she hadn’t bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

Honestly, if you put that in a work of fiction, people would assume it could only be satire, not a realistic portrayal.

"Hmmm, I could disappear leaving no evidence of this purchase, or save 34 cents. Decisions, decisions...."

I think this is why its said there is not such thing as the perfect crime as the perp always slips up somehow, many times, without even realizing it.

Of course, if someone made the perfect frame and went un-caught, then the investigators just *think* there's no perfect crime, because they haven't caught the framer.   ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 15, 2013, 12:58:28 PM
 
Death involved:

I don't know if it was denial or cheapskate, but I personally feel it was a combination, then fanned two people in the next generation.

My father-in-law passed in 1993. He was cremated (a combination of cheapness and ecological concerns). His ashes were kept by the funeral home as no one did anything about an internment. At that point the major decision makers were the four children and widow. Two children wanted to do something, but the other three involved just got emotional and angry when it was mentioned.

My mother-in-law passed in 2004, as later did my dad. My brother and I had the funeral, cremation, and burial done in a timely manner. Daddy always said that everyone deserves a memorial, even the smallest piece of ground. I, of course, was torn with grief and getting angrier and angrier at everyone ignoring my in-laws' ashes just sitting in the funeral home.

I called my sister-in-law with Lucas's approval, then wrote letters to the other brothers and all of the grandchildren asking permission to get the job done. (Sister and Lucas were prepared to go the huge granite memorial together if needed.) All agreed, but the two brothers fought every decision we made. One suggested we buy a tree for the park dedicated to them ($50). We finally bought a plot in the memorial garden for $1200 and had them properly marked and interred. We handled the Christian burial service ourselves, everyone attended (all children grandchildren, spouses and great-grandchildren). Lucas and his sister paid for a dinner for all of us.

I do occasionally get some gratitude from the sister and grandchildren for finally getting the job done, but one brother still complains about the expense, even though all he paid was gasoline. (This is the same man mentioned in the far earlier post above.)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Calistoga on April 15, 2013, 01:11:06 PM
The restaurant I work in is right across the street from a big medical plaza and smack dab in the middle of two car dealer ships. It's the closet restaurant for all of those employees, so we get a lot of repeat business. Sometimes someone will come in in the morning and get a soda, then come back later and get a refill, and we let them, because we remember them from earlier in the day.

But this one woman...she's such a cheap skate that she comes in on monday morning, gets a tea, then keeps the same glass all week and comes in every day with it to get a refill! For a while we would just change her glass out, but now she's been cut off- she only gets a refill if she comes in on the same day, just like everyone else. Boy was she mad! But keep in mind here, a glass of tea costs 1.08.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: artk2002 on April 15, 2013, 01:18:38 PM
The restaurant I work in is right across the street from a big medical plaza and smack dab in the middle of two car dealer ships. It's the closet restaurant for all of those employees, so we get a lot of repeat business. Sometimes someone will come in in the morning and get a soda, then come back later and get a refill, and we let them, because we remember them from earlier in the day.

But this one woman...she's such a cheap skate that she comes in on monday morning, gets a tea, then keeps the same glass all week and comes in every day with it to get a refill! For a while we would just change her glass out, but now she's been cut off- she only gets a refill if she comes in on the same day, just like everyone else. Boy was she mad! But keep in mind here, a glass of tea costs 1.08.

My elder son and I took a road trip a couple of weeks ago and I noticed something in a McDonald's. Over the self-serve drinks machine there were two signs each saying the same thing, multiple times, just worded differently. The gist was that "free refill" was for someone who had bought a drink on that visit. Apparently, people were bringing in cups from previous days and refilling. And, counter to stereotypes, this was in a relatively well-to-do neighborhood; I've been in McDonald's in some pretty dicey places and have never seen that kind of sign.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Hillia on April 15, 2013, 01:26:50 PM
The restaurant I work in is right across the street from a big medical plaza and smack dab in the middle of two car dealer ships. It's the closet restaurant for all of those employees, so we get a lot of repeat business. Sometimes someone will come in in the morning and get a soda, then come back later and get a refill, and we let them, because we remember them from earlier in the day.

But this one woman...she's such a cheap skate that she comes in on monday morning, gets a tea, then keeps the same glass all week and comes in every day with it to get a refill! For a while we would just change her glass out, but now she's been cut off- she only gets a refill if she comes in on the same day, just like everyone else. Boy was she mad! But keep in mind here, a glass of tea costs 1.08.

My elder son and I took a road trip a couple of weeks ago and I noticed something in a McDonald's. Over the self-serve drinks machine there were two signs each saying the same thing, multiple times, just worded differently. The gist was that "free refill" was for someone who had bought a drink on that visit. Apparently, people were bringing in cups from previous days and refilling. And, counter to stereotypes, this was in a relatively well-to-do neighborhood; I've been in McDonald's in some pretty dicey places and have never seen that kind of sign.

I'm seeing this exact sign in almost every McDonald's I go in; this is across 4 states and various neighborhoods.  It must be getting to be such an issue that they're taking a stand franchise-wide, regardless of whether that particular store has a problem or not.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 15, 2013, 01:31:48 PM
Saving a cup from a previous McD visit and bringing it back to get a free refill?   ::)

Reminds me of that guy on the "Extreme Cheapskates" show who (I think) took a cup from the trash and got his wife a free drink.

I almost never get a drink from McD or any fast food (I usually just get a sandwich to go).  I've never seen such a sign, but next time I'll look.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Coralreef on April 15, 2013, 01:59:56 PM
Postage cheapskate : at my first job, I was a sales rep.  I went to visit one of our distributors with my boss (have to introduce the newbie).  The manager was not there, he was hand delivering the mail to his in-town customers, on his bike.  I usually took him most of the day.  My boss was  >:(  and I was  ??? .

I've removed stamps from envelopes, but only because they were either from another country or had a nice picture on them.  Mother only bought the ones with the Queen or the Canadian flag.  Getting one with a bird was a treasure-in-waiting.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 15, 2013, 02:04:45 PM
Quote
The manager was not there, he was hand delivering the mail to his in-town customers, on his bike.

He was overpaid.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 15, 2013, 08:56:27 PM
My mother and sisters used to joke about Granddaddy being cheap.  Other than him telling people to keep the door shut because "I'm not gonna heat up/air condition the great outdoors!"


My grandma's expression was "You're lettin' out all the bought air!"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: weeblewobble on April 15, 2013, 09:15:22 PM
All of the talk of discount cards reminds me a story that isn't so much cheapskate-y, but "He did WHAT?!"  My favorite local sushi place offers a discount card for repeat customers.  In the beginning, it was really awesome, 10 percent off all purchases.  Then about six months ago, a little sign showed up on the tables stating that the discount card would no longer be applied to credit card purchases.  Cash purchases only.  I thought that was a little weird.  And then the next time I came in for carryout, I noticed that the cashier took my discount card to the back of the restaurant during my transaction.  That had never happened when I used it before.  And the next few times I ordered carryout, same thing, the minute I pulled out my discount card, the cashier got this vaguely annoyed look on her face and took my card to the back. 

So finally, I asked if there was some sort of problem with my card. (An issue with the coding or magnetic strip, etc.) The cashier assured me that no, there was no problem, but she had to clear the transaction through the manager. 

While she was in the back of the restaurant, another customer told me that six months before, the management had to drastically change the way they handled discount cards because a former employee had issued  himself several different discount cards.  He would do transactions for customers without the discount cards and then had figured out how to go back into the system after the customer left the store, apply the discount to the transaction and collect the difference.  (I wasn't really clear on that part.  I guess he took cash out of the drawer?)   It may not sound like much, but with several of these transactions a day, it added up quickly.

Finally, the management noticed that the same cards were being used several times each day, which seemed like a lot of sushi, even for an enthusiast.  They caught the guy and fired him.  And to keep employees from using the cards willy nilly, all discounted transactions had to be noted by the manager.

Thanks a lot, sushi bar thief guy.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: *inviteseller on April 15, 2013, 09:30:29 PM
My parents are on the upper end of comfortable thanks to my dads pensions, and his inheritance from my grandparents, but you would think they were standing in the dole line during the depression!  Some fine examples _  Growing up, the thermostat was set at igloo.  It also was in the hallway we all walked through to get to the bathroom and bedrooms so it might get bumped if you got some kids horsing around.  He honestly would check it 3-4 times a day and if it was moved (he used a marker to mark the exact spot) he would raise the roof that we were gonna live on the streets because the gas bill was putting him in the poor house.  At a picnic for my DD's birthday at a park, after everyone was done eating they were throwing away their plates, cups and silverware.  My Step mom was standing there taking peoples plastic silver ware and putting them in a separate bag.  She then handed me the bag so I could take them home to wash and reuse.  When she wasn't looking, I threw the bag away.  Tin foil is the devil's product!  It is too expensive so they use cheap plastic wrap that is impossible to use because it sticks to everything but the bowl you are trying to wrap.  At my house, I hear how I waste money on it.  Toilet paper useage-nuff said.  I could go on for days...
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 15, 2013, 09:31:54 PM
Speaking of loyalty cards, my local grocery store (Meijer) is one of the few grocery stores I've used that doesn't have a loyalty card.  They do have some sort of program where you can clip coupons, but it's cell-phone-based so I can't use it.  But I like that I don't have to keep track of a loyalty card when I shop, they don't track my purchases, and the prices are the same.  I was somewhat amused to see a sign they had at the store last night, though, which said something like, "You don't have to prove your loyalty to us... it's our job to be loyal to you!"  I was rather charmed, I have to admit.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 15, 2013, 09:42:30 PM
Speaking of loyalty cards, my local grocery store (Meijer) is one of the few grocery stores I've used that doesn't have a loyalty card.  They do have some sort of program where you can clip coupons, but it's cell-phone-based so I can't use it.  But I like that I don't have to keep track of a loyalty card when I shop, they don't track my purchases, and the prices are the same.  I was somewhat amused to see a sign they had at the store last night, though, which said something like, "You don't have to prove your loyalty to us... it's our job to be loyal to you!"  I was rather charmed, I have to admit.

They probably still track your purchases if you use a credit or debit card, but I'm with you on the loyalty card thing.  I no longer shop at Kroger because I hate having to count out "Did I get nine of the sale items, or ten?  What if I need eleven - should I put one back?"  (They frequently have "Buy 10 get $5 off" or "10 for $10" deals, but you have to get exactly ten for the deal.  If you buy nine, no dice.  If you buy nineteen, only the first ten qualify.)  Publix is another store that doesn't require a loyalty card - and their "buy one get one free" sales are actually "everything on sale is half price," which is nice when I don't really need two  :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 15, 2013, 09:49:27 PM
Quote
(They frequently have "Buy 10 get $5 off" or "10 for $10" deals, but you have to get exactly ten for the deal.  If you buy nine, no dice.  If you buy nineteen, only the first ten qualify.) 
At Kroger here if they have 10 for $10, you can get 1 for $1 and so on.  I've gone to their website to download e-coupons a few times, and it works but takes a lot of time to go thru everything.  I also get good coupons from them in the mail (Haagen Dazs - free, :) $1.50 off Starbucks and Gevalie coffee, $2 off Gain detergent).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 15, 2013, 11:10:17 PM
Lucas is not usually a cheapskate, but he does insist on generic/house brand where I will try it once and then decide.

I needed a medication that is now over the counter, so I was ready to buy the name brand that I have used twice before. Lucas happened to be with me and convinced me to get the store brand. Well, I suffered for another 5 days, went back for the trusted brand and was comfortable in 12 hours and cured in 72 as promised. So he paid double and made me suffer for almost an extra week because we were being cheap.

On my part: when we were painting to sell, I found a suitable color of paint for the bathroom at a super discount store. Bought it. He  never struggled so hard to get that stuff spread and sticking than any other decorating job, ever! Thank goodness it was just the upper half of a small room. Now when we paint, we always use Baer or Clark and Kensington or Sherwin-Williams and the best rollers. Life is really smooth in that area, now! I converted us to good brushes about 4 projects ago, at least.

We have bought good flooring lately, professionally installed. Now I think he will go along with good drapes - that fit!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Last_Dance on April 16, 2013, 06:47:23 AM
I saw a TV show last year called “Extreme Cheapskates”.  I don’t know anyone that extreme, but I have a story:

Both that show and the stories of this thread remind me of something my great-aunt said about extreme compulsive savers: "What's the point in being the richest man in the churchyard?"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: dawbs on April 16, 2013, 07:40:07 AM
Speaking of loyalty cards, my local grocery store (Meijer) is one of the few grocery stores I've used that doesn't have a loyalty card.  They do have some sort of program where you can clip coupons, but it's cell-phone-based so I can't use it.  But I like that I don't have to keep track of a loyalty card when I shop, they don't track my purchases, and the prices are the same.  I was somewhat amused to see a sign they had at the store last night, though, which said something like, "You don't have to prove your loyalty to us... it's our job to be loyal to you!"  I was rather charmed, I have to admit.

FWIW, you can do it w/o smart phones now (but they do require a cell.  In theory, you could enter your normal phone number...but I haven't tried.
(I use my smartphone mostly, but you can do it on the computer--this past weekend was 5% off grocery with it  ;D)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 16, 2013, 08:17:15 AM
Speaking of loyalty cards, my local grocery store (Meijer) is one of the few grocery stores I've used that doesn't have a loyalty card.  They do have some sort of program where you can clip coupons, but it's cell-phone-based so I can't use it.  But I like that I don't have to keep track of a loyalty card when I shop, they don't track my purchases, and the prices are the same.  I was somewhat amused to see a sign they had at the store last night, though, which said something like, "You don't have to prove your loyalty to us... it's our job to be loyal to you!"  I was rather charmed, I have to admit.

FWIW, you can do it w/o smart phones now (but they do require a cell.  In theory, you could enter your normal phone number...but I haven't tried.
(I use my smartphone mostly, but you can do it on the computer--this past weekend was 5% off grocery with it  ;D)

Oh, really?  I guess I should look at it again.  I didn't understand how it was supposed to work, and thought there was some way that you could use a SmartPhone to tell it you wanted to use those coupons.  I have a really basic flip phone with a pay-as-you-go plan.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: GirlyGirl on April 16, 2013, 08:28:24 AM
Speaking of loyalty cards, my local grocery store (Meijer) is one of the few grocery stores I've used that doesn't have a loyalty card.  They do have some sort of program where you can clip coupons, but it's cell-phone-based so I can't use it.  But I like that I don't have to keep track of a loyalty card when I shop, they don't track my purchases, and the prices are the same. 

They probably still track your purchases if you use a credit or debit card, but I'm with you on the loyalty card thing. 

I'd say they definitely track your purchases through your credit or debit card.  I can go in and buy any random item, and not put in my Mperks info, and the Catalina still prints out coupons for our favorite brand of dog food.

And regarding the pay-as-you-go phone for Mperks, that's what I use.  I just clip the coupons on my computer.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: dawbs on April 16, 2013, 08:33:24 AM
Speaking of loyalty cards, my local grocery store (Meijer) is one of the few grocery stores I've used that doesn't have a loyalty card.  They do have some sort of program where you can clip coupons, but it's cell-phone-based so I can't use it.  But I like that I don't have to keep track of a loyalty card when I shop, they don't track my purchases, and the prices are the same.  I was somewhat amused to see a sign they had at the store last night, though, which said something like, "You don't have to prove your loyalty to us... it's our job to be loyal to you!"  I was rather charmed, I have to admit.

FWIW, you can do it w/o smart phones now (but they do require a cell.  In theory, you could enter your normal phone number...but I haven't tried.
(I use my smartphone mostly, but you can do it on the computer--this past weekend was 5% off grocery with it  ;D)

Oh, really?  I guess I should look at it again.  I didn't understand how it was supposed to work, and thought there was some way that you could use a SmartPhone to tell it you wanted to use those coupons.  I have a really basic flip phone with a pay-as-you-go plan.

You can do it that way--but you can also log into your mperks account on any given computer and 'clip' the coupons that way.  Then when you enter the number at checkout, it applies them.
easy-peasy--once you get the hang of it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 16, 2013, 08:46:41 AM
I once saw that someone was throwing out what appeared to be a perfectly good white dresser, and knowing that my daughter wanted one for her room, I grabbed it and took it home.  We inspected it carefully for woodworm or anything nasty, and it seemed fine - the only trouble was, it wasn't white.  It was a pale pink.  My very un-girly daughter professed unhappiness at the colour, and my husband ended up promising to paint it blue.   But hey, free dresser!

First, however, he had to strip off the old paint (I can't remember why he couldn't just paint over it, but there was a reason).  Then he had to prime it. Then he had to paint it.  It took several days and roughly $100 worth of supplies.    So much for "free"!

The next time one of our daughters asked for a dresser, we went to Ikea.  :D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: magicdomino on April 16, 2013, 09:07:31 AM
I saw a TV show last year called “Extreme Cheapskates”.  I don’t know anyone that extreme, but I have a story:

Both that show and the stories of this thread remind me of something my great-aunt said about extreme compulsive savers: "What's the point in being the richest man in the churchyard?"

You get to have the biggest mausoleum in the cemetary?  ;)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: lady_disdain on April 16, 2013, 09:25:14 AM
I saw a TV show last year called “Extreme Cheapskates”.  I don’t know anyone that extreme, but I have a story:

Both that show and the stories of this thread remind me of something my great-aunt said about extreme compulsive savers: "What's the point in being the richest man in the churchyard?"

You get to have the biggest mausoleum in the cemetary?  ;)

If your heirs are willing to pay for it :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Thipu1 on April 16, 2013, 09:41:39 AM
'If your heirs are willing to pay for it'. 

On the contrary, you move into the one that Grandpa had built.   >:D

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: hjaye on April 16, 2013, 10:39:24 AM
I used to work for an Armored Car company many years ago.

Some of the trucks we had were referred to as Over The Road trucks since they delivered money outside of the metropolitan area.  They would travel hundreds of miles and usually be gone for about a day.  They were three man crews, and since they were gone for twenty four hours they would have to stop for at least lunch or dinner.

One of the guys on one of the crews was notoriously cheap.  They had stopped for dinner and in the restaurant there was a salad bar, along with a soup station. 

Now since these truck were traveling long distances, and were out on the road for twenty four hours the employees who were regular over the road crew got a per diem in their paychecks to cover their meals.  If you spent less than the per diem you made a little extra, if you spent more, some of your expense was subsidized.

So that being said, this particular person decided that instead of purchasing a salad bar which was basically an all you can eat from the salad bar, including the soup station, he would just purchase a bowl of soup.  the difference in price between the salad bar and bowl of soup was about four dollars or so.

However, even though he only purchased a bowl of soup, which allowed him to get one bowl, he went back multiple times to refill his soup bowl.  Now, they did not pay when they placed their order, they got their ticket ate, then brought it up to the cashier and paid on their way out.

The person at the register saw him go up to the soup station and refill his bowl and kept track of how many times he got did this.  She charged him for the five or six bowls of soup he got which ended up being more than if he had just purchased the salad bar.  He was very upset over this.

I suppose the cashier could have gone ahead and just charged him for the salad bar, but I think she was upset that he tried to scam the restaurant.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bloo on April 16, 2013, 11:11:34 AM
The person at the register saw him go up to the soup station and refill his bowl and kept track of how many times he got did this.  She charged him for the five or six bowls of soup he got which ended up being more than if he had just purchased the salad bar.  He was very upset over this.

I supposed the cashier could have gone ahead and just charged him for the salad bar, but I think she was upset that he tried to scam the restaurant.

Good for the cashier! I hope he was so upset he wouldn't want to patronize that restaurant again. Charging him by the bowl is a good way to cut the deadwood (cheapskates).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Virg on April 16, 2013, 11:22:39 AM
Luci45 wrote:

"I needed a medication that is now over the counter, so I was ready to buy the name brand that I have used twice before. Lucas happened to be with me and convinced me to get the store brand. Well, I suffered for another 5 days, went back for the trusted brand and was comfortable in 12 hours and cured in 72 as promised. So he paid double and made me suffer for almost an extra week because we were being cheap."

I don't see this as cheap.  You tried out a generic, and when it didn't work for you you returned to the brand name.  You gambled and lost, but trying something out to see if you can save (and then going for the more costly thing when you figure out you need it) doesn't make either of you a cheapskate.

Also, it's not really fair to him to say he made you suffer, unless you had no way to get the brand name for yourself during those five days.  If that's the case, then he definitely gets his skates tied, but if not then I'd say you should have given up on the generic after a day or two (since the brand name starts working in twelve hours).

Virg
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BabyMama on April 16, 2013, 12:24:28 PM
My sister and I went to a Japanese steakhouse. We sat at a mostly empty teppanyaki table across from a full one. The people at the full one appeared to be mostly a family (parents, three children) and two couples who appeared to be strangers. After dinner, the waiter was collecting the plates. He picked up the strangers' plates and moved down to collect the families'. The father stopped him and grabbed all the strangers' plates that still had food on them and emptied the food into his to-go boxes.

Our town has an annual junk day where you can throw out just about anything you want. People troll the neighborhoods looking for "good" junk to take. We had an old couch in our basement. It was hideous (we got it from his parents) and our cat had decided to pee on it many, many times. DH bagged the gross couch cushions and hauled the couch to the curb. Less than an hour later, it was gone. Did I mention it was August, and in the 90s?

We drove around later that night trying to see if whoever took it had thrown it back out again, but we never did. So someone possibly decided it was worth it to keep a pee-stained couch because it was free. Yeesh.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 16, 2013, 12:43:52 PM
Well, you know how they say that one man's junk is another man's treasure, but I'd definitely draw the line at taking a pee-stained couch - free or not!

Quote
The father stopped him and grabbed all the strangers' plates that still had food on them and emptied the food into his to-go boxes.

EWWWW!  :o
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 16, 2013, 01:26:57 PM
My sister and I went to a Japanese steakhouse. We sat at a mostly empty teppanyaki table across from a full one. The people at the full one appeared to be mostly a family (parents, three children) and two couples who appeared to be strangers. After dinner, the waiter was collecting the plates. He picked up the strangers' plates and moved down to collect the families'. The father stopped him and grabbed all the strangers' plates that still had food on them and emptied the food into his to-go boxes.

Our town has an annual junk day where you can throw out just about anything you want. People troll the neighborhoods looking for "good" junk to take. We had an old couch in our basement. It was hideous (we got it from his parents) and our cat had decided to pee on it many, many times. DH bagged the gross couch cushions and hauled the couch to the curb. Less than an hour later, it was gone. Did I mention it was August, and in the 90s?

We drove around later that night trying to see if whoever took it had thrown it back out again, but we never did. So someone possibly decided it was worth it to keep a pee-stained couch because it was free. Yeesh.

Ewww to the first one

And the second one reminds me of a VW commercial from a while back. Two guys are driving in a VW, and spy a chair on the side of the road. They stop, and next thing you see them driving again, with the chair in the back. They look at each other and sniff. Car stops again, then pans back to them driving away, sans car, and see the chair once again on the side of the road.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Thipu1 on April 16, 2013, 01:35:10 PM
When I lived in Manhattan in the 1970s, Thursday evenings were the times when big stuff went out on the curb to be picked up by the DSNY.  I would never take anything upholstered but would consider things that could easily be washed or cleaned up.  I got a nice table that way, some decent dishes, and pair of lamps that only needed a simple rewiring to be perfectly functional.

On Thursday evenings half the people I knew would be doing a bit of urban picking.  Toward the end of the month, when people would be cleaning out apartments and preparing to move, the lode was particularly rich. 

We weren't cheap.  We were thrifty and, if you had a use for something that was being thrown away, it was almost considered a crime not to take it. 

Sometimes, we'd make deals with each other.  'If you help me get this up the stairs to the third floor, I'll treat you to a drink at the Red Blazer'.  You could meet some interesting potential dates on
Thursday evenings. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 16, 2013, 01:51:47 PM
DH & I are also urban pickers. Our living room table, our vacuums, some beautiful crystal serve ware, all picked.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Redwing on April 16, 2013, 01:58:14 PM
If you live in a big university town, you could probably furnish your whole house with cast-offs at the end of the year.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: SiotehCat on April 16, 2013, 02:01:37 PM
Last year, I had to go to New York and move my brother out of his apartment.

In the basement of his apartment building, the building super had a really cool set up. There were book cases with tons of books, an area for furniture, an area for clothes, etc... You could leave what you wanted and you could take what you wanted.

If not for my DH, I think I would be a hoarder. I wanted to take everything in that basement with me. DH didn't let me take anything.

Im not sure if I can be considered cheap, but I like to think I am thrifty. Most of my clothes was bought at the Goodwill or on serious clearance. I just can't bring myself to pay full price.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 16, 2013, 02:41:32 PM
Over the last few years, I've developed the hobby of picking up any beer can or beer bottle I see (even if they're dirty).  I get ten cents per can/bottle, and it's amazing how quickly the money adds up.  We must live in a neighborhood full of slobs, because we've managed to buy a very nice couch with our "free money".

That's cheapskate story part 1.  Part 2 is when I crowed about all the money we had in our beer fund, and how we were going to use it to buy a couch.  Someone on another forum said "Why don't you buy a used couch from Craigslist and pocket the difference?"  Same reason that another poster already mentioned - I do NOT take someone else's upholstered furniture.  You never know what grossness it's been subjected to!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 16, 2013, 02:49:39 PM
Over the last few years, I've developed the hobby of picking up any beer can or beer bottle I see (even if they're dirty).  I get ten cents per can/bottle, and it's amazing how quickly the money adds up.  We must live in a neighborhood full of slobs, because we've managed to buy a very nice couch with our "free money".


I wish we could do that in this state!  We used to do that for easy quick money when we were a young, newly married couple and living in CA, but now we're in Maryland, we can't as much. 

On the other hand, DH would save up coated copper wires, strip the coating off them, and once we took that and an old washer that was in the house before we moved but wasn't working down to this place in Frederick that would pay you per pound I think for any recyclable metal.  We got a good amount off that washer!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Elfmama on April 16, 2013, 02:58:23 PM
Well, you know how they say that one man's junk is another man's treasure, but I'd definitely draw the line at taking a pee-stained couch - free or not!

Quote
The father stopped him and grabbed all the strangers' plates that still had food on them and emptied the food into his to-go boxes.

EWWWW!  :o
Toss the cushions, strip it down to the frame, and reupholster it.  Pee smell goes away with the cushions and other padding. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: dawbs on April 16, 2013, 03:01:19 PM
Over the last few years, I've developed the hobby of picking up any beer can or beer bottle I see (even if they're dirty).  I get ten cents per can/bottle, and it's amazing how quickly the money adds up.  We must live in a neighborhood full of slobs, because we've managed to buy a very nice couch with our "free money".


The pop cans from my work stash (I go through a case every month or 2, so not a lot) live in a plastic grocery bag in my car's back seat.
When I'm asked for money on the street or I see someone collecting, I don't always want to open my wallet (for a variety of reasons), but asking if they would like $1 worth of cans generally is positive all around.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: mumma to KMC on April 16, 2013, 03:03:50 PM

BUT I think that some of DH's family is worse.

MIL in particular is obsessed with plastic take away cups. Not the thick, reasonably you could use this a few times kind, but the cheap clear plastic ones and even the paper ones. Woe on the person who tries to throw away a solo cup.

I think we share the same MIL. My MIL and FIL were visiting last week and when they come to visit, they bring food. Lots of it, nothing I'd ever want to eat (esp when it's been in their van for two days travelling from a cold state to a warm state and shrimp is involved w/o ice.) Anyway....some of the leftovers they brought (because MIL cleans out her fridge to travel) were in cottage and ricotta cheese containers. Those containers were on the counter when it came time to do dishes and I asked my FIL if I should toss them out or would they be making the return trip. He said to toss. I did. Ten minutes later, she asked where they were. I left the kitchen to avoid the disapproving look.

They stopped at MickyD's for coffee on the way down and used those cups to drink coffee out of the entire time they were here. I knew not to toss them from previous visits when my MIL got upset that I served coffee in real mugs. :)

When my dd #1 was baptized, dh and I decided that we would go the paper plate and plasticware route for the baptism party, to save us time and a bit of energy, so we could enjoy our guests and so we wouldn't have to worry too much about clean up at the end of the day. Well my MIL went around collecting all of the plasticware and put it in my sink so I could wash it. (after we said to just toss) To be honest, I already felt bad about using them as it was and thought well, they are all here, I should just wash them. Then I came to my senses and tossed them.

Earlier in the thread someone talked of saving the nice plastic containers that come with take out these days. I love those, great for left overs and for dh's lunch!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 16, 2013, 03:12:59 PM
On the other hand, DH would save up coated copper wires, strip the coating off them, and once we took that and an old washer that was in the house before we moved but wasn't working down to this place in Frederick that would pay you per pound I think for any recyclable metal.  We got a good amount off that washer!

We've done that!  What drove my husband crazy a few weeks ago was when he discovered that somebody had gone up to the house we'd just bought and torn the copper pipes off the compressor.  The value of the amount of copper they stole?  Probably about $2.  The cost of fixing the damage they made ripping it out?  Several hundred.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Carotte on April 16, 2013, 03:19:43 PM
DH & I are also urban pickers. Our living room table, our vacuums, some beautiful crystal serve ware, all picked.

I started reading that you were a urban pickler, didn't bat an eye at that, but wondered quite fast how you could pickle a table, vacuums or dinnerware...

When we got rid of a set of a storage unit I taped the legs (removable) with the rest of the shelves. It was in pretty good condition, I just hated it in my room.

My father got the building manager to allow a table under the main staires that is used for magazine/book drop-off. You can drop the ones you don't like and take anything left before you. There used to be more stuff on it and now there's only a few magazines but I still think it was a go idea.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Wulfie on April 16, 2013, 03:30:23 PM
please be REALLY carefull with trading things around apartments. That is the leading cause of Bedbugs being transfered!  We eliminated the "free" tables from most apartment complexes that our company owns/runs.  Make  sure you know what to look for with Bedbugs and whenever possible either toss it in the dryer on HIGH for at least 15 minutes or freeze it in the freezer for at least 48 hours.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Micah on April 16, 2013, 05:03:42 PM
Regarding free things.....

When I was a child we went away for six months, leaving the house in the care of a family who we were friends with at the time. When we got back, the house was trashed and INFESTED with fleas. No kidding, when you walked into a room a black wave of fleas would come towards you. In the office we had a mat made of straw type material. It looked like a woven hay bale. We flea bombed the rest of the house, but that mat was contaminated by the chemicals and STILL infested with fleas, so Dad thew it out. As we were leaving the dump we saw someone roll it up and put it in his car...... :o
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Thipu1 on April 16, 2013, 06:31:07 PM
If you live in a big university town, you could probably furnish your whole house with cast-offs at the end of the year.

Hoo boy on that one! 

I remember a family gathering during move-in week at the University in Madison WI.  I swear that I saw the truck from the 'Beverly Hillbillies' with the rocking chair on top pull up to the curb near a dorm. 

MIL thought the scene was a gigantic yard sale. We almost had to physically restrain her from asking
 the people unloading the stuff how much they wanted for some Christmas tree decorations. 

MIL is usually pretty good about thils sort of thing but the scene was so surreal she went little tharn.   
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Minmom3 on April 16, 2013, 06:48:04 PM
I once saw that someone was throwing out what appeared to be a perfectly good white dresser, and knowing that my daughter wanted one for her room, I grabbed it and took it home.  We inspected it carefully for woodworm or anything nasty, and it seemed fine - the only trouble was, it wasn't white.  It was a pale pink.  My very un-girly daughter professed unhappiness at the colour, and my husband ended up promising to paint it blue.   But hey, free dresser!

First, however, he had to strip off the old paint (I can't remember why he couldn't just paint over it, but there was a reason).  Then he had to prime it. Then he had to paint it.  It took several days and roughly $100 worth of supplies.    So much for "free"!

The next time one of our daughters asked for a dresser, we went to Ikea.  :D

On the other hand, the quality of what you spiffed up may have been much higher than something new.  My mother has an Ikea dresser that hasn't handled her moves at all well.  It's falling apart.  I have an old dresser that cost much less than her Ikea dresser, that I found at a consignment store.  That dresser has come through far too many moves with no damage at all, and it's really well made with dove tailing and no staples anywhere in sight!  I like old furniture a whole lot!   ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 16, 2013, 07:21:34 PM
I'm not generally a big fan of IKEA's sparse style, but I have to say that the IKEA dresser we have has held up much better than our "nice" furniture.  We actually feel really bad for our bedroom furniture, because with 7 moves in 4 years, the poor dressers have gotten really banged up.  :(  Two of my girls have IKEA dressers, though, and those look almost new.  One girl has a similar style dresser that we got off craigslist, and it looks okay on the outside but the drawer bottoms are falling out and need to be fixed sometime.  I am *so* looking forward to living in one place for 4 years and not destroying all of our property by moving around.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Moralia on April 16, 2013, 07:28:54 PM
I hereby nominate my friend's DH. I posted about him and his tantrum to my mechanic, who I had recommended to him, recently.  Some other examples of his cheapness include:

Wearing his undies even though they are holey and stained;
Only getting a haircut when he has a coupon, and said haircut WIHTOUT is $10
Has a coniption if she or their son need to go to the dr., since their copay is $30. HE never goes, and HIS parents don't even have health insurance, so he doesnt get the need for it 
He also had a fit when she bought their son his first pair of shoes, saying the $30 or $40 was unnecesasry, that she could yave gotten cheaper ones at Walmart.

He is beyond cheap, irrationally and obessively so. He refused to entertain the notion of buying a new car until they could pay cash. NO ifs, ands, or buts. Which is his choice, but by doing that, chose to pour $$ into an old car that eventually died (which was the subject of his childish tirade), because he REFUSED to have anything to do with a car loan.  Nevermind they HAD the $$ to buy one, but as it would have drained most of their savings, he refused. And now is going around saying "we should have gotten rid of it a long time ago" yes due to his stubborness and cheap ways, he didn.t

He also doesn't know very much either; he is convinced that the mechanic caused their elderly car's transmission to fail, simply by replacing the starter the day before. and nothing you say to him will convince him that is not the case. nevermind the car was pushing 14, and already had a replacement tranny. Oh no. in his mind, since the mechanic was the last to touch it, it was HIS fault.

Anyone want to take bets on his never having the transmission fluid changed because of the "unnecessary" expense.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: lady_disdain on April 16, 2013, 09:13:24 PM
I'm not generally a big fan of IKEA's sparse style, but I have to say that the IKEA dresser we have has held up much better than our "nice" furniture.  We actually feel really bad for our bedroom furniture, because with 7 moves in 4 years, the poor dressers have gotten really banged up.  :(  Two of my girls have IKEA dressers, though, and those look almost new.  One girl has a similar style dresser that we got off craigslist, and it looks okay on the outside but the drawer bottoms are falling out and need to be fixed sometime.  I am *so* looking forward to living in one place for 4 years and not destroying all of our property by moving around.

I understand! My parents have some Ikea stuff that is 25 years old and still looks good (bed, dresser, sofas, etc). All the drawers open and close beautifully, the bed is tight, etc. I remember that I was kind of happy when a pipe burst and soaked my Ikea desk, as it was still going strong. I wanted a larger one but I knew my parents wouldn't just throw out a functional piece of furniture to replace it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Amasi on April 17, 2013, 01:07:40 AM
Finally finished this thread so now I can post!

My family is riddled with hoarders, and in their case I don't think it's so much about the money as much about never throwing anything out, but the behaviour seems to fit in with a few of these stories. Most of these things happened during my childhood and teen years when I was still living with my parents.

The gross:

- I wanted jam on toast one day, and discovered the jam in the jar had become absolutely blanketed with a layer of bright blue mold. My mother told me to just pull the mold off and eat the jam. I decided I wasn't hungry (and yes, the jam had to go back in the cupboard)

- We were eating pizza one night and my brother put his plate down to go to the loo. While he was gone, one of the cats jumped up and started licking his slice. We shooed it away, and my mother suggested we simply not mention it to him so he would eat the slice anyway. We told him.

- My sister volunteered for a neighbourhood trash cleanup. She mentioned they had found discarded used syringes during the event. My father requested that next time, she remove any needles from the syringes and bring them home to him. I very stridently protested that she should NOT do that.

Attempted thrift:

- My father decided to dry out tea bags so that they could be reused. He left them on a tray outside and forgot about them. They were rained on repeatedly and went mouldy. They were there for months.

- Neither of my parents could resist raiding any skip (or dumpster) they came across. As other posters mentioned this is genuinely thrifty. However, they would take literally anything good, whether it had use to them or not. I remember my humiliation as a teenage girl being forced to run back and forth carrying piles of old crockery out of one skip despite my protests that we didn't need it. As I predicted, it was dumped in out garage, and has still not been touched 10 years later.

- This one might make me sound a bit bratty. All our clothes were freebies or from op shops. That's genuinely thrifty and I still get almost all my clothes 2nd hand. The problem was that our clothes were hideously ugly, ill-fitting, either damaged and repeatedly patched or damaged and not repaired at all, and often not even clean. I generally looked like a homeless clown, and by the time I got old enough to realise I stood out, I just felt awful. I don't think I would have survived high school had it not required a uniform (which was also ill-fitting, damaged and often dirty, but at least I looked kind of the same!)

The bait n switch:

Many of my family members can't bear to throw anything away, so now that I have my own place they employ certain methods to get me to take things they don't want (so I can keep them in my house!)

- My aunt texted me asking if I liked a certain kind of food. I turned to someone who was with me and said "watch this, she's going to try to give me expired food". I texted back truthfully that I did like it. She replied that she had recently bought some and found out she didn't like I, would I have it? Ashamed to have made that assumption, I told my friend I'd been wrong, and my aunt that I would take the item. Her response? "I'll bring it over! Also, have some expired [similar item]!"

- Shortly after my grandma passed, my same aunt texted me to ask if I wanted one of her rose bushes. My grandma was well known for her roses, so I thought that would be a wonderful thing to remember her by, and very generous of my aunt. It was only after she dropped it off on my doorstep that I discovered the plant was very very dead.

- Same aunt sold me a freezer (yeah I paid without seeing it, silly me) on behalf of my great uncle. When it arrived, it was full of maggots, and also didn't work. I still haven't figured out how to get rid of it.

- When I bought my own house a couple of years ago, little did I know I was embarking on what I feel were the most stressful three months of my life. My family were overjoyed because that meant I would be upgrading from tiny one room flats to a WHOLE HOUSE, and could therefore be 'gifted' all the unwanted junk from my parents' (6 bedroom, 3 living space, 2 garage, packed to the seams) house, my aunt's house, and my grandma's house (she was selling and moving into care). Never mind my house is SMALL, I should take wholly inappropriate items of furniture like 12 person dining tables and enormous wall units. They were literally measuring spaces in the new house to PROVE that furniture i didn't need or want WOULD fit, regardless of my protests. My mother took to dumping piles of junk on my tiny flat's doorstep when I wasn't home. I was trying to pack for the move, and every time I got somewhere, more stuff showed up. I couldn't walk around without tripping over old ugly light shades or expired foodstuffs. I had no car so by myself I had no way of getting it to the dump or op shop. I would sit down in the chaos and just cry because this was not what I wanted for myself. I had visions of arriving for the first night in my wonderful new house and not being able to open the door for junk.
In my mother's defence, when I confronted her about leaving stuff when I wasn't there, she did apologise, stop doing it, and take some of it back away. I think she genuinely didn't realise how she was affecting me until I told her.

Love my family, and they are awesome in other ways, but will probably always battle with them over the issues of "stuff" and "waste".
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 17, 2013, 03:07:24 AM
Amasi, I assume it was a chest freezer?  I've seen people on my local Freecycle asking for non-working freezers to store grain in (presumably for in a barn) because it helps keep vermin out.  If you're within driving distance of a rural area, you may be able to find someone who will come pick it up!

This isn't really my cheapskate story, since it happened before I met DH, but FIL has (and apparently has always had) a strong cheapskate streak.  MIL has a strong passive-aggressive streak, which makes for some interesting dynamics sometimes.  Apparently once upon a time when DH was young, FIL went to Costo or Sam's Club or one of those big "bargain" stores and discovered you can buy split pea soup by the crate - 48 times the regular package size.  Incidentally, he's the only one in the family who likes split pea soup.  MIL proceeded to serve him split pea soup every breakfast, lunch, and dinner for two weeks.  (FIL later canceled his Costco membership.)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 17, 2013, 03:16:00 AM
(just remembered . . .)

FIL comes by his cheapskateness honestly - his mother (DH's grandmother) is the same way.  Both FIL and GMIL have had rental properties their whole lives - FIL at least tries to fix them up, but GMIL's are the "rent is $50 a month" types.  (Seriously - she rents some of her trailers for $50/month.)  At those income levels, there's often a lot of turnover in renters, and renters up and leave their possessions on a semi-regular basis.  I'm not sure exactly what the legalities are (I think they're obligated to keep the stuff for a while, then they can get rid of it), but FIL and GMIL both love to pick through left-behind items.  GMIL, in particular, gives them as Christmas gifts.  This year I got a chipped toy tea set (too small for my daughters to actually play with), an old-style cradle for Bittybartfast (missing slats on one side, missing one of the legs, and at this point Bittybartfast was already six months old and too big for a cradle), and a bell missing the clapper.  It still beats what GMIL gave MIL last year, though - a grimy makeup bag with half-used makeup in it of unknown origin  :-\
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 17, 2013, 07:32:54 AM
Amasi, I assume it was a chest freezer?  I've seen people on my local Freecycle asking for non-working freezers to store grain in (presumably for in a barn) because it helps keep vermin out.  If you're within driving distance of a rural area, you may be able to find someone who will come pick it up!

This isn't really my cheapskate story, since it happened before I met DH, but FIL has (and apparently has always had) a strong cheapskate streak.  MIL has a strong passive-aggressive streak, which makes for some interesting dynamics sometimes.  Apparently once upon a time when DH was young, FIL went to Costo or Sam's Club or one of those big "bargain" stores and discovered you can buy split pea soup by the crate - 48 times the regular package size.  Incidentally, he's the only one in the family who likes split pea soup.  MIL proceeded to serve him split pea soup every breakfast, lunch, and dinner for two weeks.  (FIL later canceled his Costco membership.)

I forget if I told this one before, but when my husband was little, there was some sort of promotion that if you sent in enough labels from baked beans, you could get an apron.  My MIL really wanted that apron, so the family ate baked beans.  And more baked beans.  And more baked beans.  And MORE baked beans.  To this day, my husband will not eat baked beans.  But MIL got her apron!  (One day as an adult, my husband asked her what had ever happened to the apron, and she said she got rid of it.  His reaction was... priceless.)  I should mention, though, that MIL is not truly a cheapskate, this was just one incident.  :)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 17, 2013, 08:21:41 AM

This isn't really my cheapskate story, since it happened before I met DH, but FIL has (and apparently has always had) a strong cheapskate streak.  MIL has a strong passive-aggressive streak, which makes for some interesting dynamics sometimes.  Apparently once upon a time when DH was young, FIL went to Costo or Sam's Club or one of those big "bargain" stores and discovered you can buy split pea soup by the crate - 48 times the regular package size.  Incidentally, he's the only one in the family who likes split pea soup.  MIL proceeded to serve him split pea soup every breakfast, lunch, and dinner for two weeks.  (FIL later canceled his Costco membership.)

OH this made me laugh. Yes, a bit PA on the part of your MIL, but FIL really did kind of ask for it by buying something only he liked in such a huge quantity.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 17, 2013, 09:03:50 AM
My FIL is a pretty good cook, and often makes sausage gravy for breakfast. One day, he bought a food service size 5# can of sausage gravy. It is just he and MIL who eat breakfast at their house. The can is still in the pantry, and I am leery of being invited over for breakfast.  :P
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bloo on April 17, 2013, 09:17:30 AM
Quote
I would sit down in the chaos and just cry because this was not what I wanted for myself. I had visions of arriving for the first night in my wonderful new house and not being able to open the door for junk.
In my mother's defence, when I confronted her about leaving stuff when I wasn't there, she did apologise, stop doing it, and take some of it back away. I think she genuinely didn't realise how she was affecting me until I told her.

Love my family, and they are awesome in other ways, but will probably always battle with them over the issues of "stuff" and "waste".

Amasi, honestly my heart just goes out to you. My mother has a mild case of what yours does and it has affected me to where I start getting twitchy when I feel like I'm accumulating stuff (oddly I feel compelled to get 'stuff' and then am always talking myself out of taking it).

I think I've told this story before on this board, but a friend of mine's mom (I'll call her Mrs. Collyer) is a serious, bonafide hoarder.

She had a home, packed to the brim with cr@p and was buying trailers and filling them up with even more cr@p at an alarming rate so that when it was determined that Mrs. Collyer needed to be moved, she had six trailers packed to the ceiling with junk. Some friends from my friend's place of worship asked her to help pack and clean to which my friend, knowing her own mother, demurred. They pressured her to help, as this is her mother, but she informed them, "I will clean, I will NOT pack anything." Okay, fine.

At one point during the clean-up/pack-up, one of the friends found a massive supply of twist-ties. Enough to fill nine (9) black garbage bags. Friend saved one sandwich bag's worth of twist-ties (why?) and bagged up the rest and threw it into a rented dumpster. Mrs. Collyer, watching such waste, fell down and had a seizure - to the surprise of everyone BUT my friend.

The sad part is that hoarding, from what I've read, is one of the most difficult compulsions to treat because it is almost impossible to convince the hoarder that what they're doing is not normal.

My FIL is a pretty good cook, and often makes sausage gravy for breakfast. One day, he bought a food service size 5# can of sausage gravy. It is just he and MIL who eat breakfast at their house. The can is still in the pantry, and I am leery of being invited over for breakfast.  :P


Wha...?

Pantry is not a word I usually interchange with refrigerator. Is it open?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Midge on April 17, 2013, 09:25:04 AM
If you live in a big university town, you could probably furnish your whole house with cast-offs at the end of the year.



I remember a family gathering during move-in week at the University in Madison WI.  I swear that I saw the truck from the 'Beverly Hillbillies' with the rocking chair on top pull up to the curb near a dorm. 

 

Yep, we call it "Hippie Christmas!"
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Cami on April 17, 2013, 10:29:53 AM
My late MIL was the cheapest person I've ever met. Mean cheap. Everything revolved around her cheapness. My dh is in no way that cheap, but occasionally the apron strings will tighten invisibly from the great beyond and he'll try something. (Try, because I don't let that ghost of my MIL win.) For example, he's a great fan of coupons. He got to the point where he would only go to restaurants for which we had coupons. He'd actually eat food he didn't like at restaurants he didn't like just to use a coupon! Or we'd spend more money in total than if we went to another, cheaper restaurant without a coupon. Made no sense except that the value lay not in the food consumed, but in the  money saved.  He couldn't get that it's not really a savings if you don't want what you're eating! He couldn't get it because that's how he was raised -- the enjoyment or value of something lay not in the experience, but in the (often false) savings you got from using coupons (or in my MIL's case, outright stealing, such as taking all of the donuts and teabags from a motel's breakfast tray.)

Last straw: one night we went to a restaurant and when we got there, he realized he'd forgotten the stinking coupon. He wanted to drive back home to get the coupon which was a 30 minute round trip, so that's a gallon of gas or $4. The coupon was for $5. Also, we had timed our arrival at this restaurant to arrive before the Friday night rush. If we went in right now, we'd be seated immeditely. If we put our names in 30 minutes from now, we'd end up waiting 90+ minutes to be seated. So was the wait worth it to save ONE dollar? He pouted for a while at which point I pulled a buck out of my purse and handed it to him.  He  took a look at my face and decided to wise up. We then had a conversation about how the value of coupons is only real if you want to actually eat at that restaurant on that occasion and if it doesn't cause more trouble than it's actually worth. Every once in a while, the apron string tightens, however, and I need to yank it loose or I'll end up eating food I don't want at a restaurant I don't like.

- When I bought my own house a couple of years ago, little did I know I was embarking on what I feel were the most stressful three months of my life. My family were overjoyed because that meant I would be upgrading from tiny one room flats to a WHOLE HOUSE, and could therefore be 'gifted' all the unwanted junk from my parents' (6 bedroom, 3 living space, 2 garage, packed to the seams) house, my aunt's house, and my grandma's house (she was selling and moving into care). Never mind my house is SMALL, I should take wholly inappropriate items of furniture like 12 person dining tables and enormous wall units. They were literally measuring spaces in the new house to PROVE that furniture i didn't need or want WOULD fit, regardless of my protests. My mother took to dumping piles of junk on my tiny flat's doorstep when I wasn't home. I was trying to pack for the move, and every time I got somewhere, more stuff showed up. I couldn't walk around without tripping over old ugly light shades or expired foodstuffs. I had no car so by myself I had no way of getting it to the dump or op shop. I would sit down in the chaos and just cry because this was not what I wanted for myself. I had visions of arriving for the first night in my wonderful new house and not being able to open the door for junk.
In my mother's defence, when I confronted her about leaving stuff when I wasn't there, she did apologise, stop doing it, and take some of it back away. I think she genuinely didn't realise how she was affecting me until I told her.

Love my family, and they are awesome in other ways, but will probably always battle with them over the issues of "stuff" and "waste".
A few years ago, before the show Hoarders, there was a show called Clean House starring Niecy Nash. One episode involved a young married couple and their house, overrun with "treasures" her family kept dumping on them. It sounded as though the family were all hoarders and now that there was new "free" space, they were going to fill it up. As an example, I remember someone had been driving along the highway and had seen a golf bag and stopped, picked it up and brought it to their house. The clubs were all bent and totally unusable. They felt like they couldn't get rid of it because it would be "mean" or "rude". Niecy pointed out that her family was being incredibly rude and presumptuous to foist junk, BROKEN junk, on them and take over their home as a dumping ground. And honestly, the house and yard looked like a dump, a real dump.  Niecy basically told them to grow spines and refuse to allow this behavior to continue.

(In our case, a few years back, my FIL mailed us (at great expense) some "treasures" when he moved from his large house to a condo. We had neither asked for nor wanted these treasures. In fact, we had refused them when he offered them to us originally. They do not remotely come close to matching our decor, plus there were dust collectors and I'm allergic to dust. They were large and bulky and we have very little storage space in our house. So I sold them at a garage sale. He was not happy about it, but got over it when his 2nd wife pointed out that he had tried to give them to us before and we had refused, so he'd knowingly foisted an unwelcome burden upon us and that I was smart to make money off of a burden.)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 17, 2013, 10:46:40 AM

My FIL is a pretty good cook, and often makes sausage gravy for breakfast. One day, he bought a food service size 5# can of sausage gravy. It is just he and MIL who eat breakfast at their house. The can is still in the pantry, and I am leery of being invited over for breakfast.  :P


Wha...?

Pantry is not a word I usually interchange with refrigerator. Is it open?

It is a very large can, still sealed, but I can't imagine the expiration date hasn't passed. He has had it for at least 3 years.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BabyMama on April 17, 2013, 10:52:38 AM

My FIL is a pretty good cook, and often makes sausage gravy for breakfast. One day, he bought a food service size 5# can of sausage gravy. It is just he and MIL who eat breakfast at their house. The can is still in the pantry, and I am leery of being invited over for breakfast.  :P


Wha...?

Pantry is not a word I usually interchange with refrigerator. Is it open?

It is a very large can, still sealed, but I can't imagine the expiration date hasn't passed. He has had it for at least 3 years.

He should have some meals with my FIL. He likes to buy things in huge cans too, and like your in-laws, their house is just FIL and MIL. He really likes to buy huge cans of nacho cheese sauce. When he does this, any meal at their house has every item topped with this nasty cheese that deity knows how long it's been in their fridge (I find the cheese sauce gross in itself.) They could have a canned sausage gravy and nacho cheese party. It's great for his onset diabetes I'm sure...  ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 17, 2013, 10:54:20 AM
FIL has high blood pressure and high cholesterol, so the sausage gravy is not an ideal food for him.

Homemade sausage gravy, delicious.

Prefabricated, gelatinous, shelf-stable goo with meat in it? Disgusting.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BabyMama on April 17, 2013, 10:55:30 AM
Yeah, I'm not real big on the whole canned meat thing in general. My friend is becoming a crazy home canner, which is awesome because that means I have homemade pie filling and veggies on my shelf, but she's started getting into canning meat now and I just cannot get behind it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 17, 2013, 10:56:01 AM
I don't eat preserved meat other than dried.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bloo on April 17, 2013, 10:58:39 AM
FIL has high blood pressure and high cholesterol, so the sausage gravy is not an ideal food for him.

Homemade sausage gravy, delicious.

Prefabricated, gelatinous, shelf-stable goo with meat in it? Disgusting.

Agreed. I feel something akin to nausea just looking at that stuff at Sam's Club. It just doesn't strike me as 'real food'.

Yeah, I'm not real big on the whole canned meat thing in general. My friend is becoming a crazy home canner, which is awesome because that means I have homemade pie filling and veggies on my shelf, but she's started getting into canning meat now and I just cannot get behind it.

I can understand that. I learned to can meat and honestly, the English cut roasts look like dog food when you're done with it. It's really only good for BBQ sandwiches or beef-n-noodles. :P

However, my DH goes to NY to catch large salmon and we smoke half of it and can the other half and it makes delicious salmon patties or salmon balls as the bones dissolve in the canning process!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 17, 2013, 11:18:30 AM
I use canned corned beef* for my beloved dill corned beef dip.  And I like corned beef hash too in a can, but otherwise I don't do canned beef.  Canned chicken and tuna, however, I'm okay with.

*(16oz mayo, 16oz sour cream, 1 can corned beef, dill, parsley, seasoned salt to taste.)

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: mumma to KMC on April 17, 2013, 11:22:05 AM
snip

Love my family, and they are awesome in other ways, but will probably always battle with them over the issues of "stuff" and "waste".
A few years ago, before the show Hoarders, there was a show called Clean House starring Niecy Nash. One episode involved a young married couple and their house, overrun with "treasures" her family kept dumping on them. It sounded as though the family were all hoarders and now that there was new "free" space, they were going to fill it up. As an example, I remember someone had been driving along the highway and had seen a golf bag and stopped, picked it up and brought it to their house. The clubs were all bent and totally unusable. They felt like they couldn't get rid of it because it would be "mean" or "rude". Niecy pointed out that her family was being incredibly rude and presumptuous to foist junk, BROKEN junk, on them and take over their home as a dumping ground. And honestly, the house and yard looked like a dump, a real dump.  Niecy basically told them to grow spines and refuse to allow this behavior to continue.

[/quote]

I needed to read this. When my inlaws were here earlier this month, I was "given" six jars of homecanned food. I have no problem with homecanned foods at all, my pantry is full of things I've canned. However, the newest of these jars is from 2011, the oldest, 2005, and that is orange cucumber relish, not something we'd eat at all. The rest of the canned goods are strange food combos or food that I question the quality of before it was canned. We will not eat them at all, I know to be polite (even though they are gone) I will stick them in my pantry and then curse them whenever I can't put something else away, so in the garbage they will go.

So it may not have been garbage they were leaving in my yard, it is garbage they are giving us none the less.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: rose red on April 17, 2013, 11:25:40 AM
The sausage gravy story and the coupon story remind me of my friend's husband.  Due to his upbringing, he's afraid of running out of food and can't pass up a deal.  Years ago, he brought a huge amount of canned good (lets say franks and beans).  It was a really good deal, like a few cents per can.  The problem is he hates franks and beans.  Nobody in their lives are too thrilled with franks and beans so it wasn't served often.  I told them to donate them, but they never got around to it (anyway, I suspect he may be too cheap to donate).  Now it's been over ten years and they still have the cans, but he won't get rid of them because that would be such a "waste."
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: gramma dishes on April 17, 2013, 11:32:00 AM
...    I will stick them in my pantry and then curse them whenever I can't put something else away, so in the garbage they will
go.   ...


I'd dump the contents and save the jars!   ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: anniehawks on April 17, 2013, 11:39:33 AM
My late grandmother used to can meat.  It was delicious.  I don't really know how she did it.  She died more than 25 years ago.  When she was alive, I had no interest in learning.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 17, 2013, 12:01:52 PM
   The sad part is that hoarding, from what I've read, is one of the most difficult compulsions to treat because it is almost impossible to convince the hoarder that what they're doing is not normal.

 

Yup. I was watching over the weekend, and told a friend there is no way I could ever help someone who hoards clean out their home. I am ruthless, and am of the mind, if its not needed, don't have space for it, its trash, or you have more than you could ever possibly use" it goes. I simply don't have the patience since as you said, they don't know that their behavior isn't normal.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Lynn2000 on April 17, 2013, 12:47:11 PM
   The sad part is that hoarding, from what I've read, is one of the most difficult compulsions to treat because it is almost impossible to convince the hoarder that what they're doing is not normal.

 

Yup. I was watching over the weekend, and told a friend there is no way I could ever help someone who hoards clean out their home. I am ruthless, and am of the mind, if its not needed, don't have space for it, its trash, or you have more than you could ever possibly use" it goes. I simply don't have the patience since as you said, they don't know that their behavior isn't normal.

Yeah, my dad comes from a family of hoarders. He and his brothers all married women who are either anti-hoarders or good at organizing, which is probably the only thing that saved them. Sometimes the symptoms of being a hoarder and being a cheapskate are the same--collecting plasticware, napkins, and condiment packages from restaurants, for example. In my mind, the hoarder never ends up using all the napkins they've collected, while the cheapskate uses them them for everything, even stuff that's kind of dicey, like baby diapers and toilet paper and gift wrap. I think the cheapskate actually has to save money, on the surface anyway, from not buying diapers and toilet paper and gift wrap in order to feel good; while the hoarder feels good because they've got this huge pile of napkins, which probably gets dirty and unusable before they can ever be used. That's my take on it, anyway.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: mumma to KMC on April 17, 2013, 12:57:17 PM
...    I will stick them in my pantry and then curse them whenever I can't put something else away, so in the garbage they will
go.   ...




I'd dump the contents and save the jars!   ;D

Some of the jars are reused commercial jars, like salsa jars. I don't think those can be/should be reused.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Coralreef on April 17, 2013, 01:20:51 PM
My late MIL was the cheapest person I've ever met. Mean cheap. Everything revolved around her cheapness. My dh is in no way that cheap, but occasionally the apron strings will tighten invisibly from the great beyond and he'll try something. (Try, because I don't let that ghost of my MIL win.) For example, he's a great fan of coupons. He got to the point where he would only go to restaurants for which we had coupons. He'd actually eat food he didn't like at restaurants he didn't like just to use a coupon! Or we'd spend more money in total than if we went to another, cheaper restaurant without a coupon. Made no sense except that the value lay not in the food consumed, but in the  money saved.  He couldn't get that it's not really a savings if you don't want what you're eating! He couldn't get it because that's how he was raised -- the enjoyment or value of something lay not in the experience, but in the (often false) savings you got from using coupons (or in my MIL's case, outright stealing, such as taking all of the donuts and teabags from a motel's breakfast tray.)

Snipping a bit.  Bolding mine. 

Mother would eat/ wear / use things that she would not like or find attractive if it was on sale / free / with a coupon.  Anything that was "expensive" was not to be enjoyed.  This included clothes that were in style and fit, food at a sit-down restaurant or even perfume that cost more than 50 cents a gallon.  My ex was also a "deal" buyer.  Need three nails?  Buy half a kilo of those.  Yes, each nail was cheaper, but you're stuck with the 500 others that will never ever be used and take up space.  You did not save money.

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Ginger G on April 17, 2013, 01:23:57 PM
Amasi, your post reminds me of something that happened to a friend of mine years ago.  Her husband's parents were genuine hoarders.  She told me that they lived in a mobile home on a good bit of property out in the country about 2 hours away from our city.  They had filled up one mobile home with so much junk that they had to buy and move into another mobile home on their property.  That one then got so filled up that all they had was a few paths to get from the sofa to the bed to the kitchen, etc.  They were unable to bathe because their shower/tub was filled with so much junk.

To give a specific example - my friend and her husband had an ancient artificial Christmas tree that the in-laws had bequeathed them.  It was so shoddy looking it made the Charlie Brown Christmas tree look full and luxurious.  After using it a few years, my friend put her foot down and insisted on a live tree so they put the old one to the curb.  The husband happened to mention to the father that they had thrown out the old tree, so the parents immediately jumped in their car and drove 2 hours to get it before the trash collectors got there.  Apparently they were extremely upset with my friend and her husband for throwing it out and did not hesitate to tell them so.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Figgie on April 17, 2013, 01:28:53 PM
Just a quick note to remind people that pressure cooking canning is the only effective way to prevent botulism in high PH foods like meat.  Here's a link with more information:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/Clostridium_botulinum/index.asp
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: magicdomino on April 17, 2013, 01:36:00 PM
...    I will stick them in my pantry and then curse them whenever I can't put something else away, so in the garbage they will
go.   ...




I'd dump the contents and save the jars!   ;D

Some of the jars are reused commercial jars, like salsa jars. I don't think those can be/should be reused.

Oh, I don't know.  I inherited a lot of ancient home-canned goods, many of them in whatever jar happened to fit a canning lid.  I buried the contents in the vegetable garden, and the jars are being reused -- after being smashed, melted and formed into new jars.   That counts as reusing, doesn't it?  ;)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Amasi on April 17, 2013, 02:29:09 PM
Amasi, I assume it was a chest freezer?  I've seen people on my local Freecycle asking for non-working freezers to store grain in (presumably for in a barn) because it helps keep vermin out.  If you're within driving distance of a rural area, you may be able to find someone who will come pick it up!

It's a very large upright freezer. I've already tried putting it on my local free stuff page. I've also tried emailing the local scrap metal place to see if they'd pick it up, but got no reply. It may be time to try again  :)

A few years ago, before the show Hoarders, there was a show called Clean House starring Niecy Nash. One episode involved a young married couple and their house, overrun with "treasures" her family kept dumping on them. It sounded as though the family were all hoarders and now that there was new "free" space, they were going to fill it up. As an example, I remember someone had been driving along the highway and had seen a golf bag and stopped, picked it up and brought it to their house. The clubs were all bent and totally unusable. They felt like they couldn't get rid of it because it would be "mean" or "rude". Niecy pointed out that her family was being incredibly rude and presumptuous to foist junk, BROKEN junk, on them and take over their home as a dumping ground. And honestly, the house and yard looked like a dump, a real dump.  Niecy basically told them to grow spines and refuse to allow this behavior to continue.

Yes I think spine is the key here. I'm working on it!

I needed to read this. When my inlaws were here earlier this month, I was "given" six jars of homecanned food. I have no problem with homecanned foods at all, my pantry is full of things I've canned. However, the newest of these jars is from 2011, the oldest, 2005, and that is orange cucumber relish, not something we'd eat at all. The rest of the canned goods are strange food combos or food that I question the quality of before it was canned. We will not eat them at all, I know to be polite (even though they are gone) I will stick them in my pantry and then curse them whenever I can't put something else away, so in the garbage they will go.

You're lucky! Mine weren't even dated! Every so often a jar of home canned pickled onions will turn up. I'm sure they must be about a decade old by now, and they have bright green spots all over them...I throw em out whenever they end up in my hands but they keep turning up.

Yeah, my dad comes from a family of hoarders. He and his brothers all married women who are either anti-hoarders or good at organizing, which is probably the only thing that saved them. Sometimes the symptoms of being a hoarder and being a cheapskate are the same--collecting plasticware, napkins, and condiment packages from restaurants, for example. In my mind, the hoarder never ends up using all the napkins they've collected, while the cheapskate uses them them for everything, even stuff that's kind of dicey, like baby diapers and toilet paper and gift wrap. I think the cheapskate actually has to save money, on the surface anyway, from not buying diapers and toilet paper and gift wrap in order to feel good; while the hoarder feels good because they've got this huge pile of napkins, which probably gets dirty and unusable before they can ever be used. That's my take on it, anyway.

I think this is quite accurate. I try to be careful to follow through when I set out to be thrifty. For example, I read a thread here about making your own stock from vege scraps, and since I always feel guilty about throwing "good" parts of veges in the compost, and I love making soup, I thought it was a brilliant idea. And then I had visions of myself collecting 800 containers of scraps and never making any stock. Luckily, I don't have the freezer space for that, and I've been regularly making up stocks. And no, I haven't told my family I've found a use for food scraps  :)

Another example of attempted thrift thwarted by lack of follow through. When my parents moved into their current house, the room they chose for me was unfinished. Most of the saga is irrelevant, but the room had two windows, one looking into the garage and one onto the back yard. They acquired a curtain from somewhere for my garage window, which didn't quite fit so wouldn't close all the way. They also decided to make the curtains for my large garden window. Fair enough. And they did make...one of the pair. Alone, it only covered 2/3 of the window, so I spent my teenage years carefully hiding whenever I wanted to change clothes. It's still like that.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 17, 2013, 02:53:30 PM
When my husband's aunt had to move into a senior's complex, her furniture was up for grabs.  My mother-in-law, knowing that we were planning to buy a couch (the "beer" couch that I mentioned in a previous post), high-handedly informed us that we could buy Aunt's couch from her.  We said "No, thank you - we'd rather buy our own."  "But why?  It's nice!"  "We just don't want a used couch."  "But it's almost new!  She only bought it a couple of years ago!"  "No, we don't want it.  But thanks anyway."

About a week later, she called us again and said "Aunt will give you the couch for free."  Um, yeah, because that was what was holding us back - the price.    ::)

She was quite put out when we still said no.  I hope Aunt was able to sell it to someone else!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: wheeitsme on April 17, 2013, 03:56:12 PM
...    I will stick them in my pantry and then curse them whenever I can't put something else away, so in the garbage they will
go.   ...




I'd dump the contents and save the jars!   ;D

Some of the jars are reused commercial jars, like salsa jars. I don't think those can be/should be reused.

Oh, I don't know.  I inherited a lot of ancient home-canned goods, many of them in whatever jar happened to fit a canning lid.  I buried the contents in the vegetable garden, and the jars are being reused -- after being smashed, melted and formed into new jars.   That counts as reusing, doesn't it?  ;)

Actually the old jars (including old commercial jars) can be re-used.  They need to be cleaned and sterilized (like in a dishwasher), but they can be re-used.  The lids should not.  Every time you can something you should use a new lid. If the new canning lids fit the old commercial jars, that could be very acceptable. 

I don't bother with the old commercial jars because it's too much trouble.  I do, however, check to see if they have any old canning jars in any thrift store I go into (but those usually get snatched up really quick).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Arrynne on April 17, 2013, 05:08:31 PM
Amasi, I assume it was a chest freezer?  I've seen people on my local Freecycle asking for non-working freezers to store grain in (presumably for in a barn) because it helps keep vermin out.  If you're within driving distance of a rural area, you may be able to find someone who will come pick it up!

It's a very large upright freezer. I've already tried putting it on my local free stuff page. I've also tried emailing the local scrap metal place to see if they'd pick it up, but got no reply. It may be time to try again  :)

Check for an appliance recycler.  Last time we bought a fridge, a third party company came out to pick up the old one and recycle it.  It cost us $30, but got rid of the boat anchor.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Wulfie on April 17, 2013, 05:10:31 PM
Or look online for a scrap metal hauler. We had one come take away our dead fridge for free. He also took a bunch of other metal stuff that had been building up in the shed.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Elfmama on April 17, 2013, 05:33:32 PM
Made no sense except that the value lay not in the food consumed, but in the  money saved.  He couldn't get that it's not really a savings if you don't want what you're eating!
Or if you don't need what is on sale.  If you don't need a widget that normally costs $1000, but you buy it because it's 70% off, you haven't saved $700 -- you've spent $300 for a totally useless widget!  Couldn't get that through to my brother in any way, shape, form, or manner.  He and his wife would spend all their money on junk and then go whining to my parents that they couldn't pay their rent/car payment/electric bill.

Never figured it out. We were raised in the same house by the same parents, but I learned to budget my money, pay the bills and put some in savings FIRST, then buy the fun stuff with what was left over.  Brother never did.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Luci on April 17, 2013, 06:01:16 PM
I honestly think that if it weren't for recycling that I would be a hoarder about some things.

When recycling came to town, I had over 50 margarine and Cool Whip containers and about 25 gallon milk jugs and uncountable glass jars - peanut butter, Miracle Whip, dressing (those all came in glass in my early marriage.) Now I am the queen of recycling and even treated myself to food storage containers that stack and fit nicely into a  small space.  I'm very choosey about plastic bags to reuse, to.

I still have fabric scraps from the first suit I sewed (1961) and some other pieces that will never be used, but I'm working on it. I even donated my yarn stash to Good Will when I realized that my hands don't work for crochet and knitting anymore, but I was very neat about it and labeled by fiber type. I keep hoping that I read on here that 'Wow! I got the coolest bunch of yarn! Several skeins that matched and a lot of scraps in neat balls for my plastic mesh projects!'
 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 17, 2013, 06:08:54 PM
I have to keep my middle child from turning into a hoarder.  He's an aspiring engineer and wants to hold onto just about every single piece of scrap metal or plastic he can find, or wire or tape.

It doesn't matter if toys are broken, he will insist "But I can use it to build something else!"  Now, to give him credit, he is very creative and at 10 years old, he's very good and understands the basics of circuits.  Today, with batteries and some spare bits of wire, he gave a Lego car a homemade motorized propeller.   

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: GreenEyedHawk on April 17, 2013, 06:24:13 PM
Pirateluvr your son reminds me of my cousins and me when we were that age...we were all creators and builders (as adults now, among us there are a machinist, an engineer and a mechanic) and when we were about the same age as your son when we built a little boat (that floated!) and took apart a Walkman and used its cassette motor to give it a propeller.  It buzzed out into the middle of our town's man-made lake, where we'd repeatedly swim out to rescue it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Bluenomi on April 17, 2013, 06:54:08 PM
Made no sense except that the value lay not in the food consumed, but in the  money saved.  He couldn't get that it's not really a savings if you don't want what you're eating!
Or if you don't need what is on sale.  If you don't need a widget that normally costs $1000, but you buy it because it's 70% off, you haven't saved $700 -- you've spent $300 for a totally useless widget!  Couldn't get that through to my brother in any way, shape, form, or manner.  He and his wife would spend all their money on junk and then go whining to my parents that they couldn't pay their rent/car payment/electric bill.

Never figured it out. We were raised in the same house by the same parents, but I learned to budget my money, pay the bills and put some in savings FIRST, then buy the fun stuff with what was left over.  Brother never did.

DH and BIL are like that. DH is great at budgeting, saving etc but BIL just spends and spends (mostly on new cars). It took me a while but I worked it out, DH is like MIL but BIL is like FIL. He is the same, MIL is always complaining about him wanting to buy new cars and waste money. So glad I got the sensible brother!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 17, 2013, 07:34:46 PM
   The sad part is that hoarding, from what I've read, is one of the most difficult compulsions to treat because it is almost impossible to convince the hoarder that what they're doing is not normal.

 

Yup. I was watching over the weekend, and told a friend there is no way I could ever help someone who hoards clean out their home. I am ruthless, and am of the mind, if its not needed, don't have space for it, its trash, or you have more than you could ever possibly use" it goes. I simply don't have the patience since as you said, they don't know that their behavior isn't normal.

Yeah, my dad comes from a family of hoarders. He and his brothers all married women who are either anti-hoarders or good at organizing, which is probably the only thing that saved them. Sometimes the symptoms of being a hoarder and being a cheapskate are the same--collecting plasticware, napkins, and condiment packages from restaurants, for example. In my mind, the hoarder never ends up using all the napkins they've collected, while the cheapskate uses them them for everything, even stuff that's kind of dicey, like baby diapers and toilet paper and gift wrap. I think the cheapskate actually has to save money, on the surface anyway, from not buying diapers and toilet paper and gift wrap in order to feel good; while the hoarder feels good because they've got this huge pile of napkins, which probably gets dirty and unusable before they can ever be used. That's my take on it, anyway.

I  agree (w/bolded).  Cheapskate must save money/get something free and will use the items.  OTOH, hoarder feels better just having things and stockpiling them, even though they often won't use them or even allow others to use them. (footnote: I hope we haven't derailed the thread with analysis of hoarding.  Don't want to get thread locked.)  :-\
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: misha412 on April 17, 2013, 09:01:39 PM
This isn't really my cheapskate story, since it happened before I met DH, but FIL has (and apparently has always had) a strong cheapskate streak.  MIL has a strong passive-aggressive streak, which makes for some interesting dynamics sometimes.  Apparently once upon a time when DH was young, FIL went to Costo or Sam's Club or one of those big "bargain" stores and discovered you can buy split pea soup by the crate - 48 times the regular package size.  Incidentally, he's the only one in the family who likes split pea soup. MIL proceeded to serve him split pea soup every breakfast, lunch, and dinner for two weeks.  (FIL later canceled his Costco membership.)

I am laughing so hard I just about snorted Coke out my nose.  ;D

He loved split pea soup...so what was the problem?  >:D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: jedikaiti on April 17, 2013, 09:08:59 PM
This isn't really my cheapskate story, since it happened before I met DH, but FIL has (and apparently has always had) a strong cheapskate streak.  MIL has a strong passive-aggressive streak, which makes for some interesting dynamics sometimes.  Apparently once upon a time when DH was young, FIL went to Costo or Sam's Club or one of those big "bargain" stores and discovered you can buy split pea soup by the crate - 48 times the regular package size.  Incidentally, he's the only one in the family who likes split pea soup. MIL proceeded to serve him split pea soup every breakfast, lunch, and dinner for two weeks.  (FIL later canceled his Costco membership.)

I am laughing so hard I just about snorted Coke out my nose.  ;D

He loved split pea soup...so what was the problem?  >:D

Did he still love split pea soup after week 3?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: artk2002 on April 17, 2013, 09:19:26 PM
I have to keep my middle child from turning into a hoarder.  He's an aspiring engineer and wants to hold onto just about every single piece of scrap metal or plastic he can find, or wire or tape.

It doesn't matter if toys are broken, he will insist "But I can use it to build something else!"  Now, to give him credit, he is very creative and at 10 years old, he's very good and understands the basics of circuits.  Today, with batteries and some spare bits of wire, he gave a Lego car a homemade motorized propeller.

Kid after my own heart!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 17, 2013, 09:37:59 PM
Here's a picture of the motor, and it works.  He even took it to school to show off.   He said his teacher has dubbed him Thomas Edison and every progress report comes home with a note from Mr. S. praising Pirateboy2 for his intelligence and aptitude for engineering.   

They have a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) program in our county and each week I think the kids have some kind of STEM activity which Pirateboy2 absolutely adores.

(http://images2.snapfish.com/232323232%7Ffp54368%3Enu%3D9%3A92%3E589%3E258%3EWSNRCG%3D364%3B766%3A36349nu0mrj)

Really, when he does stuff like this, it's hard to convince him to throw away anything, but I do have my limits.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Moralia on April 17, 2013, 09:55:55 PM
Aw!  You should get him a little small parts cabinet for his bits and bobs.  Then if he wants to save things for projects, there's a designated and limited size spot.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Akro-Mils-16-Drawer-Small-Parts-Storage-Cabinet-10116/203538802#.UW9fB4y9KSM (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Akro-Mils-16-Drawer-Small-Parts-Storage-Cabinet-10116/203538802#.UW9fB4y9KSM)

Of course, he'll probably need this, too...
http://www.makershed.com/Encyclopedia_of_Electronic_Components_Vol_1_p/mkbk17.htm (http://www.makershed.com/Encyclopedia_of_Electronic_Components_Vol_1_p/mkbk17.htm)


I don't know if this is thrifty or cheapskatey, but I pick up good stuff from the curb or dumpsters and stash it in my garage for the express purpose of donating on my next thrift shop run.  I usually get about $1000 in tax deductions for doing so.

There was one day when I took in 2 metal ironing boards, only to find a vintage wooden board at the thrift shop for $3.  So I bought it and then took in my metal ironing board later that afternoon. The thrift shop ladies had a very good laugh about that!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 17, 2013, 10:12:02 PM
Aw!  You should get him a little small parts cabinet for his bits and bobs.  Then if he wants to save things for projects, there's a designated and limited size spot.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Akro-Mils-16-Drawer-Small-Parts-Storage-Cabinet-10116/203538802#.UW9fB4y9KSM (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Akro-Mils-16-Drawer-Small-Parts-Storage-Cabinet-10116/203538802#.UW9fB4y9KSM)

Of course, he'll probably need this, too...
http://www.makershed.com/Encyclopedia_of_Electronic_Components_Vol_1_p/mkbk17.htm (http://www.makershed.com/Encyclopedia_of_Electronic_Components_Vol_1_p/mkbk17.htm)


I don't know if this is thrifty or cheapskatey, but I pick up good stuff from the curb or dumpsters and stash it in my garage for the express purpose of donating on my next thrift shop run.  I usually get about $1000 in tax deductions for doing so.

There was one day when I took in 2 metal ironing boards, only to find a vintage wooden board at the thrift shop for $3.  So I bought it and then took in my metal ironing board later that afternoon. The thrift shop ladies had a very good laugh about that!

Oooh I need to bookmark those pages, as those would make for great birthday presents for him! 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: baglady on April 17, 2013, 11:58:33 PM
Quote
If you don't need a widget that normally costs $1000, but you buy it because it's 70% off, you haven't saved $700 -- you've spent $300 for a totally useless widget!

Amy Dacyczyn of "Tightwad Gazette" fame offered this handy tip: "Want to save $100,000 this year? Don't buy a Rolls-Royce."
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Thipu1 on April 18, 2013, 10:21:40 AM
This is a small one that happened when Mr. Thipu and I moved into our current home. 

All the big stuff was taken from our two apartments.  However, he had some delicate electronics he didn't trust to the movers.  His parents came over in the evening to finish the move and his mother decided to look in his old refrigerator. 

There were a few bits of food left there including a wilted head of lettuce and a jar of raspberry jam with about a quarter inch of product left in the bottom. MIL  packed these up.  They weren't thrown away. 

When we arrived at our apartment, MIL put the lettuce and the jam in our new refrigerator because these remnants would be, 'Pennies from Heaven'. 

The next morning, they went out with the moving trash. 
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: snowflake on April 18, 2013, 11:03:03 AM
Not sure if I shared this before, but the couch reminded me of one more. 

I was once poor and starting out.  I had moved into an apartment and had no couch and was keeping an eye on the local Goodwill to see if I could pick up something worn but serviceable.

I had some friends who lived in a rental house.  This rental house had been passed down through a few rounds of roommates and in the process the garage and backyard had been filled up with stuff of roommates past.

One of these friends found out that I was perusing Goodwill for a couch and offered one to me free.  Said couch had been sitting out in the backyard, exposed to elements for over a year.  I was currently living in a climate that included lots of rain and some snow.  So the couch was understandably coming apart at the seams.  It wasn't a well-made couch to begin with and it was literally disintegrating.  So I said "No thank you."

There then followed several weeks of badgering me to take the couch.  The "benefactor" kept explaining that it was an easy matter to have the couch reupholstered.  I pointed out that the frame was in terrible shape and he insisted that it could be rebuilt too.  Wait! I'm in the market for a $50 couch and you are telling me, "No problem!  Just bring this to a hand artisan and have it rebuilt?"  UM NO!  Further more, any kind of careful repair would be much more expensive than the couch itself.  It was likely a $200 couch at the most originally.

I finally bought a couch that was worn but workable for the grand bargain of $40.  I was very pleased with myself but the person kept going on and on and on about how I really should have saved myself the money by repairing their junker couch. 

I found out later that their landlord had given them an ultimatum to clean up the place.  He and his roommates had been bringing stuff to the dump/Goodwill one car load at the time, but couldn't get rid of the couch that way.  They didn't want to spring the $30 or so that it would require to hire a pickup to move the couch.  So instead they were hoping that I'd spend hundreds of dollars to rescue and rehabilitate that couch.

Wow, with friends like those, who needs credit card companies?
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: MerryCat on April 18, 2013, 12:29:02 PM
It's weird how a lot of people pushing old junk on you to "save money" end up costing you more if you take them up on your offer. Relatedly, I'm often surprised by how many cheap people end up spending more by being cheap than they would have otherwise.

I think that the two things that distinguish cheap from thrifty are that (1) for cheap people the feeling of getting a deal is more important than actual savings and (2) while thrity people will do with less for themselves, cheap people are all about what they can make others do without to save themselves money.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 18, 2013, 01:59:42 PM
It's weird how a lot of people pushing old junk on you to "save money" end up costing you more if you take them up on your offer. Relatedly, I'm often surprised by how many cheap people end up spending more by being cheap than they would have otherwise.

I think that the two things that distinguish cheap from thrifty are that (1) for cheap people the feeling of getting a deal is more important than actual savings and (2) while thrity people will do with less for themselves, cheap people are all about what they can make others do without to save themselves money.

And for the cheapskates out there, they simply can't fathom that sometimes you NEED to spend a little more to get something that will work or last.  Or something you can't do yourself. I have friends who are appalled that I will actually spend money to have someone put highlights in my hair. In their mind, i shoudl be able to do it myself and save money! So not happening. not unless i want to look like a zebra!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 18, 2013, 02:11:29 PM
Ooh, another one about my FIL:

In the process of renovating all these rental properties FIL has, he ends up filling his trunk with stuff.  The theory is that he might as well haul this stack of two dozen paving stones and three sheets of drywall and two used toilets and who knows what else around, because what if he takes out a mostly-functional toilet from one house and throws it away but then needs to replace a toilet that was in even worse shape at another house?  By keeping used junk in his truck, he won't have to buy new things!

Of course, the extra weight in his truck means extra gas, which probably negates any savings he may receive.  And - in the case of the used toilets, which rode around in his truck for at least two years before he finally got rid of them - they made more work for other people: FIL works at a secure government facility, which means all vehicles have to be inspected every time they come in or out.  Which means some poor security guard had to inspect the same two used toilets for TWO WHOLE YEARS (in addition to the daily construction detritus FIL carries around anyway).
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 18, 2013, 02:47:41 PM
Ooh, another one about my FIL:

In the process of renovating all these rental properties FIL has, he ends up filling his trunk with stuff.  The theory is that he might as well haul this stack of two dozen paving stones and three sheets of drywall and two used toilets and who knows what else around, because what if he takes out a mostly-functional toilet from one house and throws it away but then needs to replace a toilet that was in even worse shape at another house?  By keeping used junk in his truck, he won't have to buy new things!

Of course, the extra weight in his truck means extra gas, which probably negates any savings he may receive.  And - in the case of the used toilets, which rode around in his truck for at least two years before he finally got rid of them - they made more work for other people: FIL works at a secure government facility, which means all vehicles have to be inspected every time they come in or out.  Which means some poor security guard had to inspect the same two used toilets for TWO WHOLE YEARS (in addition to the daily construction detritus FIL carries around anyway).

He sounds like my former landlord! Who was cheaper than cheap. Mind you, he owns two rental houses, and lives in a nice home himself, but he refuses to spend ANY money on maintaining or fixing properly, anything in either house. And when something did need to be fixed, he took a “wait and see and maybe I can fix it” approach.  The one I was in had 4 apts. Mine was on the 3rd floor and had central a/c, in the attic above me.  One day, during a torrential thunderstorm, water began to POUR down my LR wall from the attic. I called him, and he said oh, its just a small leak, I’ll be over sometime.  I said NO, its pouring down you need to come NOW. so he does and its something simple with the a/c unit. Apparently it sits in a pain, with a drain, and somehow the drain had gotten clogged, so the water went everywhere. He then tried to blame it on the guys who had fixed my heat NINE months prior. I don’t think so.

The end result was he got up and did whatever to unclog it, but the water had damaged my apt and the one below me. It took him MONTHS to fix, and even then he did a half-a**ed job. 

The best one though was the wasps. I saw them in my apt, and called him. he found (don’t know how) a nest under the siding. Now according to the exterminator we called, the best way to deal with these is put some type of powder that kills them around a hole you drill, and they carry it back to the nest and they all die. Cheapo landlord though called an ex. but I think he must have known him since they guy wasn’t too interested. LL then drilled a hole, stuck a bug bomb in and let it rip. Scattering these wasps into the wall voids, and rendering my kitchen pretty much useless for a good 6 weeks. He refused to allow a pro to do the job as HE knew best. Shortly thereafter I moved out.

LL’s former job was maintenance etc for various companies and he could do some things, but others no, yet he refused to pay anyone to do anything he couldn’t do. It really was quite annoying.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 18, 2013, 04:14:20 PM
Quote
he refused to pay anyone to do anything he couldn’t do

Sounds like my dad.  He's a very  handy guy, and there's a lot he CAN do, but if he finds himself flummoxed by a home repair job, he's convinced that no-one on this earth could fix it.

Case in point:  I visited my parents once and slept in their guest bedroom, which had an ensuite bathroom.  The toilet kept making this loud constant "water trickling" noise that kept me awake.  I mentioned it the next day, and Dad blew his top, yelling "I can't fix it!  I've tried everything!"  I said "Well, can't you call someone?  Because I can't sleep with that racket going on."   

WELL.  You would have thought that I'd spat on his mother.  He was SO insulted.  He didn't call anyone, of course, and I had a miserable visit because I got no sleep.  (I tried ear plugs, putting the pillow over my head - nothing helped.)

A year later, his mother visited and stayed in the same bedroom.  She had the same complaint that I did about the toilet's noise.  (Considering that she was going deaf, that gives you an idea about how loud it was.)  Then, all of a sudden it became a huge priority, and Dad called a plumber immediately.    Problem solved!   ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: bloo on April 18, 2013, 04:24:06 PM
It's weird how a lot of people pushing old junk on you to "save money" end up costing you more if you take them up on your offer. Relatedly, I'm often surprised by how many cheap people end up spending more by being cheap than they would have otherwise.

I think that the two things that distinguish cheap from thrifty are that (1) for cheap people the feeling of getting a deal is more important than actual savings and (2) while thrity people will do with less for themselves, cheap people are all about what they can make others do without to save themselves money.

And for the cheapskates out there, they simply can't fathom that sometimes you NEED to spend a little more to get something that will work or last.  Or something you can't do yourself. I have friends who are appalled that I will actually spend money to have someone put highlights in my hair. In their mind, i shoudl be able to do it myself and save money! So not happening. not unless i want to look like a zebra!

Oh you are not kidding!

My DH has been wanting a motor for his boat but I kvetched at the idea of spending $5K. That's a lot of money for us. But it's a Honda.

So at the advice of his friend, Bob, whose property is littered with junk he's going to get around to fixing, DH bought Bob's sister's boyfriend's old motor for $200.

After pouring another $800 into it and still afraid it wasn't going to work, I finally hollered uncle at told DH to go to the local marine shop and buy the dingdangity motor.

Now DH knows 100% of the time that the motor is going to start.

And now everytime DH talks to Bob, Bob whines about what a waste of money that Honda is. Of course, the last time Bob was supposed to take DH out on Bob's boat, Bob's motor died and they had to troll back to shore.  :o
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Elfmama on April 18, 2013, 07:51:03 PM
Quote
If you don't need a widget that normally costs $1000, but you buy it because it's 70% off, you haven't saved $700 -- you've spent $300 for a totally useless widget!

Amy Dacyczyn of "Tightwad Gazette" fame offered this handy tip: "Want to save $100,000 this year? Don't buy a Rolls-Royce."
Oddly enough, DH does not understand this form of math.  I want a quilting machine.  The one that I want, for the features that I want, runs about $5000.  I keep telling him "Look, I'm saving you money.  The top-of-the-line longarm is $18,000. If I get what I want, I've saved you $13,000!"  And he just does. not. get. it!  And so far, neither do I.  :(
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: alkira6 on April 18, 2013, 08:41:44 PM
What about the cheapos who push their trash onto you and then in the 1/100 times it turns out to be something nice or even great, they lose it.  One of my friends got some old games and such from an aunt. She had been pushing her to take them for years, so my friend finally took them and was going to trash them.  I came over and after a little googling and a couple of ebay auctions, she netted a little over $300 selling pieces from the torn up games to collectors who were missing pieces and selling a couple of games intact as hey were barely played with.  Aunt lost it when she found out.  This was in 1995 and my friend still hears about how she "ripped her poor aunt off".
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Lindee on April 18, 2013, 09:47:15 PM
Years ago when I was living in a furnished flat in London the landlord never did any repairs. He told me how the previous tenants had damaged the coffee table and other things so they didn't get their deposit back but the damage was never fixed. Funnily enough nor were the planned improvements to the lighting and stairs he promised when we were looking at it. I was younger then and didn't realise if it wasn't done by the time you moved into a flat it would never happen.  Later when rain started to come in the bathroom ceiling I realised I could actually see sky through the ceiling and the roof. His response was that it was a rain storm and roofs weren't meant to be storm proof. Well,  yes I thought they were. Further complaints were met with the excuse that he didn't have a long enough ladder. This was a four storey house in a nice part of London, I would have though protecting his investment would be a priority, but no. 

I moved out soon after and since I was leaving the country and didn't trust him to return my deposit even though the place was in better order than when we moved in (he"graciously" allowed us repaint and fix things at our own expense) I kept back the final rent payment as the bond covered it.  He then rented it out for a bigger rent, I often wondered what the new tenants felt when it next rained.

Letting a major asset fall to bits because you are too cheap to pay for the upkeep is not good management.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: reflection5 on April 18, 2013, 10:12:24 PM
Quote
Letting a major asset fall to bits because you are too cheap to pay for the upkeep is not good management.

No kidding.

Many landlords will only spend money to repair or replace something if and when they have to (i.e. when tenant puts rent money in escrow).  They don’t manage their money well, and they keep getting questionable tenants who only stay a short period of time.  Then the unit stays empty for months (empty apartments don’t earn any money).

Years ago I had a cheapskate landlord who, whenever I needed something fixed or replaced, whined about his cash flow problems.   ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: mbbored on April 18, 2013, 10:17:24 PM
A former roommate and I were fixing dinner for a group of friends, including one young woman who has obsessive compulsive disorder. Roommate was making her "signature" salad which involved sesame seeds. Except when she went to grab the jar, it was filled with moth larvae. She shrugged her shoulder and dumped them in anyways. Nothing I said could convince her to forget the salad that night.

When our friends showed up and she pulled out the salad, I said "Funny thing! We discovered moths in the sesame seeds and Roommie added them anyways!" Oddly enough, nobody wanted to eat the salad and my roommate sulked all night. Friend with OCD since then has never touched a single dish that Roommie prepared, and now that we no longer live together, will only meet her in public places. ("If she was willing to serve me bugs, how clean could her house be?")
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Margo on April 19, 2013, 05:43:10 AM
When I was a student, we had a cheapskate landlord/agent. He/They also had a lot of relatives so when things *did* get done it was always by one of his brothers/sons/cousins, not by a professional. Quite a few of the relatives were recent immigrants and didn't speak much English, whcih made communicating what needed to be done difficult at times.

Some of the highlights:

- A leak from the bathroom, which meant that water came through the living room ceiling and down the wall every time the bath, shower or sink were used. There were 6 of us living in the house - the bathroom got a lot of use. The agents kept telling us we just needed to be more careful and not splash (er, no, this isn't a little splashing, the main down pipe seems to have sprung a leak. I eventually called and told them that I, personally, didn't care f the bathtub fell through the ceiling because they were too cheap to fix it, but that I would sue the pants off them it that happened and I was injured, or any of my property damaged, and that it would really be cheaper for them to fix it before that happened. The came and fixed it 3 days later.

- The house was broken in to. The burglars used a garden spade as a lever to breakthe back door lock off the door. The landlord took over a week to come to secure it (we put bolts on, ourselves, in the mean time) When they did come, rather than replacing the door or the lock, they tried to screw the splintered wood back into place. They ignored us when we explained that the lock needed to be replaced as the burglars had also stolen the keys to the door. (A week later the burglars returned. They couldn't get access because of the bolts which my housemates and I had fixed to the door)

- the landlords had agreed to have an extra power point put into the kitchen, as there was no socket to plug in a washer, and we pointed out that an extension cord running across the kitchen floor was not acceptable. the guy who came to do it had absolutely no clue. Fortunately some of us did, and managed to ensure he didn't get the 'earth' and 'live'  wires wrong way round, but we did end up with a wire which went up one wall, zig-zagged across the ceiling and went down another wall, as running the wire along the skirting would have meant using more wire..)

- We're pretty sure that the landlord was pretty cheap in other ways, too, as we often got bailiffs knocking on the door looking for him.

- the landlord didn't live in the city where the house was. they visited occasionally, and once turned up at the door wanting us to let them stay in the house for a few nights so they didn't have t use a hotel. they got quite shirty when we refused to let them into the house.

- When we moved house, they tried to withhold our security deposits on the basis that there was 'junk in the hall'. Yes, there was a small amount of junk mail which was delivered after we moved out, and before they could be bothered to inspect. Fortunately, I have a nasty suspicious mind and had taken date-stamped photos of every room immediately before returning the keys. I still wound up havingto go to the agent's office and sit there advising *every*single*person* person not to rent through them as they would not return deposits to get our money back. (they had failed to return it 3 months after we moved out. They specialised in student lets, and it was just before the start of term, when every student and their parents are looking for rental properties.  It took about 20 minutes before they discovered that actually, no, my cheque was't in the post, and yes, there was someone in the office who could sign it, and oh yes, I was correct about the amount and the fact that they didn't have any right to deduct anything. I can't help wondering how much money they made every year from the interest on all those deposits,not to mention keeping them / creaming off the top. ( I made them give me the cheques from my house-mates, which I then posted, too. I'm sure they ought not to have given them to me, but I'm pretty sure none of them would have got their money otherwise...)

I reported them to the University housing office. (it wasn't university housing, but the housing office kept details of private landlord and agencies and if asked, would tell students whether there had been complaints or problems with particular landlords / agencies )

Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 19, 2013, 05:54:55 AM
Quote
Letting a major asset fall to bits because you are too cheap to pay for the upkeep is not good management.

No kidding.

Many landlords will only spend money to repair or replace something if and when they have to (i.e. when tenant puts rent money in escrow).  They don’t manage their money well, and they keep getting questionable tenants who only stay a short period of time.  Then the unit stays empty for months (empty apartments don’t earn any money).

Years ago I had a cheapskate landlord who, whenever I needed something fixed or replaced, whined about his cash flow problems.   ::)

There are some duplexes around here that have sat empty for a year or more.  I haven't seen any for sale signs out front, or any signs letting anyone know it's for rent, so I'm kind of curious.  The house next door to that one has been condemned for a while.  Not due to fire, and I don't want to think about other reasons it would be condemned.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Emmy on April 19, 2013, 06:15:51 AM
It's weird how a lot of people pushing old junk on you to "save money" end up costing you more if you take them up on your offer. Relatedly, I'm often surprised by how many cheap people end up spending more by being cheap than they would have otherwise.

I think that the two things that distinguish cheap from thrifty are that (1) for cheap people the feeling of getting a deal is more important than actual savings and (2) while thrity people will do with less for themselves, cheap people are all about what they can make others do without to save themselves money.

And for the cheapskates out there, they simply can't fathom that sometimes you NEED to spend a little more to get something that will work or last.  Or something you can't do yourself. I have friends who are appalled that I will actually spend money to have someone put highlights in my hair. In their mind, i shoudl be able to do it myself and save money! So not happening. not unless i want to look like a zebra!

Cheapskates will also go through major inconvenience or put their life at risk to save some money (often because they refuse to throw out expired or questionable food).  It often seems that hoarding and cheapness goes hand in hand.  There was an episode where a woman could not be convinced to get rid of several boxes of chicken broth that expired several years ago because it was an expensive organic broth and replacing it would cost a lot - she didn't take into consideration that she bought way more than she needed if she had that much old broth left over and something that old could make her very ill.  Saving money (no matter how little) is the #1 priority, and if that means the comfort, enjoyment, health, time, ect. of the cheapskate or their family is sacrificed, so be it.  A thrifty person knows how to be smart about saving money, but not sacrifice something more important to do it.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on April 19, 2013, 07:09:53 AM
Quote
Letting a major asset fall to bits because you are too cheap to pay for the upkeep is not good management.

No kidding.

Many landlords will only spend money to repair or replace something if and when they have to (i.e. when tenant puts rent money in escrow).  They don’t manage their money well, and they keep getting questionable tenants who only stay a short period of time.  Then the unit stays empty for months (empty apartments don’t earn any money).

Years ago I had a cheapskate landlord who, whenever I needed something fixed or replaced, whined about his cash flow problems.   ::)

A lot of people get into the landlord business to "make money".   ::)  They're constantly cash flow poor, which makes them CHEAP.  After the fire at my former complex, the damage was patched together, not really fixed.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 19, 2013, 08:49:46 AM
Quote
Letting a major asset fall to bits because you are too cheap to pay for the upkeep is not good management.

No kidding.

Many landlords will only spend money to repair or replace something if and when they have to (i.e. when tenant puts rent money in escrow).  They don’t manage their money well, and they keep getting questionable tenants who only stay a short period of time.  Then the unit stays empty for months (empty apartments don’t earn any money).

Years ago I had a cheapskate landlord who, whenever I needed something fixed or replaced, whined about his cash flow problems.   ::)

Oh yeah. the house I lived in literally is falling apart. It originally was a 2-family, and now has 4 apts. I feel for his kids who will end up having to sell it once he's gone since it most likely a. won't pass any inspections for sale being that I'm not quite sure all those apts are legal, and b. it needs so much work and updating its probably best as a teardown!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: faithlessone on April 19, 2013, 09:06:49 AM
I had a ridiculously cheap landlord in my 2nd year of uni. He was apparently highly recommended by the university, and he owned 9 or 10 houses near the campus. I'm not sure how he got this good reputation though - he was appalling! He was generally quite reluctant to do anything - it took at least 4 or 5 phone calls/emails to get him to respond. He was also really sexist. There were three girls and two boys in my house. No matter who contacted him, he'd only talk to either Chris or Matt, not to us girls.

There were two serious cheapskatey cases though.

The first happened soon after we moved in. It turned out that the microwave that had been in the kitchen was the property of one of the previous tenants - but there was a microwave on the list of supplied appliances on our lease, so he was obliged to give us one. After three weeks, he finally got round to dropping it off. It was obviously old - there was a thick layer of old food and grease, which took my housemate hours to clean. When she finally got through that, she found large patches of rust. We refused to use it, and the landlord accused us of being snobby. He tried to demonstrate that it was "safe", and there were several very loud popping noises before it finally died.

He then pointed out a clause in the lease that said that any damaged appliances would have to be replaced by the tenants, and accused my housemate of breaking it by cleaning it wrong. We would have reported him, but it was just easier to go to Argos and get a new microwave ourselves. When we left, we personally donated it to the next tenants. (I imagine the landlord claimed that it was his, though!)

The second case was ongoing, really. There were two bathrooms in the house, one upstairs, and one downstairs. The downstairs bathroom had been put in by the landlord, and it was... temperamental. The toilet wasn't plumbed in particularly well, and had a nasty habit of backing up at the slightest provocation, so we really tried not to use it. There was also a shower, which leaked like crazy, and had the most terrible water pressure I've ever seen. If you could get it to give more than a trickle, you were lucky. No matter how many times we complained, nothing ever happened about it. So it ended up with all 5 of us using 1 bathroom, which was really less than ideal.

Luckily, we moved into a different house for our 3rd year, with perfectly lovely landlords. ;D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: mumma to KMC on April 19, 2013, 09:29:37 AM
A former roommate and I were fixing dinner for a group of friends, including one young woman who has obsessive compulsive disorder. Roommate was making her "signature" salad which involved sesame seeds. Except when she went to grab the jar, it was filled with moth larvae. She shrugged her shoulder and dumped them in anyways. Nothing I said could convince her to forget the salad that night.

When our friends showed up and she pulled out the salad, I said "Funny thing! We discovered moths in the sesame seeds and Roommie added them anyways!" Oddly enough, nobody wanted to eat the salad and my roommate sulked all night. Friend with OCD since then has never touched a single dish that Roommie prepared, and now that we no longer live together, will only meet her in public places. ("If she was willing to serve me bugs, how clean could her house be?")

This is something my mil would do and the reason I won't eat food at their house.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 19, 2013, 11:05:28 AM
Quote
This is something my mil would do and the reason I won't eat food at their house.

You must know my MIL!  I was once at her house and was offered a drink.  My favorite adult beverage is a Bloody Caesar, which is Clamato juice and vodka, so I asked if she had any Clamato.  She said "Oh, yes!" and pulled out a bottle of the stuff - which had been opened at some point and then stored unrefrigerated for who knows how long.   Clamato is supposed to be red (since its main component is tomato juice).  This stuff was brown

I drank it anyway because, at the time, I was too intimidated to say no to my MIL.  These days I'd give her a look and say "Think I'll have something else, thanks."
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 19, 2013, 11:41:05 AM
Okay, all of these bad landlord stories reminded me of my last apartment.  It was in a complex that started out good, but went very bad over the years I lived there.

We had NINETEEN fires.   yes, you read that right.  3 or 4 of the fires were electrical fires, but the rest of them were from an arsonist (who they caught, later).   After the fires started, they started requiring proof of renter's insurance before signing a lease.

But that's not the worst.  I came home one day to find a big hole kicked in my front door!  All those years I lived there, I had no idea that they had HOLLOW CORE doors as apartment front doors!!  I called Maintenance just before 5pm, and someone finally showed up around 11pm, With A Screwdriver.  Because 'There's a giant freaking hole in my door!' apparently translates as 'her locks are loose, bring a screwdriver'.    And while he was thinking about how he was going to fix it, they called him on his cell phone to send him to another 'emergency'.  I stood in the hallway and screamed 'IF THEY HAVE A DOOR, IT'S NOT AN EMERGENCY!!' 
He did come back and boarded my door, but I never slept until maintenance showed up the next day and replaced the whole door, with something SOLID.    Meanwhile, I packed.  I was out of there 2 months later, breaking my lease, and they didn't complain.  I'm sure it was because they knew that I had pictures and could sue.
They didn't take much, and I lost nothing of real value (just 2 antique sewing machines, which have no street value), so it was obviously just kids.  They kicked in at least 15 doors that week, too.  I wasn't the only one.   I never got my deposit back, though, but I thought it was worth getting out of that place for. 
The police never caught the kids.

That sound you heard was my jaw hitting the floor right before I thanked the heavens I got a good landlord while in college. 

We were living on the second floor of a Victorian house and I personally loved it, but then I've always loved old homes.  This house was yellow with green shutters.  The other roommates thought it was ugly, I thought it was awesome. :)

The only problem was that when it came to heating this house in the winter, the gas bills were terrible.  I'm talking $300 one January and the pilot light was always going out.  The guy the landlord called to look at it taught myself and the other two girls who lived there how to relight it and we never had a problem again or had to call him out.   

Now like I said, three girls were living there and one  must have thought the other two were so cheap.   Jessie and I would come home at the end of our school day to find that Cathy had turned the heat up to 80.  We had a rule that it doesn't go up past 72 and she'd whine "But I was COLD!"  "That's what blankets and sweaters were invented for, m'dear." said Jessie.  I said "Well if you want to be that warm you could pay more than a 1/3 of the heating bill."   

She did find other ways of coping but she'd still whine.   To try and deal with the lack of insulation in the house, Jessie's boyfriend got the idea of getting plastic sheeting and putting it over the windows so at the very least we wouldn't be losing warm air or having drafts and that did work.  Didn't look all that great, but it worked.   

And oh, while we were living there, we didn't have a couch for a while but before DH joined the Marines, his coworker said "Hey I've got a couch y'all could have, it's a sleeper sofa!"  We said sure, we'll take it, we were tired of bean bags.   This couch was in good shape, other than smelling mildly of smoke and dog, but that's what air freshener was for. ;)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: snowflake on April 19, 2013, 12:33:29 PM
Quote
he refused to pay anyone to do anything he couldn’t do

Sounds like my dad.  He's a very  handy guy, and there's a lot he CAN do, but if he finds himself flummoxed by a home repair job, he's convinced that no-one on this earth could fix it.


Wow, are we related?  Because you just described my parents AND my ILs.  The difference is that my ILs do the repairs and have a wonky house. My parents don't do the repairs and just keep adding the potential projects to their list and have a broken house.  No kidding I once visited for Christmas and discovered that they had a toilet that had been stopped up for six months.  Because they are empty-nesters and it used to be the "kids'" bathroom, they just kept the door closed.  A plumber was "too expensive" and they were "too busy" to get it done.  (They protested and complained when my sister called a plumber for them for Christmas.)

My husband and I resembled that for our first year of home ownership.  Then we spent money on a handyman cleaning up our goofs that would have cost half as much (and 1/10 the time) for him to do in the first place.  We've been cured ever since. 

Last year we had a serious repair in our bathroom.  His parents kept freaking out that we were paying someone to fix it.  But they have a toilet that wobbles after they replaced the wax seal.  Seriously, there is a whole generation of grandkids who are all terrified of using the potty there.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Outdoor Girl on April 19, 2013, 12:53:20 PM
I have a buddy that is a great DIY type handyman.  I save up my list of little things and call him once a year or so to do all of the little things that need doing.  If he can't do it, he tells me so and gives me recommendations on who to call for the job.

So for a couple of hundred bucks a year, tops, my house stays in decent shape.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 19, 2013, 02:02:02 PM
Quote
he refused to pay anyone to do anything he couldn’t do

Sounds like my dad.  He's a very  handy guy, and there's a lot he CAN do, but if he finds himself flummoxed by a home repair job, he's convinced that no-one on this earth could fix it.


Wow, are we related?  Because you just described my parents AND my ILs.  The difference is that my ILs do the repairs and have a wonky house. My parents don't do the repairs and just keep adding the potential projects to their list and have a broken house.  No kidding I once visited for Christmas and discovered that they had a toilet that had been stopped up for six months.  Because they are empty-nesters and it used to be the "kids'" bathroom, they just kept the door closed.  A plumber was "too expensive" and they were "too busy" to get it done.  (They protested and complained when my sister called a plumber for them for Christmas.)

My husband and I resembled that for our first year of home ownership.  Then we spent money on a handyman cleaning up our goofs that would have cost half as much (and 1/10 the time) for him to do in the first place.  We've been cured ever since. 

Last year we had a serious repair in our bathroom.  His parents kept freaking out that we were paying someone to fix it.  But they have a toilet that wobbles after they replaced the wax seal.  Seriously, there is a whole generation of grandkids who are all terrified of using the potty there.

Exactly how it is for me!

My parents use a hotplate or electric skillet, because their range hasn't worked properly in 15+ years.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 19, 2013, 02:29:39 PM
This thread has inspired me to track down a handyman on Craigslist and get some stuff fixed around the house - mostly stuff DH and I poked at, couldn't figure out what to do next, and never got back to.  I'm sick of my back door not working properly, for instance  :)

ETA: Woohoo, SO glad I did this!  Found an engineering student who came out and fixed the front and back door (back door screen was stuck closed and we haven't been able to use it in months), fixed a light fixture in the guest bathroom in which the dead lightbulb was stuck in the fixture, and figured out what was wrong with the fluorescent light in the kitchen.  Best $35 ever.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: norrina on April 19, 2013, 06:30:19 PM
Quote
he refused to pay anyone to do anything he couldn’t do

Sounds like my dad.  He's a very  handy guy, and there's a lot he CAN do, but if he finds himself flummoxed by a home repair job, he's convinced that no-one on this earth could fix it.


Wow, are we related?  Because you just described my parents AND my ILs.  The difference is that my ILs do the repairs and have a wonky house. My parents don't do the repairs and just keep adding the potential projects to their list and have a broken house.  No kidding I once visited for Christmas and discovered that they had a toilet that had been stopped up for six months.  Because they are empty-nesters and it used to be the "kids'" bathroom, they just kept the door closed.  A plumber was "too expensive" and they were "too busy" to get it done.  (They protested and complained when my sister called a plumber for them for Christmas.)

My husband and I resembled that for our first year of home ownership.  Then we spent money on a handyman cleaning up our goofs that would have cost half as much (and 1/10 the time) for him to do in the first place.  We've been cured ever since. 

Last year we had a serious repair in our bathroom.  His parents kept freaking out that we were paying someone to fix it.  But they have a toilet that wobbles after they replaced the wax seal.  Seriously, there is a whole generation of grandkids who are all terrified of using the potty there.

Exactly how it is for me!

My parents use a hotplate or electric skillet, because their range hasn't worked properly in 15+ years.

Different strokes for different folks. When I owned my house, my oven broke (the range itself still "mostly" worked, 3 out of 4 burners), and I replaced it the same day. When I rented later the range broke, and I nearly went out of my mind because it was being repaired under warranty and took over a month to resolve. Even though the oven was a separate unit and was still okay, as was the microwave, and we had 2 electric skillets, and electric griddle, and a 2-burner hot plate.

I'm cheap/thrifty in my own way though. I can't think of the last time I spent full price on a pair of shoes or piece of clothing though; it's thrift stores, eBay, outlet shops, and clearance rack 100%. (Actually, I can remember. I paid full-price for my wedding dress, which was an ivory bridesmaids dress, 6 months ago. Then I found another dress I liked better for $20 at Goodwill. Hah!)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 19, 2013, 07:33:03 PM
My parent's kitchen, aside from a new refrigerator and a microwave, is exactly the same as it was when we bought the house in 1974. Rust red appliances, barely working oven and broken range. They have been waiting for my uncle to help them redo their kitchen as a favor since 1987. See, my father has helped him, so his brother is going to pay them back by building new cabinets and counter tops. Eventually...  ::)
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: BarensMom on April 19, 2013, 07:48:35 PM
My parent's kitchen, aside from a new refrigerator and a microwave, is exactly the same as it was when we bought the house in 1974. Rust red appliances, barely working oven and broken range. They have been waiting for my uncle to help them redo their kitchen as a favor since 1987. See, my father has helped him, so his brother is going to pay them back by building new cabinets and counter tops. Eventually...  ::)

His name wouldn't happen to be Paul, would it?  >:D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 19, 2013, 08:08:00 PM
No! Uncle is a carpenter, and AFAIK, my uncle has never volunteered or hinted that he would do the work, much less pro bono as my parents assume.

They did get the second bathroom renovated two years ago. The only part of it that worked before was the toilet and sink, the shower had not worked since they bought the house in 1974. Of course, there are only two people living there, versus five when I was a child.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: HoneyBee42 on April 19, 2013, 08:44:45 PM
Oh, the landlord stories reminded me ...

Back in my college student days, I lived in an apartment in a building which was rented through the student housing office and there were four to the apartment (it was a female only building, except for the apartment manager and his wife).  So, his go-to thing was tinfoil.  Toilet running non-stop?  Wrap the chain in tinfoil.  Fridge not keeping cool? wrap the back in tinfoil. 

Then there was the renter when my now-ex and I were co-managing an apartment building.  She tried to break the lease and still get her deposit back on the grounds that the apartment was "dangerously cold".  Unfortunately for her, the thermostats were controlled *by the tenant* and keeping the temperature down to 55 degrees was *her* choice and her lack of cleaning resulted in mold growths that required a lot of effort to clean.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Zenith on April 19, 2013, 11:28:30 PM
What about the cheapos who push their trash onto you and then in the 1/100 times it turns out to be something nice or even great, they lose it.  One of my friends got some old games and such from an aunt. She had been pushing her to take them for years, so my friend finally took them and was going to trash them.  I came over and after a little googling and a couple of ebay auctions, she netted a little over $300 selling pieces from the torn up games to collectors who were missing pieces and selling a couple of games intact as hey were barely played with.  Aunt lost it when she found out.  This was in 1995 and my friend still hears about how she "ripped her poor aunt off".

That happened a lot when I was a kid. I would be given things or find things in horrible condition and spend time and money to bring it back to life and function and looking good. Inevitably, whoever gave me the item or decided they deserved it more would want it or want it back back and kick up such a stink it would get taken away from me and given back to them. I started refusing anything my family would give me and be called ungrateful  ::). Meh

The last incident was my aunt had refinished a house and had junked a handmade bar top which another aunt grabbed and she left it outside for 3 years. It was in a very sorry state but due to the solid handmade quality it was salvageable with work. When aunt moved house she dumped the bar top on the nature strip (basically free game) and I made sure to ask aunt if I could have it and she said yes. Luckily I asked in front of an uncle because when I had refinished it and turned it into a very nice coffee table she wanted it back and went screeching to everyone that I had stolen it. Oh the phone calls I got!. Uncle got wind of it and told her to shove it. Said uncle had seen me ask and he had helped me refinish it so he knew what was going on. Still have the coffee table now.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 20, 2013, 07:55:40 AM
I remembered something that's eyeroll-y.  One Christmas, while I was still on speaking terms with my parents, my mother had only filled the boys' stockings, which was fine with me.  But then a few days later I went over because she had something for me and turns out it was a paper bag from some place she'd gone shopping, filled with stuff she'd gotten as samples that she didn't want or couldn't use, or had used and didn't want the rest.

Now, this wouldn't be a problem as some of the stuff I did like and could use.  But she called that my "stocking."  ::)  I didn't say anything and did take it (lack of backbone) but she did get my "You have got to be kidding me." look.   
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Shalamar on April 20, 2013, 09:42:17 AM
My uncle refuses to pay for any repairs in his house.  He has a bathtub in his KITCHEN - uninstalled, I should add, it's just standing on its end - because he doesn't know how to deal with it himself and won't pay for a plumber.   My dad stayed with him a while back and offered to install it for him; my uncle was so insulted by the implication that he didn't know how to do it himself that he threw my dad out and never invited him back.
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: ladyknight1 on April 20, 2013, 05:33:34 PM
Your uncle cuts off his nose to spite his face!
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: Eclectic Dugong on April 20, 2013, 07:38:23 PM
I love my father, but I'm starting to wonder if he is a cheapskate. I have a couple of examples:

My mother sometimes makes huge batches of certain foods to take with her when she visits friends or family who are often resting up from illnesses or are just in need of some of her food. She stores this food in those foil containers with cardboard lids and leaves some of them for myself and my father. She has always emphasised to me how reusing them is out of the question, as they aren't safe for such a thing, and even then they are too flimsy to keep their original, useful shape after use. Father saw me moving to throw a used container away and shouted at me about how wasteful I was being, how we could use it again etc. I tried to explain to him that it may not be the best of ideas, but I'm not very good at, well, talking. In the end I waited for him to leave the room and quietly disposed of the container (was that PA of me?)

He also goes to some odd lengths to save himself a few pennies. When we were in another country, he insisted we walk somewhere a long distance away during a storm to save money instead of getting a taxi. Rainstorms which, in this country, are really bad with heavy rain and strong winds. Despite my protests, as I had been living in the country for 5 months at that point and had experienced said storms, he insisted that it would be fine. He didn't lose out on any money, but he made everyone else very unhappy.

My apologies for the length :-[
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: gramma dishes on April 20, 2013, 07:45:39 PM
...     he insisted we walk somewhere a long distance away during a storm to save money instead of getting a taxi. Rainstorms which, in this country, are really bad with heavy rain and strong winds. Despite my protests, as I had been living in the country for 5 months at that point and had experienced said storms, he insisted that it would be fine. He didn't lose out on any money, but he made everyone else very unhappy.   ...



I think at that point I would have said "Fine, Dad.  You go ahead and walk on and the rest of us will take a cab.  We'll meet you at the [destination].  ~~  Taxi!!"   >:D
Title: Re: Cheapskate stories
Post by: CakeEater on April 20, 2013, 07:59:30 PM
I love my father, but I'm starting to wonder if he is a cheapskate. I have a