Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Time For a Coffee Break! => Topic started by: DottyG on April 11, 2013, 12:36:36 PM

Title: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 11, 2013, 12:36:36 PM
There's a discussion in the "Never Shopping There Again" thread about customer surveys and being asked to rate the store/server/whatever with the highest rating.  Many times, it appears, this is done per company policy, and if a score less than the highest is given, there are repercussions.
 
Although it does seem that this discussion fits that thread, there was a request to move it to a spin-off.  Since it's an interesting topic, in my opinion, I thought I'd start one.  I'm interested in hearing more from those who know more about this from the "inside view" of it.
 
 
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Amara on April 11, 2013, 12:46:04 PM
Not from the inside but I won't fill them out. Albertson's, a grocery chain, gives them to you with your receipt. They have the cashier's number on it and you are supposed to go online and rate the interaction. They try to tempt you with the chance to win a $100 gift card.

I still won't do it. I hate companies that spend so much time and money to check up on their employees. Just pay them well, treat them well, and the customers will benefit. Why is that so hard for management to understand?! (I sometimes wish I could rate the management on the number of stupid ideas they institute. I would definitely fill out a form for that--and heading the list would be "fire the piece of rot who decided that I should donate to your corporate donation."  >:()
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: zyrs on April 11, 2013, 12:52:05 PM
Since the surveys do absolutely nothing, I don't fill them out.

Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: nutraxfornerves on April 11, 2013, 12:57:18 PM
There is a discussion of surveys on this thread (http://www.customerssuck.com/board/showthread.php?t=97933) from Customers Suck. Language warning.

Posters agree--less than a score of 9 or 10 and the employee's performance rating can really be hurt. They also note that there is often only one question that the business cares about "How likely are you to recommend this place to someone else?"  The answer to that may be the only score that is used for employee evaluation.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 11, 2013, 12:58:21 PM
I only do them for smallish businesses (i.e. places where someone might actually read mine), and only when they actually offer ME something.  Not "a chance to win a $100 gift card [out of the 2.5 million people who get these surveys]," but something like a free item or a few dollars off my next visit.  I also will tend to rate "customer service" lower if I get explicitly told to give them a perfect score.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: MariaE on April 11, 2013, 01:00:24 PM
Disclaimer: I've actually only ever encountered this once. I work with IT and had to raise a support case with Microsoft. They did ultimately solve my problem, but it was clear along the way that the case handler had serious communication problems. After the final call, she asked if I would mind doing a survey with her supervisor. I agreed to this, but it very soon became obvious that he was just there to groom me for the official Microsoft survey that's always sent out as a result of these support cases (standard procedure and until now has always been in a non-aggressive automated email, so I've never minded them). He asked me how I would rate the call handler, and I explained that I hadn't made up my mind yet, but that we had had some communication problems.
"We've been having some problems with our phones, so that's probably why." (No... the problem wasn't that she couldn't hear me). "Please do rate her high - a 9 or a 10".

When the survey came, I filled it out, rated her a 7 or an 8 (because she did eventually fix my problem, even though it took a LOT longer than it should have!), but rated my overall satisfaction only 5 and explained, "I would have rated this higher, but I was prompted very forcefully by the call handler's supervisor to rate the call high. I did get a solution for my problem, but I did not appreciate being pressured in this way."

They'll probably ignore it, but if possible I'll leave such a comment whenever I'm pressured to leave a high rating.

If the survey is just "dumb" ratings with no means of leaving a comment, I just don't fill it out.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 11, 2013, 01:00:38 PM
I did a Chick-Fil-A one the other day and got a free entree the next time I went.  It was worth it to do that one.  (Plus, they were going to get all 10s from me anyway - I didn't have to lie.  I've never had less than a 10 there!)  I should also add that I wasn't told what to put on the survey.  Plus, there was a lot of room to add actual comments in as well as just the numbers.  So if something needed to be elaborated on, it was possible to do that.
 

 
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: nuit93 on April 11, 2013, 01:13:51 PM
It seems to me that whichever grand high muckety-muck came up with the idea to instruct employees to tell customers to "give a perfect score!" needs to go back to school and learn about how surveys and feedback actually work.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Ginger G on April 11, 2013, 01:17:05 PM
These surveys seem pretty pointless to me.  Here are two examples from two completely different businesses I've dealt with recently:

The grocery store nearest my house has pretty bad customer service, so I rarely go there, usually choosing to drive a little further for better service.  I did break my rule and went there a year or so ago and, as usual, the employees were surly and acted like having to ring up my groceries was some kind of burden to them.  My receipt printed out one of those survey invitations.  I completed the survey the next day and expressed my opinions, that I usually avoided shopping there due to the unfriendliness of the staff.  I have been there on an off a few times since when I just needed something quickly and nothing has changed.  Not that I expected my one survey to make a difference, but it does make me wonder if anybody even looks at them.

The other is related to my job.  I work in HR/Benefits and we have one insurance company for one of our benefits.  Every year we renew this policy and in my 9 years of doing this, not one representative of that company has ever contacted me to offer assistance or just to let me know that they know we exist.  It's a benefit that is thankfully rarely used (Accidental Death insurance), but it would still be nice to have a specific contact person there.  The couple of times I've had to contact them, it took many phone calls and transfers to find someone who could actually help.  A couple of years ago, they emailed me a survey and I was very happy to fill it out and let them know I was disappointed that we didn't seem to have an assigned account rep, that no one there ever contacted me, etc.  Once again, my responses seem to have had no result whatsoever.  I'm going to look into switching to a new company when we get closer to renewal time.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Twik on April 11, 2013, 01:25:56 PM
It seems to me that whichever grand high muckety-muck came up with the idea to instruct employees to tell customers to "give a perfect score!" needs to go back to school and learn about how surveys and feedback actually work.

I doubt it was the grand high muckety-muck who decided that. S/he decided "all surveys must give a perfect score, OR ELSE!" Then the mid-level muckety-mucks passed the word on, "do whatever you can to get that perfect score, or we're all in trouble."
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on April 11, 2013, 01:36:17 PM
A gentle reminder... when you give a less than perfect score, you're not sticking it to the company.  They don't care, by and large.  You're sticking it to the cashier, who has no input in corporate policy and no choice in how to present the survey.  If corporate says "ask the customers for 10s" that's exactly what they'll do, because if they don't, corporate will stand someone next to the register that will.

If you don't like the idea, please just don't fill it out, or else you're punishing the person who is the least responsible for the decision.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Outdoor Girl on April 11, 2013, 01:40:41 PM
I will never fill out one of these surveys again unless I can truly give them maximum marks.  I always filled them out truthfully and never knew that less than perfect scores affected the front line service personnel until I read it on here.

However, if the FL person were truly awful, I might fill it in so it does affect them.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Thipu1 on April 11, 2013, 01:46:13 PM
We fill the surveys out on ships because we've been spending at least a week with the cabin stewards, waiters and bar staff.  We do get to know these people to a degree and want to let management know that X gave especially good service. We also know that employees can benefit from good passenger reviews. 

We don't bother with them in retail establishments because, since we dealt with the person for a maximum of five minutes, there's no way to evaluate performance. 
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: CakeBeret on April 11, 2013, 01:47:27 PM
In general I refuse to fill out the surveys, unless I have a particularly awesome experience (in which case I give all 10s) or a particularly bad experience (in which case I give well-deserved low scores).

I really hate the corporate BS that goes into "if it's not a 10, it's a fail".

My husband's workplace plays these games. The employees get bonused if 90% or more of the surveys are perfect 10s. Mid-management gets bonused on selling 95% or more of their stock during a time period. So management purposely orders low levels of stock and over-sells pre-orders, so that they will sell out quickly, which leads to huge $$$ bonuses. And then the employees get screwed because customers are giving poor ratings on the surveys, because their desired product is never in stock or their pre-order is worthless. It's a sick, vicious cycle.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Desdemona on April 11, 2013, 01:51:51 PM
I used to work at a store that did these surveys but they really twisted things as I'm sure most stores do. They really only looked at the responses that came from people who had a store credit card. And then anything less than  an "outstanding" ranking didn't court towards the store benefits. I'm not sure who decided we should do it but the store manager always told us to tell customers about the survey and then say we needed an outstanding rank for every category.

Now I usually don't fill out the surveys just because I feel like corporate sets them up to hurt the actual retail employees. Since from my experience corporate people don't want real feedback it's not worth it to me to give it to them. I also don't want to risk having generally understaffed places even more understaffed because corporate cut payroll because people gave honest feedback instead of unearned perfect scores. If I do have a perfect experience I will fill out a survey but that does include not being told how I should be responding.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: MindsEye on April 11, 2013, 02:07:15 PM
I have actually told people that I would not rate them a 10, and therefor would not be filling out the survey.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Twik on April 11, 2013, 02:16:00 PM
If they want to punish staff for not getting top marks, a 10-point scale is the wrong way to go. As others have said, should a normal, though well executed, interaction be rated the same as someone who went well above the call of duty? But should the normal transaction be penalized if they just never got an opening to do more?

What they should be asking is, "Were you happy with the service you received? Yes/No/Not totally" They don't need a scale of ten to tell them if the customer was happy.

Then, "Is there anything we could have done to improve your experience?" And this should NOT reflect on staff. It should simply be treated as a suggestion box from customers, who may think of improvements that everyone else has overlooked.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 11, 2013, 02:27:28 PM
I still won't do it. I hate companies that spend so much time and money to check up on their employees. Just pay them well, treat them well, and the customers will benefit. Why is that so hard for management to understand?! (I sometimes wish I could rate the management on the number of stupid ideas they institute. I would definitely fill out a form for that--and heading the list would be "fire the piece of rot who decided that I should donate to your corporate donation."  >:()

I am right there with you! Esp when (as someone who works in retail) we have to institute and follow each stupid corporate policy and idea.  My store doesn't have surveys, thankfully, but I can see us getting dinged on such things as not bending over backwards and violating our return policy to give a customer what they want, running out of a popular size and having to (gasp) find it for them in another store or from the catalog, or shipping on orders taking too long since we use Fed Ex Smartpost, which sends it all over heck and back.

None of which, we, the store-level employees, have any control over. But some people don't care. in their minds, if they can't get what they want, no matter what it is, then they will not rate a 10.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Bijou on April 11, 2013, 03:21:01 PM
I don't mind surveys, but I once called a business and had the customer service representative dribble honey into the phone with something like, "What can I do to make your call to us a perfectly lovely and beautiful experience, dear valued customer?".  I knew they must have been told by their powers that be to be nice, and over-boardly so.  I just wanted to scream "Stop it!  You're making my ear all sticky!!!!"  If there had been a survey I don't know what I would have said!
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Peregrine on April 11, 2013, 05:16:34 PM
I hate those stupid surveys with the fiery passion of a thousand suns......I worked at a Joanns Fabrics when we started having to do those.  We were essentially told by our upper management that the survey was designed to show a failure on our part if we got any less than a perfect score, because according to their algorithm only a perfect score indicated that the person would come back and spread good word about you in the community.

That survey nonsense was why I actually quit.  It wasn't enough to efficiently check your customer out and wish them a good day.  Customers were quizzed on the sincerity of our "thank you".  It was a bunch of BS.  We could never make ourselves good enough for certain of our customers and I got tired of bending over backwards.  Some people were never going to be happy unless you gave them their entire order for free and volunteered to carry it to their car for them.  The amount of backlash we got from upper management was so depressing that morale was terrible.  We were never good enough, never going to be good enough, and might as well just quit trying.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Luci on April 11, 2013, 05:22:05 PM
I don't fill out surveys at all.

I go to the hospital to get a test, I go to a dealership to buy a car, I go to Pancake House for a meal, I go to a campground to have a place to stay and shower. I do not do these things to do homework!

One trip I had 6 KOA surveys in my inbox! I simple wrote to corporate separately, so the campgrounds wouldn't get into trouble, just that. If we have an individual problem, we usually just tell the immediate supervisor privately, no matter what kind of business it is. Now I have finally learned not to let people know we have an email address - we are old enough to get away with that, even though we have three. (Business, private, and just with one person.)

For the "would you recommend this to others?', my answer would always be 'No!' If we recommend something and it goes south, it's all our fault, so it's best just not to answer the surveys. This is true especially for electronics and medical care.

When we have a particularly friendly cashier who does the survey spiel, we usually laugh and say, "They make you say that, don't they?" The answer is usually a rueful smile.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: P12663 on April 11, 2013, 05:23:53 PM
I filled out a survey once.  It was for a tour that we had taken and we were not happy.  There had been two incidents where people were hurt, lost laundry, bad food, misinformation given out; in general a lousy time was had by all.

I even got a response:  "Thank you for your comments.  We are so glad that you enjoyed the trip!"

You have to wonder - did anyone even read the survey?
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: HoneyBee42 on April 11, 2013, 07:38:19 PM
I don't fill out surveys, but if I have a less than stellar experience, I will write to corporate and lay out exactly what went wrong.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: doodlemor on April 11, 2013, 08:00:26 PM
I have twice had a carry out guy at Wegman's give me a survey to fill out and mail back about his services.  The first time he just asked me to fill it out and mail it back.  The second time he told me that he was giving me *homework,* and that he would get a bonus or prize or something if I did this.  Both times the forms were tossed.

Wegman's is considered to be a good place to work, with generally high employee satisfaction.  Never, ever, has anyone else there ever asked to to fill out a survey.  Not at the register, no other carry out guys - nobody except this one guy.

This guy's behavior was rather annoying, but I don't want to report him because he seems to be one of the mentally challenged people that they hire. 

On another note, I once emailed Wegman's corporate headquarters to praise a cashier who had been outstandingly patient and efficient on the day before Mother's Day.  On the next day, which was Mother's Day, I received a happy and kind phone message from the store manager thanking me for my appreciative words about his cashier.

Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Bluenomi on April 11, 2013, 08:30:30 PM
I bought a new car recently and was warned by the saleman that I'd be getting a follow up survey from the company, they are big on customer service and rate anything less than 9/10 as bad.

I like him and the car so I did it but I do think it's a bit unfair on the sales staff. Some customers are never going to be happy no matter what you do so they skew the results.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 11, 2013, 08:47:27 PM
Quote
I don't fill out surveys at all.

I go to the hospital to get a test, I go to a dealership to buy a car, I go to Pancake House for a meal, I go to a campground to have a place to stay and shower. I do not do these things to do homework!

I'm the opposite.  I love doing the surveys!  They're asking for my opinion, and I give it.  I'm truthful about how I felt my visit went.  If I felt it was a good experience*, I give a good review.  If it's not a good experience, I try to give a constructive type of feedback so, if the company truly is looking to improve in some areas, they have some ideas from this end of the transaction.
 
HOWEVER, tell me what to rate you as, and my score will drop.  You don't get to tell me how to fill out my survey.  If you want my opinion, I'll give it, but don't dictate it to me.


*  And, by that, I mean in a reasonable way - not in a "you must cater to me, because I'm the customer and you should be honored to have me here" type of way; I'm not over the top in what I want as a customer, and I do make allowances for real life type issues such as a store that's swamped and doing the best they can at the time.  I know that there are times when service might not be 100% for a legitimate reason but that the store/restaurant/whatever is handling it the best way they can.  I don't hold that against them.



Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: nutraxfornerves on April 11, 2013, 09:02:15 PM
I filled out a survey once.  It was for a tour that we had taken and we were not happy.  There had been two incidents where people were hurt, lost laundry, bad food, misinformation given out; in general a lousy time was had by all.

I even got a response:  "Thank you for your comments.  We are so glad that you enjoyed the trip!"

You have to wonder - did anyone even read the survey?
I got a survey from a tour company with which I had taken 10 or so trips. I hadn't always filled out surveys for previous trips, but this one had been a disaster. The tour leader in no way met the high standards I was accustomed ot with this company. Really--is it a good idea to leave your clients to stew in a hot van for 45 minutes while you go shopping for decor for your house? Or to refuse to allow a client with car sickness to sit up front in the seat you have claimed for you own? Or to tell clients to be ready to depart at 8 AM, but not show until 10?

The company response? Well, before I got the survey, I had discovered that they were offering one of my bucket list trips. I had immediately booked. After they got my survey, they  apologized profusely and  offered me a serious discount on the bucket list trip. Which turned out to be incredible, with one of the best tour leaders I've ever seen.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Sophie Jenkins on April 11, 2013, 09:35:26 PM
Quote
I don't fill out surveys at all.

I go to the hospital to get a test, I go to a dealership to buy a car, I go to Pancake House for a meal, I go to a campground to have a place to stay and shower. I do not do these things to do homework!

I'm the opposite.  I love doing the surveys!  They're asking for my opinion, and I give it.  I'm truthful about how I felt my visit went.  If I felt it was a good experience*, I give a good review.  If it's not a good experience, I try to give a constructive type of feedback so, if the company truly is looking to improve in some areas, they have some ideas from this end of the transaction.
 
HOWEVER, tell me what to rate you as, and my score will drop.  You don't get to tell me how to fill out my survey.  If you want my opinion, I'll give it, but don't dictate it to me.


*  And, by that, I mean in a reasonable way - not in a "you must cater to me, because I'm the customer and you should be honored to have me here" type of way; I'm not over the top in what I want as a customer, and I do make allowances for real life type issues such as a store that's swamped and doing the best they can at the time.  I know that there are times when service might not be 100% for a legitimate reason but that the store/restaurant/whatever is handling it the best way they can.  I don't hold that against them.

Thing is, corporate offices very rarely actually take into account the *content* of the surveys. You can leave a constructive, well-though-out comment about how your needs were adequately met, and rate them a 6-7 out of 10 for not going above and beyond because you didn't need them to, or give them a chance to, or whatever... and all the company will see is a non-perfect score and scold the employee for it.

That's not your fault, but a perfectly nice, hard worker will still pay for a lack of a perfect score.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Miss Tickle on April 11, 2013, 11:23:05 PM
It's an either/or game. There are no shades of grey. 10 is pass, 9 is fail. That's why they ask for a 10. Please keep that in mind when you do these surveys.

Companies make their staff live and die by LTR (likelyhood to recommend).  It's terrible when something out of your control like new regulations, higher  interest rates or taxes cause your service ratings to drop. It's even worse when they say, "We really like you, but we never give tens."

Our bonuses are based partly on LTR, and a low score can be costly. We track the 10's as well as the 9/10's and it's interesting to note how much a centre's scores can change if you add in the 90th percentile.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 11, 2013, 11:35:49 PM
Quote
I don't fill out surveys at all.

I go to the hospital to get a test, I go to a dealership to buy a car, I go to Pancake House for a meal, I go to a campground to have a place to stay and shower. I do not do these things to do homework!

I'm the opposite.  I love doing the surveys!  They're asking for my opinion, and I give it.  I'm truthful about how I felt my visit went.  If I felt it was a good experience*, I give a good review.  If it's not a good experience, I try to give a constructive type of feedback so, if the company truly is looking to improve in some areas, they have some ideas from this end of the transaction.
 
HOWEVER, tell me what to rate you as, and my score will drop.  You don't get to tell me how to fill out my survey.  If you want my opinion, I'll give it, but don't dictate it to me.


*  And, by that, I mean in a reasonable way - not in a "you must cater to me, because I'm the customer and you should be honored to have me here" type of way; I'm not over the top in what I want as a customer, and I do make allowances for real life type issues such as a store that's swamped and doing the best they can at the time.  I know that there are times when service might not be 100% for a legitimate reason but that the store/restaurant/whatever is handling it the best way they can.  I don't hold that against them.

Thing is, corporate offices very rarely actually take into account the *content* of the surveys. You can leave a constructive, well-though-out comment about how your needs were adequately met, and rate them a 6-7 out of 10 for not going above and beyond because you didn't need them to, or give them a chance to, or whatever... and all the company will see is a non-perfect score and scold the employee for it.

That's not your fault, but a perfectly nice, hard worker will still pay for a lack of a perfect score.

That last sentence is the key, though. You've given me the opportunity to give you feedback that you can choose to use in order to rise above your competition. Whether you do so is up to you. But if you don't want to get responses, don't provide the means for people to give them to you (all "yous" meaning the business, of course).

What use is a bunch of surveys with 10s on them? If that's all you want, pass them out at your company meetings or hire a department within your company to get your own workers to do the busy work of circling 10s on some sheets of paper and paste them all over the building in some delusional "rose-colored glasses" attempt to pat yourselves on the back.

OR actually read your surveys from the people you want money from and see if they have some merit. Not all will. Some people will complete them in a way that's not true. Learn how to cull those out and get to the ones that have some honest words about where you're succeeding or could improve.

But the choice as to which of the above you take is not my problem. And I'm not going to pacify you by lying in order to make it my problem.

Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: MariaE on April 11, 2013, 11:53:22 PM
I'm the opposite.  I love doing the surveys!  They're asking for my opinion, and I give it.  I'm truthful about how I felt my visit went.  If I felt it was a good experience*, I give a good review.  If it's not a good experience, I try to give a constructive type of feedback so, if the company truly is looking to improve in some areas, they have some ideas from this end of the transaction.
 
HOWEVER, tell me what to rate you as, and my score will drop.  You don't get to tell me how to fill out my survey.  If you want my opinion, I'll give it, but don't dictate it to me.


*  And, by that, I mean in a reasonable way - not in a "you must cater to me, because I'm the customer and you should be honored to have me here" type of way; I'm not over the top in what I want as a customer, and I do make allowances for real life type issues such as a store that's swamped and doing the best they can at the time.  I know that there are times when service might not be 100% for a legitimate reason but that the store/restaurant/whatever is handling it the best way they can.  I don't hold that against them.

Thing is, corporate offices very rarely actually take into account the *content* of the surveys. You can leave a constructive, well-though-out comment about how your needs were adequately met, and rate them a 6-7 out of 10 for not going above and beyond because you didn't need them to, or give them a chance to, or whatever... and all the company will see is a non-perfect score and scold the employee for it.

That's not your fault, but a perfectly nice, hard worker will still pay for a lack of a perfect score.

That last sentence is the key, though. You've given me the opportunity to give you feedback that you can choose to use in order to rise above your competition. Whether you do so is up to you. But if you don't want to get responses, don't provide the means for people to give them to you (all "yous" meaning the business, of course).

What use is a bunch of surveys with 10s on them? If that's all you want, pass them out at your company meetings or hire a department within your company to get your own workers to do the busy work of circling 10s on some sheets of paper and paste them all over the building in some delusional "rose-colored glasses" attempt to pat yourselves on the back.

OR actually read your surveys from the people you want money from and see if they have some merit. Not all will. Some people will complete them in a way that's not true. Learn how to cull those out and get to the ones that have some honest words about where you're succeeding or could improve.

But the choice as to which of the above you take is not my problem. And I'm not going to pacify you by lying in order to make it my problem.

Well said, DottyG. I agree completely.

Somebody else mentioned that they'd never give out 10s anyway because 10 = perfect. I don't see the scale going from "Awful" to "Perfect" but from "Hopeless" to "No need for improvement". So a person doesn't have to go above and beyond to get a 10, they just have to leave me with nothing to complain about :) So higher than "Adequate" but lower than "Perfect".
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 11, 2013, 11:54:53 PM
I don't mean that to sound as harsh as it appears. I understand that there's a problem. And it lies with Corporate and their misguided ideas.  But how do we get that fixed?
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Sophie Jenkins on April 11, 2013, 11:55:21 PM
Thing is, corporate offices very rarely actually take into account the *content* of the surveys. You can leave a constructive, well-though-out comment about how your needs were adequately met, and rate them a 6-7 out of 10 for not going above and beyond because you didn't need them to, or give them a chance to, or whatever... and all the company will see is a non-perfect score and scold the employee for it.

That's not your fault, but a perfectly nice, hard worker will still pay for a lack of a perfect score.

That last sentence is the key, though. You've given me the opportunity to give you feedback that you can choose to use in order to rise above your competition. Whether you do so is up to you. But if you don't want to get responses, don't provide the means for people to give them to you (all "yous" meaning the business, of course).

What use is a bunch of surveys with 10s on them? If that's all you want, pass them out at your company meetings or hire a department within your company to get your own workers to do the busy work of circling 10s on some sheets of paper and paste them all over the building in some delusional "rose-colored glasses" attempt to pat yourselves on the back.

OR actually read your surveys from the people you want money from and see if they have some merit. Not all will. Some people will complete them in a way that's not true. Learn how to cull those out and get to the ones that have some honest words about where you're succeeding or could improve.

But the choice as to which of the above you take is not my problem. And I'm not going to pacify you by lying in order to make it my problem.

The employees who have to ask for all tens know that they're useless, believe me. And they know that people hate being asked for a particular score. But they aren't the ones who are seeing those surveys and "learning" from the feedback. Corporate is.

And corporate rules are corporate rules, usually made by people who haven't worked directly with customers in years.

If you want to be heard, surveys will not do that. Contacting corporate directly will.

If you had a bad experience, by all means express that. If nothing was wrong but it wasn't outstanding, think twice about filling out the survey at all if you can't give it top marks honestly. How would you like to get written up because you did a solid job without any mistakes but someone who only saw you for two minutes felt like you were just okay?
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Sophie Jenkins on April 11, 2013, 11:55:54 PM
I don't mean that to sound as harsh as it appears. I understand that there's a problem. And it lies with Corporate and their misguided ideas.  But how do we get that fixed?

You fix it by talking to corporate, not taking surveys that get perfectly good employees in trouble.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 12, 2013, 12:16:18 AM
I don't mean that to sound as harsh as it appears. I understand that there's a problem. And it lies with Corporate and their misguided ideas.  But how do we get that fixed?

You fix it by talking to corporate, not taking surveys that get perfectly good employees in trouble.

Or you fix it by giving honest and accurate reviews, letting corporate make their mistakes, and when enough people do it, corporate starts to realize that penalizing employees for things out of their control is a stupid way to run a store.  Yes, it means that employees get caught in the middle - but I refuse to spend time giving false evaluations just because some corporation chooses to hold their employees' welfare hostage.  I will - maybe - spend some time giving an honest evaluation if I actually do want the company to improve or I want to commend a job particularly well done.  I won't bother wasting my time on any evaluation at all if I have to lie on it.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Sophie Jenkins on April 12, 2013, 12:47:54 AM
I don't mean that to sound as harsh as it appears. I understand that there's a problem. And it lies with Corporate and their misguided ideas.  But how do we get that fixed?

You fix it by talking to corporate, not taking surveys that get perfectly good employees in trouble.

Or you fix it by giving honest and accurate reviews, letting corporate make their mistakes, and when enough people do it, corporate starts to realize that penalizing employees for things out of their control is a stupid way to run a store.  Yes, it means that employees get caught in the middle - but I refuse to spend time giving false evaluations just because some corporation chooses to hold their employees' welfare hostage.  I will - maybe - spend some time giving an honest evaluation if I actually do want the company to improve or I want to commend a job particularly well done.  I won't bother wasting my time on any evaluation at all if I have to lie on it.

How would you feel about an employee describing to you how the ranking system works? Like, if they said that corporate sees 5=pretty good or better 4=neutral 3=bad 2=very bad 1=worst ever, would you see that as telling you how to rate them, or as informing you of a system you might not be familiar with?

Because that's really what's going on here. They give a 1-5 or 1-10 scale, but they don't actually consider the numbers in an intuitive way. It tends to be very binary, with 1-9=0 and 10=1. In fact, binary was exactly how the Borders system of surveys was described to me by my general manager.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 12, 2013, 12:51:27 AM
I don't mean that to sound as harsh as it appears. I understand that there's a problem. And it lies with Corporate and their misguided ideas.  But how do we get that fixed?

You fix it by talking to corporate, not taking surveys that get perfectly good employees in trouble.

Or you fix it by giving honest and accurate reviews, letting corporate make their mistakes, and when enough people do it, corporate starts to realize that penalizing employees for things out of their control is a stupid way to run a store.  Yes, it means that employees get caught in the middle - but I refuse to spend time giving false evaluations just because some corporation chooses to hold their employees' welfare hostage.  I will - maybe - spend some time giving an honest evaluation if I actually do want the company to improve or I want to commend a job particularly well done.  I won't bother wasting my time on any evaluation at all if I have to lie on it.

How would you feel about an employee describing to you how the ranking system works? Like, if they said that corporate sees 5=pretty good or better 4=neutral 3=bad 2=very bad 1=worst ever, would you see that as telling you how to rate them, or as informing you of a system you might not be familiar with?

Because that's really what's going on here. They give a 1-5 or 1-10 scale, but they don't actually consider the numbers in an intuitive way. It tends to be very binary, with 1-9=0 and 10=1. In fact, binary was exactly how the Borders system of surveys was described to me by my general manager.

Personally, I would go by what the survey says instead of what the employee says.  I don't think I've ever seen a survey that didn't give a written scale (like "From 1 to 10 where 1 is "not very good" and 10 is "excellent"").  If the company lies on their survey - asking for a 1-10 scale and really only wanting true/false - that's their issue to fix and not something I want to have to correct for.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: MrsJWine on April 12, 2013, 12:58:59 AM
I don't mean that to sound as harsh as it appears. I understand that there's a problem. And it lies with Corporate and their misguided ideas.  But how do we get that fixed?

You fix it by talking to corporate, not taking surveys that get perfectly good employees in trouble.

Or you fix it by giving honest and accurate reviews, letting corporate make their mistakes, and when enough people do it, corporate starts to realize that penalizing employees for things out of their control is a stupid way to run a store.  Yes, it means that employees get caught in the middle - but I refuse to spend time giving false evaluations just because some corporation chooses to hold their employees' welfare hostage.  I will - maybe - spend some time giving an honest evaluation if I actually do want the company to improve or I want to commend a job particularly well done.  I won't bother wasting my time on any evaluation at all if I have to lie on it.

This went on for at least ten years at the restaurant I worked, and nothing ever changed. It's still doing well business-wise, and they still have the stupid surveys.

You can't give honest and accurate reviews because you're speaking a different language than they are. You're speaking normal person English, and they are speaking a twisted version in which "good/neutral/fair" = "fail" and "perfect/exceptional" = "pass". Either speak the same language they are, or don't fill out the surveys. Corporate isn't getting the message; lower-level management and local employees are.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 12, 2013, 01:45:21 AM
Back to my question I posted above then. If they're this useless, why have them? Why ask customers to do them instead of hiring a new department in the company to sit and complete some fake surveys for you?
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: atirial on April 12, 2013, 04:33:28 AM
I really dislike these, because so few companies actually do anything about the feedback. The only one I will fill out for a local chain store doesn't have a 1-10 scale, just boxes for comments and has been known to act on them.

Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: zyrs on April 12, 2013, 05:02:16 AM
Back to my question I posted above then. If they're this useless, why have them? Why ask customers to do them instead of hiring a new department in the company to sit and complete some fake surveys for you?

The reason they have these surveys is so corporate management looks good and get their bonuses.  If your survey isn't all 10s, they can cull perfectly good employees and show that they are "taking care of problems".  If your survey is all 10s, they can point to that as proof they are doing their job. 

This is why I will not fill out any survey unless the service was so horrible that I think the employee should not be employed.  Because anything less than a 10 is going to have that result.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Outdoor Girl on April 12, 2013, 07:57:20 AM
If they are are considering 10 to be the only acceptable score, why don't they just have:

0 - did not meet expectations
1 - met or exceeded expectations

And then give you a box to provide comments.

If they are going to treat it as a binary system anyway, they might as well have you answer that way.  I bet it would vastly improve their scores.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Thipu1 on April 12, 2013, 08:20:53 AM
If they are are considering 10 to be the only acceptable score, why don't they just have:

0 - did not meet expectations
1 - met or exceeded expectations

And then give you a box to provide comments.

If they are going to treat it as a binary system anyway, they might as well have you answer that way.  I bet it would vastly improve their scores.

That suggestion makes excellent sense. 

Apart from restaurant comment cards, I haven't come across evaluation forms in a retail situation. 

Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: siamesecat2965 on April 12, 2013, 08:42:03 AM

Or you fix it by giving honest and accurate reviews, letting corporate make their mistakes, and when enough people do it, corporate starts to realize that penalizing employees for things out of their control is a stupid way to run a store.  Yes, it means that employees get caught in the middle - but I refuse to spend time giving false evaluations just because some corporation chooses to hold their employees' welfare hostage.  I will - maybe - spend some time giving an honest evaluation if I actually do want the company to improve or I want to commend a job particularly well done.  I won't bother wasting my time on any evaluation at all if I have to lie on it.

Unfortunately, I don't think this will ever happen. Corporate will continue their charade with the surveys, and nothing will change. I agree with everyone else who says contact them direclty if you have either an issue or want to compliment then. I can tell you it WILL get passed down to store level. esp. if its negative
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Sharnita on April 12, 2013, 08:49:08 AM

Or you fix it by giving honest and accurate reviews, letting corporate make their mistakes, and when enough people do it, corporate starts to realize that penalizing employees for things out of their control is a stupid way to run a store.  Yes, it means that employees get caught in the middle - but I refuse to spend time giving false evaluations just because some corporation chooses to hold their employees' welfare hostage.  I will - maybe - spend some time giving an honest evaluation if I actually do want the company to improve or I want to commend a job particularly well done.  I won't bother wasting my time on any evaluation at all if I have to lie on it.

Unfortunately, I don't think this will ever happen. Corporate will continue their charade with the surveys, and nothing will change. I agree with everyone else who says contact them direclty if you have either an issue or want to compliment then. I can tell you it WILL get passed down to store level. esp. if its negative

Not always.  Go to the facebook page of a lot of companies and you will see people posting about a problem they had.  The company responds "Contact us by ..." and a good percentage of the time the person has contacted them and has hear nothing more.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Cami on April 12, 2013, 09:04:45 AM
Back to my question I posted above then. If they're this useless, why have them? Why ask customers to do them instead of hiring a new department in the company to sit and complete some fake surveys for you?
Have you ever read the Dilbert comics? They explain why companies act like this quite well.

As an example, a company I worked for had employee reviews. The RULE is that you are not told of any compliments your boss receives about you, but you are told of any complaints. The theory is that if you only hear bad feedback, you'll work harder so that you don't get any bad feedback. Does this make sense? Of course not. Are they going to change their ways? Of course not. Why? Inertia, refusal to admit mistakes, and bassackward understanding of what constitutes EFFECTIVE motivational techniques. In other words, stupid people rise to mid-management positions where their stupid ideas become policy.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Sophie Jenkins on April 12, 2013, 10:09:23 AM
Personally, I would go by what the survey says instead of what the employee says.  I don't think I've ever seen a survey that didn't give a written scale (like "From 1 to 10 where 1 is "not very good" and 10 is "excellent"").  If the company lies on their survey - asking for a 1-10 scale and really only wanting true/false - that's their issue to fix and not something I want to have to correct for.

This sounds very much like the people who, when informed that in much of the US servers get paid below minimum wage and are expected to have tips fill in the difference, refuse to tip in order to encourage the system to change.

If you're not willing to fulfill the social contract of tipping, don't go out to eat. If you're not willing to speak the language of the survey, don't fill out the survey.

The only people who get hurt in either case are the people who have no power to effect change.

Corporate would definitely re-evaluate the survey process if they suddenly stopped getting any results back whatsoever.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Calistoga on April 12, 2013, 10:21:05 AM
We have these random surveys that print out on some of receipts at my place of work that ask for a 1-5 score.

The kicker?

Getting a 4 is EXACTLY the same as getting a 1. It looks just as bad on us and we get chewed out just as much. This might be why so many places emphasis the "Give me a 10!" thing- it's literally all or nothing, either you're perfect or you suck.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Sharnita on April 12, 2013, 10:30:16 AM
Personally, I would go by what the survey says instead of what the employee says.  I don't think I've ever seen a survey that didn't give a written scale (like "From 1 to 10 where 1 is "not very good" and 10 is "excellent"").  If the company lies on their survey - asking for a 1-10 scale and really only wanting true/false - that's their issue to fix and not something I want to have to correct for.

This sounds very much like the people who, when informed that in much of the US servers get paid below minimum wage and are expected to have tips fill in the difference, refuse to tip in order to encourage the system to change.

If you're not willing to fulfill the social contract of tipping, don't go out to eat. If you're not willing to speak the language of the survey, don't fill out the survey.

The only people who get hurt in either case are the people who have no power to effect change.

Corporate would definitely re-evaluate the survey process if they suddenly stopped getting any results back whatsoever.

I think there is a very clear indication of the intention to go by the language of the survey.  The problem is that apparently some people are expected to divine on at least some surveys that they aren't supposed speak the language of the contract but rather some other, secret language.  If you believe there is a social contract to know and speak that language then I heartily disagree with you.  That would be like arguing that being informed of an 18% autogratuity in reality obligates everyone to tip 25% and we should all know that and tip accordingly or not go out to eat.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: camlan on April 12, 2013, 10:38:14 AM
I bought a new car recently and was warned by the saleman that I'd be getting a follow up survey from the company, they are big on customer service and rate anything less than 9/10 as bad.

I like him and the car so I did it but I do think it's a bit unfair on the sales staff. Some customers are never going to be happy no matter what you do so they skew the results.

Had a similar survey the last time I bought a car. Wasn't going to do the survey, but I'm a bit OCD about user manuals, and I'd read the owner's manual for the car from front to back. There was a massive problem with the instructions for installing a child safety seat--I think an entire line of text was dropped out. It was early enough in internet days that there was no way to contact them on-line, and the woman doing the survey called the day after I'd read the manual, so I took the darn survey just so I could tell her about the problem.

If it had been something about how to clean the floor mats or the like, I wouldn't have bothered. But a child safety seat--that's a different story.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Sophie Jenkins on April 12, 2013, 10:59:02 AM
Personally, I would go by what the survey says instead of what the employee says.  I don't think I've ever seen a survey that didn't give a written scale (like "From 1 to 10 where 1 is "not very good" and 10 is "excellent"").  If the company lies on their survey - asking for a 1-10 scale and really only wanting true/false - that's their issue to fix and not something I want to have to correct for.

This sounds very much like the people who, when informed that in much of the US servers get paid below minimum wage and are expected to have tips fill in the difference, refuse to tip in order to encourage the system to change.

If you're not willing to fulfill the social contract of tipping, don't go out to eat. If you're not willing to speak the language of the survey, don't fill out the survey.

The only people who get hurt in either case are the people who have no power to effect change.

Corporate would definitely re-evaluate the survey process if they suddenly stopped getting any results back whatsoever.

I think there is a very clear indication of the intention to go by the language of the survey.  The problem is that apparently some people are expected to divine on at least some surveys that they aren't supposed speak the language of the contract but rather some other, secret language.  If you believe there is a social contract to know and speak that language then I heartily disagree with you.  That would be like arguing that being informed of an 18% autogratuity in reality obligates everyone to tip 25% and we should all know that and tip accordingly or not go out to eat.

That's not what I said at all.

Being informed of how the surveys work behind the scenes is like being told that servers don't make minimum wage. I don't expect anyone to know either piece of information without being told first. That would be totally unreasonable!

However, being told and then insisting upon behaving in a way that hurts people who don't deserve it- that's where the social contract comes in. Once you know how the surveys work, despite the untrue phrasing used on the surveys themselves, either take it into account or don't do the survey.

I'm not asking anyone to lie. Far from it! I'm only explaining how the corporate offices actually read the surveys. It's not an intuitive and reasonable system- if it were, we would not be having this conversation at all!


An example I personally witnessed: A cashier, one of our best and friendliest employees, gave out a survey (it printed with the receipt automatically), and the customer was livid about their whole visit, due to the fact that the "employee" they'd asked for help had claimed to not be an employee.

(spoiler alert: they were, in fact, another customer, and the angry customer had totally ignored the actual employees offering to help him. the situation was pretty hilarious at the time.)

The cashier was given a 2 of 5 survey score by this customer. So corporate ordered that she be written up. The general manager fought  the write-up, because not a single thing about the customer's anger was the cashier's or even the store as a whole's fault.

That cashier- a friendly, sweet, kind-hearted woman who worked hard and was never late and only wanted to help customers, eventually got fired because she got too many surveys with 4 out of 5's on them. Corporate didn't care- they only wanted a body to ask all their questions and take money. But the morale and actual customer service levels in our store directly suffered as a result of corporate being obtuse about surveys.


Taking surveys the way you think is right is fine, but shouldn't you care enough about the people around you to take into account new information about how they work?
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Outdoor Girl on April 12, 2013, 11:11:28 AM
That's why I will only do a survey now if I have a complaint.  I'm not willing to give out top marks unless the service was exceptional so I won't do it at all if I was just happy with the service I received.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Cami on April 12, 2013, 11:16:36 AM
Personally, I would go by what the survey says instead of what the employee says.  I don't think I've ever seen a survey that didn't give a written scale (like "From 1 to 10 where 1 is "not very good" and 10 is "excellent"").  If the company lies on their survey - asking for a 1-10 scale and really only wanting true/false - that's their issue to fix and not something I want to have to correct for.

This sounds very much like the people who, when informed that in much of the US servers get paid below minimum wage and are expected to have tips fill in the difference, refuse to tip in order to encourage the system to change.

If you're not willing to fulfill the social contract of tipping, don't go out to eat. If you're not willing to speak the language of the survey, don't fill out the survey.

The only people who get hurt in either case are the people who have no power to effect change.

Corporate would definitely re-evaluate the survey process if they suddenly stopped getting any results back whatsoever.

I think there is a very clear indication of the intention to go by the language of the survey.  The problem is that apparently some people are expected to divine on at least some surveys that they aren't supposed speak the language of the contract but rather some other, secret language.  If you believe there is a social contract to know and speak that language then I heartily disagree with you.  That would be like arguing that being informed of an 18% autogratuity in reality obligates everyone to tip 25% and we should all know that and tip accordingly or not go out to eat.

That's not what I said at all.

Being informed of how the surveys work behind the scenes is like being told that servers don't make minimum wage. I don't expect anyone to know either piece of information without being told first. That would be totally unreasonable!

However, being told and then insisting upon behaving in a way that hurts people who don't deserve it- that's where the social contract comes in. Once you know how the surveys work, despite the untrue phrasing used on the surveys themselves, either take it into account or don't do the survey.

I'm not asking anyone to lie. Far from it! I'm only explaining how the corporate offices actually read the surveys. It's not an intuitive and reasonable system- if it were, we would not be having this conversation at all!


An example I personally witnessed: A cashier, one of our best and friendliest employees, gave out a survey (it printed with the receipt automatically), and the customer was livid about their whole visit, due to the fact that the "employee" they'd asked for help had claimed to not be an employee.

(spoiler alert: they were, in fact, another customer, and the angry customer had totally ignored the actual employees offering to help him. the situation was pretty hilarious at the time.)

The cashier was given a 2 of 5 survey score by this customer. So corporate ordered that she be written up. The general manager fought  the write-up, because not a single thing about the customer's anger was the cashier's or even the store as a whole's fault.

That cashier- a friendly, sweet, kind-hearted woman who worked hard and was never late and only wanted to help customers, eventually got fired because she got too many surveys with 4 out of 5's on them. Corporate didn't care- they only wanted a body to ask all their questions and take money. But the morale and actual customer service levels in our store directly suffered as a result of corporate being obtuse about surveys.


Taking surveys the way you think is right is fine, but shouldn't you care enough about the people around you to take into account new information about how they work?
Parking my POD right here.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Barney girl on April 12, 2013, 11:38:42 AM
Disclaimer - I dislike doing surveys myself as I find them boring.

That said we are a firm which is independently audited to achieve a particular quality mark and one of the many items we're audited against is client feedback. [I deal with compliance and wonder if I'll ever have to time to do my main job there's so much I have to check and audit for quality standards].

We used to send out questionnaires to clients, but gave up on that as most won't returned. It was generally only if there was a very high or very low comment they came in. We moved over for a while to telephone surveys, but that wasn't ideal, so are putting in hand emails with a short survey.

It would be pointless to us if those came back with only full marks as we wouldn't learn from them. Ultimately we see the surveys as way of finding out where we have problems and putting them right. If a client doesn't like us they'll not only never come back, but they'll tell ten other people as well. We'd rather know at early stage that there are issues.

What it boils down to is - please don't tar all surveys with the same brush. Some may be for genuine reasons.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Twik on April 12, 2013, 11:48:42 AM
I fill out surveys if I like the service, and want them to get the props for it.

The only time I'd pass in a survey with bad ratings is if the service had been atrocious, and I was looking for a storm of Biblical proportions to fall on everyone involved.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Sophie Jenkins on April 12, 2013, 11:53:30 AM
Disclaimer - I dislike doing surveys myself as I find them boring.

That said we are a firm which is independently audited to achieve a particular quality mark and one of the many items we're audited against is client feedback. [I deal with compliance and wonder if I'll ever have to time to do my main job there's so much I have to check and audit for quality standards].

We used to send out questionnaires to clients, but gave up on that as most won't returned. It was generally only if there was a very high or very low comment they came in. We moved over for a while to telephone surveys, but that wasn't ideal, so are putting in hand emails with a short survey.

It would be pointless to us if those came back with only full marks as we wouldn't learn from them. Ultimately we see the surveys as way of finding out where we have problems and putting them right. If a client doesn't like us they'll not only never come back, but they'll tell ten other people as well. We'd rather know at early stage that there are issues.

What it boils down to is - please don't tar all surveys with the same brush. Some may be for genuine reasons.

I see you used the term "clients." I presume you're not in a retail/food service field? What I'm talking about are the surveys in retail and food service, which have been used exactly as I described by every establishment that I and my friends have worked for.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Calistoga on April 12, 2013, 11:57:55 AM
On the same kind of note, I've recently started getting PHONE CALLS the day after a hospital visit where the receptionist basically asks me all those types of questions. To me this is like...300 times worse, because I feel bad saying "Well honestly, the doctor I saw was horrible" to an actual person.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 12, 2013, 12:43:57 PM
Sophie, I just thought of something else.  A lot of times, the survey doesn't ask for the name of an employee.  And there have even been times when there's not a question for the date/time or anything else that could possibly be linked to a specific person.

So if a negative one is completed, how is one employee hurt by it?  If they're punishing everyone that works there at all times of the day or night for survey with a 9 instead of a 10 on it, the place has more problems to deal with than my little 9.

Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 12, 2013, 12:47:40 PM
It seems to me that the companies could save on the cost of these surveys and actually give themselves all raises with the money, if that's the final intent anyway.  If all they want is a bonus check, skip the middleman and the farse of getting the customers' opinions.

Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Twik on April 12, 2013, 01:13:30 PM
Yes, but that overlooks the "Dilbert Principle". This way, they *feel* that they are doing something useful, even though they're not.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Jones on April 12, 2013, 01:42:43 PM
There have been recent articles about poor organization in Walmart stores and the people getting frustrated at empty shelves in front, full boxes in the back. The Walmart spokesperson has been quoted as claiming the surveys show customer satisfaction. Well, yeah, since the CSRs ask for good scores and people who fill them out are A-happy customers, or B-very angry customers, they probably aren't getting a reply from C-customers who couldn't find what they wanted and went elsewhere.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Sophie Jenkins on April 12, 2013, 02:42:08 PM
Sophie, I just thought of something else.  A lot of times, the survey doesn't ask for the name of an employee.  And there have even been times when there's not a question for the date/time or anything else that could possibly be linked to a specific person.

So if a negative one is completed, how is one employee hurt by it?  If they're punishing everyone that works there at all times of the day or night for survey with a 9 instead of a 10 on it, the place has more problems to deal with than my little 9.

If it's the kind of survey that prints out from the register, there is usually a code to input. That code gives them all the information about date/time/cashier without having to rely on an untrained customer to find that info on the receipt.

It has been my experience that negative surveys without identifying information of any kind (which were incredibly rare) got everyone who worked in that time frame in trouble. Not usually a write-up, but stern talkings-to and threats.

And I really do think that the survey system as corporations use it is useless. But they're also not going to get any kind of message from survey responses that are moderate- they'll just tell their employees that if they aren't going out of their way to make someone feel special, they are not good enough.

(A friend of mine who works at a bank just told me that she's supposed to offer to walk her customers out to their cars with an umbrella when it's rainy- regardless of how busy they are. It's a service she's happy to offer on slow days, but when they're busy, more people would be happy with prompt, pleasant service uninterrupted by the five minutes to make another customer feel extra special.)
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 12, 2013, 03:45:04 PM
Quote
negative surveys without identifying information of any kind (which were incredibly rare)

Not rare at all.

I'm thinking of a restaurant I go to, for instance, that has comment cards with a survey on them.  No need to add the Date or Time (although you can, if you wanted to, I suppose).  It also has about 5 restaurants that are covered by the one card.  The 5 are owned by the same entity.

Seriously, if one less than stellar mark on that thing gets everyone who has ever possibly worked at any of the 5 restaurants a "stern talking to," there's an even more serious problem with the system.  I really truly can't believe that they chew out everyone that works at those 5 places at all times of the day or night just because they got some feedback from a customer that has a suggestion on how they might improve.

At this restaurant, as an example, they've taken off a menu item that I used to get every time I went in.  I think that the reasoning behind removing it (confirmed by the wait staff) wasn't really thought out fully.  And I have a suggestion on how, if they bring it back, they can overcome the problem that they initially had.  Yeah, I complete that survey when I go in.  And that's at the recommendation of the servers - they want it back as well.  If, for no other reason, because they're the ones who are hearing from the customers that they're wanting to order it!  If that gets people in trouble, I can't help it.  Don't ask for comments if you don't want to hear them!

Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Cami on April 12, 2013, 03:54:53 PM
Quote
negative surveys without identifying information of any kind (which were incredibly rare)

Not rare at all.

I'm thinking of a restaurant I go to, for instance, that has comment cards with a survey on them.  No need to add the Date or Time (although you can, if you wanted to, I suppose).  It also has about 5 restaurants that are covered by the one card.  The 5 are owned by the same entity.

Seriously, if one less than stellar mark on that thing gets everyone who has ever possibly worked at any of the 5 restaurants a "stern talking to," there's an even more serious problem with the system.  I really truly can't believe that they chew out everyone that works at those 5 places at all times of the day or night just because they got some feedback from a customer that has a suggestion on how they might improve.

At this restaurant, as an example, they've taken off a menu item that I used to get every time I went in.  I think that the reasoning behind removing it (confirmed by the wait staff) wasn't really thought out fully.  And I have a suggestion on how, if they bring it back, they can overcome the problem that they initially had.  Yeah, I complete that survey when I go in.  And that's at the recommendation of the servers - they want it back as well.  If, for no other reason, because they're the ones who are hearing from the customers that they're wanting to order it!  If that gets people in trouble, I can't help it.  Don't ask for comments if you don't want to hear them!
That one example does not make a rule for every establishment that hands out surveys.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Yvaine on April 12, 2013, 04:34:25 PM
I really truly can't believe that they chew out everyone that works at those 5 places at all times of the day or night just because they got some feedback from a customer that has a suggestion on how they might improve.

Believe it.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: SiotehCat on April 12, 2013, 04:52:31 PM
I work at a place where we use these surveys.

They are given to every customer. We have a score system from 1-5. Anything that is not a 5 is a fail. Customers can also leave a comment.

Every morning, we discuss any new surveys that have been submitted. They absolutely are helpful if a comment is left. We want to know what we are doing right and what we are doing wrong. We cannot fix the problems if we are not made aware.

We want our clients to be satisfied with our service. If they are not satisfied, we need to fix that.

We do not ask our clients to give us 5's. We do encourage them to fill it out and leave a comment.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 12, 2013, 06:56:53 PM
Quote
That one example does not make a rule for every establishment that hands out surveys.

It was one example of many places I know that do it.  Hence the "for instance" and "for example."  So I stand by my post.

Sophie said it was "incredibly rare" for a place to not have a place for Date/Time.  I disagree.  I don't think it's "incredibly rare" at all.  Maybe not the overwhelming norm where she is.  But to say that it's "incredibly rare" is a generalization that's not true everywhere.  (In her defense, she did say "It has been my experience".  So it could be that she's really not aware that there are places where it's done differently than she's accustomed.)
 

 
 
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 12, 2013, 06:59:21 PM
Quote
Every morning, we discuss any new surveys that have been submitted. They absolutely are helpful if a comment is left. We want to know what we are doing right and what we are doing wrong. We cannot fix the problems if we are not made aware.

We want our clients to be satisfied with our service. If they are not satisfied, we need to fix that.

We do not ask our clients to give us 5's. We do encourage them to fill it out and leave a comment.

Excellent - the way it should work and an example of a company that has its head on its shoulders.

Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: DottyG on April 12, 2013, 07:02:09 PM
I'm not arguing that some of you have experienced places where you're punished for not getting all A+'s.  I believe you.

However, somewhere, somehow, that does need to change (and I realize you're agreeing with that).  I don't know how to get it to change.  Someone needs to fight it.  I don't know who or how.  But it does need to be changed so that whoever is doing that understands that they're missing out on some very valuable information from the very people who are giving them the money that they so desire.
 
And yes, while I disagree that this is the case in all businesses (I do think there are some that actually do pay attention to the surveys - and I stand by the above that there are some places where it wouldn't be possible to pinpoint a Date/Time/Person - I know of some where I am), this thread has been enlightening as to some places where Corporate isn't as interested in our opinions.  I think that's very pathetic on their part.  But I believe that there are some places where it's true.
 
 
 


 
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: SiotehCat on April 12, 2013, 07:22:23 PM
Our surveys don't give us anyone's name. It does tell us the date that they filled out the survey. They do have 3 days(I think) after receiving the survey for them to fill it out. So we can narrow it down a little bit.

There have been times that a customer has left a comment where we have really wanted to fix it in some way, but we had no way of contacting them or getting their contact info.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Venus193 on April 12, 2013, 08:52:58 PM
Interestingly, I found this thread just after doing a survey about a restaurant trip from the other day.  I went because of their current promotion for those delicious crustaceans I wish I could afford to eat more of.

As it happens, I had no complaints and the server was prompt, efficient, and had a good attitude.

I have never been asked or begged for a perfect score there or elsewhere.

I always fill out the Bath & Body Works ones because they turn into coupons for $10 off (no expiration date either).  The staff in my local store is excellent.

The idea that only perfect is acceptable is insane.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on April 13, 2013, 12:22:33 AM
Interestingly, I found this thread just after doing a survey about a restaurant trip from the other day.  I went because of their current promotion for those delicious crustaceans I wish I could afford to eat more of.

As it happens, I had no complaints and the server was prompt, efficient, and had a good attitude.

I have never been asked or begged for a perfect score there or elsewhere.

I always fill out the Bath & Body Works ones because they turn into coupons for $10 off (no expiration date either).  The staff in my local store is excellent.

The idea that only perfect is acceptable is insane.

It wouldn't be the first time corporate thinking has been dubbed "insane."
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Venus193 on April 13, 2013, 05:13:44 AM
Although I don't work in retail this points to my intolerance of my own mistakes.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: MissRose on April 13, 2013, 03:43:04 PM
I hate the customer survey things.  I seldom do them as most of the time you get nothing for them besides a free snack (for the restaurant ones).  If I have a complaint about something at the car dealership, I still know how to go through the chain of command properly due to my experiences doing work in the auto industry before moving in IT.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Peregrine on April 13, 2013, 04:25:50 PM
Quote
However, somewhere, somehow, that does need to change (and I realize you're agreeing with that).  I don't know how to get it to change.  Someone needs to fight it.  I don't know who or how.  But it does need to be changed so that whoever is doing that understands that they're missing out on some very valuable information from the very people who are giving them the money that they so desire.

Dotty, I think what those of us who are, or have been subject to those types of surveys are asking is that people don't call in, it perpetuates those types of useless, punitive surveys.  If you have a complaint try contacting corporate directly.  If people quit calling in, the surveys wouldn't happen, and the corporations would find some other way to gather information.  I have no problems whatsoever with open ended comment cards, it's just the stupid numerically based phone surveys.

I have always swore up and down that whatever company does those surveys has some sort of dirt on all the executives in the participating company....Because you are very correct that the surveys as designed are not gathering any useful information.
Title: Re: Customer Surveys - "Give me a 10"
Post by: Figgie on April 13, 2013, 06:47:49 PM
I don't feel like it is my job to help corporations by filling out surveys for them that pretty much are only for the benefit of the corporation.   My time is worth something and if they offer anything back, it usually isn't worth the time it would take me to fill out their survey.  Instead, I post online reviews because I use them myself and want to give back to other reviewers.

So, I stopped filling out corporate surveys several years ago.  When I did fill them out, I would never fill out the ones that only had places for a number rating.  I would fill out the ones that had number ratings and a comment section, but only in the comments area and then only if I had something that I wanted the company to know about.

I was ending up feeling resentful at what seemed like endless surveys on every store purchase slip and since the main purpose was for the corporation to get free (or mostly free) feedback, I didn't want to do that for them for free. 

Heck, if they want my opinion, they can pay me for it. :)  They might actually value it more if it cost them something to get it.