Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Time For a Coffee Break! => Topic started by: Slartibartfast on May 28, 2013, 11:25:35 PM

Title: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on May 28, 2013, 11:25:35 PM
The other thread got me thinking - what things have you only recently learned that other people were surprised you didn't know?

For me, one recent one was that red wine is made with the skins and white wine is without.  I assumed it was red grapes versus white grapes.  (It's not as easy as that, apparently.)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on May 29, 2013, 08:20:14 AM
I've been learning a lot about twins here.  It may not be all that useful in my everyday life but it's certainly interesting. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on May 29, 2013, 08:44:16 AM
I don't count it as just learning it, but my studies have revealed the extent of ethnocentrism in my grade school education. From historical perspectives to maps to having information excluded, I am learning things now that I should have learned as a child in the 1970's and 1980's. It is a disgrace.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: blueyzca01 on May 29, 2013, 11:47:00 AM
It's really embarassing now, but I just didn't give it that much thought:  I didn't realize that "the flu" was "influenza."

I thought the word "flu" was generic for being sick w/ vomiting, fever, etc.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on May 29, 2013, 11:53:16 AM
^ When I was still living at home, every ailment was either a cold or the flu. I was also misinformed.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: rose red on May 29, 2013, 11:58:55 AM
I'll admit it.  I only realised as an adult that Washington and DC are two different places.  And that Africa is not a country. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: siamesecat2965 on May 29, 2013, 12:18:00 PM
I learned at my last job, working for a law firm that handled asbestos litigation, that its mined from the ground! I figured something that harmful HAD to be man-made
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on May 29, 2013, 12:24:23 PM
For years, I had Naples on the wrong side of Italy.  I am truly abashed. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Hmmmmm on May 29, 2013, 12:41:52 PM
The one I learned previously on eHell that still amazes me I missed all my life is that there is an arrow near the gas gauge in cars  indicating which side the gas tank is on. When I read it I immediately went and checked both our cars. At least 70% of the people I have shared that knowledge with never knew it either.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: joraemi on May 29, 2013, 01:07:41 PM
The one I learned previously on eHell that still amazes me I missed all my life is that there is an arrow near the gas gauge in cars  indicating which side the gas tank is on. When I read it I immediately went and checked both our cars. At least 70% of the people I have shared that knowledge with never knew it either.

I will be checking that out in about 10 minutes when I get in my car!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: mrs_deb on May 29, 2013, 01:35:14 PM
I didn't figure out until I was in my 30's that when an adult tells a child that something is "broken" it often means they just don't want the child playing with it.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: siamesecat2965 on May 29, 2013, 01:44:15 PM
The one I learned previously on eHell that still amazes me I missed all my life is that there is an arrow near the gas gauge in cars  indicating which side the gas tank is on. When I read it I immediately went and checked both our cars. At least 70% of the people I have shared that knowledge with never knew it either.

Only in newer cars. My previous 3, a '78, '90 and '95 didn't have this feature. My last two, and '03, and current, a '10, do.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: #borecore on May 29, 2013, 01:50:45 PM
I honestly never knew which finger a wedding/engagement ring went on (obviously they can go wherever, but left ring finger is tradition here) until we were talking about buying one and I had to be sized. Oh, and I thought you wore the engagement ring on one hand and switched it after marriage (which, as it turns out, is tradition in some places/cultures, but not ours).

My then-fiance was astounded -- apparently it's standard to check a person's hand before flirting if you are a single, conscientious person of an age where people are as likely to be married as not.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RubyCat on May 29, 2013, 01:54:39 PM
The one I learned previously on eHell that still amazes me I missed all my life is that there is an arrow near the gas gauge in cars  indicating which side the gas tank is on. When I read it I immediately went and checked both our cars. At least 70% of the people I have shared that knowledge with never knew it either.

I will be checking that out in about 10 minutes when I get in my car!

I just had to go check out my SUV and my dh's work van.  And there was the arrow  :)  When I came back inside, dh wanted to know why I was smiling, so I dragged him outside and showed him.  He didn't know about it either.  Thanks for sharing!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on May 29, 2013, 03:03:41 PM
The one I learned previously on eHell that still amazes me I missed all my life is that there is an arrow near the gas gauge in cars  indicating which side the gas tank is on. When I read it I immediately went and checked both our cars. At least 70% of the people I have shared that knowledge with never knew it either.

Only in newer cars. My previous 3, a '78, '90 and '95 didn't have this feature. My last two, and '03, and current, a '10, do.

Not all newer cars. Mine is an '03, and it doesn't. Neither did my '01, different make. Not all of them still have it.

In other news, I just had the sudden realization that the first several presidents of the USA weren't American born citizens.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on May 29, 2013, 03:07:26 PM
The one I learned previously on eHell that still amazes me I missed all my life is that there is an arrow near the gas gauge in cars  indicating which side the gas tank is on. When I read it I immediately went and checked both our cars. At least 70% of the people I have shared that knowledge with never knew it either.

I will be checking that out in about 10 minutes when I get in my car!

That's one I only learned in the last couple years, too.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Judah on May 29, 2013, 03:17:43 PM

In other news, I just had the sudden realization that the first several presidents of the USA weren't American born citizens.

They were born here, it just wasn't called the United Stated of America yet. They considered themselves American.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lilfox on May 29, 2013, 03:18:43 PM
I honestly never knew which finger a wedding/engagement ring went on (obviously they can go wherever, but left ring finger is tradition here) until we were talking about buying one and I had to be sized. Oh, and I thought you wore the engagement ring on one hand and switched it after marriage (which, as it turns out, is tradition in some places/cultures, but not ours).

My then-fiance was astounded -- apparently it's standard to check a person's hand before flirting if you are a single, conscientious person of an age where people are as likely to be married as not.

On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on May 29, 2013, 03:23:07 PM
Regarding the arrow, it is most useful when renting a car as you can immediately tell which side of the gas pump to pull up next to when you go to fill it up.

And don't feel bad if you didn't know about it. I've told lots of people who didn't previously know. Since it's relatively new and not all that noticeable, it's not surprising many people don't know.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on May 29, 2013, 03:25:24 PM
I didn't figure out until I was in my 30's that when an adult tells a child that something is "broken" it often means they just don't want the child playing with it.

I was a grownup w/ my own kids when I realized that my parents had been *deliberately ignoring* the fact that we were staying up WAY past our bedtime on the nights when they went out.

I don't know why I ever thought we could be fooling them as we ran around turning off all the lights in the house when we heard their car turn onto our small-town street 3 blocks away. Of course they could see the light rectangles on the lawn, blinking out, one by one.

And that explains why sometimes their conversations as they got out of the car were REALLY absorbing, so that they took so long to actually walk in the door!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on May 29, 2013, 03:28:10 PM

In other news, I just had the sudden realization that the first several presidents of the USA weren't American born citizens.

They were born here, it just wasn't called the United Stated of America yet. They considered themselves American.

Yes, but the Constitution specifically says that to be the preisdent, one has to be a natural-born citizen of the United States. Of course there was a loophole for them, but before the USA was formed, they were still technically British citizens. That realization nearly floored me.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on May 29, 2013, 04:00:48 PM
It's not a loophole. The constitution specifically allows for this.

from the website:
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html (http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html)

Quote
No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on May 29, 2013, 04:02:12 PM
It's not a loophole. The constitution specifically allows for this.

from the website:
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html (http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html)

Quote
No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States.

And that's my something new learned today.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Calistoga on May 29, 2013, 04:06:27 PM
You can't use regular dish detergent in a dish washer.

It makes bubbles...everywhere.

DH and I had never used one before, we've had our current home for more than a year...we just wanted to know if the dish washer worked...

The guy who came up with Scientology is named L. Ron Hubbard. Not Elrond Hubbard. For the longest time people would talk about him being an odd man and I thought "Well his parents named him Elrond, what do you expect?"

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on May 29, 2013, 04:17:37 PM
siamesecat2965 wrote:

"I learned at my last job, working for a law firm that handled asbestos litigation, that its mined from the ground! I figured something that harmful HAD to be man-made"

Mercury.  QED.  Anyway, you're not the only one who learned that in adulthood.  Someone told me that and I didn't believe him at first, and even cracked a joke about nylon mining to go along with it.  I had to look it up in a real encyclopedia because this was long before Wiki.

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Bethczar on May 29, 2013, 04:39:45 PM
The other thread got me thinking - what things have you only recently learned that other people were surprised you didn't know?

For me, one recent one was that red wine is made with the skins and white wine is without.  I assumed it was red grapes versus white grapes.  (It's not as easy as that, apparently.)
Well, I've now learned something today. I always thought it was red vs white grapes, too. Then again, I'm not much of a drinker.

When I was in college I had an arguement with my roommate about how Wyoming was pronounced. For some reason, I always thought the g was silent and pronounced it "Wy o mee"

Still not sure where that came from!  :o
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Hmmmmm on May 29, 2013, 05:02:36 PM
The other thread got me thinking - what things have you only recently learned that other people were surprised you didn't know?

For me, one recent one was that red wine is made with the skins and white wine is without.  I assumed it was red grapes versus white grapes.  (It's not as easy as that, apparently.)
Well, I've now learned something today. I always thought it was red vs white grapes, too. Then again, I'm not much of a drinker.

When I was in college I had an arguement with my roommate about how Wyoming was pronounced. For some reason, I always thought the g was silent and pronounced it "Wy o mee"

Still not sure where that came from!  :o
On the grape wine issue, I know that roses come from red grapes which have their skin removed. And there are some new varietals where the skin is being removed early on from red grapes.  But most white wines are made from white grapes.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on May 29, 2013, 05:05:42 PM
This is kind of weird, but there is a major US city "near" the small town where I grew up. Well, when I was a kid, this city was a distant dream on the horizon, like the city of Oz or something--maybe if I was really good, we might block out a long weekend, someday, and make the journey there. I think I've been there three times total in my life.

I actually live further away from it now, but it's nothing for people from my current town to run there and back in a day. Actually my co-worker just ran over there this morning to pick someone up from the airport, drove them back to our town, and came into work mid-afternoon, when he totally could have taken the whole day off.

So 1) for many years I failed to realize how close, geographically, I actually was to this city; and 2) apparently, my parents just didn't like going there, and always gave the impression it was too far. Understandably they probably didn't relish the city driving. But, my mind was boggled the first time I heard of people just jaunting there and back.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on May 29, 2013, 05:11:17 PM
I had nearsighted and farsighted mixed up for the longest time.  Thought farsighted meant you had a hard time seeing things far away.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TylerBelle on May 29, 2013, 06:13:45 PM
Speaking of gauges on your vehicle, I've had mine for over fourteen years and not too long ago I noticed the dashboard lights were quite dim. Doing so out of curiosity, I found turning that little knob on the left with the lightbulb symbol on it, which I never paid much attention to, brightens up those gauges and stuff. ::)

And I'll be checking for the little tank-indicating arrow as well. I did not know that.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: JustCallMePat on May 29, 2013, 06:14:54 PM
The one I learned previously on eHell that still amazes me I missed all my life is that there is an arrow near the gas gauge in cars  indicating which side the gas tank is on. When I read it I immediately went and checked both our cars. At least 70% of the people I have shared that knowledge with never knew it either.

I just learned why the gas tank opening is on one side or another.  To me, the drivers side is the "right" place to have it.  It's made to be on the opposite side of where the exhaust runs to minimize the possibility of gas spilling down onto a hot exhaust pipe and starting a fire.  I thought it was a "foreign car" thing.   It further confused me as my Japanese car was actually made in Japan (gas on drivers' side) and DH's "German" car was made in Alabama (gas on "wrong" side).

You can't use regular dish detergent in a dish washer.

It makes bubbles...everywhere.

DH and I had never used one before, we've had our current home for more than a year...we just wanted to know if the dish washer worked...

Didn't we all learn that the hard way?  I know we did!  :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Katana_Geldar on May 29, 2013, 06:17:52 PM
You need to make sure what hot plate it is you turn on, particularly if you have a plate or an egg on the stove.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on May 29, 2013, 06:30:38 PM
I didn't just find this out - it was when I was about 13 - but I'm still kind of embarrassed.   When I was a kid, my mother used to cut my fingernails for me with a pair of nail scissors.  These scissors were like any other kind; i.e. they were for right-handed people only.  That's why I needed her help - I could cut my left hand's nails, but not my right.  One day, I said to my friend "I have no idea how I'm going to cut my nails when I'm grown up and in a place of my own.  I'll probably have to call Mum over to help me!"  She looked at me oddly and said "Um, just use nail clippers."  "Huh?  What are those?"  "You're kidding, right?"

I wasn't.  I'd never heard of them.

My nail scissors have straight circular metal handles.  They can be used by persons of either-handed pursuasion.  I've not seen them otherwise (thoguht larger scissor ofen are...)
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcThZyLuqqhWyF-Xo81vpQwORL9cWZ5GijQK0fwCbKevnNQlEkxO)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Amava on May 29, 2013, 06:40:13 PM
You can't use regular dish detergent in a dish washer.

It makes bubbles...everywhere.

DH and I had never used one before, we've had our current home for more than a year...we just wanted to know if the dish washer worked...

Didn't we all learn that the hard way?  I know we did!  :-[

I didn't. I read it all over the internet.
But do you want to know something crazy? I have been really, REALLY wanting to try it ever since I heard about it.   ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: kherbert05 on May 29, 2013, 06:50:20 PM
It's not a loophole. The constitution specifically allows for this.

from the website:
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html (http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html)

Quote
No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States.
Well they couldn't exactly wait 35 years for a president to be born, grow up, and run for office.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: kherbert05 on May 29, 2013, 06:55:15 PM
siamesecat2965 wrote:

"I learned at my last job, working for a law firm that handled asbestos litigation, that its mined from the ground! I figured something that harmful HAD to be man-made"

Mercury.  QED.  Anyway, you're not the only one who learned that in adulthood.  Someone told me that and I didn't believe him at first, and even cracked a joke about nylon mining to go along with it.  I had to look it up in a real encyclopedia because this was long before Wiki.

Virg
Uranium -


About 12 - 13 years ago there was a big deal about crayons imported from China. Crayons use talc - and talc and  asbestos tend to form together. So some of the crayons had asbestos in them. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: KenveeB on May 29, 2013, 09:20:44 PM
I learned the gas gauge thing from E-Hell, the last time a thread like this popped up. I told my dad, and he was so amazed with this knowledge that he immediately called his dad to share it. My grandpa's reaction was, "Uh, yeah, of course?" So apparently it's either totally obvious or a grand secret discovery! :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: twiggy on May 29, 2013, 10:10:52 PM
You can't use regular dish detergent in a dish washer.

It makes bubbles...everywhere.

DH and I had never used one before, we've had our current home for more than a year...we just wanted to know if the dish washer worked...

Didn't we all learn that the hard way?  I know we did!  :-[

I didn't. I read it all over the internet.
But do you want to know something crazy? I have been really, REALLY wanting to try it ever since I heard about it.   ;D

Me too  ;D though to be honest, I really need to mop the floor. And while I think it would be cool to see the suds come out, it would also light a fire under my butt in the floor mopping department as well
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: mbbored on May 29, 2013, 10:27:14 PM
You can't use regular dish detergent in a dish washer.

It makes bubbles...everywhere.

DH and I had never used one before, we've had our current home for more than a year...we just wanted to know if the dish washer worked...

Didn't we all learn that the hard way?  I know we did!  :-[

I didn't. I read it all over the internet.
But do you want to know something crazy? I have been really, REALLY wanting to try it ever since I heard about it.   ;D

Me too  ;D though to be honest, I really need to mop the floor. And while I think it would be cool to see the suds come out, it would also light a fire under my butt in the floor mopping department as well

Rest assured, it's a LOT of mopping. I knew it, but apparently college friends who were sharing the beach rental didn't.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dindrane on May 29, 2013, 10:57:24 PM
Embarrassing fact I learned very recently: the verb "to ruminate" has two common meanings.

ru∑mi∑nate
/ˈro͞oməˌnāt/
Verb

I learned this about 6 months ago when my husband asked me what I was doing, and I said I was ruminating. He said, "Oh, like a ruminant?" I thought he was pulling my leg, because he frequently does that, often by making up fake words that are derivatives of real ones, and because I had never even heard the term "ruminant" before.

But, as it turns out, he was teasing me with entirely factual information that time. I didn't believe him until I looked it up on Google. For the record, he was calling me a cow, not a contemplative person. :P

ru∑mi∑nant
/ˈro͞omənənt/ 
Noun
ruminants, plural

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Optimoose Prime on May 29, 2013, 11:23:10 PM
My husband's classic Camaro has a gas tank opening in the back.  When I lived in Wyoming (hard g), we lived in a house with a fairly steep driveway and no garage door opener.  I had just filled the car and went home, parking the car in the driveway because I was leaving again soon.  The gas was coming out of the tank and running down the driveway.   ::)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: twiggy on May 30, 2013, 01:01:11 AM
I had heard the word epitome and knew what it meant/proper usage. But for some reason when I read it, the voice in my head pronounced it "ep-ee-tome" I was living in a world with both words for years
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on May 30, 2013, 02:06:30 AM
I had heard the word epitome and knew what it meant/proper usage. But for some reason when I read it, the voice in my head pronounced it "ep-ee-tome" I was living in a world with both words for years

I still do that, despite knowing they are the same word.  My brain just reads it wrongly.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Bethalize on May 30, 2013, 02:44:12 AM
Americans will probably roll their eyes at this but I had no idea that the word "coloured" was racist. Of course, once I saw that I worked out that for someone to be coloured meant that some people were not coloured, rather than everyone's skin having  a colour.

What can I say? I never used the word, but then I never had any reason to talk about someone's skin colour. People are people, you know? Our largest ethnic minority where I live is white and we're simply not very aware about race issues. I'm really glad I found out before I stuck my foot in it though.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: menley on May 30, 2013, 02:57:11 AM
When I was a kid, I had a babysitter who told me the at the "FL" in "FL OZ" that's on canned drinks meant floral :o I was only 3 or 4 at the time, so I believed her without questioning why "floral" would be on a can of Coke!

And since it's not something that regularly comes up in conversation, I didn't think about it at all until I was much older (maybe high school or college? I honestly don't know). I was staring at a can of Coke and thought "Fluid ounces. Wait. Jamie told me it was floral... ... ... Sweet monkey fritters! was she thinking??"

But still, to this day, when I look at a package that has "FL OZ" on it, the first word that pops into my mind is floral, even though I know better. Thanks, Jamie.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on May 30, 2013, 02:58:16 AM
I had heard the word epitome and knew what it meant/proper usage. But for some reason when I read it, the voice in my head pronounced it "ep-ee-tome" I was living in a world with both words for years

Well, here's my contribution to the thread  :-[.  How is it pronounced?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: menley on May 30, 2013, 03:10:44 AM
I had heard the word epitome and knew what it meant/proper usage. But for some reason when I read it, the voice in my head pronounced it "ep-ee-tome" I was living in a world with both words for years

Well, here's my contribution to the thread  :-[.  How is it pronounced?

eh-pih-toh-mee
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: HenrysMom on May 30, 2013, 10:23:16 AM
I had heard the word epitome and knew what it meant/proper usage. But for some reason when I read it, the voice in my head pronounced it "ep-ee-tome" I was living in a world with both words for years

Well, here's my contribution to the thread  :-[.  How is it pronounced?

eh-pih-toh-mee

I used "epitome" in talking to DH a few days ago.  He replied, "Don't use words you've only read in books."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on May 30, 2013, 10:31:18 AM
I had heard the word epitome and knew what it meant/proper usage. But for some reason when I read it, the voice in my head pronounced it "ep-ee-tome" I was living in a world with both words for years

Well, here's my contribution to the thread  :-[.  How is it pronounced?

eh-pih-toh-mee

I used "epitome" in talking to DH a few days ago.  He replied, "Don't use words you've only read in books."

I have this problem SO frequently. My sister teases me about it, but at least I'm reading, encountering new words, and then incorporating them into my vocabulary, so there is that, right?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: GreenHall on May 30, 2013, 11:55:08 AM
Even with familiarity (from movies) of the hand crank on the front of a car it was just a couple weeks ago that the connection between that handle (crank) and the term for starting the car today (CRANK!) was made...boy did I feel silly.

I'm not certain, but the idea could have percolated finally, due to a comment somewhere recently about recent generations not knowing why we say 'dial' the phone.  (I saw them, on occasion at grandparents, and we had one when we moved at one point, but changed that pretty quick).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on May 30, 2013, 12:03:10 PM
Even with familiarity (from movies) of the hand crank on the front of a car it was just a couple weeks ago that the connection between that handle (crank) and the term for starting the car today (CRANK!) was made...boy did I feel silly.

I'm not certain, but the idea could have percolated finally, due to a comment somewhere recently about recent generations not knowing why we say 'dial' the phone.  (I saw them, on occasion at grandparents, and we had one when we moved at one point, but changed that pretty quick).

Also, kids growing up likely won't know why the save button in most programs looks the way it does. They've never had to deal with actual floppy discs. Cut/paste used to mean actually cutting the paper and pasting into a new place, which honestly hurt my head a bit when I finally figured it out.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Seraphia on May 30, 2013, 12:03:59 PM
I had heard the word epitome and knew what it meant/proper usage. But for some reason when I read it, the voice in my head pronounced it "ep-ee-tome" I was living in a world with both words for years

I did that with 'beige.' For me bay-szhh was the color of the walls, while bejji (like veggie) was the color of the sweaters in the clothes catalogs.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: staceym on May 30, 2013, 12:14:13 PM
The one I learned previously on eHell that still amazes me I missed all my life is that there is an arrow near the gas gauge in cars  indicating which side the gas tank is on. When I read it I immediately went and checked both our cars. At least 70% of the people I have shared that knowledge with never knew it either.

when I got home last night from work and got in my car - first thing I checked and darn if there isn't a little arrow pointing to the right side  :o
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on May 30, 2013, 12:21:18 PM
I had heard the word epitome and knew what it meant/proper usage. But for some reason when I read it, the voice in my head pronounced it "ep-ee-tome" I was living in a world with both words for years

Well, here's my contribution to the thread  :-[.  How is it pronounced?

eh-pih-toh-mee

I used "epitome" in talking to DH a few days ago.  He replied, "Don't use words you've only read in books."

My contribution: I went to a Catholic high school, and was raised more or less Catholic (this is at least semi-relevant), but it wasn't until college that I knew how to pronounce the last name of St. Thomas Aquinas. 5 years of French class had trained my brain to think "qui" is pronounced "kee" so I thought Aquinas = ah-kee-ness, not A-kwhy-ness.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on May 30, 2013, 12:23:35 PM
I had heard the word epitome and knew what it meant/proper usage. But for some reason when I read it, the voice in my head pronounced it "ep-ee-tome" I was living in a world with both words for years

Well, here's my contribution to the thread  :-[.  How is it pronounced?

eh-pih-toh-mee

I used "epitome" in talking to DH a few days ago.  He replied, "Don't use words you've only read in books."

Really? Wow. I absolutely do not agree with that advice. My younger son is and always has been an avid reader. He learned a great deal of vocabulary from books. And based on the context, he could understand the meaning of lots of words without having to look them up.

Often, while growing up, he would use a word properly but mispronounce it. I would correct him on his pronunciation and then commend him on not only growing his vocabulary, but on retaining the meaning of words he'd never heard said out loud.

What difference does it make how you expand your vocabulary, whether it's from reading, talking to people or whatever? I'm scratching my head over this one.  :o
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: KenveeB on May 30, 2013, 12:37:27 PM
Until book 4 (I think) of the Harry Potter series, I had no idea how to pronounce Hermione's name.  One of the character's (Ron?) got a bit drunk and said it very slowly and deliberately:  "Her-MY-oh-NEE", and I was all "... ohhhh."

No one was drunk. :) Hermione was trying to explain the pronunciation to a foreign visitor (Viktor Krum). I already knew it, but only because I'd studied Shakespeare's "A Winter's Tale" a few years before, and the queen there is named Hermione.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Sheila Take a Bow on May 30, 2013, 12:37:49 PM
Until book 4 (I think) of the Harry Potter series, I had no idea how to pronounce Hermione's name.  One of the character's (Ron?) got a bit drunk and said it very slowly and deliberately:  "Her-MY-oh-NEE", and I was all "... ohhhh."

My best friend and I figured it out when we saw the movie.   As soon as we walked out, the first thing we said was, "So *that's* how her name is pronounced!"
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on May 30, 2013, 12:44:54 PM
She was Her-me-own to me for a whole year! (I was a late adopter of HP)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on May 30, 2013, 12:47:40 PM
I saw Hermione Gingold on Broadway when I was in high school and knew the name from her. But I can sure see how it would not be intuitive to know how to pronounce that name had you never heard how to say it out loud.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0320006/?ref_=sr_3 (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0320006/?ref_=sr_3)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lady_disdain on May 30, 2013, 12:55:57 PM
I had heard the word epitome and knew what it meant/proper usage. But for some reason when I read it, the voice in my head pronounced it "ep-ee-tome" I was living in a world with both words for years

Well, here's my contribution to the thread  :-[.  How is it pronounced?

eh-pih-toh-mee

I used "epitome" in talking to DH a few days ago.  He replied, "Don't use words you've only read in books."

Really? Wow. I absolutely do not agree with that advice. My younger son is and always has been an avid reader. He learned a great deal of vocabulary from books. And based on the context, he could understand the meaning of lots of words without having to look them up.

Often, while growing up, he would use a word properly but mispronounce it. I would correct him on his pronunciation and then commend him on not only growing his vocabulary, but on retaining the meaning of words he'd never heard said out loud.

What difference does it make how you expand your vocabulary, whether it's from reading, talking to people or whatever? I'm scratching my head over this one.  :o

Because if you just read a word, instead of hearing it, you may use one of the "alternative" pronunciations we are talking about here :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on May 30, 2013, 01:26:14 PM
Yeah, I get it. Like I said, my son often mispronounced words he'd only read and not heard. But it was much more important that he knew what the word meant and used it properly. Especially in a world where the same word can be pronounced so many different ways depending on where the speaker is from. I'd hate to tell him to banish all words from his vocabulary that he had never actually heard anyone say.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: EMuir on May 30, 2013, 01:28:21 PM
For some reason I grew up thinking myopic meant blind.  I said "I'm nearsighted, but at least I'm not myopic" to friends and had to wait until they'd stopped laughing to find out why...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on May 30, 2013, 01:29:55 PM
lowspark wrote:

"Like I said, my son often mispronounced words he'd only read and not heard. But it was much more important that he knew what the word meant and used it properly. Especially in a world where the same word can be pronounced so many different ways depending on where the speaker is from. I'd hate to tell him to banish all words from his vocabulary that he had never actually heard anyone say."

My take on it is to tell people, if they've never heard a word spoken, it's a good idea to look up the pronunciation in a dictionary or online before speaking it.  That eliminates the idea that you can't learn new words from written works but cuts down on "alternate" pronunciations.

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on May 30, 2013, 01:55:22 PM
Until book 4 (I think) of the Harry Potter series, I had no idea how to pronounce Hermione's name.  One of the character's (Ron?) got a bit drunk and said it very slowly and deliberately:  "Her-MY-oh-NEE", and I was all "... ohhhh."

Same here.  Then I was working somewhere once and saw the name and was pleased I knew how to pronounce it! :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on May 30, 2013, 03:13:03 PM
Yeah, I get it. Like I said, my son often mispronounced words he'd only read and not heard. But it was much more important that he knew what the word meant and used it properly. Especially in a world where the same word can be pronounced so many different ways depending on where the speaker is from. I'd hate to tell him to banish all words from his vocabulary that he had never actually heard anyone say.

But if he'd like to learn how a new word is pronounced first, dictionaries have pronunciation guides! :-)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on May 30, 2013, 03:15:14 PM
Americans will probably roll their eyes at this but I had no idea that the word "coloured" was racist. Of course, once I saw that I worked out that for someone to be coloured meant that some people were not coloured, rather than everyone's skin having  a colour.

What can I say? I never used the word, but then I never had any reason to talk about someone's skin colour. People are people, you know? Our largest ethnic minority where I live is white and we're simply not very aware about race issues. I'm really glad I found out before I stuck my foot in it though.

What's funny is that "person of color" became the very politically correct term to use because it encompasses all races, etc. But "colored" wouldn't have flown.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on May 30, 2013, 03:20:01 PM
lowspark wrote:

"Like I said, my son often mispronounced words he'd only read and not heard. But it was much more important that he knew what the word meant and used it properly. Especially in a world where the same word can be pronounced so many different ways depending on where the speaker is from. I'd hate to tell him to banish all words from his vocabulary that he had never actually heard anyone say."

My take on it is to tell people, if they've never heard a word spoken, it's a good idea to look up the pronunciation in a dictionary or online before speaking it.  That eliminates the idea that you can't learn new words from written works but cuts down on "alternate" pronunciations.

Virg

I think that has a chilling effect. It becomes so much work that nobody ever bothers.

I think people should just forge on ahead, using the right word even if they pronounce it wrong. and then other people can simply tell the the correct pronunciation, and they can just go blithlely on, pronouncing it right because someone told them.

My daughter also pronounced words exactly as they read (still does--she's in college). I just tell her the right pronunciation and then focus on the substance of what she is saying.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on May 30, 2013, 03:21:24 PM
Yeah, I get it. Like I said, my son often mispronounced words he'd only read and not heard. But it was much more important that he knew what the word meant and used it properly. Especially in a world where the same word can be pronounced so many different ways depending on where the speaker is from. I'd hate to tell him to banish all words from his vocabulary that he had never actually heard anyone say.

But if he'd like to learn how a new word is pronounced first, dictionaries have pronunciation guides! :-)

LOL yeah. Convincing a kid who is glued to his book to put it down long enough to grab the dictionary and look up a word that he can already figure out the meaning to is much harder than it sounds. And it doesn't really even sound all that easy.

I think it sounds like good advice in theory but in practice I don't think there's a conscious process of
--oh! new word, wonder what it means, wonder how it's pronounced, maybe I should look it up.

It's more like a subconcious understanding of the sentence/paragraph and the new word which happens to contribute to that meaning sinking in. And with repeated reading of that particular word over time, it just gets internalized with the pronunciation which the reader attributes to it, again, subconciously.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Ms_Cellany on May 30, 2013, 03:55:47 PM
I didn't just find this out - it was when I was about 13 - but I'm still kind of embarrassed.   When I was a kid, my mother used to cut my fingernails for me with a pair of nail scissors.  These scissors were like any other kind; i.e. they were for right-handed people only.  That's why I needed her help - I could cut my left hand's nails, but not my right.  One day, I said to my friend "I have no idea how I'm going to cut my nails when I'm grown up and in a place of my own.  I'll probably have to call Mum over to help me!"  She looked at me oddly and said "Um, just use nail clippers."  "Huh?  What are those?"  "You're kidding, right?"

I wasn't.  I'd never heard of them.

My nail scissors have straight circular metal handles.  They can be used by persons of either-handed pursuasion.  I've not seen them otherwise (thoguht larger scissor ofen are...)
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcThZyLuqqhWyF-Xo81vpQwORL9cWZ5GijQK0fwCbKevnNQlEkxO)

It's not just the shape of the handles; it's the direction that the blades cross each other.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: snowflake on May 30, 2013, 04:17:20 PM
I'm really embarrassed about this, but I can't snap my fingers. 

I suppose I could have tried to figure it out but I couldn't bring myself to do it because the sound makes my blood run cold.  (Cracking knuckles does too.)  I took a fun dance class a few years ago and faked it (with 20 other people snapping, who can tell?)

For the life of me, I cannot make myself draw an ampersand.  It comes out funny every time.  Of course I can't draw and my handwriting stinks too.

I grew up in an area where everyone was a member of the Purple political party.  I heard many times that every Yellow political party member was crooked, immoral, and destroying the country.  Whenever there was a Yellow scandal, I heard about how it was because they were a Yellow and no Purple would EVER be caught doing anything wrong. 

After I was about 14 I started seeing the whole political situation a little more balanced.  But I was 30 before I realized that one of the more famous "caught" politicians of our age was Purple.  I guess growing up hearing about his misdeeds and the Anti-Yellow rants, I assumed from a young age that he was Yellow.  I MUST have heard this information hundreds of times.  As a teen and young person, I spent a whole lot of time following politics in the US because I'm odd and I like it.  I used to think I was "Very well informed politically" but obviously not. 

(You probably know what I'm talking about, but this is not meant to be condemning of either political party.)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: BatCity on May 30, 2013, 06:35:59 PM
Okay, I've got one. Groundhog Day.

About the time the internet became a big thing (maybe 1996 or so), it occurred to me that Groundhog Day didn't make any sense. Until then I just assumed it was a real thing.

So I set about looking for anything I could find on the veracity of this silly holiday. I found nothing. Every newspaper article or TV broadcast would say things like "Groundhog Day is the day that groundhogs come out of their burrow, and if they see their shadow, blah de blah blah".  Never once did anyone utter the words "according to legend", "according to popular belief", or even "allegedly". Nope, they all just stated it as if it were fact.

I finally found something under "Groundhog" in an old encyclopedia explaining how the legend started. I was 26.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Hazmat on May 30, 2013, 06:44:28 PM
I'm really embarrassed about this, but I can't snap my fingers. 

I suppose I could have tried to figure it out but I couldn't bring myself to do it because the sound makes my blood run cold.  (Cracking knuckles does too.)  I took a fun dance class a few years ago and faked it (with 20 other people snapping, who can tell?)

For the life of me, I cannot make myself draw an ampersand.  It comes out funny every time.  Of course I can't draw and my handwriting stinks too.

I grew up in an area where everyone was a member of the Purple political party.  I heard many times that every Yellow political party member was crooked, immoral, and destroying the country.  Whenever there was a Yellow scandal, I heard about how it was because they were a Yellow and no Purple would EVER be caught doing anything wrong. 

After I was about 14 I started seeing the whole political situation a little more balanced.  But I was 30 before I realized that one of the more famous "caught" politicians of our age was Purple.  I guess growing up hearing about his misdeeds and the Anti-Yellow rants, I assumed from a young age that he was Yellow.  I MUST have heard this information hundreds of times.  As a teen and young person, I spent a whole lot of time following politics in the US because I'm odd and I like it.  I used to think I was "Very well informed politically" but obviously not. 

(You probably know what I'm talking about, but this is not meant to be condemning of either political party.)
I think all political parties have their share of "crooked, immoral, and destroying the country" members.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on May 30, 2013, 07:09:42 PM
I didn't just find this out - it was when I was about 13 - but I'm still kind of embarrassed.   When I was a kid, my mother used to cut my fingernails for me with a pair of nail scissors.  These scissors were like any other kind; i.e. they were for right-handed people only.  That's why I needed her help - I could cut my left hand's nails, but not my right.  One day, I said to my friend "I have no idea how I'm going to cut my nails when I'm grown up and in a place of my own.  I'll probably have to call Mum over to help me!"  She looked at me oddly and said "Um, just use nail clippers."  "Huh?  What are those?"  "You're kidding, right?"

I wasn't.  I'd never heard of them.

My nail scissors have straight circular metal handles.  They can be used by persons of either-handed pursuasion.  I've not seen them otherwise (thoguht larger scissor ofen are...)
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcThZyLuqqhWyF-Xo81vpQwORL9cWZ5GijQK0fwCbKevnNQlEkxO)

It's not just the shape of the handles; it's the direction that the blades cross each other.

But it doesn't make any difference.  After all, I use my left hand to cut the nails on my right and both hands look the same at the end.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Minmom3 on May 30, 2013, 07:38:09 PM
Heh heh heh.  Going on words I had read and knew (but somehow could not SAY correctly) - gelding.  For some silly reason, my young self was POSITIVE that it was pronounced "GEEEE-ll-ding"  My mother could not convince me otherwise.  I'm not sure what did change my stubborn head, but I think it was years....

My other word - heuchera - a plant I've seen numerous times at numerous nurseries - I was SURE it was hwe-CHER-a.  I heard somebody say it, and then got up the bravery to ask nursery staff "HOW do you say this name??"  YOU-ker-a.  Who knew?

I feel endlessly stupid when I find I've mangled the pronunciation of a word, but I can, 99% of the time, use it properly, I just can't SAY it properly - it's all that reading that is at fault.  Only the knowledge that many of my friends and co-workers also mangle words (both meaning and pronunciation) makes me feel less stupid!

Bonus - I was a really good speller until I took Spanish in 7th grade.  After that, I couldn't separate out English spelling and Spanish spelling.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: BB-VA on May 30, 2013, 08:04:02 PM
She was Her-me-own to me for a whole year! (I was a late adopter of HP)

I knew how to pronounce it because of Hermione Gingold (same as a later poster). but my husband called her Hermi-one (sorta rhymes with Obi-Wan).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: baglady on May 30, 2013, 08:25:14 PM
I was about 30 when I finally figured out the origins of certain items found at certain seashore locations. No, those things that look like jellyfish are not jellyfish! And no, there is not this cadre of shameless women who think nothing of changing their tampons on a public beach and leaving the applicators in the sand. I haven't flushed either product since.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: amandaelizabeth on May 30, 2013, 08:50:59 PM
I have the Greater Oxford as an app on both my phone and ipad. Can you tell I am a cryptic crossword fan?  Anyway they come with a spoken  pronunciation guide.  Settles arguments in the pub really quickly.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Hazmat on May 30, 2013, 09:54:26 PM
Ascertain (asser-tane).  I thought it was pronounced a-certain. :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: MariaE on May 31, 2013, 03:04:59 AM
I didn't just find this out - it was when I was about 13 - but I'm still kind of embarrassed.   When I was a kid, my mother used to cut my fingernails for me with a pair of nail scissors.  These scissors were like any other kind; i.e. they were for right-handed people only.  That's why I needed her help - I could cut my left hand's nails, but not my right.  One day, I said to my friend "I have no idea how I'm going to cut my nails when I'm grown up and in a place of my own.  I'll probably have to call Mum over to help me!"  She looked at me oddly and said "Um, just use nail clippers."  "Huh?  What are those?"  "You're kidding, right?"

I wasn't.  I'd never heard of them.

My nail scissors have straight circular metal handles.  They can be used by persons of either-handed pursuasion.  I've not seen them otherwise (thoguht larger scissor ofen are...)
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcThZyLuqqhWyF-Xo81vpQwORL9cWZ5GijQK0fwCbKevnNQlEkxO)

It's not just the shape of the handles; it's the direction that the blades cross each other.

But it doesn't make any difference.  After all, I use my left hand to cut the nails on my right and both hands look the same at the end.
Does to me. I'm left-handed, but I still can't use nail scissors to cut my right hand. The blades just won't meet properly. I've tried turning it around (so the blades curl away from the nail rather than with it) and that helps somewhat, but not enough to make it worth while.

Nail-clippers are so much easier to use :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 31, 2013, 06:17:37 AM
My other word - heuchera - a plant I've seen numerous times at numerous nurseries - I was SURE it was hwe-CHER-a.  I heard somebody say it, and then got up the bravery to ask nursery staff "HOW do you say this name??"  YOU-ker-a.  Who knew?

I feel that where "the vegetable kingdom" in general is concerned, anarchy obtains pronunciation-wise, and nobody need feel ashamed about, for however much of their life, getting pronunciations wrong. For a very long while, I thought that cotoneaster (I'd seen the word in print, but not heard it said) was pronounced "cotton-Easter". In fact it's "cot-OWN-e-aster". And quinoa: I long pronounced that as "kwi-NO-ah"; it's actually "KEEN-wah". And with the latter word having got into English from the Quechua language by way of Spanish; I consider messing-up of it on the part of Anglophones, to be particularly forgivable.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RingTailedLemur on May 31, 2013, 06:44:07 AM
I think it was in the other thread.  I just found out why carpenter's pencils are flat.  I'd never thought about it before, I think I assumed they use round pencils like anyone else.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Louie_LI on May 31, 2013, 08:09:45 AM
The other thread got me thinking - what things have you only recently learned that other people were surprised you didn't know?

For me, one recent one was that red wine is made with the skins and white wine is without.  I assumed it was red grapes versus white grapes.  (It's not as easy as that, apparently.)

There are three types of wine grapes: red skin with red insides, red skin with white insides and white skin with white insides. You can make white, red or rosť from the red ones with white insides; the color will depend on how long the skins stay in the vat. For white grapes, the skins stay in the vat for a bit (how long depends on what the winemaker is trying to do).

For example, the three grapes authorised for Champagne are pinot noir, pinot meunier (both red skinned with white insides) and chardonnay (white grape).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on May 31, 2013, 09:25:20 AM
Somehow my left hand is "dumb" when it comes to things like using scissors, too, which doesn't help. 

I'm...somewhat ambidextrous. I write with my left hand, and can use scissors with both, but when I was working in a grooming salon for a stint, I couldn't use the regular scissors with my left hand, I had to borrow another groomer's left-handed shears. They are made differently. Paper scissors and kitchen shears don't seem to matter too much, but specialty shears make a huge difference in how they cut between hands.

It came as a surprise to me when I started learning fencing that not everyone could learn on one hand and just transfer the knowledge to their other hand. I only practiced with my right arm, but when it was "cut off" (Renaissance style fencing, not competitive, so when a limb is hit, you just either kneel or stick your arm behind your back and keep going), I'd switch to my left and go from there. It threw everyone else off because I was just as good on my off hand. I didn't see it as my off hand, I'm actually left handed so the coordination was there, I just learned to do sports right-handed!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on May 31, 2013, 01:57:34 PM
cwm wrote:

"I only practiced with my right arm, but when it was "cut off" (Renaissance style fencing, not competitive, so when a limb is hit, you just either kneel or stick your arm behind your back and keep going), I'd switch to my left and go from there.  It threw everyone else off because I was just as good on my off hand."

And when you did, I presume you said (in a proper Spanish accent), "I am not right handed."

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on May 31, 2013, 05:45:40 PM
I kind of suspect the whole Hermione pronunciation thing in book 4 was because JK Rowling was sick of people mispronouncing it  :P. (I'll admit I was reading it as "Hermi-ninny" until then!)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RegionMom on May 31, 2013, 05:48:56 PM
But, he was not left-handed!
:)

a few years ago, when DD was about 9/10 years old, she peeked up from a chapter book and asked, "mom, what is Mary-Jew-Anna?"
I thought it was a proper noun, until I had her read to me the surrounding sentences.  The word was marijuana.
 ::)
(The part was about teens stumbling upon a secret crop in a field)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Iris on May 31, 2013, 08:22:07 PM
Somehow my left hand is "dumb" when it comes to things like using scissors, too, which doesn't help. 

I'm...somewhat ambidextrous. I write with my left hand, and can use scissors with both, but when I was working in a grooming salon for a stint, I couldn't use the regular scissors with my left hand, I had to borrow another groomer's left-handed shears. They are made differently. Paper scissors and kitchen shears don't seem to matter too much, but specialty shears make a huge difference in how they cut between hands.

It came as a surprise to me when I started learning fencing that not everyone could learn on one hand and just transfer the knowledge to their other hand. I only practiced with my right arm, but when it was "cut off" (Renaissance style fencing, not competitive, so when a limb is hit, you just either kneel or stick your arm behind your back and keep going), I'd switch to my left and go from there. It threw everyone else off because I was just as good on my off hand. I didn't see it as my off hand, I'm actually left handed so the coordination was there, I just learned to do sports right-handed!

Off topic, but if Renaissance fighters could have an ARM cut off and then just continue fighting with their other arm then they were *seriously* tough cookies.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on May 31, 2013, 08:43:38 PM
It's just a flesh wound!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on May 31, 2013, 11:33:32 PM
I discovered today that I am not cut out to work in a grade school. I have issues with unnecessary noise, and the bell ringing every 45-50 minutes all day accompanied by the music to Super Mario and the principals message would drive me around the bend within a week. Even though I could get all my student loan debt forgiven, it is not worth it for my sanity.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jocelyn on June 01, 2013, 12:04:57 AM
I discovered today that I am not cut out to work in a grade school. I have issues with unnecessary noise, and the bell ringing every 45-50 minutes all day accompanied by the music to Super Mario and the principals message would drive me around the bend within a week. Even though I could get all my student loan debt forgiven, it is not worth it for my sanity.
Had a friend who walked out of a job interview at a certain pizza place when the animatronics floor show started. He said he just apologized to the interviewer, but that he knew he couldn't take that several times a day, every day.  ::)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: StarFaerie on June 01, 2013, 06:22:34 AM
Ascertain (asser-tane).  I thought it was pronounced a-certain. :-[

Albeit - I thought it was said al-bite and that "All be it" was a phrase that some people said that was vaguely synonymous. I was very embarrassed to find out they were the same thing and I'd been pronouncing it wrong in my head for years (never said it). I still read it wrong in my head and have to correct my internal dialogue.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: kherbert05 on June 01, 2013, 06:41:38 AM
Americans will probably roll their eyes at this but I had no idea that the word "coloured" was racist. Of course, once I saw that I worked out that for someone to be coloured meant that some people were not coloured, rather than everyone's skin having  a colour.

What can I say? I never used the word, but then I never had any reason to talk about someone's skin colour. People are people, you know? Our largest ethnic minority where I live is white and we're simply not very aware about race issues. I'm really glad I found out before I stuck my foot in it though.


Any American that expects other nationalities to keep up with our ever changing vocabulary for race relations needs a smack up side the head with a clue by 4. We can barely keep up - why would someone who doesn't live it be able to keep up. If I see it spelled our - I just assume the person is either South African or used to their vocabulary where Coloured is acceptable.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Barney girl on June 01, 2013, 06:43:53 AM
I once met someone who said her daughter was called, I think, Ermyone (or rather that's what I heard) after the girl in the Harry Potter books. I often wondered if they would change the pronunciation when they realised it was wrong.

For myself. I know perfectly well how to pronounce quay, but in my head, when I'm reading it will always be kway.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: GreenHall on June 01, 2013, 09:26:51 AM
.

For myself. I know perfectly well how to pronounce quay, but in my head, when I'm reading it will always be kway.
Durn it all, you're going to make me go find a dictionary to find out the real pronunciation.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on June 01, 2013, 09:31:33 AM
.

For myself. I know perfectly well how to pronounce quay, but in my head, when I'm reading it will always be kway.
Durn it all, you're going to make me go find a dictionary to find out the real pronunciation.

I've also heard it pronounced like 'key'. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on June 01, 2013, 10:05:43 AM
.

For myself. I know perfectly well how to pronounce quay, but in my head, when I'm reading it will always be kway.
Durn it all, you're going to make me go find a dictionary to find out the real pronunciation.

I've also heard it pronounced like 'key'.

I've heard 'key', 'kay', and 'kway', depending on who's talking.

It's sad how many people don't know how to spell queue. I work in a place where we have a call queue, and until I got there for YEARS on the phone list, there was the 'Que Calls' section. Every time an email gets sent out to the sales floor, it goes along the lines of:

Ms. So-and-so called into the que, was looking for someone who had talked to her before.

Although, the Que Calls could have been right, if someone decided to mix Spanish and English. I mean, we didn't know who was calling.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: CrazyDaffodilLady on June 01, 2013, 12:29:04 PM
If you want to quickly know the meaning of a word or how to pronounce it, Google "define <word>".   For most words, the definition appears with a phonetic guide, which has a little microphone next to it.  Click on the microphone to hear the pronunciation.

If there's no microphone, Google "pronounce <word>".  There will be links to talking dictionaries.  Sadly, when I Googled "pronounce epitome", I got this link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfwNi16eHog (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfwNi16eHog)

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Carotte on June 01, 2013, 12:47:46 PM
.

For myself. I know perfectly well how to pronounce quay, but in my head, when I'm reading it will always be kway.
Durn it all, you're going to make me go find a dictionary to find out the real pronunciation.

I've also heard it pronounced like 'key'.

I've heard 'key', 'kay', and 'kway', depending on who's talking.

It's sad how many people don't know how to spell queue. I work in a place where we have a call queue, and until I got there for YEARS on the phone list, there was the 'Que Calls' section. Every time an email gets sent out to the sales floor, it goes along the lines of:

Ms. So-and-so called into the que, was looking for someone who had talked to her before.

Although, the Que Calls could have been right, if someone decided to mix Spanish and English. I mean, we didn't know who was calling.

I've seen people use 'queu' or something like that instead of cue, which for me seems strange since cue is an english word at least, where queue is latin/french, so I was thinking anglophone people would make the error the other way.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: artk2002 on June 01, 2013, 01:34:51 PM
As far as I know, "quay" is properly pronounced "key."  From Eric Bogle, The Band Played Waltzing Matilda:

Quote
And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay
I looked at the place where my legs used to be
And thanked Christ there was nobody waiting for me
To grieve, and to mourn, and to pity.

Blows the rhyme scheme right out of the water if it's pronounced "kay" or "kway".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Twik on June 01, 2013, 01:54:06 PM
Virg - true, but I think there are regional variations on pronunciation. The etymology I found online says "variant of Middle English key, keye, caye, "wharf"". So, I think pronouncing it "key" or "caye" would be justified, while "kway" is an example of a literal pronunciation.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: GreenHall on June 01, 2013, 03:06:32 PM
If you want to quickly know the meaning of a word or how to pronounce it, Google "define <word>".   For most words, the definition appears with a phonetic guide, which has a little microphone next to it.  Click on the microphone to hear the pronunciation.

If there's no microphone, Google "pronounce <word>".  There will be links to talking dictionaries.  Sadly, when I Googled "pronounce epitome", I got this link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfwNi16eHog (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfwNi16eHog)
I've been spoiled on the desktop, where I can highlight a word, and right click, at which point one of my options is to google the highlighted.  (Flamingvixen, don't usually use other browsers, so cant vouch). I do love my iPad, but manually opening another window, after manipulating it into copying, is just enough trouble to make me skip it. (why yes, I was one of the children who only kneew words from reading them, and mispronounced,  I believe Xanth is what finally made the connection between the spoken word eh-pit-oh-me and written word epi-tome. I blame middle school science where'd we learned the prefix epi- :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 01, 2013, 05:58:41 PM
I learned "epitome" from Calvin & Hobbes:

(http://bradshawfamily.net/~samuel/comicweb/calvin/poems/tigersareperfect.jpg)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: White Dragon on June 01, 2013, 06:08:15 PM
If you want to quickly know the meaning of a word or how to pronounce it, Google "define <word>".   For most words, the definition appears with a phonetic guide, which has a little microphone next to it.  Click on the microphone to hear the pronunciation.

If there's no microphone, Google "pronounce <word>".  There will be links to talking dictionaries.  Sadly, when I Googled "pronounce epitome", I got this link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfwNi16eHog (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfwNi16eHog)
I've been spoiled on the desktop, where I can highlight a word, and right click, at which point one of my options is to google the highlighted.  (Flamingvixen, don't usually use other browsers, so cant vouch). I do love my iPad, but manually opening another window, after manipulating it into copying, is just enough trouble to make me skip it. (why yes, I was one of the children who only kneew words from reading them, and mispronounced,  I believe Xanth is what finally made the connection between the spoken word eh-pit-oh-me and written word epi-tome. I blame middle school science where'd we learned the prefix epi- :)

I learned it from Calvin and Hobbes, where Calvin has to recite a "secret password" poem.
The poem is several stanzas long and includes a part where tigers are the 'e-pit-o-me of quiet grace and dignity.'.

Thank you Bill Watterston!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on June 01, 2013, 06:45:15 PM
I'm 50, and just learned today that Dr. Pepper and root beer aren't the same thing  ::).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Brisvegasgal on June 01, 2013, 06:50:24 PM
I didn't realise that aluminium foil had a right side out for cooking.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Iris on June 01, 2013, 06:59:18 PM
As far as I know, "quay" is properly pronounced "key."  From Eric Bogle, The Band Played Waltzing Matilda:

Quote
And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay
I looked at the place where my legs used to be
And thanked Christ there was nobody waiting for me
To grieve, and to mourn, and to pity.

Blows the rhyme scheme right out of the water if it's pronounced "kay" or "kway".

I can second that in Australia, at least, it's definitely 'key'. You would never catch the ferry to Manly from Circular "Kway" or "Kay".

OT - that song never fails to choke me up.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jelaza on June 01, 2013, 07:00:58 PM
I didn't realise that aluminium foil had a right side out for cooking.

As far as I know it doesn't (http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1135/should-a-baking-potato-be-wrapped-in-foil-shiny-side-in-or-shiny-side-out).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: artk2002 on June 01, 2013, 09:44:49 PM
As far as I know, "quay" is properly pronounced "key."  From Eric Bogle, The Band Played Waltzing Matilda:

Quote
And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay
I looked at the place where my legs used to be
And thanked Christ there was nobody waiting for me
To grieve, and to mourn, and to pity.

Blows the rhyme scheme right out of the water if it's pronounced "kay" or "kway".

I can second that in Australia, at least, it's definitely 'key'. You would never catch the ferry to Manly from Circular "Kway" or "Kay".

OT - that song never fails to choke me up.

That one and Green Fields of France. He's brilliant. I was in Sydney many years ago and walked down to Circular Quay from my hotel and just stood there and cried.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Delia DeLyons on June 02, 2013, 12:38:04 AM
I had read Hermione as a 'yooneeq' spelling of Harmony :-/ my family actually had debates over it, since we all read the books together.

The tabs on either end of the plastic wrap (or foil) box to hold the roll in place blew my mind!

Also, the little hook inside my gas compartment door of my car, to hang my gas cap from while fueling - love it!  Took 3+ years of ownership to realize that it was *for* something, and not just an extra metal bit...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Catananche on June 02, 2013, 05:04:31 AM
(http://www.bonappetit.com/blogsandforums/blogs/badaily/kitchen-shears-600.jpg)

The pointy bit on kitchen scissors? You use it to pop the vacuum when a lid is stuck on a glass jar.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: IslandMama on June 02, 2013, 06:54:31 AM
(http://www.bonappetit.com/blogsandforums/blogs/badaily/kitchen-shears-600.jpg)

The pointy bit on kitchen scissors? You use it to pop the vacuum when a lid is stuck on a glass jar.

Or you turn the jar upside down, give it a little shake and turn it right way up and open it.  If you do that then you've pushed the contents into the little air pocket on top and... well, you filled the vacuum.

(My grandmother used to do that, she saved the jars and lids for preserving fruit and making jam and the lids were never quite right if you'd popped the seal with a knife as most people are prone to do)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Catananche on June 02, 2013, 10:01:39 AM

Or you turn the jar upside down, give it a little shake and turn it right way up and open it.  If you do that then you've pushed the contents into the little air pocket on top and... well, you filled the vacuum.

(My grandmother used to do that, she saved the jars and lids for preserving fruit and making jam and the lids were never quite right if you'd popped the seal with a knife as most people are prone to do)

That doesn't always work, sometimes the contents of the jar refuse to move. I've never ruined a seal with my scissor trick and I've made (and still make!) lots of jams and jellies.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on June 02, 2013, 10:20:36 AM
I had read Hermione as a 'yooneeq' spelling of Harmony :-/ my family actually had debates over it, since we all read the books together.

The tabs on either end of the plastic wrap (or foil) box to hold the roll in place blew my mind!

Also, the little hook inside my gas compartment door of my car, to hang my gas cap from while fueling - love it!  Took 3+ years of ownership to realize that it was *for* something, and not just an extra metal bit...

I never had a problem with Hermione because I grew up in the generation that saw Hermione Gingold on television.  Also, Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen in Greek literature.   
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: marcel on June 02, 2013, 10:42:18 AM
On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)
But, are you aware of the fact that there are married people who have neither ring.

(It was only halfway during my brthers reception that I realised that he and his wif hadn't exchanged rings.)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: wx4caster on June 02, 2013, 11:03:13 AM
I once met someone who said her daughter was called, I think, Ermyone (or rather that's what I heard) after the girl in the Harry Potter books. I often wondered if they would change the pronunciation when they realised it was wrong.

For myself. I know perfectly well how to pronounce quay, but in my head, when I'm reading it will always be kway.

Ermyone or Air-a-m-one would be the French pronunciation of Hermione. Not wrong, just not English.

The name that tripped me up for years was Penelope. It was a light bulb moment realizing it didn't rhyme with cantaloupe.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: baglady on June 02, 2013, 02:32:45 PM
I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 02, 2013, 04:56:10 PM
I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."

Ah, the song about the ups-and-downs of the chap who looks after the light-ship at the Nore, in the estuary of the River Thames. I've always loved that one.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: artk2002 on June 02, 2013, 07:59:16 PM
I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."

Ah, the song about the ups-and-downs of the chap who looks after the light-ship at the Nore, in the estuary of the River Thames. I've always loved that one.

There's a version about a lighthouse off of Plymouth called Eddystone Light. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oGeHlj6g008) In fact the lines quoted above sound more like they come from a variation on The Weaver's performance (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ub0Jw3wxuTg) of Eddystone Light. (Note that the lyrics transcription in that second video is really bad.)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: baglady on June 02, 2013, 08:11:06 PM
There are lots of versions of "Eddystone Light." The one I quoted is "Man at the Nore" as sung by John Roberts and Tony Barrand. I'm partial to that one because Bagman sings it, and I'm fortunate to know John and Tony personally. Have a listen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WURBrx0XiWM
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on June 02, 2013, 08:16:49 PM
As far as I know, "quay" is properly pronounced "key."  From Eric Bogle, The Band Played Waltzing Matilda:

Quote
And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay
I looked at the place where my legs used to be
And thanked Christ there was nobody waiting for me
To grieve, and to mourn, and to pity.

Blows the rhyme scheme right out of the water if it's pronounced "kay" or "kway".

Circular Quay is most definitly pronunced "Key".

Additionally, And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda has got to be rivally I was Only 19 for most depressing song ever.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on June 02, 2013, 08:17:40 PM
I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."

Australians too.  I remember watching a USA show (some kind of obstacle challengy thing?) and found the pronounciation Boo-ee rather amusing.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gadget--gal on June 03, 2013, 06:08:44 AM
Until book 4 (I think) of the Harry Potter series, I had no idea how to pronounce Hermione's name.  One of the character's (Ron?) got a bit drunk and said it very slowly and deliberately:  "Her-MY-oh-NEE", and I was all "... ohhhh."

No one was drunk. :) Hermione was trying to explain the pronunciation to a foreign visitor (Viktor Krum). I already knew it, but only because I'd studied Shakespeare's "A Winter's Tale" a few years before, and the queen there is named Hermione.


See, the funny thing for me was that I'd read "a winter's tale" as a child but never heard the names aloud so I assumed it was pronounced "her-mee-own" until the first Harry Potter film came out
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dazi on June 03, 2013, 06:30:41 AM
I had no idea about the wine varieties being based on the skins being used or not.  I guess I just assumed it was based on the color of the grape.

Just a curiosity, how do they remove the skins on grapes?  Do they do this before they are squished or squish and strain?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: StarFaerie on June 03, 2013, 06:41:00 AM
I had no idea about the wine varieties being based on the skins being used or not.  I guess I just assumed it was based on the color of the grape.

Just a curiosity, how do they remove the skins on grapes?  Do they do this before they are squished or squish and strain?

Squish and strain, at least at the wineries I've been too. For some it's squish, strain, start fermentation then add skins back.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 03, 2013, 09:43:09 AM
I had no idea about the wine varieties being based on the skins being used or not.  I guess I just assumed it was based on the color of the grape.

Just a curiosity, how do they remove the skins on grapes?  Do they do this before they are squished or squish and strain?

Squish and strain, at least at the wineries I've been too. For some it's squish, strain, start fermentation then add skins back.

hehehe..squish and strain....:)

Ok I'm putting my inner 8 year old away
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: scotcat60 on June 03, 2013, 09:54:06 AM
 I also thought Persephone was pronounced "Percy-phone".

So how do you pronounce "Proserpine"? I have always thought of it as Pros-er-pin-ee, because if its Antigone, Hermione, Athene, Psyche, Chloe, Gethsemine, Melpomine, Andromache etc. all with an elongated e at the end, but I  haveheard it pronounced Pros-er-pine (as in pine tree)

I know she is sometimes called Proserpina  which I assume is Pros-er- pin-ah.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lilfox on June 03, 2013, 01:49:27 PM
On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)
But, are you aware of the fact that there are married people who have neither ring.

(It was only halfway during my brthers reception that I realised that he and his wif hadn't exchanged rings.)

Hmm, come to think of it, my dad never wore a ring (he lost it before I was born) so I also didn't know it was common for men to have a wedding ring.  I think I just wasn't very observant!   ;)

My name pronunciation problem was Penelope.  Pen-ah-lope isn't right??
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on June 03, 2013, 02:03:31 PM
You don't want to know how long it finally took to dawn on me that our own Ehellion, Moray, has a picture of a Moray Eel as her avatar.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: menley on June 03, 2013, 02:07:00 PM
On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)
But, are you aware of the fact that there are married people who have neither ring.

(It was only halfway during my brthers reception that I realised that he and his wif hadn't exchanged rings.)

Hmm, come to think of it, my dad never wore a ring (he lost it before I was born) so I also didn't know it was common for men to have a wedding ring.  I think I just wasn't very observant!   ;)

My name pronunciation problem was Penelope.  Pen-ah-lope isn't right??

It's pronounced Pen-EH-lo-pee. But I always pronounced it the other way until I was like... in my teens, and someone gently corrected me. Whoops.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Cat-Fu on June 03, 2013, 02:21:49 PM
I just realized recently that I can no longer silently judge people who say "so-and-so is such a trouper" (meaning, an uncomplaining person) (because, you know, it's obviously "trooper").

Now I shall silently judge the people who write "trooper." :P
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: nuit93 on June 03, 2013, 02:59:08 PM
You don't want to know how long it finally took to dawn on me that our own Ehellion, Moray, has a picture of a Moray Eel as her avatar.

*sings* When you swim in the sea and an eel bites your knee, that's....a moray!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: zyrs on June 03, 2013, 03:01:48 PM
You don't want to know how long it finally took to dawn on me that our own Ehellion, Moray, has a picture of a Moray Eel as her avatar.

*sings* When you swim in the sea and an eel bites your knee, that's....a moray!

And ... you beat me to it.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on June 03, 2013, 03:08:07 PM
I just realized recently that I can no longer silently judge people who say "so-and-so is such a trouper" (meaning, an uncomplaining person) (because, you know, it's obviously "trooper").

Now I shall silently judge the people who write "trooper." :P

This is an interesting question because it can go either way.  A 'trooper' can mean a good, loyal soldier who will do whatever is required for the cause.  A 'trouper' can refer to an actor who puts up with terrible audiences or personal sorrows  and is dedicated to the maxim that 'the show must go on'. 

Either one works equally well. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Mikayla on June 03, 2013, 03:25:06 PM
I was in grad school before I realized that the Cowardly Lion, the Wicked Witch of the West, the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow were really the people from Kansas.  I watched that movie a million times and never made the connection.

I also POD the comment upthread about education not giving me facts.  My roomie and I had this convo just the other day about General Custer.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Calistoga on June 03, 2013, 04:03:33 PM
^ Who I thought was General Custard for a very long time.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: dawnfire on June 03, 2013, 09:25:54 PM
You don't want to know how long it finally took to dawn on me that our own Ehellion, Moray, has a picture of a Moray Eel as her avatar.

*sings* When you swim in the sea and an eel bites your knee, that's....a moray!

And ... you beat me to it.


or hubby's version

*sings* when the eel that you feel, doesn't feel like an eel, that's a moray
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: baglady on June 03, 2013, 11:35:53 PM
You don't want to know how long it finally took to dawn on me that our own Ehellion, Moray, has a picture of a Moray Eel as her avatar.

*sings* When you swim in the sea and an eel bites your knee, that's....a moray!

And ... you beat me to it.


or hubby's version

*sings* when the eel that you feel, doesn't feel like an eel, that's a moray

When you're stung by an eel and a shock's what you feel, that's a moray.

(I have no idea if morays are electric eels, but that's my story and I'm sticking to it.  ;))

I've always seen the "trouper" spelling to refer to a good sport, someone who keeps on going in the face of adversity. From "troupe" as in performing troupe and "the show must go on" and all that. But we call that behavior "soldiering on," and soldiers are "troopers," so yeah, I may need to rethink that. Hmmm....
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: m2kbug on June 04, 2013, 01:22:45 AM
The one I learned previously on eHell that still amazes me I missed all my life is that there is an arrow near the gas gauge in cars  indicating which side the gas tank is on. When I read it I immediately went and checked both our cars. At least 70% of the people I have shared that knowledge with never knew it either.

I will be checking that out in about 10 minutes when I get in my car!

An arrow?  I'm going to have to check.  I've noticed that the fuel indicator light is usually on the same side.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: m2kbug on June 04, 2013, 01:27:32 AM
You can't use regular dish detergent in a dish washer.

It makes bubbles...everywhere.

DH and I had never used one before, we've had our current home for more than a year...we just wanted to know if the dish washer worked...

The guy who came up with Scientology is named L. Ron Hubbard. Not Elrond Hubbard. For the longest time people would talk about him being an odd man and I thought "Well his parents named him Elrond, what do you expect?"

You can use about a teaspoon of dish soap if you're desperate.  Add some oxyclean and vinegar.  Your dishes will probably be streaky if you have hard water.  The vinegar is supposed to help with that. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: crella on June 04, 2013, 03:48:45 AM
The one I learned previously on eHell that still amazes me I missed all my life is that there is an arrow near the gas gauge in cars  indicating which side the gas tank is on. When I read it I immediately went and checked both our cars. At least 70% of the people I have shared that knowledge with never knew it either.

No! Really?  Every time I go to the US I rent a car and have done loop-de-loops around the gas pumps when I mistake which side the tank is on. I never noticed! My last trip I was all over the place and rented 3 cars in total and I was confused  :D How simple, thank you!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: crella on June 04, 2013, 04:13:36 AM
It's just a flesh wound!


**Snort!** We really need a 'like' button!

I hit some other button, and I got some spiel about my IP address, I hope I didn't do anything stupid, like hit 'report'...I loved this post!  :D If you hit 'report' by mistake, are there following steps or does it automatically 'report'?

Mods, I didn't mean it!

Edit- It looks like I clicked on the 'Logged' thing next to 'Report'. Phew. I guess.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on June 04, 2013, 08:31:34 AM

I hit some other button, and I got some spiel about my IP address, I hope I didn't do anything stupid, like hit 'report'...I loved this post!  :D If you hit 'report' by mistake, are there following steps or does it automatically 'report'?

Mods, I didn't mean it!

Edit- It looks like I clicked on the 'Logged' thing next to 'Report'. Phew. I guess.

The "Report" button takes us to a screen to say why the post is being reported and then we must hit "Send" or something like that. Anyway, not all reports are acted on. If the mod doesn't agree with the report, it will be ignored.

It's pretty hard to report something by accident!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Twik on June 04, 2013, 08:47:26 AM
The moray song that I know:

"What's that thing in the reef, with a mouthful of teeth? That's a moray."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Ms_Cellany on June 04, 2013, 09:44:49 AM
The comic strip Fusco Brothers had:

"When an eel bites your leg, and the pain makes you beg, that's a moray."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on June 04, 2013, 01:51:39 PM
I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."

I grew up calling it "bwoy" as well. And that was in southern Iowa. (note the "w")
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on June 04, 2013, 02:05:33 PM
I pronounce it the same way I do the Maryland town of Bowie.  Boo-ee.

In house hunting I was surprised to find out that not all homes have breaker boxes and that some of the older ones had fuseboxes. (one had a fusebox on the outside of the house.  I'm sorry, all I could think was "That's a horror movie waiting to happen" because I could just imagine someone coming up and pulling fuses to make lights go out and freak out the inhabitants of the house before pulling them all out, going in and killing someone. 

No I don't watch too many horror movies, I've seen just enough, thank you. :)

I was also surprised when my friend told me that Iowa had vineyards.  I blame it on the fact that I'd just never heard about it till then and never seen any bottles marked as being from an Iowa vineyard, they were mostly foreign, Californian, or Maryland vineyards.  We visited one of those vineyards while I visited my friend, one called Fireside Winery and the wine was VERY good! I tried to find it when I got back home but no one had it.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on June 04, 2013, 02:16:50 PM
And see, I learned it:

"When it's something you know, that your culture says so, that's a more."

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Betelnut on June 04, 2013, 02:30:14 PM
I pronounce it the same way I do the Maryland town of Bowie.  Boo-ee.

In house hunting I was surprised to find out that not all homes have breaker boxes and that some of the older ones had fuseboxes. (one had a fusebox on the outside of the house.  I'm sorry, all I could think was "That's a horror movie waiting to happen" because I could just imagine someone coming up and pulling fuses to make lights go out and freak out the inhabitants of the house before pulling them all out, going in and killing someone. 

No I don't watch too many horror movies, I've seen just enough, thank you. :)

I was also surprised when my friend told me that Iowa had vineyards.  I blame it on the fact that I'd just never heard about it till then and never seen any bottles marked as being from an Iowa vineyard, they were mostly foreign, Californian, or Maryland vineyards.  We visited one of those vineyards while I visited my friend, one called Fireside Winery and the wine was VERY good! I tried to find it when I got back home but no one had it.

Plus, not all grapes are used for wine.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on June 04, 2013, 03:32:59 PM

Plus, not all grapes are used for wine.

Are you saying you never saw grapes in the produce section or someone's backyard, or that not all varieties of grapes are suitable for making wine?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on June 04, 2013, 04:17:47 PM

Plus, not all grapes are used for wine.

Are you saying you never saw grapes in the produce section or someone's backyard, or that not all varieties of grapes are suitable for making wine?

How did you get that meaning?

It seems pretty obvious to me that Betelnut means "not every grape variety that is grown is used for wine; some are used for other things instead."

Most wine varietals aren't sold as eating grapes (thogh they often taste quite good); most eating-grape varietals aren't used for wine.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Moray on June 04, 2013, 05:56:43 PM
You don't want to know how long it finally took to dawn on me that our own Ehellion, Moray, has a picture of a Moray Eel as her avatar.

*sings* When you swim in the sea and an eel bites your knee, that's....a moray!

And ... you beat me to it.


or hubby's version

*sings* when the eel that you feel, doesn't feel like an eel, that's a moray

When you're stung by an eel and a shock's what you feel, that's a moray.

(I have no idea if morays are electric eels, but that's my story and I'm sticking to it.  ;))

I've always seen the "trouper" spelling to refer to a good sport, someone who keeps on going in the face of adversity. From "troupe" as in performing troupe and "the show must go on" and all that. But we call that behavior "soldiering on," and soldiers are "troopers," so yeah, I may need to rethink that. Hmmm....

LOL, I thought I felt my ears burning! I love Morays because they always look like they've told a really really stupid joke and are going "Do you get it? Get it? It's funny because ducks can't drive tractors!"

Fun fact: Electric Eels aren't acutally eels at all; they're a species of Knifefish.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Betelnut on June 04, 2013, 07:41:50 PM

Plus, not all grapes are used for wine.

Are you saying you never saw grapes in the produce section or someone's backyard, or that not all varieties of grapes are suitable for making wine?

How did you get that meaning?

It seems pretty obvious to me that Betelnut means "not every grape variety that is grown is used for wine; some are used for other things instead."

Most wine varietals aren't sold as eating grapes (thogh they often taste quite good); most eating-grape varietals aren't used for wine.

Yes, exactly,  I was responding to the poster who was surprised that there were vineyards in Iowa because she/he had never seen wine from Iowa (until recently).  Well, not all grapes are used for wine.  A person can have a vineyard and not produce wine.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on June 04, 2013, 08:21:48 PM

Plus, not all grapes are used for wine.

Are you saying you never saw grapes in the produce section or someone's backyard, or that not all varieties of grapes are suitable for making wine?
I was responding to the poster who was surprised that there were vineyards in Iowa because she/he had never seen wine from Iowa (until recently).  Well, not all grapes are used for wine.  A person can have a vineyard and not produce wine.

I was laughing at my first reading on your statement. I thought it was funny that I read that into it. I did know what you meant!  :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: flowersintheattic on June 04, 2013, 09:14:08 PM

Or you turn the jar upside down, give it a little shake and turn it right way up and open it.  If you do that then you've pushed the contents into the little air pocket on top and... well, you filled the vacuum.

(My grandmother used to do that, she saved the jars and lids for preserving fruit and making jam and the lids were never quite right if you'd popped the seal with a knife as most people are prone to do)

That doesn't always work, sometimes the contents of the jar refuse to move. I've never ruined a seal with my scissor trick and I've made (and still make!) lots of jams and jellies.

My father had all of my siblings and I convinced that blowing on the lid made it open easily. And then he'd demonstrate...and it ALWAYS worked. I was well into high school before I realized that he was really just stronger than us.  :-[

I was in college before I realized that Perchik in "Fiddler on the Roof" was a communist. Re-watching it now, it seems painfully obvious.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on June 04, 2013, 09:33:14 PM
I think all of you are just hilarious with the "Just A Moray" songs  ;D.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: crella on June 04, 2013, 10:40:10 PM
The moray song that I know:

"What's that thing in the reef, with a mouthful of teeth? That's a moray."


BC's version-

"When an eel lunges out,
and bites off your snout,
that's a mora-a-a--ay!"
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: crella on June 04, 2013, 10:41:26 PM


The "Report" button takes us to a screen to say why the post is being reported and then we must hit "Send" or something like that. Anyway, not all reports are acted on. If the mod doesn't agree with the report, it will be ignored.

It's pretty hard to report something by accident!

Oh, good! Thank you!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on June 05, 2013, 10:35:35 AM
LOL, I thought I felt my ears burning! I love Morays because they always look like they've told a really really stupid joke and are going "Do you get it? Get it? It's funny because ducks can't drive tractors!"

Everyone accuses me of having that face most of the time.

To be fair, I do have it frequently. I tell a lot of REALLY bad jokes and then have to explain half of them because they're either obscure science puns that nobody understands or obscure TV/book series puns that nobody else has read.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 05, 2013, 11:09:23 AM
Could we get back to the topic before the thread gets locked?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: NyaChan on June 05, 2013, 11:33:30 AM
I didn't just find this out - it was when I was about 13 - but I'm still kind of embarrassed.   When I was a kid, my mother used to cut my fingernails for me with a pair of nail scissors.  These scissors were like any other kind; i.e. they were for right-handed people only.  That's why I needed her help - I could cut my left hand's nails, but not my right.  One day, I said to my friend "I have no idea how I'm going to cut my nails when I'm grown up and in a place of my own.  I'll probably have to call Mum over to help me!"  She looked at me oddly and said "Um, just use nail clippers."  "Huh?  What are those?"  "You're kidding, right?"

I wasn't.  I'd never heard of them.

My nail scissors have straight circular metal handles.  They can be used by persons of either-handed pursuasion.  I've not seen them otherwise (thoguht larger scissor ofen are...)
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcThZyLuqqhWyF-Xo81vpQwORL9cWZ5GijQK0fwCbKevnNQlEkxO)

It's not just the shape of the handles; it's the direction that the blades cross each other.

But it doesn't make any difference.  After all, I use my left hand to cut the nails on my right and both hands look the same at the end.
Does to me. I'm left-handed, but I still can't use nail scissors to cut my right hand. The blades just won't meet properly. I've tried turning it around (so the blades curl away from the nail rather than with it) and that helps somewhat, but not enough to make it worth while.

Nail-clippers are so much easier to use :)

I had no idea those scissors were for nails until I read this thread  :-[  Always thought it was strange that they included scissors in manicure sets, but I figured it was for general grooming or cutting.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on June 05, 2013, 01:12:14 PM
I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."

This reminded me of the time in fifth grade when we were learning about homophones, and the teacher would throw one out and call on a student to supply the matching word. Lucky me, I got stuck with "buoy," which the teacher pronounced like "boy." Obviously he was looking for the word "boy," as in a male child, but I had absolutely no idea what he meant. This was in the Midwest. The teacher was somewhat older so perhaps it was a generational thing, or he was from another part of the country originally. When he finally explained it, the whole class of 11-year-olds just looked at him blankly. We were also pretty landlocked with no large lakes nearby, so we only had a tenuous grasp of what a "buoy" (boo-ee) was anyway...

AND--I told my dad about the gas tank arrow last night, and he had no idea! And it was there on his car. He knows everything about cars, and I don't even drive. eHell, you made my dream come true of telling him something about a car that he didn't know. ;)

In college (late '90's) they put little cards on the tables in the dorm dining halls explaining what the "proper" politically correct terms for different ethnicities, etc. were, as a helpful thing. I think at that time, Hispanic was out and Latino was in, for example. Most of them I knew or at least had heard of, but I was absolutely shocked to learn that "little person" was the correct term to use. It seemed so patronizing to me. But, not being one myself or knowing any, I'm sure I wasn't attuned to the negative connotations of words like midget or dwarf. I guess overall the terms weren't retrospectively obvious, though, since enough students had trouble with them that the college printed up an informative sign...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Katana_Geldar on June 06, 2013, 03:37:43 PM
I really don't like how Americans pronounce the word "buoy". Or the way they pronounce "altimeter".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RingTailedLemur on June 06, 2013, 04:15:34 PM
I really don't like how Americans pronounce the word "buoy".

It makes me laugh...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on June 06, 2013, 04:21:24 PM
Different Americans pronounce things different ways... (Warning: Time Sink) http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/maps.html (http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/maps.html)

And how do you pronounce "altimeter"?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Katana_Geldar on June 06, 2013, 04:26:28 PM
Alti-meter. Similar to centimetre or millimetre. Emphasis on the first syllable.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: oogyda on June 06, 2013, 04:27:35 PM
I checked. There is no gas tank arrow on my 2009.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Ms_Cellany on June 06, 2013, 04:27:47 PM
Alt-TIM-'m'ter.

ETA that therm-MOM'm'ter has the same cadence.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on June 06, 2013, 04:27:56 PM
I learned all-TIM-et-er.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: emwithme on June 06, 2013, 04:43:13 PM
I checked. There is no gas tank arrow on my 2009.

My 2003 Peugeot (UK) doesn't have one either.  What it does have is a picture of a petrol pump.  The pipe and nozzle demonstrates which side the cap is on, similar to the arrow. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: BB-VA on June 06, 2013, 09:27:16 PM
I checked. There is no gas tank arrow on my 2009.

My 2003 Peugeot (UK) doesn't have one either.  What it does have is a picture of a petrol pump.  The pipe and nozzle demonstrates which side the cap is on, similar to the arrow.

I miss my Peugeots.  Renaults, too, although I now have a Nissan Cube (named Puppy) that is based on a Renault design. 

Those were the days...

Puppy has an arrow, btw.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Browyn on June 06, 2013, 09:55:00 PM
I had no idea about the wine varieties being based on the skins being used or not.  I guess I just assumed it was based on the color of the grape.

Just a curiosity, how do they remove the skins on grapes?  Do they do this before they are squished or squish and strain?

Squish and strain, at least at the wineries I've been too. For some it's squish, strain, start fermentation then add skins back.

Same idea with making apple jelly.  Its clear/gold unless you include the skins then you can have darker jelly and a little different taste.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: o_gal on June 07, 2013, 06:40:58 AM
I checked. There is no gas tank arrow on my 2009.

My 2003 Peugeot (UK) doesn't have one either.  What it does have is a picture of a petrol pump.  The pipe and nozzle demonstrates which side the cap is on, similar to the arrow.

Nope, it's just a coincidence with most cars: http://www.snopes.com/autos/techno/icon.asp
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 07, 2013, 08:44:11 AM
I checked. There is no gas tank arrow on my 2009.

My 2003 Peugeot (UK) doesn't have one either.  What it does have is a picture of a petrol pump.  The pipe and nozzle demonstrates which side the cap is on, similar to the arrow.

Nope, it's just a coincidence with most cars: http://www.snopes.com/autos/techno/icon.asp

You mean the gas pump icon is a coincidence right?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on June 07, 2013, 02:27:47 PM
I like the way my Mercury Mountaineer is marked.  Next to the fuel gauge, there's the words "FUEL DOOR" and an arrow.  It took me a bit to figure it out but now it's as plain as can be!

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on June 07, 2013, 04:55:45 PM
Same for it's Ford version. Makes it so easy!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: o_gal on June 10, 2013, 06:58:31 AM
I checked. There is no gas tank arrow on my 2009.

My 2003 Peugeot (UK) doesn't have one either.  What it does have is a picture of a petrol pump.  The pipe and nozzle demonstrates which side the cap is on, similar to the arrow.

Nope, it's just a coincidence with most cars: http://www.snopes.com/autos/techno/icon.asp

You mean the gas pump icon is a coincidence right?

Yes, it makes no difference what icon they use - the location of the nozzle on the icon does not always indicate which side the fuel door is on (the icon used by my 2004 Corolla has the nozzle on the right side but the fuel door is on the left.) As the snopes article explains, it's the same thing as all those predictors of a baby's sex. Since there are only 2 choices, you're going to be right at least 50% of the time.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Layla Miller on June 10, 2013, 10:08:27 AM
Earlier this morning I was picking up DD's toys, including that toy that's a rod with multi-colored rings of increasing size that stack on it.  I always have to remind myself what order they go in as I'm grabbing the rings to restack them, but this time I finally realized that they go in reverse rainbow order: blue on the bottom, then green, then yellow, then orange, then red on top.

I cannot believe it took me this long to notice.  :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: faithlessone on June 10, 2013, 11:00:22 AM
Last year (aged 23) I finally learnt that 'suckling pig' meant 'baby pig'. All these years, I'd assumed it meant 'pig with an apple in it's mouth'. Doh!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on June 10, 2013, 11:18:02 AM
It took me until well into my 20s to realize that "kid gloves" weren't gloves for children, but gloves made out of the hide of a baby goat, AKA a kid. I kept wondering how these adults were buying kid gloves that fit them until I finally got confused enough to look it up.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on June 10, 2013, 01:01:20 PM
This does remind me of a moment I had with my son when he was much younger, pertaining to that.  He heard the term "kid gloves" and asked if they were gloves for kids.  I said (with the tiniest smirk) that they weren't gloves for kids, they were gloves made of kids.  The wide-eyed horror was entertaining.  I didn't explain it to him.

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on June 10, 2013, 08:17:55 PM
I didn't just learn this, but it was an embarrassingly long time before I knew Al Jolson (The Jazz Singer) wasn't black; he was born in Lithuania.  And just for trivia, although it's little known, Mae West was 1/4 African-American.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 10, 2013, 08:48:12 PM
I didn't know Halle Berry was African-American until I saw her featured in JET (an African-American magazine).  Part of it was just knowing the name was famous and knowing the face was famous but not putting the two of them together.  I think the other part of it was that her skin tone is kind of indeterminate (especially in airbrushed pictures, where magazines are STILL awful about photoshopping stars' skin to make them look lighter).

Either way, I felt like an idiot.  I mean, it's not like she's famous for being an author or a radio personality or something - I ought to have put two and two together  :P
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on June 10, 2013, 09:23:57 PM
I didn't know Halle Berry was African-American until I saw her featured in JET (an African-American magazine).  Part of it was just knowing the name was famous and knowing the face was famous but not putting the two of them together.  I think the other part of it was that her skin tone is kind of indeterminate (especially in airbrushed pictures, where magazines are STILL awful about photoshopping stars' skin to make them look lighter).

Either way, I felt like an idiot.  I mean, it's not like she's famous for being an author or a radio personality or something - I ought to have put two and two together  :P

She is quite pale for an African American and afaik she's not really known for "championing the black cause" so I can see why you may not have realised.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 10, 2013, 11:10:12 PM
I didn't know Halle Berry was African-American until I saw her featured in JET (an African-American magazine).  Part of it was just knowing the name was famous and knowing the face was famous but not putting the two of them together.  I think the other part of it was that her skin tone is kind of indeterminate (especially in airbrushed pictures, where magazines are STILL awful about photoshopping stars' skin to make them look lighter).

Either way, I felt like an idiot.  I mean, it's not like she's famous for being an author or a radio personality or something - I ought to have put two and two together  :P

She is quite pale for an African American and afaik she's not really known for "championing the black cause" so I can see why you may not have realised.

I *may* have kind of had her mixed up with Drew Barrymore in my mind, too  :P
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RingTailedLemur on June 11, 2013, 03:01:28 AM
I didn't know Vanessa Williams was black until I read something about it (I'd never heard of her until I saw her in Ugly Betty).  I thought she was just tanned.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: perpetua on June 11, 2013, 05:14:04 AM
Ditto Slash from Guns & Roses.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Asharah on June 11, 2013, 07:03:13 AM
My grandmother used to swear Lena Horne wasn't black. I think she was just in denial. The woman had issues.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on June 11, 2013, 08:18:10 AM
Vanessa Williams was the first black Miss America. back in the 80s (I remember when she won) but was forced to give up her title when some nude photos she had posed for in the past surfaced. I applaud her for overcoming that because I always thought it was incredibly shameful how she was treated by the pageant officials.

Halle Berry was the first (and I think still the only) black actress to win an Academy Award for Best Actress. It was a huge thing which she gushed about in her acceptance speech IIRC.

So it's funny that although both of these women were the first black women to accomplish these things, there are people who don't realize they're black! Maybe that a good thing if it means we are more color blind?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: perpetua on June 11, 2013, 08:28:27 AM
My grandmother used to swear Lena Horne wasn't black. I think she was just in denial. The woman had issues.

I didn't know who Lena Horne was so I looked her up. She seems to have quite Caucasian features, so I can see how that mistake could be made.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on June 11, 2013, 08:40:12 AM
So it's funny that although both of these women were the first black women to accomplish these things, there are people who don't realize they're black! Maybe that a good thing if it means we are more color blind?

Actually I think its quite telling that they are both pale for their race.  Sadly.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on June 11, 2013, 09:23:39 AM
Ditto Slash from Guns & Roses.

Same here.  I only realized that Slash was African-American when he showed up in an exhibition of  African-American portraits at the museum. 

Along the same lines,  I never realized that Dinah Shore was Jewish until reruns of her variety show started appearing on the Jewish cable channel's  Thursday night comedy line-up.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Cat-Fu on June 11, 2013, 10:13:52 AM
So it's funny that although both of these women were the first black women to accomplish these things, there are people who don't realize they're black! Maybe that a good thing if it means we are more color blind?

There are many who argue that "color blindness" is a bad thing!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Syfygeek on June 11, 2013, 10:44:58 AM
Ditto Slash from Guns & Roses.

Wait? What? I'm a GnR fan, and had no idea Slash was African-American. Guess that answers the "is it a perm" question...Wow, mind blown.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: nuit93 on June 11, 2013, 12:41:07 PM
My grandmother used to swear Lena Horne wasn't black. I think she was just in denial. The woman had issues.

I didn't know who Lena Horne was so I looked her up. She seems to have quite Caucasian features, so I can see how that mistake could be made.

Didn't she try to pass (as they called it back then) in her day?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on June 11, 2013, 12:53:45 PM
My grandmother used to swear Lena Horne wasn't black. I think she was just in denial. The woman had issues.

I didn't know who Lena Horne was so I looked her up. She seems to have quite Caucasian features, so I can see how that mistake could be made.

Didn't she try to pass (as they called it back then) in her day?

No. She was a Civil Rights activist, and started her career in the Cotton Club chorus line.

We who were here fans had no doubts about who she was or what she stood for, both on and off stage. Her record albums definitely show she was African-American.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on June 11, 2013, 02:11:09 PM
Ditto Slash from Guns & Roses.

He always looked like Cousin Itt to me...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Snooks on June 11, 2013, 02:21:03 PM
Ditto Slash from Guns & Roses.

Wait? What? I'm a GnR fan, and had no idea Slash was African-American. Guess that answers the "is it a perm" question...Wow, mind blown.

Isn't he British?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: snowflake on June 11, 2013, 02:22:59 PM
So it's funny that although both of these women were the first black women to accomplish these things, there are people who don't realize they're black! Maybe that a good thing if it means we are more color blind?

Actually I think its quite telling that they are both pale for their race.  Sadly.

Both are more white than black when it comes down to it. 

I have always found it odd that I am an even half-and-half.  My mother has only Asian/Pacific Islander ancestry and my father has only European ancestry.   The vast majority of people cannot figure out what race I am and will ask bluntly.

But you have someone like Halle Berry who has a European mother and a father who was the standard American White/Black mix (Not sure what he looks like but the majority of people called "black" in the US are a mix.)  Of course she gets called "Black" though she is likely 50-75% white.

I was 20 before I realized that people who asked me, "What race are you?" before asking my name were on the inappropriate side.  Not mean or racist or rude - because most of the time it's without malice.  But it is sort of odd.  Get to know me before you ask personal questions.

 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: faithlessone on June 11, 2013, 03:15:00 PM
Ditto Slash from Guns & Roses.

Wait? What? I'm a GnR fan, and had no idea Slash was African-American. Guess that answers the "is it a perm" question...Wow, mind blown.

Isn't he British?

He is British. His mother is African-American though, and his father is White British.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on June 11, 2013, 04:31:03 PM
Last year (aged 23) I finally learnt that 'suckling pig' meant 'baby pig'. All these years, I'd assumed it meant 'pig with an apple in it's mouth'. Doh!

Well, actually you haven't exactly been wrong all those years. 

Most farmers or others who actually raise pigs refer to them as piglets.  The term 'suckling' pig does refer to a very new baby pig who isn't yet weaned from its Mom, but the term is rarely used outside of its culinary context.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Bluenomi on June 11, 2013, 08:25:53 PM
Earlier this morning I was picking up DD's toys, including that toy that's a rod with multi-colored rings of increasing size that stack on it.  I always have to remind myself what order they go in as I'm grabbing the rings to restack them, but this time I finally realized that they go in reverse rainbow order: blue on the bottom, then green, then yellow, then orange, then red on top.

I cannot believe it took me this long to notice.  :-[

They are too! I never noticed either, I just slacked them based on size, never paid any attention to the colours.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Sharnita on June 11, 2013, 08:46:04 PM
The set I've been cleaning up doesn't have all those colors
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gadget--gal on June 18, 2013, 10:01:08 AM
On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)
But, are you aware of the fact that there are married people who have neither ring.

(It was only halfway during my brthers reception that I realised that he and his wif hadn't exchanged rings.)

Hmm, come to think of it, my dad never wore a ring (he lost it before I was born) so I also didn't know it was common for men to have a wedding ring.  I think I just wasn't very observant!   ;)

My name pronunciation problem was Penelope.  Pen-ah-lope isn't right??

It's pronounced Pen-EH-lo-pee. But I always pronounced it the other way until I was like... in my teens, and someone gently corrected me. Whoops.

that's my name. I don't mind correcting someone the first time, but unfortunately in my parent's country. it's commonly pronounced "the other way" and the galling thing is people tried to tell me *I* was wrong. in a really patronising way some would even go as far as to say the correct way (Pen-EH-lo-pee) was "bush" i.e. uncivilized or like a bumpkin.


so now I'm really precious about the pronunciation of my name, though I do try to be polite about it.

(
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on June 18, 2013, 05:37:30 PM
This does remind me of a moment I had with my son when he was much younger, pertaining to that.  He heard the term "kid gloves" and asked if they were gloves for kids.  I said (with the tiniest smirk) that they weren't gloves for kids, they were gloves made of kids.  The wide-eyed horror was entertaining.  I didn't explain it to him.

Virg

I thought the same thing as a kid then I saw a pair of kid gloves in an antique store and said "These are too big for a kid!"

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Calistoga on June 18, 2013, 08:09:37 PM
The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Shoo on June 18, 2013, 09:00:24 PM
The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

I don't think this really fits the category of things adults should know.  I bet a LOT of people don't know.  For one, me!  I don't know the first thing about hockey.  I wouldn't even know what the Stanley Cup *is*....well, now I do, I guess. :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 19, 2013, 02:08:45 AM
The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

I don't think this really fits the category of things adults should know.  I bet a LOT of people don't know.  For one, me!  I don't know the first thing about hockey.  I wouldn't even know what the Stanley Cup *is*....well, now I do, I guess. :)

Shoo, I'm completely with you there.  In defence of the more-than-tiny minority of people on the planet who are not interested in sports: I don't think anybody need to be ashamed of sports-related ignorance, or feel that any fact or information to do with sports, is something which all adults should know.

I remember a conversation with a work colleague, many years ago.  He mentioned a prominent English cricketer who was at the time performing mighty cricketing feats here in England; he was staggered when sports-hater me replied (in genuine ignorance), "who is this fellow? -- I've never heard of him", and his reaction was highly condescending.  I "let it ride"; but wanted to say, "Look, chum, I have absolutely zero interest in cricket -- why on earth should I have been highly au fait with this hero of yours?"

Sports fans, more power to you and your enjoyment of that scene -- please just have in mind that not everyone is keen on it, or needs to be.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on June 19, 2013, 09:44:03 AM
The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

I don't think this really fits the category of things adults should know.  I bet a LOT of people don't know.  For one, me!  I don't know the first thing about hockey.  I wouldn't even know what the Stanley Cup *is*....well, now I do, I guess. :)

Shoo, I'm completely with you there.  In defence of the more-than-tiny minority of people on the planet who are not interested in sports: I don't think anybody need to be ashamed of sports-related ignorance, or feel that any fact or information to do with sports, is something which all adults should know.

I remember a conversation with a work colleague, many years ago.  He mentioned a prominent English cricketer who was at the time performing mighty cricketing feats here in England; he was staggered when sports-hater me replied (in genuine ignorance), "who is this fellow? -- I've never heard of him", and his reaction was highly condescending.  I "let it ride"; but wanted to say, "Look, chum, I have absolutely zero interest in cricket -- why on earth should I have been highly au fait with this hero of yours?"

Sports fans, more power to you and your enjoyment of that scene -- please just have in mind that not everyone is keen on it, or needs to be.

Yes.

I used to regularly follow one college team in one sport. That was it. I knew the basics of some other sports, and knew enough to make fun of my hometown pro teams. (Trust me, I wasn't in the minority for that. They're pretty much terrible.) But when my at-the-time girlfriend started talking hockey, it went right over my head. She got incensed that I didn't know exactly what she was talking about. Well, the nearest pro hockey team is on the other side of the next state over, we've never had a team, I've never cared to understand it, and I've never met anyone else who did care. So why did it matter how much I knew?

I've had people on my case about not understanding how cricket is played. I live in the middle of the USA, not a country where cricket is popular. The closest I've ever been to a country where cricket was a big deal was a weeklong trip to Italy. Barring that....um, I watch BBC shows? Why would I ever know how cricket was played, or even care?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Betelnut on June 19, 2013, 09:51:09 AM
I kind of disagree about the sports thing.  I'm not a huge sports fan either but I do consider it part of my culture and is thus something that I feel like I should know a little bit about.

I would totally understand if a person from somewhere not the U.S. didn't understand/know about football (U.S. version) and, I hope, people from other countries don't hate on me for not understanding cricket but if a person who is raised in the United States (and was an adult) doesn't know what a touchdown is or the basics of baseball (number of innings, etc.), I would be surprised and I would definitely think of him/her as ignorant about his/her own culture.

Sort of like I would also be surprised if an adult didn't know who Louis Armstrong or Ella Fitzgerald is.  It is our culture--you don't need to be a jazz fan to know the names.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: KenveeB on June 19, 2013, 10:00:16 AM
I kind of disagree about the sports thing.  I'm not a huge sports fan either but I do consider it part of my culture and is thus something that I feel like I should know a little bit about.

I would totally understand if a person from somewhere not the U.S. didn't understand/know about football (U.S. version) and, I hope, people from other countries don't hate on me for not understanding cricket but if a person who is raised in the United States (and was an adult) doesn't know what a touchdown is or the basics of baseball (number of innings, etc.), I would be surprised and I would definitely think of him/her as ignorant about his/her own culture.

Sort of like I would also be surprised if an adult didn't know who Louis Armstrong or Ella Fitzgerald is.  It is our culture--you don't need to be a jazz fan to know the names.

I do agree with this. I'm NOT a sports fan. I HATE sports -- except for Texas Rangers baseball, which I follow a little. :)  But I know the basics of the rules for football, baseball, and basketball, which are the major sports in my area. I don't feel any need to know anything about hockey or cricket, because they're not popular around me. But knowing what a touchdown is and what the Super Bowl is are part of the culture around me, and I would feel out of place not being part of that.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: CakeBeret on June 19, 2013, 10:19:08 AM
I was an avid reader from a very early age, and I often used words that I had read but never heard. My parents teased me mercilessly if I mispronounced them, so I stopped using new words. :( These days I use google pronunciation and practice saying a word several times before I feel comfortable using it. There are some words I don't use because I can't seem to get the pronunciation quite right. For example I always say "silverware" or "forks and knives" and never use the word "cutlery" because that was one of the worst cases of being teased over mispronunciation. I still can't say it properly.

I was clued in to the gas tank arrow when I was 17 or 18.

I have to admit, all the outrage over identical twins and the physical impossibility of them being differently gendered, was something I had simply never thought about. If I weren't such a reserved person, I may very well have made the same mistake. It's not something one tends to think about--IMO many people tend to focus on identicality of physical features such as eyes and nose and don't give any thought to the baby's genitalia.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 19, 2013, 10:25:57 AM
I'm NOT a sports fan. I HATE sports -- except for Texas Rangers baseball, which I follow a little. :)

My condolances.   ;)  (at least they way they are playing lately)

With my group of friends, I would never try to schedule a non-related event on Superbowl Sunday.  Or Grey Cup Sunday, for that matter.  Nor would I want to have an event scheduled during Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Playoffs.  Although this one can be tough, with the season stretching to the end of June these days.  Seriously.  Game 4 is tonight and there are potentially 3 more games.  Although I hope not.  The sooner Boston wins, the sooner I get my hockey pool money.   ;D

But I wouldn't even think about trying to schedule anything around any kind of regular season game, even if it was the biggest rivalry going.  Like the Yankees and the Red Sox.  Wouldn't even cross my mind, if I was throwing a party or something.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: CakeBeret on June 19, 2013, 10:34:05 AM
The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

It's okay, sometimes my DH will say "I'm buying tickets to the game Tuesday night" and I have to ask what sport is currently playing. :-\ I really, really do not keep up with sports.

I'm a pretty intelligent person, but I was raised by a sports nut father who expected me to magically understand sports and would react badly to me asking questions, and a mother who had no knowledge or interest. I still don't fully understand American football. My DH is very good about explaining things without making me feel like a moron, but I can't quite wrap my head around "downs".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 19, 2013, 10:36:24 AM
I don't think everyone needs to know the details of every sport, but I do think at a minimum you should know the names and sports of whatever your locally-popular professional sports franchises are.  In Wisconsin, the Green Bay Packers are about as close to a state-mandated religion as you can get  :P
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jones on June 19, 2013, 10:50:46 AM
I wasn't raised to know anything about sports, I have a faint grasp on the most basic rules of baseball and basketball, even less on U S football although I can watch a soccer game all right. My husband doesn't follow sports at all, our FOOs don't follow at all, our close friends couldn't care less. The only time it affects me is at work functions, in which I can generally say "What do you think?" And the expert is on cloud 9.

FWIW, I also have no clue who Ella Fitzgerald is, and I was introduced to the music of Michael Jackson at age 17, before which time I had no clue who he was. My interests simply laid in other areas. I can tell all sorts of fantasy, historical and sci fi stories tho... ;)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on June 19, 2013, 10:55:34 AM
The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

It's okay, sometimes my DH will say "I'm buying tickets to the game Tuesday night" and I have to ask what sport is currently playing. :-\ I really, really do not keep up with sports.

I'm a pretty intelligent person, but I was raised by a sports nut father who expected me to magically understand sports and would react badly to me asking questions, and a mother who had no knowledge or interest. I still don't fully understand American football. My DH is very good about explaining things without making me feel like a moron, but I can't quite wrap my head around "downs".

Here's how "downs" were explained to me, way back when, and it made perfect sense of something which, like you, I couldn't really get.

Down = Chance
When the team has the ball, they have four chances (downs) to progress a minimum of 10 yards down the field. So, their first chance = "first down & 10" meaning, this is their first chance and they need ten yards.

As they play each "down", they either gain yardage or lose it. And that yardage is either subtracted (if they gain) or added (if they lose) to the original 10. "Second down & 8" means they are now on their second chance and they have progressed two yards so they still need eight more to make the originally required 10.

Once they make the (at least) 10 yards (if indeed they do), the downs reset so they are back at "first & 10" with four new chances to make 10 additional yards.

By the time they get to the fourth down, if they still haven't made the 10, it's a calculated risk whether to go for that last yardage or not. If they don't make it, the other team gets the ball (and their four downs) right where they are. If they punt (kick the ball as far down the field as they can) then the other team gets the ball much further down the field.

Hope that helps!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on June 19, 2013, 11:11:16 AM
The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

It's okay, sometimes my DH will say "I'm buying tickets to the game Tuesday night" and I have to ask what sport is currently playing. :-\ I really, really do not keep up with sports.

I'm a pretty intelligent person, but I was raised by a sports nut father who expected me to magically understand sports and would react badly to me asking questions, and a mother who had no knowledge or interest. I still don't fully understand American football. My DH is very good about explaining things without making me feel like a moron, but I can't quite wrap my head around "downs".

Here's how "downs" were explained to me, way back when, and it made perfect sense of something which, like you, I couldn't really get.

Down = Chance
When the team has the ball, they have four chances (downs) to progress a minimum of 10 yards down the field. So, their first chance = "first down & 10" meaning, this is their first chance and they need ten yards.

As they play each "down", they either gain yardage or lose it. And that yardage is either subtracted (if they gain) or added (if they lose) to the original 10. "Second down & 8" means they are now on their second chance and they have progressed two yards so they still need eight more to make the originally required 10.

Once they make the (at least) 10 yards (if indeed they do), the downs reset so they are back at "first & 10" with four new chances to make 10 additional yards.

By the time they get to the fourth down, if they still haven't made the 10, it's a calculated risk whether to go for that last yardage or not. If they don't make it, the other team gets the ball (and their four downs) right where they are. If they punt (kick the ball as far down the field as they can) then the other team gets the ball much further down the field.

Hope that helps!

That actually expalins it very well.

I have a passing knowlege of American football, but only because I was in marching band and was forced to so many of those ridiculous games. And then when I ask my BF something, he'll correct me and giggle because the rules are different between high school and college. And then it's different again for professional.

I don't think everyone needs to know the details of every sport, but I do think at a minimum you should know the names and sports of whatever your locally-popular professional sports franchises are.  In Wisconsin, the Green Bay Packers are about as close to a state-mandated religion as you can get  :P

I don't agree with this. We've got pro football, pro baseball, pro soccer, NASCAR track, a minor league hockey team, an indoor football league, a nationally known roller derby team, and a fairly good AA baseball team that I can think of. There's a major university with a decent sports program within an hour's drive from my house. That's the sports I can think of off the top of my head. I won't say I know the rules to all of them or could list off the team names, but they're ALL locally-popular sports franchises, and outside of the University teams they all fall under the guise of "professional", as in people get paid to do this and make a living from it.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: CakeBeret on June 19, 2013, 11:15:00 AM
Thanks lowspark--that's definitely the clearest explanation I've ever been given!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on June 19, 2013, 11:31:23 AM
You're welcome! I got that explanation back in college. I went to the games because they were incredibly cheap for students but I was clueless as to what was going on on the field. Of course, there's a lot more to the rules of the game, but if you can at least grasp the concept of downs, it goes a really long way toward your enjoyment of watching the game because it's the most basic part of the process.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Tea Drinker on June 19, 2013, 12:06:18 PM
The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

It's okay, sometimes my DH will say "I'm buying tickets to the game Tuesday night" and I have to ask what sport is currently playing. :-\ I really, really do not keep up with sports.

I'm a pretty intelligent person, but I was raised by a sports nut father who expected me to magically understand sports and would react badly to me asking questions, and a mother who had no knowledge or interest. I still don't fully understand American football. My DH is very good about explaining things without making me feel like a moron, but I can't quite wrap my head around "downs".

Here's how "downs" were explained to me, way back when, and it made perfect sense of something which, like you, I couldn't really get.

Down = Chance
When the team has the ball, they have four chances (downs) to progress a minimum of 10 yards down the field. So, their first chance = "first down & 10" meaning, this is their first chance and they need ten yards.

As they play each "down", they either gain yardage or lose it. And that yardage is either subtracted (if they gain) or added (if they lose) to the original 10. "Second down & 8" means they are now on their second chance and they have progressed two yards so they still need eight more to make the originally required 10.

Once they make the (at least) 10 yards (if indeed they do), the downs reset so they are back at "first & 10" with four new chances to make 10 additional yards.

By the time they get to the fourth down, if they still haven't made the 10, it's a calculated risk whether to go for that last yardage or not. If they don't make it, the other team gets the ball (and their four downs) right where they are. If they punt (kick the ball as far down the field as they can) then the other team gets the ball much further down the field.

Hope that helps!

That actually expalins it very well.

I have a passing knowlege of American football, but only because I was in marching band and was forced to so many of those ridiculous games. And then when I ask my BF something, he'll correct me and giggle because the rules are different between high school and college. And then it's different again for professional.

I don't think everyone needs to know the details of every sport, but I do think at a minimum you should know the names and sports of whatever your locally-popular professional sports franchises are.  In Wisconsin, the Green Bay Packers are about as close to a state-mandated religion as you can get  :P

I don't agree with this. We've got pro football, pro baseball, pro soccer, NASCAR track, a minor league hockey team, an indoor football league, a nationally known roller derby team, and a fairly good AA baseball team that I can think of. There's a major university with a decent sports program within an hour's drive from my house. That's the sports I can think of off the top of my head. I won't say I know the rules to all of them or could list off the team names, but they're ALL locally-popular sports franchises, and outside of the University teams they all fall under the guise of "professional", as in people get paid to do this and make a living from it.

POD to this. I lived most of my life in a city with, let's see, two major league baseball teams, two and then three NHL teams, two American football, two professional basketball teams and at least one big-deal college basketball team, professional soccer on and off, and the US Open tennis championships. On the other hand, I wasn't the only person who was tracking it mostly in the same way that some New Yorkers deal with politics, that is, largely as a traffic problem. Rangers playing the Islanders, there's going to be a crowd at the station I need to walk through on my way to the subway. UN General Assembly meeting or a presidential fund-raiser, rerouted buses and extra traffic jams. If a local football team wins the championship, that will mean streets closed for a parade.

There are fewer pro teams where I'm living now, but I got a job recruiter yesterday who assumed I would want to chat about the Yankees because he saw on my resume that I had recently moved from New York.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on June 19, 2013, 12:07:14 PM
[snip for length]

I don't agree with this. We've got pro football, pro baseball, pro soccer, NASCAR track, a minor league hockey team, an indoor football league, a nationally known roller derby team, and a fairly good AA baseball team that I can think of. There's a major university with a decent sports program within an hour's drive from my house. That's the sports I can think of off the top of my head. I won't say I know the rules to all of them or could list off the team names, but they're ALL locally-popular sports franchises, and outside of the University teams they all fall under the guise of "professional", as in people get paid to do this and make a living from it.

Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark. While yes, the rest that you named off are also considered pro, the names of NFL, NBA, and MLB teams in their hometowns in the US should be common knowledge. I mean, even the Walmarts have licensed clothing from those teams (and major universities, a lot of the time).

Now, if youíre in a town way outside of the city, I don't think you'd need to be familiar with the nearest big cityís sports teams, but you cannot escape references to the big three sports leaguesí teams in their hometown. References are everywhere. That doesn't mean you even need to know how good (or not) they are, or any rules for the sport, but name and logo recognition seems inescapable.

--------------------------------

I never realized how much maintenance cleaning was needed in a house until recently. Iím guessing we just never did it at my parentsí, and never saw my grandparents do it, but things like dusting between the staircase spindles, wiping off window sills, and wiping down baseboards once a year, and such. I guess it just never occurred to me that you needed to do those things. Actually, there's a lot of cleaning stuff that I had to learn as an adultÖ

ed. to make the sports thing less geographically-specific
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on June 19, 2013, 12:45:24 PM
I kind of disagree about the sports thing.  I'm not a huge sports fan either but I do consider it part of my culture and is thus something that I feel like I should know a little bit about.

I would totally understand if a person from somewhere not the U.S. didn't understand/know about football (U.S. version) and, I hope, people from other countries don't hate on me for not understanding cricket but if a person who is raised in the United States (and was an adult) doesn't know what a touchdown is or the basics of baseball (number of innings, etc.), I would be surprised and I would definitely think of him/her as ignorant about his/her own culture.

Sort of like I would also be surprised if an adult didn't know who Louis Armstrong or Ella Fitzgerald is.  It is our culture--you don't need to be a jazz fan to know the names.

Yes, but knowing exactly what delineates teams in the Stanley Cup is not the same thing as not understanding how goals are scored in hockey, or what the goalkeeper does.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Onyx_TKD on June 19, 2013, 02:25:32 PM
[snip for length]

I don't agree with this. We've got pro football, pro baseball, pro soccer, NASCAR track, a minor league hockey team, an indoor football league, a nationally known roller derby team, and a fairly good AA baseball team that I can think of. There's a major university with a decent sports program within an hour's drive from my house. That's the sports I can think of off the top of my head. I won't say I know the rules to all of them or could list off the team names, but they're ALL locally-popular sports franchises, and outside of the University teams they all fall under the guise of "professional", as in people get paid to do this and make a living from it.

Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark. While yes, the rest that you named off are also considered pro, the names of NFL, NBA, and MLB teams in their hometowns in the US should be common knowledge. I mean, even the Walmarts have licensed clothing from those teams (and major universities, a lot of the time).

Now, if youíre in a town way outside of the city, I don't think you'd need to be familiar with the nearest big cityís sports teams, but you cannot escape references to the big three sports leaguesí teams in their hometown. References are everywhere. That doesn't mean you even need to know how good (or not) they are, or any rules for the sport, but name and logo recognition seems inescapable.

--------------------------------

I never realized how much maintenance cleaning was needed in a house until recently. Iím guessing we just never did it at my parentsí, and never saw my grandparents do it, but things like dusting between the staircase spindles, wiping off window sills, and wiping down baseboards once a year, and such. I guess it just never occurred to me that you needed to do those things. Actually, there's a lot of cleaning stuff that I had to learn as an adultÖ

ed. to make the sports thing less geographically-specific

I understand that you personally can't imagine not knowing this, but I can assure you that it's possible. I live in a large city and before writing this posts I looked up our local pro sports teams on Wikipedia. For the basketball team, I definitely could have identified the team name as being a [MyCity] team, and likely could have dredged up the name from memory if asked what [MyCity]'s team was. I did recognize the other team names, and if someone had asked me what city [LocalTeam] was associated with, I might have remembered that they were [MyCity]'s team, but I certainly wouldn't have been able to name them from memory if asked what [MyCity]'s team was. I have no idea what their logos look like, although it's possible that they'd look familiar if I saw them.

I do not run into references to them everywhere. I don't run into sports talk with people I work or hang out with. I occasionally overhear the sports fans chatting with each other, but that's as far as it goes. Frankly, a lot of them seem to spend more time chatting about the amateur sports they play on than the pro sports they watch. Besides, plenty of them actually follow non-local teams, so hearing the local sports fans chatting about a particular team doesn't necessarily suggest that they're local team. I'm sure that some stores I shop in have local team merchandise, but it's not front-and-center--since I'm not interested, I just walk on by and have no reason to pay attention to the names or logos. I see a lot more merchandise for the local university than I do the local pro sports teams.

I don't understand why this "should" be common knowledge. It may be commonly known in your experience, but it sounds like you think people should learn this information even if they don't happen to pick it up naturally. Why? What's the problem with not knowing or caring? I've never had someone try to talk to me about sports and have a problem with having to clarify that [TeamName] is the local [whatever sport] team.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: turnip on June 19, 2013, 02:55:12 PM

This was a while ago but...

I honestly never knew which finger a wedding/engagement ring went on (obviously they can go wherever, but left ring finger is tradition here) until we were talking about buying one and I had to be sized. Oh, and I thought you wore the engagement ring on one hand and switched it after marriage (which, as it turns out, is tradition in some places/cultures, but not ours).

My then-fiance was astounded -- apparently it's standard to check a person's hand before flirting if you are a single, conscientious person of an age where people are as likely to be married as not.

On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)

I once listened to a guy go on a long rant about how much people spend on engagement rings - which was his POV, fine, it's not an issue I care about - but then he finished up with "and then they only wear it for a few months until they get married!"

Apparently he really thought that people would spend $$$ on a diamond solitaire, only to take it off and lock in in a cupboard forever once the wedding was over!  Trying not to look too amused, I told him that many woman wear both rings and pointed out a few examples right around us.   I'm not sure I convinced him that a $$$ engagement ring was a good idea, but at least I calmed his outrage a bit. 


Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: P12663 on June 19, 2013, 04:43:34 PM
Normally a person has four fingers on each hand.  There is the first finger on one side and the little finger on the other side with the two middle fingers in between.  There is a rude gesture that can be made by curling all of the fingers into the palm and then raising one of the middle fingers.

My brothers (older brothers, bless their hearts!) taught me to make this gesture.

It was more than three decades later that I learned that there is only one middle finger; the one closest to the little finger is not a middle finge but the ring finger.  And it was this finger that my brothers taught me to raise.

Yes, for thirty-odd years I flipped people off using the wrong finger!

And nobody told me.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: KenveeB on June 19, 2013, 04:47:02 PM

This was a while ago but...

I honestly never knew which finger a wedding/engagement ring went on (obviously they can go wherever, but left ring finger is tradition here) until we were talking about buying one and I had to be sized. Oh, and I thought you wore the engagement ring on one hand and switched it after marriage (which, as it turns out, is tradition in some places/cultures, but not ours).

My then-fiance was astounded -- apparently it's standard to check a person's hand before flirting if you are a single, conscientious person of an age where people are as likely to be married as not.

On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)

I once listened to a guy go on a long rant about how much people spend on engagement rings - which was his POV, fine, it's not an issue I care about - but then he finished up with "and then they only wear it for a few months until they get married!"

Apparently he really thought that people would spend $$$ on a diamond solitaire, only to take it off and lock in in a cupboard forever once the wedding was over!  Trying not to look too amused, I told him that many woman wear both rings and pointed out a few examples right around us.   I'm not sure I convinced him that a $$$ engagement ring was a good idea, but at least I calmed his outrage a bit.

<splutter> Really?! Wow. I don't think I've known anyone who stopped wearing theirs after the wedding. Most did bridal sets, and the few who didn't wear their engagement ring on the right hand now.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on June 19, 2013, 06:24:45 PM
I've had people on my case about not understanding how cricket is played. I live in the middle of the USA, not a country where cricket is popular. The closest I've ever been to a country where cricket was a big deal was a weeklong trip to Italy. Barring that....um, I watch BBC shows? Why would I ever know how cricket was played, or even care?

I live in Australia.  Cricket is huge.  I still don't care how cricket is played (although I gave describing it a crack in a thread here in the past and was suprised by how much I've absorbed by osmosis over the years)

Also, we play 3 football codes (plus soccer) here pretty religiousy.  I could name maybe 10 teams in a pinch, and not be 100% confident on what code they played.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on June 19, 2013, 06:27:30 PM
Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Kaymyth on June 19, 2013, 06:28:49 PM
[snip for length]

I don't agree with this. We've got pro football, pro baseball, pro soccer, NASCAR track, a minor league hockey team, an indoor football league, a nationally known roller derby team, and a fairly good AA baseball team that I can think of. There's a major university with a decent sports program within an hour's drive from my house. That's the sports I can think of off the top of my head. I won't say I know the rules to all of them or could list off the team names, but they're ALL locally-popular sports franchises, and outside of the University teams they all fall under the guise of "professional", as in people get paid to do this and make a living from it.

Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark. While yes, the rest that you named off are also considered pro, the names of NFL, NBA, and MLB teams in their hometowns in the US should be common knowledge. I mean, even the Walmarts have licensed clothing from those teams (and major universities, a lot of the time).

Now, if youíre in a town way outside of the city, I don't think you'd need to be familiar with the nearest big cityís sports teams, but you cannot escape references to the big three sports leaguesí teams in their hometown. References are everywhere. That doesn't mean you even need to know how good (or not) they are, or any rules for the sport, but name and logo recognition seems inescapable.


While this isn't one of the "big three" American sports, I must admit that it took me forever to finally understand that "Sporting KC" is actually the name of my city's local pro soccer team, rather than just the name of the stadium.  You can hear the name bandied about quite a bit without ever picking up enough context to make the specific matchup in your head.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 19, 2013, 07:35:35 PM
Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.

Most cities only have one per sport, if that.  A few cities have two (New York having two baseball teams, for example) but that's the exception.  Using where I grew up (Wisconsin) as an example: Green Bay had the Packers (football), Milwaukee had the Brewers (baseball) and the Bucks (basketball).  Since football was the most talked-about sport, I knew the names of the primary rival teams, but I don't think I could necessarily name rivals for other sports.  Where I live now, we have some minor-league teams, but college football is the big thing - I would expect anyone who had lived here a while to know the basics about Alabama and Auburn (like what the team colors are).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on June 19, 2013, 08:08:40 PM
Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.

Most cities only have one per sport, if that.  A few cities have two (New York having two baseball teams, for example) but that's the exception.  Using where I grew up (Wisconsin) as an example: Green Bay had the Packers (football), Milwaukee had the Brewers (baseball) and the Bucks (basketball).  Since football was the most talked-about sport, I knew the names of the primary rival teams, but I don't think I could necessarily name rivals for other sports.  Where I live now, we have some minor-league teams, but college football is the big thing - I would expect anyone who had lived here a while to know the basics about Alabama and Auburn (like what the team colors are).

See, here one of the football codes is Rugby League (NRL).  There are 16 teams in the league.  9 of them (I think) are Sydney-based. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dindrane on June 19, 2013, 09:53:06 PM
I think sports are just one of the many, many facets of a particular locations culture that some people happen to be very into, and some people don't.

I think knowing that certain sports exist in your own country is about as far as a person "should" be expected to know something. In other words, as an American, I "should" know that football is a sport that kind of only exists here, that what we call soccer is what everyone else calls football, and that most places also play baseball and basketball.

I consider that to be the same level of knowledge as knowing that Ella Fitzgerald was a jazz singer, or knowing that F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote the Great Gatsby, or knowing that George Gershwin was a 20th century American composer.

But as much as I woulldn't expect someone who isn't into classical music to recognize Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue just by listening to it, I wouldn't expect someone who doesn't particularly care about a sport to know what teams play it or have more than the most rudimentary knowledge of the rules of the game.

There are so many things that, truly, are part of any given country's culture that it's just not reasonable to expect people to have more than an extremely superficial level of knowledge about them. People gravitate towards what interests them. They often forget things they have been taught (either in school or elsewhere) if it has no relevance to their lives.

Also, I live in a city that has no professional sports teams. I know what our minor league baseball team is called only because the baseball stadium is across the street from my apartment and I drive past it to get home. I don't personally follow sports because I don't care to. What I know about the rules of any game I learned in PE while I was in school, and I'm sure I don't remember all of it.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: kherbert05 on June 19, 2013, 10:15:30 PM
Normally a person has four fingers on each hand.  There is the first finger on one side and the little finger on the other side with the two middle fingers in between.  There is a rude gesture that can be made by curling all of the fingers into the palm and then raising one of the middle fingers.

My brothers (older brothers, bless their hearts!) taught me to make this gesture.

It was more than three decades later that I learned that there is only one middle finger; the one closest to the little finger is not a middle finge but the ring finger.  And it was this finger that my brothers taught me to raise.

Yes, for thirty-odd years I flipped people off using the wrong finger!

And nobody told me.
My mom was taught to point with her middle finger. The fingers on either side pulled back to the first knuckle from the top. Of course when I hit 4th or 5th grade this became a huge issue for me Mom was flipping people off.


For years I thought it was a Canadian or PEI thing with a generational gap thrown in (Aunts and Uncles do it , but younger ones (grew up in 50's and 60's) less than older depression/WWII Aunts and Uncles. Cousins pretty much don't do it.


Then I started teaching at my current school one of the things we are told is that when a child is a either a recent immigrant or their parents are recent immigrants they will do this because it is impolite/bad luck/your cursing someone if you point with your pointer finger at someone. Thing is our kids are not immigrants from PEI/Canada or even Ireland. They are largely from Mexico and to a lesser amount from Central &/or South America. So now I'm wondering if it is a Catholic thing  - because most of these kids are Roman Catholics.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: snowdragon on June 19, 2013, 10:20:41 PM
/\ I was raised Catholic ( Polish Catholic) and I have never seen that. In anyone -so I doubt it is something in Catholic dogma.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: kherbert05 on June 19, 2013, 10:40:33 PM
Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.
I'm in Houston We have
Astros MLB - Baseball
RocketsNBA  - Men's Basket Ball
[size=78%]Texans (NFL)- US Football[/size]
Aeros (AHL)- Hockey
Dynamo MLS - soccer


 


Dallas has
Cowboys (NFL) US football
Mavericks - Men's basket ball
Stars NHL - Hockey
Texas Rangers - Baseball (Based out of Arlington)
FC - Soccer


San Antonio
Spurs - Men's basketball


These are the major leagues. There are many Minor league teams in other cities. Still other cities like Austin or Bryan/College Station have university teams but not pro teams. (Texans will know why I picked those two examples.)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: WillyNilly on June 19, 2013, 10:43:06 PM
Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.

Most cities only have one per sport, if that.  A few cities have two (New York having two baseball teams, for example) but that's the exception.  Using where I grew up (Wisconsin) as an example: Green Bay had the Packers (football), Milwaukee had the Brewers (baseball) and the Bucks (basketball).  Since football was the most talked-about sport, I knew the names of the primary rival teams, but I don't think I could necessarily name rivals for other sports.  Where I live now, we have some minor-league teams, but college football is the big thing - I would expect anyone who had lived here a while to know the basics about Alabama and Auburn (like what the team colors are).

NYC has two of each actually. Two baseball (Mets & Yankees), 2 football (Jets & Giants) and 2 basketball (Knicks and Nets). We only have one hockey team (Rangers) but the Islanders are mighty close by.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: kherbert05 on June 19, 2013, 10:47:00 PM
/\ I was raised Catholic ( Polish Catholic) and I have never seen that. In anyone -so I doubt it is something in Catholic dogma.
Not dogma but something in common were earlier beliefs and the church merged. The idea that someone could be ill wishing you if they point at you. Just find it curious that that both groups point the same way. Wondering if there was some cross pollination at some point. Sorry I'm expressing myself poorly.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Bluenomi on June 19, 2013, 11:28:39 PM
Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.

Most cities only have one per sport, if that.  A few cities have two (New York having two baseball teams, for example) but that's the exception.  Using where I grew up (Wisconsin) as an example: Green Bay had the Packers (football), Milwaukee had the Brewers (baseball) and the Bucks (basketball).  Since football was the most talked-about sport, I knew the names of the primary rival teams, but I don't think I could necessarily name rivals for other sports.  Where I live now, we have some minor-league teams, but college football is the big thing - I would expect anyone who had lived here a while to know the basics about Alabama and Auburn (like what the team colors are).

See, here one of the football codes is Rugby League (NRL).  There are 16 teams in the league.  9 of them (I think) are Sydney-based.

Yup and AFL is the same, a stack of Melbourne teams, 2 in Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. Heck, even the A league which is pretty small compared to the AFL and NRL big guns have 2 Sydney and Melbourne teams.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: BB-VA on June 20, 2013, 05:34:33 AM
We live at the Top of Virginia, and we are well aware of the local sports teams.  However, we don't really care about them and pay no attention to their schedules.  Or at least we didn't....

One Sunday, we decided it was a fine day to go to the Smithsonian, duly drove to the Metro station and took the train to the Mall.  Nice and roomy on the way in, but coming back, WOW!!  We had failed to notice that the Redskins had a home game that weekend.  The train was PACKED, including some folks that had indulged in adult beverages at the stadium.   Everyone was  polite, but it still isn't pleasant to stand up on a train with a grade-school age child almost all the way back to our station.  The most amusing part was a gentleman who insisted on standing in front of the doors so that he would be first off the train.   Of course, he stood in front of the doors on the wrong side - the last time we saw him, he was just leaving the station as we drove past on our way out of the parking lot.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 20, 2013, 05:54:17 AM
I think sports are just one of the many, many facets of a particular locations culture that some people happen to be very into, and some people don't.

I think knowing that certain sports exist in your own country is about as far as a person "should" be expected to know something. In other words, as an American, I "should" know that football is a sport that kind of only exists here, that what we call soccer is what everyone else calls football, and that most places also play baseball and basketball.

I consider that to be the same level of knowledge as knowing that Ella Fitzgerald was a jazz singer, or knowing that F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote the Great Gatsby, or knowing that George Gershwin was a 20th century American composer.

But as much as I woulldn't expect someone who isn't into classical music to recognize Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue just by listening to it, I wouldn't expect someone who doesn't particularly care about a sport to know what teams play it or have more than the most rudimentary knowledge of the rules of the game.

There are so many things that, truly, are part of any given country's culture that it's just not reasonable to expect people to have more than an extremely superficial level of knowledge about them. People gravitate towards what interests them. They often forget things they have been taught (either in school or elsewhere) if it has no relevance to their lives.

Dindrane, I totally agree with all you say here. IMO there are some people who have a talent for picking up and retaining a modicum of information about things which don't interest them; but I feel that such folk are in the minority.  I'm much in favour of (beyond basic "life skills") people's right to have -- if they wish -- next-to-no knowledge about subjects in which they have no interest. Regarding a country's culture, I feel that "it all balances out".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 20, 2013, 06:17:34 AM
I've had people on my case about not understanding how cricket is played. I live in the middle of the USA, not a country where cricket is popular. The closest I've ever been to a country where cricket was a big deal was a weeklong trip to Italy. Barring that....um, I watch BBC shows? Why would I ever know how cricket was played, or even care?

I live in Australia.  Cricket is huge.  I still don't care how cricket is played (although I gave describing it a crack in a thread here in the past and was suprised by how much I've absorbed by osmosis over the years)

The following, prompted by these posts; and by lowspark's admirably clear summary (post #219) of the business of "downs" in American football (though that matter had me thinking, "lawks, the participants need to be mathematical 'whizzes' as well as athletes").

A bit naughtily, I can't resist giving here the old thing -- supposedly an Englishman's explanation of cricket to a foreigner.



There are two "sides". One side is "out" in the field, and the other side is "in" (batting).

Each man who's in the side that is "in", goes out, and when he's "out", he comes in, and the next man goes in until he's out.

When the "in" side are all out, the side that was "out" comes in, and the side that's been "in" goes "out", and tries to get those who are now coming in -- out.

When the tenth wicket falls, there is always one man from the team which is "in", who is still in, so he is recorded as "not out".

When both teams have been "in" and "out" (including those two men who were "not out"), both teams come in; and then the process starts again, for the second "innings".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: KenveeB on June 20, 2013, 07:22:06 AM
I'm NOT a sports fan. I HATE sports -- except for Texas Rangers baseball, which I follow a little. :)

My condolances.   ;)  (at least they way they are playing lately)

Hey, they're two games out of first place! I hate to think what you'd say to fans of the teams in last place. ;)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 20, 2013, 08:01:17 AM
^The Jays, who are decidely much further out of first place, just swept them in the series over the weekend.  And they commented that the Rangers had lost a couple of games before the Jays came into town.  I will admit that I didn't check the standings!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: rose red on June 20, 2013, 08:22:45 AM
Since we're on the subject of sports, the Blackhawks (hockey) won last night and are now tied.  Does that mean one of the teams need to win only one more game?  or more than one more?

Not that I care, I just want to know when this will be over.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: MindsEye on June 20, 2013, 08:24:08 AM

My mom was taught to point with her middle finger. The fingers on either side pulled back to the first knuckle from the top. Of course when I hit 4th or 5th grade this became a huge issue for me Mom was flipping people off.


For years I thought it was a Canadian or PEI thing with a generational gap thrown in (Aunts and Uncles do it , but younger ones (grew up in 50's and 60's) less than older depression/WWII Aunts and Uncles. Cousins pretty much don't do it.


Then I started teaching at my current school one of the things we are told is that when a child is a either a recent immigrant or their parents are recent immigrants they will do this because it is impolite/bad luck/your cursing someone if you point with your pointer finger at someone. Thing is our kids are not immigrants from PEI/Canada or even Ireland. They are largely from Mexico and to a lesser amount from Central &/or South America. So now I'm wondering if it is a Catholic thing  - because most of these kids are Roman Catholics.

A lot of the people that I work with are Asian or East Indian (some recent immigrants from India, some not) and they all point with their middle fingers.  I just assumed that it was an Indian "thing", and am used to it now, though I admit it was a bit of a shock the first time or two I saw someone pointing that way.  :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: camlan on June 20, 2013, 08:24:49 AM
I think sports are just one of the many, many facets of a particular locations culture that some people happen to be very into, and some people don't.

I think knowing that certain sports exist in your own country is about as far as a person "should" be expected to know something. In other words, as an American, I "should" know that football is a sport that kind of only exists here, that what we call soccer is what everyone else calls football, and that most places also play baseball and basketball.

I consider that to be the same level of knowledge as knowing that Ella Fitzgerald was a jazz singer, or knowing that F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote the Great Gatsby, or knowing that George Gershwin was a 20th century American composer.

But as much as I woulldn't expect someone who isn't into classical music to recognize Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue just by listening to it, I wouldn't expect someone who doesn't particularly care about a sport to know what teams play it or have more than the most rudimentary knowledge of the rules of the game.

There are so many things that, truly, are part of any given country's culture that it's just not reasonable to expect people to have more than an extremely superficial level of knowledge about them. People gravitate towards what interests them. They often forget things they have been taught (either in school or elsewhere) if it has no relevance to their lives.

Also, I live in a city that has no professional sports teams. I know what our minor league baseball team is called only because the baseball stadium is across the street from my apartment and I drive past it to get home. I don't personally follow sports because I don't care to. What I know about the rules of any game I learned in PE while I was in school, and I'm sure I don't remember all of it.

I completely agree.

What I know about sports and their rules and the teams comes from growing up with five brothers, all of whom played every sport going and all of whom followed every single college and professional team sport. Just sitting at the dinner table taught me everything I know--they talked sports non-stop, and I was not allowed to try and change the subject, because no one was interested in books, and the dinner table conversation had to be of general interest.

Nowadays? Couldn't tell you when the Super Bowl is, although I can attest that Super Bowl Sunday is a great day to go to the mall, because it will be empty. But go early, because many of the stores will close early so employees can watch the game. (Found that out by accident.) And there have been rule changes I was not aware of for years--three points in basketball? Really?

My grad school was a huge basketball school and my family would constantly be remarking on how well the team was doing. I'd have no clue. Oh, they won a national championship? Gee, that's nice. How about I tell you how the library has to close 2 hours earlier every night, because there's not enough money to keep it open.

I like figure skating, which, according to my family, isn't a sport at all. I can discuss the rules, the jumps and other moves. There are many figure skaters in my city--we have a club and all. But no one wants to talk about them. My state has no professional teams, but everyone follows the teams in the state directly to our south.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 20, 2013, 08:25:42 AM
Since we're on the subject of sports, the Blackhawks (hockey) won last night and are now tied.  Does that mean one of the teams need to win only one more game?  or more than one more?

Not that I care, I just want to know when this will be over.

They are tied 2-2.  One team needs to get 4 wins to end the series.  So there could be 3 more games.

(And I'm still 2 points up in the hockey pool.   ;D)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Betelnut on June 20, 2013, 08:27:19 AM
I still think if it is a huge part of your country's culture you should know something about it--just the basics. Knowing how many points a touchdown is, how golf is scored and what "home base" means doesn't take that much mental space.  Just like I would hope people would know what a trumpet, violin and flute look like--even if they no interest in music and don't care about it.  It is simply part of the world you live in (unless you live in Asia/Pacific rim--there are a lot of instruments there that I couldn't identify!)

I'm talking basic knowledge not esoteric knowledge.  I never said a person needed to know when the Super Bowl is--but what it is?  Yes, I feel like, if you live in the United States, and grew up here, yes, you should know that.  I have no interest in automobile racing but I have heard of the Indianopolis 500 and the names of famous race car drivers.

I've always been fascinated by the idea of "what should a person know" about the culture that they live/grow up in and when (the age) they should know it.  When "should" a person know who Frank Sinatra was?  When "should" a person have heard of, if not read, "Little Women"?  That kind of thing. 

I met a person recently who had never seen a Monty Python movie or show.  I believe he had heard of them but didn't have a clue.  Since he is 28 (born after/during the production of the show and most of movies), it is perfectly reasonable but I was secretly sort of ... surprised, I guess.  He needs to be forcibly sat down for a Monty Python marathon!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on June 20, 2013, 08:56:36 AM
While this isn't one of the "big three" American sports, I must admit that it took me forever to finally understand that "Sporting KC" is actually the name of my city's local pro soccer team, rather than just the name of the stadium.  You can hear the name bandied about quite a bit without ever picking up enough context to make the specific matchup in your head.

Yes, that's one of my teams too! They used to be the Wiz and then the Wizards, but when they switched over to Sporting KC, it was just weird. Though their stadium looks pretty awesome driving by, and it makes a lot of noise. They drowned out the T-Bones crowd at my first T-Bones game. Parking wasn't fun that night....


I've learned it's possible to live into one's 30s, have three bookshelves full of DVDs, claim that you absolutely love movies of all genres, especially sci-fi and fantasy, and never have seen Close Encounters of the 3rd Kind. Though it does give me nerd cred with all the rest of my friends, as I've finally seen a movie that my boyfriend hasn't. And it's a classic.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on June 20, 2013, 09:30:10 AM

Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark. . . .  you cannot escape references to the big three sports leaguesí teams in their hometown. References are everywhere. That doesn't mean you even need to know how good (or not) they are, or any rules for the sport, but name and logo recognition seems inescapable.


I understand that you personally can't imagine not knowing this, but I can assure you that it's possible. I live in a large city and before writing this posts I looked up our local pro sports teams on Wikipedia. For the basketball team, I definitely could have identified the team name as being a [MyCity] team, and likely could have dredged up the name from memory if asked what [MyCity]'s team was. I did recognize the other team names, and if someone had asked me what city [LocalTeam] was associated with, I might have remembered that they were [MyCity]'s team, but I certainly wouldn't have been able to name them from memory if asked what [MyCity]'s team was. I have no idea what their logos look like, although it's possible that they'd look familiar if I saw them.

I do not run into references to them everywhere. I don't run into sports talk with people I work or hang out with. I occasionally overhear the sports fans chatting with each other, but that's as far as it goes. Frankly, a lot of them seem to spend more time chatting about the amateur sports they play on than the pro sports they watch. Besides, plenty of them actually follow non-local teams, so hearing the local sports fans chatting about a particular team doesn't necessarily suggest that they're local team. I'm sure that some stores I shop in have local team merchandise, but it's not front-and-center--since I'm not interested, I just walk on by and have no reason to pay attention to the names or logos. I see a lot more merchandise for the local university than I do the local pro sports teams.

I don't understand why this "should" be common knowledge. It may be commonly known in your experience, but it sounds like you think people should learn this information even if they don't happen to pick it up naturally. Why? What's the problem with not knowing or caring? I've never had someone try to talk to me about sports and have a problem with having to clarify that [TeamName] is the local [whatever sport] team.

It's less that we think less of of someone for not valuing, and more that we're amazed that can be so unobservant and retail so little information about something that is of interest to so many of the people around you.

Every big city has a sports section. True, in non-tabloid cities, it may be internal, but almost always the sports team is mentioned on the front page of the paper even if only in a "check the sports section!" teaser. With some frequency during the sport's season.

They're mentioned on TV news nightly during the sport's season--true, the sports "section" is often later in the broadcast, but it's usually "teased" very early on.

There are T-shirts at Wal-Mart.

So to just not even know they exist makes people think you are deliberately ignoring it or "an incredibly incurious person." Because it's there.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Judah on June 20, 2013, 09:59:35 AM
Then I started teaching at my current school one of the things we are told is that when a child is a either a recent immigrant or their parents are recent immigrants they will do this because it is impolite/bad luck/your cursing someone if you point with your pointer finger at someone. Thing is our kids are not immigrants from PEI/Canada or even Ireland. They are largely from Mexico and to a lesser amount from Central &/or South America. So now I'm wondering if it is a Catholic thing  - because most of these kids are Roman Catholics.

It's not a Catholic thing. It's not even really a cultural thing. It's more just a preference thing. In countries where raising the middle finger is not considered vulgar, there is no reason not to point with the middle finger, so they've got the choice of fingers to point with. My mom and dad were both immigrants from the same country. Pop pointed with his middle finger, Mom points with her pointer.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on June 20, 2013, 10:18:40 AM

Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark. . . .  you cannot escape references to the big three sports leaguesí teams in their hometown. References are everywhere. That doesn't mean you even need to know how good (or not) they are, or any rules for the sport, but name and logo recognition seems inescapable.


I understand that you personally can't imagine not knowing this, but I can assure you that it's possible. I live in a large city and before writing this posts I looked up our local pro sports teams on Wikipedia. For the basketball team, I definitely could have identified the team name as being a [MyCity] team, and likely could have dredged up the name from memory if asked what [MyCity]'s team was. I did recognize the other team names, and if someone had asked me what city [LocalTeam] was associated with, I might have remembered that they were [MyCity]'s team, but I certainly wouldn't have been able to name them from memory if asked what [MyCity]'s team was. I have no idea what their logos look like, although it's possible that they'd look familiar if I saw them.

I do not run into references to them everywhere. I don't run into sports talk with people I work or hang out with. I occasionally overhear the sports fans chatting with each other, but that's as far as it goes. Frankly, a lot of them seem to spend more time chatting about the amateur sports they play on than the pro sports they watch. Besides, plenty of them actually follow non-local teams, so hearing the local sports fans chatting about a particular team doesn't necessarily suggest that they're local team. I'm sure that some stores I shop in have local team merchandise, but it's not front-and-center--since I'm not interested, I just walk on by and have no reason to pay attention to the names or logos. I see a lot more merchandise for the local university than I do the local pro sports teams.

I don't understand why this "should" be common knowledge. It may be commonly known in your experience, but it sounds like you think people should learn this information even if they don't happen to pick it up naturally. Why? What's the problem with not knowing or caring? I've never had someone try to talk to me about sports and have a problem with having to clarify that [TeamName] is the local [whatever sport] team.

It's less that we think less of of someone for not valuing, and more that we're amazed that can be so unobservant and retail so little information about something that is of interest to so many of the people around you.

Every big city has a sports section. True, in non-tabloid cities, it may be internal, but almost always the sports team is mentioned on the front page of the paper even if only in a "check the sports section!" teaser. With some frequency during the sport's season.

They're mentioned on TV news nightly during the sport's season--true, the sports "section" is often later in the broadcast, but it's usually "teased" very early on.

There are T-shirts at Wal-Mart.

So to just not even know they exist makes people think you are deliberately ignoring it or "an incredibly incurious person." Because it's there.

I think Toots explained what I couldn't put words to very well.

Iím not a sports person, but even in my city that is 4 hours away from any major league team, I see things about the Yankees, or the Buffalo Bills, or the NY Giants. Do I know anything about them? No. But there are constant references to them in every day life, and not because my life is special or surrounded by sports nuts, just in general taking in the news, going shopping, etc.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Onyx_TKD on June 20, 2013, 11:29:07 AM

Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark. . . .  you cannot escape references to the big three sports leaguesí teams in their hometown. References are everywhere. That doesn't mean you even need to know how good (or not) they are, or any rules for the sport, but name and logo recognition seems inescapable.


I understand that you personally can't imagine not knowing this, but I can assure you that it's possible. I live in a large city and before writing this posts I looked up our local pro sports teams on Wikipedia. For the basketball team, I definitely could have identified the team name as being a [MyCity] team, and likely could have dredged up the name from memory if asked what [MyCity]'s team was. I did recognize the other team names, and if someone had asked me what city [LocalTeam] was associated with, I might have remembered that they were [MyCity]'s team, but I certainly wouldn't have been able to name them from memory if asked what [MyCity]'s team was. I have no idea what their logos look like, although it's possible that they'd look familiar if I saw them.

I do not run into references to them everywhere. I don't run into sports talk with people I work or hang out with. I occasionally overhear the sports fans chatting with each other, but that's as far as it goes. Frankly, a lot of them seem to spend more time chatting about the amateur sports they play on than the pro sports they watch. Besides, plenty of them actually follow non-local teams, so hearing the local sports fans chatting about a particular team doesn't necessarily suggest that they're local team. I'm sure that some stores I shop in have local team merchandise, but it's not front-and-center--since I'm not interested, I just walk on by and have no reason to pay attention to the names or logos. I see a lot more merchandise for the local university than I do the local pro sports teams.

I don't understand why this "should" be common knowledge. It may be commonly known in your experience, but it sounds like you think people should learn this information even if they don't happen to pick it up naturally. Why? What's the problem with not knowing or caring? I've never had someone try to talk to me about sports and have a problem with having to clarify that [TeamName] is the local [whatever sport] team.

It's less that we think less of of someone for not valuing, and more that we're amazed that can be so unobservant and retail so little information about something that is of interest to so many of the people around you.

Every big city has a sports section. True, in non-tabloid cities, it may be internal, but almost always the sports team is mentioned on the front page of the paper even if only in a "check the sports section!" teaser. With some frequency during the sport's season.

They're mentioned on TV news nightly during the sport's season--true, the sports "section" is often later in the broadcast, but it's usually "teased" very early on.

There are T-shirts at Wal-Mart.

So to just not even know they exist makes people think you are deliberately ignoring it or "an incredibly incurious person." Because it's there.

I don't get a physical newspaper or watch TV news, and the online news sources I visit generally have the Sports headlines tucked under a prominent "Sports" label. Like I said before, the places I shop likely have pro sports T-shirts and merchandise, but they're not featured at all prominently and I've never had reason to seek them out. By contrast, the university merchandise is often featured on prominent displays since I live close to the university. This is similar to my experience in my much smaller hometown (in a completely different part of the country)--merchandise for nearby universities was huge, but I heard/saw very little about nearby pro sports teams. Some people cared about them, but university sports was what most people seemed to be really passionate about. Here, I occasionally see people wearing merchandise for one of the basketball teams and (less often) the hockey team--the teams I recognized as [MyCity] teams. I don't recall ever seeing anyone wearing merchandise for the other local pro teams.

I'm not living under a rock. Pro sports stuff just doesn't seem to be as omnipresent in my immediate area as it seems to be in your and stitchygreyanonymouse's areas. When people around me actually like and talk about a sports team, I pick up information. When they don't, my curiosity doesn't extend to learning about something that neither interest me nor comes up in my life. There's plenty of more interesting and/or relevant stuff to fill my brain and time with. For example, I find that knowing basic information about how different sports are played is both more interesting and more useful in my life than knowing local team names.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: mbbored on June 20, 2013, 12:10:27 PM
Normally a person has four fingers on each hand.  There is the first finger on one side and the little finger on the other side with the two middle fingers in between.  There is a rude gesture that can be made by curling all of the fingers into the palm and then raising one of the middle fingers.

My brothers (older brothers, bless their hearts!) taught me to make this gesture.

It was more than three decades later that I learned that there is only one middle finger; the one closest to the little finger is not a middle finge but the ring finger.  And it was this finger that my brothers taught me to raise.

Yes, for thirty-odd years I flipped people off using the wrong finger!

And nobody told me.
My mom was taught to point with her middle finger. The fingers on either side pulled back to the first knuckle from the top. Of course when I hit 4th or 5th grade this became a huge issue for me Mom was flipping people off.


For years I thought it was a Canadian or PEI thing with a generational gap thrown in (Aunts and Uncles do it , but younger ones (grew up in 50's and 60's) less than older depression/WWII Aunts and Uncles. Cousins pretty much don't do it.


Then I started teaching at my current school one of the things we are told is that when a child is a either a recent immigrant or their parents are recent immigrants they will do this because it is impolite/bad luck/your cursing someone if you point with your pointer finger at someone. Thing is our kids are not immigrants from PEI/Canada or even Ireland. They are largely from Mexico and to a lesser amount from Central &/or South America. So now I'm wondering if it is a Catholic thing  - because most of these kids are Roman Catholics.

I don't know if it's a Catholic thing but I had a number of older female teachers at my Catholic schools (80s and 90s) who pointed with their middle finger. Between that and very conservative parents/church environment I was way too old before I found out what the middle finger meant to most people.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: NyaChan on June 20, 2013, 12:38:04 PM
Normally a person has four fingers on each hand.  There is the first finger on one side and the little finger on the other side with the two middle fingers in between.  There is a rude gesture that can be made by curling all of the fingers into the palm and then raising one of the middle fingers.

My brothers (older brothers, bless their hearts!) taught me to make this gesture.

It was more than three decades later that I learned that there is only one middle finger; the one closest to the little finger is not a middle finge but the ring finger.  And it was this finger that my brothers taught me to raise.

Yes, for thirty-odd years I flipped people off using the wrong finger!

And nobody told me.
My mom was taught to point with her middle finger. The fingers on either side pulled back to the first knuckle from the top. Of course when I hit 4th or 5th grade this became a huge issue for me Mom was flipping people off.


For years I thought it was a Canadian or PEI thing with a generational gap thrown in (Aunts and Uncles do it , but younger ones (grew up in 50's and 60's) less than older depression/WWII Aunts and Uncles. Cousins pretty much don't do it.


Then I started teaching at my current school one of the things we are told is that when a child is a either a recent immigrant or their parents are recent immigrants they will do this because it is impolite/bad luck/your cursing someone if you point with your pointer finger at someone. Thing is our kids are not immigrants from PEI/Canada or even Ireland. They are largely from Mexico and to a lesser amount from Central &/or South America. So now I'm wondering if it is a Catholic thing  - because most of these kids are Roman Catholics.

I don't know if it's a Catholic thing but I had a number of older female teachers at my Catholic schools (80s and 90s) who pointed with their middle finger. Between that and very conservative parents/church environment I was way too old before I found out what the middle finger meant to most people.

I had no clue growing up  at all because it doesn't mean that in India and my parents grew up there - so they had no way of knowing to teach me to be careful of it.  After I had an incident at school when I got a paper cut and someone ran and told on me (I didn't get in trouble) I started trying to train Dad out of using his middle finger to read things.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 20, 2013, 01:08:12 PM
I met a person recently who had never seen a Monty Python movie or show.  I believe he had heard of them but didn't have a clue.  Since he is 28 (born after/during the production of the show and most of movies), it is perfectly reasonable but I was secretly sort of ... surprised, I guess.  He needs to be forcibly sat down for a Monty Python marathon!

Re which I -- a Python-loather (and I've seen enough of said stuff to know why I loathe it) feel that forcible same, would be cruel and unusual treatment, worthy of the world's nastiest countries' enforcement agencies. I would say -- give the poor so-and-so ten minutes, at the sadistic max. Should they decide therefrom, that they might like it -- then fine, go ahead !
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RegionMom on June 20, 2013, 01:40:59 PM
My entire family is rather blah on sports.  We have attended college and pro and HS games, but more for the spirit that the "TEAM X MUST DOMINATE!"

Anyway, a few years ago, we were out shopping as a family and saw a three generation family all decked out tip to toe and accessorized in a team's colors, climbing out of a vehicle painted in the team color with a flag of team waving. Way over the top.  since it was August, and no school yet, I innocently asked, "is there something going on today with Team X?"

And they looked at me as if I had three heads.  Of course! How could I not know that it was an exhibition game, or a pre-season, or whatever...my DH laughed and cautioned me to not ask such a silly question next time I spy such a bedecked and bedazzled fan family. 

Meh. 
Go Team X!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Carotte on June 20, 2013, 02:38:10 PM
My mother was abroad in the UK for a school trip (she's a teacher) and during the evening she ended up in a bar with her colleagues (the kids probably had some sort of activity). That was during some football/soccer world cup or something, UK vs. Portugal.
For some reason, probably a "oh, Portugal is playing! how nice, I'm from Portugal" blurt out, there she was, standing in a pub full of UK supporters, proclaiming to be for the other team. ::)
My mom's seems (and is) too much of a nice person for an average football fan to take it badly and make trouble for her, but since she also blurted "oh, who's the fellow in black in the middle?" (referee), they must have quickly decided that she wasn't there to tease them, be nasty, or actually understand anything about what was happening.  ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RegionMom on June 20, 2013, 02:55:19 PM
I have learned that when I do attend a sporting event, I should wear the home team colors, or the colors of the school team my kids are on!
:)

it also took me a while (weeks?) to realize that the Heismann trophy winner potential, and then winner, was not just fortunate to have the last name of "Football" but rather, that was his nickname.
 :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 20, 2013, 02:57:25 PM
My parents were on vacation across the country.  They just happened to score tickets to a football game being held in a newly built stadium and their home province team was playing.  They were all set to cheer for their team when they looked around and realized they were surrounded in a sea of local team colours and wisely decide to cheer for the local team.   :D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RingTailedLemur on June 20, 2013, 03:17:55 PM
My mother was abroad in the UK for a school trip (she's a teacher) and during the evening she ended up in a bar with her colleagues (the kids probably had some sort of activity). That was during some football/soccer world cup or something, UK vs. Portugal.
For some reason, probably a "oh, Portugal is playing! how nice, I'm from Portugal" blurt out, there she was, standing in a pub full of UK supporters, proclaiming to be for the other team. ::)
My mom's seems (and is) too much of a nice person for an average football fan to take it badly and make trouble for her, but since she also blurted "oh, who's the fellow in black in the middle?" (referee), they must have quickly decided that she wasn't there to tease them, be nasty, or actually understand anything about what was happening.  ;D


Nooooo!  There is no "UK" team - separate teams for England, Scotland, Wales and NI.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: camlan on June 20, 2013, 03:27:47 PM


I don't get a physical newspaper or watch TV news, and the online news sources I visit generally have the Sports headlines tucked under a prominent "Sports" label. Like I said before, the places I shop likely have pro sports T-shirts and merchandise, but they're not featured at all prominently and I've never had reason to seek them out. By contrast, the university merchandise is often featured on prominent displays since I live close to the university. This is similar to my experience in my much smaller hometown (in a completely different part of the country)--merchandise for nearby universities was huge, but I heard/saw very little about nearby pro sports teams. Some people cared about them, but university sports was what most people seemed to be really passionate about. Here, I occasionally see people wearing merchandise for one of the basketball teams and (less often) the hockey team--the teams I recognized as [MyCity] teams. I don't recall ever seeing anyone wearing merchandise for the other local pro teams.

I'm not living under a rock. Pro sports stuff just doesn't seem to be as omnipresent in my immediate area as it seems to be in your and stitchygreyanonymouse's areas. When people around me actually like and talk about a sports team, I pick up information. When they don't, my curiosity doesn't extend to learning about something that neither interest me nor comes up in my life. There's plenty of more interesting and/or relevant stuff to fill my brain and time with. For example, I find that knowing basic information about how different sports are played is both more interesting and more useful in my life than knowing local team names.

This is me. I read the paper and get my news on-line, so it is more than easy to skip the sports stuff. Even when I got the newspaper, I just didn't look at the sports section, unless the comics were in it. And then I just read the comics. And I live alone, so there is no sports fanatic in the house watching or listening to the games and related news.

I know the "local" teams. My state doesn't have any, but sports fans follow the Massachusetts teams. I know them all.

But I'm not interested in them. At all. So unless news of some sports event is basically thrust in my face, I have no clue who is playing what when.

Frankly, growing up with 5 brothers, I heard more than I ever wanted to about sports. If I never hear another word about professional team sports, I'd be happy. It is so very easy to avoid them, everywhere except at work.

And yes, I've been called "odd" or "weird" because I don't care about sports, won't join the office pool during March Madness. If people knew I secretly wished the local teams wouldn't make it to the playoffs because then I'd have to put up with less conversation about sports in my office, they'd probably see me as a traitor or something.

I don't care. It's a free country. I'm allowed to not care one whit about sports.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 20, 2013, 03:39:50 PM


I don't get a physical newspaper or watch TV news, and the online news sources I visit generally have the Sports headlines tucked under a prominent "Sports" label. Like I said before, the places I shop likely have pro sports T-shirts and merchandise, but they're not featured at all prominently and I've never had reason to seek them out. By contrast, the university merchandise is often featured on prominent displays since I live close to the university. This is similar to my experience in my much smaller hometown (in a completely different part of the country)--merchandise for nearby universities was huge, but I heard/saw very little about nearby pro sports teams. Some people cared about them, but university sports was what most people seemed to be really passionate about. Here, I occasionally see people wearing merchandise for one of the basketball teams and (less often) the hockey team--the teams I recognized as [MyCity] teams. I don't recall ever seeing anyone wearing merchandise for the other local pro teams.

I'm not living under a rock. Pro sports stuff just doesn't seem to be as omnipresent in my immediate area as it seems to be in your and stitchygreyanonymouse's areas. When people around me actually like and talk about a sports team, I pick up information. When they don't, my curiosity doesn't extend to learning about something that neither interest me nor comes up in my life. There's plenty of more interesting and/or relevant stuff to fill my brain and time with. For example, I find that knowing basic information about how different sports are played is both more interesting and more useful in my life than knowing local team names.

This is me. I read the paper and get my news on-line, so it is more than easy to skip the sports stuff. Even when I got the newspaper, I just didn't look at the sports section, unless the comics were in it. And then I just read the comics. And I live alone, so there is no sports fanatic in the house watching or listening to the games and related news.

I know the "local" teams. My state doesn't have any, but sports fans follow the Massachusetts teams. I know them all.

But I'm not interested in them. At all. So unless news of some sports event is basically thrust in my face, I have no clue who is playing what when.

Frankly, growing up with 5 brothers, I heard more than I ever wanted to about sports. If I never hear another word about professional team sports, I'd be happy. It is so very easy to avoid them, everywhere except at work.

And yes, I've been called "odd" or "weird" because I don't care about sports, won't join the office pool during March Madness. If people knew I secretly wished the local teams wouldn't make it to the playoffs because then I'd have to put up with less conversation about sports in my office, they'd probably see me as a traitor or something.

I don't care. It's a free country. I'm allowed to not care one whit about sports.

Amen. I vaguely get, from the ambient news, tidings of the doings of the biggest sports celebrities; otherwise, I don't want to know, and value living in a free country where I'm not obliged to have any interest in sports -- without fear of being dragged off to a re-education camp to have my attitudes appropriately adjusted.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on June 20, 2013, 04:06:38 PM
This is me. I read the paper and get my news on-line, so it is more than easy to skip the sports stuff. Even when I got the newspaper, I just didn't look at the sports section, unless the comics were in it. And then I just read the comics. And I live alone, so there is no sports fanatic in the house watching or listening to the games and related news.

I know the "local" teams. My state doesn't have any, but sports fans follow the Massachusetts teams. I know them all.

But I'm not interested in them. At all. So unless news of some sports event is basically thrust in my face, I have no clue who is playing what when.

...
I don't care. It's a free country. I'm allowed to not care one whit about sports.

But you see, it's not that anybody on this thread thinks that you should *care one whit* about sports.

We just think it's very remarkable if someone doesn't even know the names of the teams in their on area.
We don't think you should know who won last night, etc., etc.

But we don't understand how you can live in Kansas City and not be able to say, "The football team here? It's called the Kansas City Chiefs." That's all.

Sure, there's a prominent "sports" label, and you don't consciously read it, but doesn't your eye pick out the word "Royals" as it goes past?

In fact, JUST NOW, I went to the Kansas City Star website, and the main story on the page is about a Royals pitcher. I can't imagine that the home pages of most city papers don't ever put their sports news prominently on the page. How do you do that--live in a city, read ANY version of your city's paper, listen to ANY version of your city's radio, shop in ANY general-dry-goods store--and not know the name of the team?

You do, you see--the bolded line proves our point. You know the basics you'd know by simply being aware of the world around you.

It's not about "caring about sports." It's about "know the major social and news items that happen in my city over the years."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on June 20, 2013, 04:26:18 PM
I understood very, very little of football as a kid because honestly it just didn't interest me enough at the time. My folks would take me to games at the college where they met and another kid and I would just chase each other around down on the track that surrounded the field (staying out of people's way as much as possible) or running to the snack bar.

I knew it involved touchdowns and quarterbacks and two teams but I didn't really understand the whole down thing until my middle son wanted to play flag football about 4 years ago and I figured I ought to learn about it to properly cheer him on and so I bought Holly Robinson Peete's book "Get your own *%& beer, I'm watching the game".  And now I really enjoy football and the funny thing is I don't really even follow my state's teams that much.  I mean this year I believe the Iowa Hawkeyes and Maryland Terrapins will be in the same conference but if they play each other I confess, I'm still rooting for the Hawkeyes. :) I do watch the Ravens but I confess, I like college sports better.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: camlan on June 20, 2013, 04:52:16 PM
This is me. I read the paper and get my news on-line, so it is more than easy to skip the sports stuff. Even when I got the newspaper, I just didn't look at the sports section, unless the comics were in it. And then I just read the comics. And I live alone, so there is no sports fanatic in the house watching or listening to the games and related news.

I know the "local" teams. My state doesn't have any, but sports fans follow the Massachusetts teams. I know them all.

But I'm not interested in them. At all. So unless news of some sports event is basically thrust in my face, I have no clue who is playing what when.

...
I don't care. It's a free country. I'm allowed to not care one whit about sports.

But you see, it's not that anybody on this thread thinks that you should *care one whit* about sports.

We just think it's very remarkable if someone doesn't even know the names of the teams in their on area.
We don't think you should know who won last night, etc., etc.

But we don't understand how you can live in Kansas City and not be able to say, "The football team here? It's called the Kansas City Chiefs." That's all.

Sure, there's a prominent "sports" label, and you don't consciously read it, but doesn't your eye pick out the word "Royals" as it goes past?

In fact, JUST NOW, I went to the Kansas City Star website, and the main story on the page is about a Royals pitcher. I can't imagine that the home pages of most city papers don't ever put their sports news prominently on the page. How do you do that--live in a city, read ANY version of your city's paper, listen to ANY version of your city's radio, shop in ANY general-dry-goods store--and not know the name of the team?

You do, you see--the bolded line proves our point. You know the basics you'd know by simply being aware of the world around you.

It's not about "caring about sports." It's about "know the major social and news items that happen in my city over the years."

No, I know the basics because of my environment growing up--many brothers and two parents who were from Boston and followed the Boston teams. When I moved to Connecticut for several years, I didn't know they had a professional hockey team, until the news exploded with the fact that the team was moving to a different city, at which point it was front page news in the paper and hard to miss. And everyone was talking about it.  And the hockey team was the only professional team in the state.

People who are interesting in something, like sports, seek out news about it, so they see information about it everywhere they look. People who are indifferent, or just not interested, don't look at the news sources for that topic and frequently have no idea what's going on.

If you change the channel when the TV news gets to sports, and don't click on sports-related information on the internet, it is very, very easy to know nothing about them. Or any other topic you aren't interested in, as well.

I went to college just a few blocks from Fenway Park and walked past it frequently and only knew there was a game if I happened to be out and about and could hear the organ playing. That's how easy it is to avoid knowledge of something happening 4 blocks from you.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 20, 2013, 05:09:09 PM
This is me. I read the paper and get my news on-line, so it is more than easy to skip the sports stuff. Even when I got the newspaper, I just didn't look at the sports section, unless the comics were in it. And then I just read the comics. And I live alone, so there is no sports fanatic in the house watching or listening to the games and related news.

I know the "local" teams. My state doesn't have any, but sports fans follow the Massachusetts teams. I know them all.

But I'm not interested in them. At all. So unless news of some sports event is basically thrust in my face, I have no clue who is playing what when.

...
I don't care. It's a free country. I'm allowed to not care one whit about sports.

But you see, it's not that anybody on this thread thinks that you should *care one whit* about sports.

We just think it's very remarkable if someone doesn't even know the names of the teams in their on area.
We don't think you should know who won last night, etc., etc.

But we don't understand how you can live in Kansas City and not be able to say, "The football team here? It's called the Kansas City Chiefs." That's all.

Sure, there's a prominent "sports" label, and you don't consciously read it, but doesn't your eye pick out the word "Royals" as it goes past?

In fact, JUST NOW, I went to the Kansas City Star website, and the main story on the page is about a Royals pitcher. I can't imagine that the home pages of most city papers don't ever put their sports news prominently on the page. How do you do that--live in a city, read ANY version of your city's paper, listen to ANY version of your city's radio, shop in ANY general-dry-goods store--and not know the name of the team?

You do, you see--the bolded line proves our point. You know the basics you'd know by simply being aware of the world around you.

It's not about "caring about sports." It's about "know the major social and news items that happen in my city over the years."

I'd suggest -- don't underestimate how totally uninterested and non-knowing a sport-hater can be, about sport stuff even in their own city. I live in Birmingham, England  -- was until today, dimly aware that said city holds two, often at-bitter-odds with each other, football teams. I being totally uninterested in, and oblivious to, football -- until a few minutes ago, all I knew about that stuff was that one of such teams was called Aston Villa, and the other, wasn't.  I had to go to Google to learn that the rival team is called Birmingham (City).  Were it not for this thread -- knowing which-was-which would not have impinged on my personal life, in the slightest. Knowing the major social and news stuff, and importance of same, varies from milieu to milieu.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: snowflake on June 20, 2013, 05:15:37 PM
I think it's easier to be sports-oblivious in some cities as opposed to others.  I know the name of my city football team, I've heard of Tim Tebow, I (kind of) know what the quarterback does.  But I'm pretty ambivalent.  I never remember how many yards make a down or what is a foul or whatever.

But I had a good friend who was like me and went to a city where football was KING.  She can now talk about college vs. professional rules and all kinds of trivia. 

So yes, I'd expect an adult to pick up cultural references.  But there is no getting around the fact that it's easier in some places than others.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Betelnut on June 20, 2013, 07:43:29 PM
I never, ever said that you had to like sports or care about sports or even know your local teams (although I'm like others when I think--surely you can't avoid that information!)  I certainly don't expect people to know schedules or when games are going to be played if they aren't interested in that information.

I simply said that I felt an adult should know that basics of the most popular sports in their culture.  It is a matter of cultural literacy. That is all.  Such as, how many points is a goal in soccer?  How many innings in a basic baseball game?  Or, an easier question about baseball--how many points is a run?

This is similar to knowing other aspects of your culture.  Such as US citizens should know who was president during the Civil War or who wrote Moby wingadingdingy or who Frank Sinatra was.  A lot of people hate history but I bet most of us would be appalled if a person said, "I just don't care about who won the Civil War." That is an extreme of an example, of course.  :D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: artk2002 on June 20, 2013, 07:56:57 PM
Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.

Depends on the "city". For instance, I live in Southern California which is sometimes confused with Los Angeles (SoCal includes Los Angeles and a lot of other cities.) We have 2 NBA teams (Lakers & Clippers), 2 baseball (Dodgers and Angels) and 2 hockey teams (Kings and Ducks.) But we don't have professional football.  At one time we had two professional football teams, the Rams and the Raiders, but they left us -- good riddance! We do, however, have lots of college football (UCLA and USC.) Other markets may only have one of a sport or none. The US is a *very* big place.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: dawnfire on June 20, 2013, 08:55:37 PM
Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.

Most cities only have one per sport, if that.  A few cities have two (New York having two baseball teams, for example) but that's the exception.  Using where I grew up (Wisconsin) as an example: Green Bay had the Packers (football), Milwaukee had the Brewers (baseball) and the Bucks (basketball).  Since football was the most talked-about sport, I knew the names of the primary rival teams, but I don't think I could necessarily name rivals for other sports.  Where I live now, we have some minor-league teams, but college football is the big thing - I would expect anyone who had lived here a while to know the basics about Alabama and Auburn (like what the team colors are).

See, here one of the football codes is Rugby League (NRL).  There are 16 teams in the league.  9 of them (I think) are Sydney-based.

AFL (Australian Football league) there are there are 18 teams . 10 of them are in Melbourne based (mainly named for inner city suburbs)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dindrane on June 20, 2013, 11:13:16 PM
The thing that bothers me about the idea that the average adult "should" know various things about how sports are played and who the teams are and whatever else has been brought up in this thread is that, despite other examples of culture (popular or otherwise), the "should" thing doesn't come up for other things in nearly the same way it does for sports.

When it comes to the depth and breadth of knowledge, I've seen people say in this thread that I ought to know how points are scored, what specific terminology is, when major games are played, what teams exist in my city or possibly region and what their names are, which teams are playing in said major games at any given time, and the names of at least the most well-known players. For all of the major sports in this country, which can include everything from football to NASCAR.

That does not, in any way, compare to the depth and breadth of knowledge necessary to know, to name a few examples, what a violin looks like or who Frank Sinatra was, or who won the Civil War or who the president of the United States is. Those things are all pretty superficial levels of knowledge in the subjects of music and history/civics. As such, they are something it would be legitimately quite difficult to fail to know if you grow up in the United States.

A comparable level of knowledge with sports is knowing what sports are popular here, probably knowing the name of the championship game or match for the most popular among them (and I wouldn't include something like NASCAR or hockey in that "most popular" designation unless you live in a region that, as a region, is into it), and possibly having a rudimentary understanding of the terminology and rules of each game.

But knowing how each game is specifically scored, who the major players are, when the championship games are, what teams are playing, etc., etc.? That's relatively specific knowledge. It might not seem specific to someone who has an interest in sports or who knows a lot of people who do, but I can tell you right now as someone who isn't particularly interested in sports and doesn't spend a lot of time around people who are, it sounds pretty specific to me.

Similarly, I don't think it's especially specific knowledge to know which strings are on each of the stringed instruments, or to know the mechanics of how one plays them, or even to know the notes on a scale. I don't think it's particularly specific knowledge to know the national origin of popular composers or to know which musical periods they belonged to by listening to their music. To me, that knowledge is basic, broad, and superficial. But that's because I started playing the piano when I was six years old and the cello when I was 11. I've played in multiple orchestras and sung in multiple choirs.

That level of knowledge is basic for someone interested in classical music. But to someone who hasn't been exposed and/or isn't interested, it's pretty in-depth.

The difference, with sports, is that there are a lot of people in the world who assume all adults ought to have an interest, and therefore know these sort of specific facts that only seem basic to those who are interested. I don't assume that everyone ought to have an interest in classical music and classical instruments to the point where they know specific pieces of music written by specific composers. I'd be surprised if someone had never heard of J. S. Bach or Mozart at all, but not surprised if they couldn't name a composition of either. So I also don't think that I ought to know specific sports teams or games or players, even though I'd be equally surprised to meet an American who had never heard of baseball.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Ereine on June 21, 2013, 12:34:31 AM
I would assume that an adult would know something about the major sports in their area, but not really anything to do with the rules, maybe on the level of recognising the violin it would be knowing what sort of equipment is involved and what the goal is. I guess that my country is more into sports than some others, I don't watch tv or read newspapers often and am not interested in team sports at all but I still manage to hear about major things, like world championships and things like that (though they seem to happen so rarely that they're big news). I would also expect an adult to know about the skiing world championships that were held about ten years ago, not because people should be interested in skiing but because it unleashed a doping scandal that's possibly caused one suicide and caused court cases that are still going on. Likewise I would expect people to know something about the Olympic games held in out capital and what they meant (like introducing Coca Cola to us) or how important sports were in building the image of the country.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: starry diadem on June 21, 2013, 12:48:49 AM
I never, ever said that you had to like sports or care about sports or even know your local teams (although I'm like others when I think--surely you can't avoid that information!)  I certainly don't expect people to know schedules or when games are going to be played if they aren't interested in that information.

I simply said that I felt an adult should know that basics of the most popular sports in their culture.  It is a matter of cultural literacy. That is all.  Such as, how many points is a goal in soccer?  How many innings in a basic baseball game?  Or, an easier question about baseball--how many points is a run?

This is similar to knowing other aspects of your culture.  Such as US citizens should know who was president during the Civil War or who wrote Moby wingadingdingy or who Frank Sinatra was.  A lot of people hate history but I bet most of us would be appalled if a person said, "I just don't care about who won the Civil War." That is an extreme of an example, of course.  :D


Whoa, no.  This isn't basic cultural literacy . 'Basic' would be knowing that baseball is a popular sport and it involves whacking a ball with a bat.  'Basic' here in the UK would be knowing that football is the most popular sport and maybe the names of one or two players and that only because the press here treat a few of them - Beckham, Rooney - as celebrities and their doings are reported on the main pages so that even if you skip reading that article, the name registers. 'Basic' is knowing that the teams are divided into leagues and there's an annual competition for the FA Cup.

Knowing which team is at the top of the league or how the F A Cup rounds are going or scored?  Takes far more effort to know than I am willing to grant it. I have other things I want to give mental and cultural space to and there is no 'should know' about it. In fact, I find the whole idea of 'should' as narrow and judgemental.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 21, 2013, 01:12:34 AM
Statistics from a disheartening survey:

Only 53% of adults know how long it takes for the Earth to revolve around the Sun.
Only 59% of adults know that the earliest humans and dinosaurs did not live at the same time.

I was trying to find a source for the statistic I heard during election times, that 11% of Americans don't believe that Hawaii is a state, but all the top results on Google were things like "Is Hawaii a state or a country?" and "Do people in Hawaii speak American?" so now I'm going to go hide in the corner and cry for the state of our country's education system  :-\
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Nikko-chan on June 21, 2013, 01:19:06 AM
Statistics from a disheartening survey:

Only 53% of adults know how long it takes for the Earth to revolve around the Sun.
Only 59% of adults know that the earliest humans and dinosaurs did not live at the same time.

I was trying to find a source for the statistic I heard during election times, that 11% of Americans don't believe that Hawaii is a state, but all the top results on Google were things like "Is Hawaii a state or a country?" and "Do people in Hawaii speak American?" so now I'm going to go hide in the corner and cry for the state of our country's education system  :-\

I know the second one but not the first >.<
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 21, 2013, 03:35:43 AM
Statistics from a disheartening survey:

Only 53% of adults know how long it takes for the Earth to revolve around the Sun.
Only 59% of adults know that the earliest humans and dinosaurs did not live at the same time.

I was trying to find a source for the statistic I heard during election times, that 11% of Americans don't believe that Hawaii is a state, but all the top results on Google were things like "Is Hawaii a state or a country?" and "Do people in Hawaii speak American?" so now I'm going to go hide in the corner and cry for the state of our country's education system  :-\

I know the second one but not the first >.<

365 days and some change.  It's why we have leap years every 4 years
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on June 21, 2013, 08:31:50 AM
Statistics from a disheartening survey:

Only 53% of adults know how long it takes for the Earth to revolve around the Sun.
Only 59% of adults know that the earliest humans and dinosaurs did not live at the same time.

I was trying to find a source for the statistic I heard during election times, that 11% of Americans don't believe that Hawaii is a state, but all the top results on Google were things like "Is Hawaii a state or a country?" and "Do people in Hawaii speak American?" so now I'm going to go hide in the corner and cry for the state of our country's education system  :-\

I know the second one but not the first >.<

365 days and some change.  It's why we have leap years every 4 years

A year, give or take, is what I always tell people.

I've had people when I visited another part of the country quietly take me aside and point out what a tree was, and explain what a hill was. Even in the middle of the USA, we still have both.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: wolfie on June 21, 2013, 11:01:08 AM

I simply said that I felt an adult should know that basics of the most popular sports in their culture.  It is a matter of cultural literacy. That is all.  Such as, how many points is a goal in soccer?  How many innings in a basic baseball game?  Or, an easier question about baseball--how many points is a run?


How many points is a goal in soccer - no idea.
How many innings in a basic baseball game - 7?
How many points in a run in baseball - no idea.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Tea Drinker on June 21, 2013, 11:21:03 AM
Americans mostly don't learn much geography (I don't know whether people in other countries do better). I remember a survey some years back, of either high school students or adults, where something like 45% of the Americans asked could not answer "name a country near the Pacific Ocean."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: missanpan on June 21, 2013, 11:39:16 AM
Statistics from a disheartening survey:

I was trying to find a source for the statistic I heard during election times, that 11% of Americans don't believe that Hawaii is a state, but all the top results on Google were things like "Is Hawaii a state or a country?" and "Do people in Hawaii speak American?" so now I'm going to go hide in the corner and cry for the state of our country's education system  :-\

Something similar: I will be going to Hawaii in a couple of months. Someone asked me where I would go to exchange money. I just calmly explained that Hawaii is part of the U.S. so I won't have to do that. She was born and raised in the U.S. so it's not like she's new to the country.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jones on June 21, 2013, 11:45:39 AM
Americans mostly don't learn much geography (I don't know whether people in other countries do better). I remember a survey some years back, of either high school students or adults, where something like 45% of the Americans asked could not answer "name a country near the Pacific Ocean."

This makes me weep. When I was in high school, I was informed I would not graduate unless I took a World Geography course. Unfortunately, the only one that would be offered during the amount of time I had to take it was the summer before my senior year. So I took summer school, with a surprisingly large class, and learned an awful lot that has actually helped me quite a bit as I read history or watched the news.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: WillyNilly on June 21, 2013, 12:02:41 PM

I simply said that I felt an adult should know that basics of the most popular sports in their culture.  It is a matter of cultural literacy. That is all.  Such as, how many points is a goal in soccer?  How many innings in a basic baseball game?  Or, an easier question about baseball--how many points is a run?


How many points is a goal in soccer - no idea.
How many innings in a basic baseball game - 7?
How many points in a run in baseball - no idea.

I absolutely agree adults should know the basics about the popular sports in their area. I disagree the level of detail you are listing is basic. I have been to baseball games - at least 10 in the last 20 years and I'm not sure how many innings in a basic game (9 I think?... if the team I'm rooting for isn't winning by 7th we usually leave - because the detail I know is the one that's important to me: no beer after the 7th inning!) And I don't know how many points (are they called "points in baseball"? I seem to recall being rebuffed over that word) a run garners (I assume 1).

Basic info is: my local teams are the Mets and Yankees. Baseball is played by two teams at time, each with a bunch of players. They use a bat to hit a ball and then they run. Its generally a "summer" sport. beer and hotdogs are associated with the sport. The subways are hella crowded on game days.

Basic soccer info is: its played on a soccer field. The ball is kicked not handled by hand. Its more popular everywhere else then it is in the US.

Basic football info is: the field is used as a common reference measurement (although a meaningless one to me). Its called "football" but the players tend to carry the ball. The ball is not round. People get tackled. Football payers tend to be very big guys. It more of a winter sport, some families combine it with Thanksgiving.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: #borecore on June 21, 2013, 12:57:08 PM
Former sports editor chiming in here: You certainly don't HAVE to know sports stuff, cursory or detailed, to get by. But (speaking as someone who knew less than a typical sports-hater when she got the job), it can't hurt to be able to converse with a sports nut on a superficial level.  I never realized how much sports talk is all around me until I gained some fluency around the subject.
This one stinks if you're on the wrong side of it, but it is upsettingly common to have sports be something of a boys' club gateway. Just pretending you know what's going on can: allow you to steer the conversation in a new direction eventually,  get you an 'in' with a jocular boss, or set up an excuse to keep checking in with someone ("How bout those Spurs? ... and how about that TPS report?").

I will never love sports, but I do think being able to "appreciate" them is a cultural asset.

My real contribution: "Based on a true story" does NOT mean "documentary"! Tom Hanks did not go to space. Russell Crowe is not a brilliant mathematician. Et cetera. You'd be surprised!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 21, 2013, 01:54:04 PM
Former sports editor chiming in here: You certainly don't HAVE to know sports stuff, cursory or detailed, to get by. But (speaking as someone who knew less than a typical sports-hater when she got the job), it can't hurt to be able to converse with a sports nut on a superficial level. 
Being a bit unkind here -- but who needs to actually converse with a sports nut?  People with great passions in life, tend to "monologise" joyously, and not to need or wish for input from anyone else. Just wind 'em up and watch 'em go !
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on June 21, 2013, 02:27:14 PM
Former sports editor chiming in here: You certainly don't HAVE to know sports stuff, cursory or detailed, to get by. But (speaking as someone who knew less than a typical sports-hater when she got the job), it can't hurt to be able to converse with a sports nut on a superficial level.  I never realized how much sports talk is all around me until I gained some fluency around the subject.
This one stinks if you're on the wrong side of it, but it is upsettingly common to have sports be something of a boys' club gateway. Just pretending you know what's going on can: allow you to steer the conversation in a new direction eventually,  get you an 'in' with a jocular boss, or set up an excuse to keep checking in with someone ("How bout those Spurs? ... and how about that TPS report?").

I will never love sports, but I do think being able to "appreciate" them is a cultural asset.

My real contribution: "Based on a true story" does NOT mean "documentary"! Tom Hanks did not go to space. Russell Crowe is not a brilliant mathematician. Et cetera. You'd be surprised!

LOL about the bolded. There's a movie starring Hillary Swank called Iron Jawed Angels which depicts the horrer that the suffragettes endured in trying to get American women the right to vote. My sister and I, after watching it, kept joking that we had no idea how Hillary Swank had to suffer* just so we could vote.

*In reality, neither of us really did have any idea how those women (real women) suffered, physically and mentally. Which sort of does fall into the category of things you should know but don't -- in this case, though, because it's simply not taught in school. I recommend the movie to anyone who doesn't bother voting. Once you see how much it meant to these women and how much the endured to gain that right, it'll make you want to vote.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on June 21, 2013, 02:54:37 PM
I think it's sad that some American elementary schools no longer teach cursive.  My oldest son has beautiful penmanship (he's 12 and going into 7th) but my 10 1/2 year old is going into fifth and they didn't teach it to him at all in school.   I'm seriously considering getting a workbook to teach him at home.  Even if he never uses it, he ought to be able to at least read it.   

I have a hard time making myself write in print.  Even if I start out printing it turns into cursive by the end of the sentence.  Even my lists are in cursive.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Snooks on June 21, 2013, 05:49:28 PM

This was a while ago but...

I honestly never knew which finger a wedding/engagement ring went on (obviously they can go wherever, but left ring finger is tradition here) until we were talking about buying one and I had to be sized. Oh, and I thought you wore the engagement ring on one hand and switched it after marriage (which, as it turns out, is tradition in some places/cultures, but not ours).

My then-fiance was astounded -- apparently it's standard to check a person's hand before flirting if you are a single, conscientious person of an age where people are as likely to be married as not.

On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)

I once listened to a guy go on a long rant about how much people spend on engagement rings - which was his POV, fine, it's not an issue I care about - but then he finished up with "and then they only wear it for a few months until they get married!"

Apparently he really thought that people would spend $$$ on a diamond solitaire, only to take it off and lock in in a cupboard forever once the wedding was over!  Trying not to look too amused, I told him that many woman wear both rings and pointed out a few examples right around us.   I'm not sure I convinced him that a $$$ engagement ring was a good idea, but at least I calmed his outrage a bit.

<splutter> Really?! Wow. I don't think I've known anyone who stopped wearing theirs after the wedding. Most did bridal sets, and the few who didn't wear their engagement ring on the right hand now.

My mom.  I've never seen her wear her engagement ring.  She never liked it, didn't want one, but dad insisted.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jones on June 21, 2013, 07:10:25 PM

This was a while ago but...

I honestly never knew which finger a wedding/engagement ring went on (obviously they can go wherever, but left ring finger is tradition here) until we were talking about buying one and I had to be sized. Oh, and I thought you wore the engagement ring on one hand and switched it after marriage (which, as it turns out, is tradition in some places/cultures, but not ours).

My then-fiance was astounded -- apparently it's standard to check a person's hand before flirting if you are a single, conscientious person of an age where people are as likely to be married as not.

On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)

I once listened to a guy go on a long rant about how much people spend on engagement rings - which was his POV, fine, it's not an issue I care about - but then he finished up with "and then they only wear it for a few months until they get married!"

Apparently he really thought that people would spend $$$ on a diamond solitaire, only to take it off and lock in in a cupboard forever once the wedding was over!  Trying not to look too amused, I told him that many woman wear both rings and pointed out a few examples right around us.   I'm not sure I convinced him that a $$$ engagement ring was a good idea, but at least I calmed his outrage a bit.

<splutter> Really?! Wow. I don't think I've known anyone who stopped wearing theirs after the wedding. Most did bridal sets, and the few who didn't wear their engagement ring on the right hand now.

My mom.  I've never seen her wear her engagement ring.  She never liked it, didn't want one, but dad insisted.
We couldn't afford two rings so my engagement ring is my wedding ring. A few years later DH bought me an anniversary ring; that's the only ring I wear now.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on June 21, 2013, 07:14:13 PM
My engagement ring doesn't fit me anymore. I still have it though.  Gold band, heart shaped sapphire surrounded by diamond chips.  It looks like a small version of the Heart of the Ocean from Titanic.  Yeah, I got engaged in '98, about 6 months after Titanic was released and always loved it. :)

I  have big knuckles, I guess, I have to get my rings big enough to go over them but then once they're where they belong they tend to slip around my fingers.  It doesn't fit with my wedding ring which is a gold claddagh so I never did wear them on the same finger.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: kckgirl on June 21, 2013, 07:43:32 PM
When we first began discussing the arrow next to the fuel indicator in our cars to show which side the gasoline goes in, I didn't know about it and checked the car the next morning. It was a rental because my car had been rear-ended and was in the body shop for repairs. After I got my car back this week, I checked to find no arrow. It's a 2005 Honda. I was kind of disappointed.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on June 21, 2013, 07:45:29 PM
DH and I were poor when we decided to get married, so we put a loose diamond on layaway (in the mid 1990's). When it was paid off, we decided to get a simple diamond crossover band and I have worn it since our wedding day in 1997. I have a sterling silver claddagh and Celtic knot band I wear as an anniversary ring with a diamond eternity band. I only wear rings that have a solitaire stone when out at a social event, because I don't like things catching on them.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jocelyn on June 23, 2013, 09:56:18 AM
My DH is very good about explaining things without making me feel like a moron, but I can't quite wrap my head around "downs".
A 'down' is called that, because a team has the chance to move the ball until it is down on the ground, firmly placed there by a player. Running off the side of the field also 'downs' a ball. If someone drops the ball, or kicks the ball, and it is bouncing around on the turf, not under the control of either team, it is still in play until a player 'downs' it. For example, at the beginning of the game, when one team kicks off the ball, the other team can catch the ball and run with it hoping to score, or they can kneel down immediately upon catching it to maintain the field position they have. This is what you want to do if a bunch of the players from the opposing team are running at you, and you're afraid you might get pushed backwards. :) The players on the team which kicked off are running down the field as fast as they can, in hopes of surrounding the bouncing ball and keeping their opponents from downing it, because the ball might bounce several yards more, which is all in their favor.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on June 23, 2013, 10:07:11 AM
My DH is very good about explaining things without making me feel like a moron, but I can't quite wrap my head around "downs".
A 'down' is called that, because a team has the chance to move the ball until it is down on the ground, firmly placed there by a player. Running off the side of the field also 'downs' a ball. If someone drops the ball, or kicks the ball, and it is bouncing around on the turf, not under the control of either team, it is still in play until a player 'downs' it. For example, at the beginning of the game, when one team kicks off the ball, the other team can catch the ball and run with it hoping to score, or they can kneel down immediately upon catching it to maintain the field position they have. This is what you want to do if a bunch of the players from the opposing team are running at you, and you're afraid you might get pushed backwards. :) The players on the team which kicked off are running down the field as fast as they can, in hopes of surrounding the bouncing ball and keeping their opponents from downing it, because the ball might bounce several yards more, which is all in their favor.

I've been a football fan all my life, and have to admit I didn't know the origins of "down", either  ::). 

Cake, combine this post with the "chances to move the ball" explanation upthread :).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jocelyn on June 23, 2013, 10:08:12 AM
My parents were on vacation across the country.  They just happened to score tickets to a football game being held in a newly built stadium and their home province team was playing.  They were all set to cheer for their team when they looked around and realized they were surrounded in a sea of local team colours and wisely decide to cheer for the local team.   :D
My father went to a university football game with me. I had a student season ticket, and bought him a regular ticket. It was impossible for me to sneak into his section, so he came into the student section with me. The game was homecoming...his alma mater versus mine. And he wore his team colors, totally without thinking about it.
Did I mention that his alma mater was a powerhouse that year, and mine was miserable?
At one point I had to tell him to stop cheering for his team because he was about to get lynched by a bunch of drunk frat guys sitting behind us.  ::)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jocelyn on June 23, 2013, 10:17:38 AM
The thing that bothers me about the idea that the average adult "should" know various things about how sports are played and who the teams are and whatever else has been brought up in this thread is that, despite other examples of culture (popular or otherwise), the "should" thing doesn't come up for other things in nearly the same way it does for sports.
On the contrary, I would identify knowing what Lincoln Center or the Met to be as important as knowing the name of sports teams. Or knowing if your city has a symphony or opera or ballet company in residence. Knowing the difference between stringed, brass, woodwind and percussion instruments. Recognizing the names Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Picasso, Monet, Rodin. Knowing what museums are available in your vicinity.

For example: my family are avid attenders of museums. We will go to a museum about anything, on the assumption that if someone thought this stuff was worth collecting, it's worth going to see. One year, my sister's in-laws took her children to another city on vacation, and when the kids came back, my mother was asking about the trip. Did they go to Historic Site A? No. What about B? No. C? D? E? (these are all sites where our parents took us when we visited). No. Finally, my mother asked, where DID you go? My nephew replied, 'We went to WalMart.'
This, in a nutshell, is the difference between the two families.  >:D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dindrane on June 23, 2013, 10:45:35 AM
The thing that bothers me about the idea that the average adult "should" know various things about how sports are played and who the teams are and whatever else has been brought up in this thread is that, despite other examples of culture (popular or otherwise), the "should" thing doesn't come up for other things in nearly the same way it does for sports.
On the contrary, I would identify knowing what Lincoln Center or the Met to be as important as knowing the name of sports teams. Or knowing if your city has a symphony or opera or ballet company in residence. Knowing the difference between stringed, brass, woodwind and percussion instruments. Recognizing the names Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Picasso, Monet, Rodin. Knowing what museums are available in your vicinity.

There are individual people in this country who feel the way you do, but that doesn't disprove my point. You are far more likely to encounter someone who thinks you live under a rock for having a spotty knowledge of sports than you are for having a spotty knowledge of classical music or art.

I have personally had interactions with more people than I can say who were absolutely shocked that I don't know much about sports, and don't care to know more. I can't recall a single interaction with anyone who was shocked that my knowledge of art history was spotty and that I don't much care for modern art. In part because the topic of art and art history so rarely comes up in conversation in the first place.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Barney girl on June 23, 2013, 12:50:38 PM
This discussion reminds me of CP Snow's "Two Cultures" where he comments that people who are quite scathing of how little scientists know of the arts may not know the most basic things about science, such as what acceleration is.

I'm not saying we should all have a basic grounding in sport ( heaven knows I know little), but our assumptions about what is normal come from different view points.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on June 23, 2013, 02:04:40 PM
This thread reminds me of my own thread in which I have very 'arty" interests and my DH just doesn't.  I might think he should know who Rembrandt was, or Van Gogh; he thinks I should understand his video games and the Anime culture.  In fact, in our family, he's a sports widower; I'm the one who teaches him about football and baseball.    If you ask 100 people what cultural literacy citizens should be "expected" to have for their respective countries, you're going to get 100 different answers based on education, economics, and many other factors.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jocelyn on June 23, 2013, 04:07:58 PM


There are individual people in this country who feel the way you do, but that doesn't disprove my point. You are far more likely to encounter someone who thinks you live under a rock for having a spotty knowledge of sports than you are for having a spotty knowledge of classical music or art.

Not in the circles I run in.  ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: baglady on June 23, 2013, 06:57:18 PM
I don't give a whit about sports, although being from Boston, rooting for the Red Sox is in my DNA. I was over the moon when they won the World Series in 2004, although I didn't watch any actual games. My happiness was more vicarious for all the true fans who had waited so many years. I have a passing knowledge of other sports because of my job, but I don't actually care about who wins what.

I have a friend who gives even a smaller whit than I do. When co-workers would say, "How 'bout that game last night?" he'd shut them down with "Uh, is that the one with the pointy ball?"
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on June 23, 2013, 07:56:24 PM
Neither Mr. Thipu nor I have much interest in sports.  If a NY team is in the finals we might use it as  an excuse to indulge in a meal of our favorite junk foods but that's about it. 

He likes technology, trains and weather.  I like decorative arts, the Classical world and Ancient Egypt.  These aren't particularly popular topics at parties so we usually wind up talking about local politics and the weird weather.

Ah well.  That's the joy of being a nerd.     
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: turnip on June 23, 2013, 08:24:19 PM
Could I suggest that we have a spin-off on the necessity of a basic sports vocabulary?   This conversation has gone well outside the definition of the topic.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on June 24, 2013, 10:51:05 AM
Neither Mr. Thipu nor I have much interest in sports.  If a NY team is in the finals we might use it as  an excuse to indulge in a meal of our favorite junk foods but that's about it. 

He likes technology, trains and weather.  I like decorative arts, the Classical world and Ancient Egypt.  These aren't particularly popular topics at parties so we usually wind up talking about local politics and the weird weather.

Ah well.  That's the joy of being a nerd.   

In my group of friends, technology, the Classical world, and Ancient Egypt could all be brought up in the same conversation! And I think I'm one of the few who can hold my own no matter where the conversation goes.

I have just enough basic knowledge about a lot of things to be dangerous. And to be good a trivia games.

Side note: neither my boyfriend nor I are ever allowed to challenge anyone else to a game of Star Wars Trivial Pursuits. Apparently he's won a game entirely within the first turn, and I've won one in three turns (before I met them, but sis still grumbles about it).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on June 24, 2013, 11:19:08 AM
Former sports editor chiming in here: You certainly don't HAVE to know sports stuff, cursory or detailed, to get by. But (speaking as someone who knew less than a typical sports-hater when she got the job), it can't hurt to be able to converse with a sports nut on a superficial level. 
Being a bit unkind here -- but who needs to actually converse with a sports nut?  People with great passions in life, tend to "monologise" joyously, and not to need or wish for input from anyone else. Just wind 'em up and watch 'em go !

Snerk!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on June 26, 2013, 10:31:05 AM
On a totally different note, I only realized a few years ago why the power company (and other places) want me to write my customer number on the check when I pay my bill each month. I think I was waiting around my landlord's office and someone was processing rent checks, and I saw them searching for the customer number on each check and typing that into the computer to bring up the customer's account.

Well, duh.

Checks usually have your name printed on them, and then you sign them. But of course signatures can be hard to read, and if it's your mom paying your bills (common on the university campus) the name printed on the check won't match the name on the apartment lease/electrical account/etc.. Or people have common names, checks leftover from before a name change, etc.. So writing your customer number on/near the "memo line" helps the company match the check to your account much faster.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Kate on June 26, 2013, 05:25:56 PM
All my life..(I'm 59), I as an eastern Canadian pronounced the western city of Calgary as CAL-gare-ee..until an AMERICAN friend who lives in western USA said she thought it was pronounced CAl-gree..so I started paying attention to how it is pronounced in the media and was mortified to discover she was right  :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: daen on June 26, 2013, 05:48:10 PM
All my life..(I'm 59), I as an eastern Canadian pronounced the western city of Calgary as CAL-gare-ee..until an AMERICAN friend who lives in western USA said she thought it was pronounced CAl-gree..so I started paying attention to how it is pronounced in the media and was mortified to discover she was right  :-[

And I, as a Canadian prairie girl, pronounce it about halfway between the two: CAL-(g')-ree, with an extremely short schwa-vowel middle syllable. Just a hint and a break, really.

Of course, I've been told I have a strange accent...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Kate on June 27, 2013, 09:44:30 AM
All my life..(I'm 59), I as an eastern Canadian pronounced the western city of Calgary as CAL-gare-ee..until an AMERICAN friend who lives in western USA said she thought it was pronounced CAl-gree..so I started paying attention to how it is pronounced in the media and was mortified to discover she was right  :-[

And I, as a Canadian prairie girl, pronounce it about halfway between the two: CAL-(g')-ree, with an extremely short schwa-vowel middle syllable. Just a hint and a break, really.

Of course, I've been told I have a strange accent...


Good to know the pronunciation is not carved in stone  LOL I'm a former Ontario farm girl and I've been told I talk like a Southerner (USA)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on June 27, 2013, 01:04:29 PM
All my life..(I'm 59), I as an eastern Canadian pronounced the western city of Calgary as CAL-gare-ee..until an AMERICAN friend who lives in western USA said she thought it was pronounced CAl-gree..so I started paying attention to how it is pronounced in the media and was mortified to discover she was right  :-[

And I, as a Canadian prairie girl, pronounce it about halfway between the two: CAL-(g')-ree, with an extremely short schwa-vowel middle syllable. Just a hint and a break, really.

Of course, I've been told I have a strange accent...

I have a morphing accent, but that's how I've always pronounced it. And everyone I know, for that matter. Midwest USA, born and raised.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: hobish on June 27, 2013, 05:07:59 PM
I really don't like how Americans pronounce the word "buoy". Or the way they pronounce "altimeter".

 :o My that's a wide brush you've got there.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Kaora on June 27, 2013, 07:37:18 PM
Until book 4 (I think) of the Harry Potter series, I had no idea how to pronounce Hermione's name.  One of the character's (Ron?) got a bit drunk and said it very slowly and deliberately:  "Her-MY-oh-NEE", and I was all "... ohhhh."

No one was drunk. :) Hermione was trying to explain the pronunciation to a foreign visitor (Viktor Krum). I already knew it, but only because I'd studied Shakespeare's "A Winter's Tale" a few years before, and the queen there is named Hermione.

Catching up on thread.

For the longest time, my dyslexic brain thought it was "Her-moy-ne," after it switched the O and I around.  I read hte books before the movies came out, so it took me a few years.  :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PeterM on June 27, 2013, 07:40:14 PM
I really don't like how Americans pronounce the word "buoy". Or the way they pronounce "altimeter".

 :o My that's a wide brush you've got there.

Do you actually think she needs a disclaimer for that? If I comment about Americans say "aluminum" but Brits say "aluminium," do I need to put in a disclaimer saying that it may not be true that literally everyone in America says "aluminum" and literally everyone in England says "aluminium?"

Honestly, at what point can something be considered universal enough that it doesn't require a disclaimer that would probably end up being longer than the original statement?

As far as the specific statement goes, are you aware of significant numbers of Americans who pronounce the words buoy or altimeter differently from the majority? I'm not, but it's certainly possible. I think it's safe to say that most Americans say both words the same way.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 27, 2013, 08:09:10 PM
I really don't like how Americans pronounce the word "buoy". Or the way they pronounce "altimeter".

 :o My that's a wide brush you've got there.

Do you actually think she needs a disclaimer for that? If I comment about Americans say "aluminum" but Brits say "aluminium," do I need to put in a disclaimer saying that it may not be true that literally everyone in America says "aluminum" and literally everyone in England says "aluminium?"

Honestly, at what point can something be considered universal enough that it doesn't require a disclaimer that would probably end up being longer than the original statement?

As far as the specific statement goes, are you aware of significant numbers of Americans who pronounce the words buoy or altimeter differently from the majority? I'm not, but it's certainly possible. I think it's safe to say that most Americans say both words the same way.

Are you responding to hobish? or Katana?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on June 28, 2013, 09:48:54 AM
My college roommate was a marketing major and she learned some things in her classes about the "secrets" that are kept from consumers, or that the average consumer just isn't aware of, and she would come home in an indignant huff to share them with me. I have to admit, I didn't know them either.

One thing, which I've read other places, is about how a lot of cars from different companies have the same... framework. (Not a car person.) Like, Brand A Model A and Brand B Model B are essentially the same car in all the important parts, but the companies have "dressed" them differently. So if something seems structurally unsound about Brand A Model A, you shouldn't buy Brand B Model B thinking you're getting a different, better car, because basically they're the same; you have to do some research and discover that Brand B Model C is based on a different framework, which shouldn't have the same problems.

Another one, so I've heard, is chocolate chips. Allegedly, all chocolate chips for mainstream brands are made by the same manufacturer, and they get packaged up as Nestle, Toll House, Hershey, generic supermarket brand, etc.. Maybe Ghirardelli is different. That's what I've heard, anyway. So you might as well buy the generic brand, because it's the exact same thing as in the more expensive branded package.

Finally, milk. There's two things I've heard/experienced about milk. One is that for mainstream U.S. brands--not organic specialty stuff, but the general thing you find in the dairy case at the grocery store--all milk is the same. Prairie Farms 2% white milk is the same as Schnucks supermarket brand 2% white milk is the same as Dean 2% white milk, etc.. So if there was ever a choice between Pricy Branded Milk and Cheap Generic Milk, you should buy the latter, because they're exactly the same substance inside the container.

However, personally, I can taste the difference between a couple of brands of milk I would consider "mainstream." I can also taste the difference between Coke and Pepsi, and between regular soda and diet soda, for reference; and the milk brand difference was more obvious to me than those. So now I'm not sure what to believe on that one.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on June 28, 2013, 10:27:58 AM
My college roommate was a marketing major and she learned some things in her classes about the "secrets" that are kept from consumers, or that the average consumer just isn't aware of, and she would come home in an indignant huff to share them with me. I have to admit, I didn't know them either.

One thing, which I've read other places, is about how a lot of cars from different companies have the same... framework. (Not a car person.) Like, Brand A Model A and Brand B Model B are essentially the same car in all the important parts, but the companies have "dressed" them differently. So if something seems structurally unsound about Brand A Model A, you shouldn't buy Brand B Model B thinking you're getting a different, better car, because basically they're the same; you have to do some research and discover that Brand B Model C is based on a different framework, which shouldn't have the same problems.

Another one, so I've heard, is chocolate chips. Allegedly, all chocolate chips for mainstream brands are made by the same manufacturer, and they get packaged up as Nestle, Toll House, Hershey, generic supermarket brand, etc.. Maybe Ghirardelli is different. That's what I've heard, anyway. So you might as well buy the generic brand, because it's the exact same thing as in the more expensive branded package.

Finally, milk. There's two things I've heard/experienced about milk. One is that for mainstream U.S. brands--not organic specialty stuff, but the general thing you find in the dairy case at the grocery store--all milk is the same. Prairie Farms 2% white milk is the same as Schnucks supermarket brand 2% white milk is the same as Dean 2% white milk, etc.. So if there was ever a choice between Pricy Branded Milk and Cheap Generic Milk, you should buy the latter, because they're exactly the same substance inside the container.

However, personally, I can taste the difference between a couple of brands of milk I would consider "mainstream." I can also taste the difference between Coke and Pepsi, and between regular soda and diet soda, for reference; and the milk brand difference was more obvious to me than those. So now I'm not sure what to believe on that one.

The car stuff, I knew. I had a Ford Taurus that got t-boned by a steel-frame golf cart. Trashed my front door. My dad took me to a junkyard and we got a door from a Mercury (can't remember model) and it fit perfectly. Because it was the same door. It was even the same color.

The only difference in milk I've ever noticed was Braum's, and they make their own. All the brands at the major stores taste the same to me. Sodas, though, I used to be able to tell the difference before I stopped drinking them. I could tell the difference between a Coke and Pepsi AND the sugar version of both of them (as opposed to high fructose corn syrup), as well as some store brands and diet sodas. As it is, I can tell by taste how fast food places make their iced tea.

One thing I've learned recently, which is kind of icky but not quite gross - the basket part needs to be cleaned on coffeemakers. Especially if that coffeemaker is being used to make four or five pots of coffee a day. Even the tiniest bit of grounds that seeps through the filter (or goes over the top) creates a black sludge of junk on the bottom of the basket part that builds up. I don't think anyone at my last office knew that, but they all noticed when the coffee tasted so much better after I cleaned it...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: blue2000 on June 28, 2013, 11:06:41 AM
My college roommate was a marketing major and she learned some things in her classes about the "secrets" that are kept from consumers, or that the average consumer just isn't aware of, and she would come home in an indignant huff to share them with me. I have to admit, I didn't know them either.

One thing, which I've read other places, is about how a lot of cars from different companies have the same... framework. (Not a car person.) Like, Brand A Model A and Brand B Model B are essentially the same car in all the important parts, but the companies have "dressed" them differently. So if something seems structurally unsound about Brand A Model A, you shouldn't buy Brand B Model B thinking you're getting a different, better car, because basically they're the same; you have to do some research and discover that Brand B Model C is based on a different framework, which shouldn't have the same problems.

Another one, so I've heard, is chocolate chips. Allegedly, all chocolate chips for mainstream brands are made by the same manufacturer, and they get packaged up as Nestle, Toll House, Hershey, generic supermarket brand, etc.. Maybe Ghirardelli is different. That's what I've heard, anyway. So you might as well buy the generic brand, because it's the exact same thing as in the more expensive branded package.

Finally, milk. There's two things I've heard/experienced about milk. One is that for mainstream U.S. brands--not organic specialty stuff, but the general thing you find in the dairy case at the grocery store--all milk is the same. Prairie Farms 2% white milk is the same as Schnucks supermarket brand 2% white milk is the same as Dean 2% white milk, etc.. So if there was ever a choice between Pricy Branded Milk and Cheap Generic Milk, you should buy the latter, because they're exactly the same substance inside the container.

However, personally, I can taste the difference between a couple of brands of milk I would consider "mainstream." I can also taste the difference between Coke and Pepsi, and between regular soda and diet soda, for reference; and the milk brand difference was more obvious to me than those. So now I'm not sure what to believe on that one.

Retail person here.

There are only a few milk companies (three around here) so all the brand names and generic products you see on the shelves of any store are all made at those companies. If Brand A (milk, cheese, whatever) tastes different from Brand B, it may be from different companies, or it may be engineered to taste different to appeal to a different part of the population. Some generic brands are literally the exact same thing in a different package, some are the cheap garbage they have left over from making the expensive brand - you have to check the ingredients.

Not all chocolate is the same, sorry. But it is the same situation - all the brands/variations you see are made by only a few companies. Nestle (owned by General Mills) Hershey, Cadbury (which is owned by Kraft), and Lindt (who owns Ghirardelli) are the main ones. Nestle also does most of the ice cream/frozen dessert brands. I was upset to learn that they own Haagen Dazs!

In short, if the house brand tastes just as good or better, it probably is.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 28, 2013, 12:15:48 PM
re: milk -

There is a very definite taste difference between milk in different parts of the country, and a big part of that is the different types of grasses the cows eat.  Different feed means different flavors in the milk.  That's more noticeable in vastly different areas of the country, but it may still be true even locally, if Company A tends to source from dairies on the mountainside (which grows one kind of grass) and Company B tends to source from dairies fifty miles away in the valley (with grows a different type of grass).  Also, milk in clear plastic jugs can change flavor more than in opaque jugs does, because the light can affect the flavor.  Third - temperature really does affect it as well, so if Company A keeps their milk perfectly cool the whole time and Company B has inadequately refrigerated trucks (or has a lazy driver who takes forever to load the milk into the store), the flavor may be different there too.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Tea Drinker on June 28, 2013, 12:26:59 PM
The weird thing is that not just milk, but yogurt and sour cream brands, seem to be regional. Moving across the country has meant finding a new brand of plain whole milk yogurt--the supermarkets here don't have the Dannon, they have brands that were new to me. Weirder than that, they carry the brand of butter we were used to, but only salted; in New York I could get that brand of unsalted butter.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 28, 2013, 01:20:33 PM
Toyota/Lexus, Honda/Acura, Hyundai/Kia, Nissan/Infinity,Volkswagon/Audi are all sister companies who share parts, engines, and frames with each other.  I don't know any of the american brands except for Ford and Mercury.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: stitchygreyanonymouse on June 28, 2013, 01:32:17 PM
Ford, Lincoln, Mercury

Chevy, Buick (and previously also, Saturn, Pontiac, Oldsmobile)

Chrysler and Dodge


But there are a lot of "import"/"domestic" crossovers, too.

The Pontiac Vibe and the Toyota Matrix is the one that comes to mind. There are a few others out there now, too, but I can't think of them at the moment.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 28, 2013, 01:42:16 PM
The Ford ranger and the Mazda B-something or other were the same truck.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: magicdomino on June 28, 2013, 01:52:06 PM
Isn't GMC a sibling of Chevy?  Their trucks look awfully similar.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 28, 2013, 01:53:12 PM
You are correct.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Just Lori on June 28, 2013, 02:10:13 PM
I was in my 30s when my husband pointed out that "thank you" is pronounced with a soft "th" - the same way you'd say "thin," for instance.  I spent the first 30 plus years pronouncing "thanks" the same way you pronounce "then."

This isn't obvious, but a copyright attorney told me that when restaurants say "Is Diet Pepsi OK?" they're actually protecting the soda's trademark.  If a brand name becomes synonymous for a product - think Kleenex or Zipper - the company loses exclusivity.  So if someone can prove that ordering a Coke has become the same as ordering any cola, regardless of the brand, Coke stands to lose its trademark protection.

This explains it better than I can:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generic_trademark

Anyway, I now understand why servers ask the question, and often I will simply ask for a diet cola.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on June 28, 2013, 02:16:32 PM
I always thought they'd just gotten complained at too much by folks who are very brand-loyal.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Onyx_TKD on June 28, 2013, 02:30:42 PM
I was in my 30s when my husband pointed out that "thank you" is pronounced with a soft "th" - the same way you'd say "thin," for instance.  I spent the first 30 plus years pronouncing "thanks" the same way you pronounce "then."

This isn't obvious, but a copyright attorney told me that when restaurants say "Is Diet Pepsi OK?" they're actually protecting the soda's trademark.  If a brand name becomes synonymous for a product - think Kleenex or Zipper - the company loses exclusivity.  So if someone can prove that ordering a Coke has become the same as ordering any cola, regardless of the brand, Coke stands to lose its trademark protection.

This explains it better than I can:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generic_trademark

Anyway, I now understand why servers ask the question, and often I will simply ask for a diet cola.

While protecting the trademark may be reason for clarifying, I suspect the fact that a lot of people have very strong Coke vs Pepsi preferences is another reason for that question. If the customer is a rabid Coke fan and hates Pepsi, better to find that out before leaving with the drink order rather than ticking the customer off by substituting without asking and having to get them a different drink anyway.* I'm not a frequent cola drinker and have never compared them head-to-head, but my understanding is that blind tests have shown that there is in fact a distinct taste difference between Coke and Pepsi and it's not just perception due to brand loyalty.

*I would hope that substituting a different item than ordered without checking with the customer is discouraged anyway. Many customers might wonder why they're being asked about minor substitutions, but getting something subtly different than what was ordered could potentially be a serious problem for others.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on June 28, 2013, 03:36:12 PM
...    getting something subtly different than what was ordered could potentially be a serious problem for others.

The difference between Coke and Pepsi isn't really all that subtle.  I can tell the difference instantly.  If I order a Coke, I want Coke.  Not Pepsi.  Not RC.  Coke.  If the restaurant only has Pepsi (most restaurants seem to only have one or the other -- not both), then I'd rather substitute iced tea or lemonade.  So yeah, I'd be upset if I ordered one thing and was served another.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 28, 2013, 03:47:05 PM
The Geo Metro is a Toyota Corolla I think
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Onyx_TKD on June 28, 2013, 04:04:03 PM
...    getting something subtly different than what was ordered could potentially be a serious problem for others.

The difference between Coke and Pepsi isn't really all that subtle.  I can tell the difference instantly.  If I order a Coke, I want Coke.  Not Pepsi.  Not RC.  Coke.  If the restaurant only has Pepsi (most restaurants seem to only have one or the other -- not both), then I'd rather substitute iced tea or lemonade.  So yeah, I'd be upset if I ordered one thing and was served another.

When I said "subtly different," I wasn't talking about the Coke/Pepsi distinction specifically; I was making a more general comment about food/drink substitutions. In that last paragraph/footnote, I was trying to make the point that, in general, substituting food/drink items without checking with the customer could be problematic or dangerous. Even if the server thought that the difference between the items was trivial or unnoticeable, and even if the difference truly wasn't obvious, the wrong substitution could be a serious issue for someone with food restrictions. For that reason, I would hope it was standard policy to check with the customer before substituting a different item for what was ordered, regardless of whether it was noticeable or involved trademark issues.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Twik on June 28, 2013, 04:07:13 PM
Yes, I would expect a restaurant to ask me if Pepsi is an acceptable substitute for Coca Cola, or Sprite for Seven-Up, just as if I'd ordered a Chardonnay, and they could only offer a Riesling.

I may be willing to accept the substitution, but it should be my choice, not decided for me that "they're near enough".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 28, 2013, 04:37:22 PM
Not really "obvious," but really cool: if you're watching a YouTube video, you can hit "1" to fast-forward to 10% into the video, "2" to 20%, "3" to 30%, etc.  Really useful for zooming around without having to drag the slider!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on June 28, 2013, 06:40:37 PM
...    Even if the server thought that the difference between the items was trivial or unnoticeable, and even if the difference truly wasn't obvious, the wrong substitution could be a serious issue for someone with food restrictions. For that reason, I would hope it was standard policy to check with the customer before substituting a different item for what was ordered, regardless of whether it was noticeable or involved trademark issues.

Ah ... okay.  Got it.  I was spot focusing and you were looking at the panoramic view!   :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: MommyPenguin on June 28, 2013, 07:37:03 PM
Ooh, that's really useful to know, Slartibartfast!  Thanks!

I'm another one who can tell the difference between Coke and Pepsi easily.  I can also recognize Coke Zero.  I'm not sure if I could tell the difference between the other diet versions, though.  To me, Pepsi tastes sweeter than Coke.  Coke is a little less sweet.  And then Coke Zero tastes less sweet than Coke, with a bit of an aspartame taste.  I used to drink Coke, then I decided I ought to switch to diet.  It took me most of a 12-pack to get used to Coke Zero, now I find it hard to give up!  (I try not to drink it while pregnant, just in case.)  In general, I think adding ice makes it much harder to recognize the difference between sodas, though.  My husband is definitely one that appreciates the restaurant telling you if it's Pepsi, because he'll choose not to order it in that case (he'll ONLY drink Coke... I prefer it, but I'll take Pepsi in a pinch).

I think a lot of the stuff here is part of a good basic education, which not everybody has.  I think that's why some of the things that seem "basic" to some people don't seem very basic to everybody else.  Personally?  I think everybody ought to know the names of the major sports in their country and maybe recognize the balls for them, maybe know the *very* basics, like baseball is about hitting a ball with a bat and then running around bases while others try to catch it, tennis is about hitting a fuzzy (green) ball with a racket and trying to get the other person not to hit it while not hitting it out of bounds, etc.  I don't think everybody *does* know this, but I think it's part of a basic education.  Knowing specific teams is more of a "pop culture" knowledge than a basic education.  I'd also count knowing the names and maybe something about some of the major composers and artists, general familiarity with a work or two, knowing science facts like the fact that the sun is a lot bigger than the Earth and that the Earth goes around the sun while the moon goes around the Earth, what acceleration is and how it's different from speed, etc.  For some of these, no, I don't think that all adults know this.  But I think that in an ideal world, they *should*, that these things are part of a good basic education, the kind I expect my daughters to have even if they decide to go for their GED at 16 and work as welders (nothing against welders, just meaning some sort of job where you don't usually go to college, which at least claims to promote a core basis of knowledge along with your degree information).

I *do* find it a little amazing that people *could* go to college, which almost always has courses required in order to claim that they give you an overall knowledge of the world, and still not know that Hawaii is a state or what country the United States fought against for independence.  That's if you're in the U.S., obviously your basic knowledge would be different in another country.  Of course, I also found the writing abilities (or lack thereof) of some of my fellow librarians underwhelming, considering that they'd been to graduate school...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on June 28, 2013, 09:31:16 PM
I was in my 30s when my husband pointed out that "thank you" is pronounced with a soft "th" - the same way you'd say "thin," for instance.  I spent the first 30 plus years pronouncing "thanks" the same way you pronounce "then."

This isn't obvious, but a copyright attorney told me that when restaurants say "Is Diet Pepsi OK?" they're actually protecting the soda's trademark.  If a brand name becomes synonymous for a product - think Kleenex or Zipper - the company loses exclusivity.  So if someone can prove that ordering a Coke has become the same as ordering any cola, regardless of the brand, Coke stands to lose its trademark protection.

This explains it better than I can:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generic_trademark

Anyway, I now understand why servers ask the question, and often I will simply ask for a diet cola.

While there may be truth in the legal position, I seincerely doubt that that's why servers ask.  Its more than plenty of people like some brands and not others. Or even some options within same brand. Here were have Diet Coke AND Coke Zero - both bering artificially sweetened versions of coke.  My DH only like Diet Coke, not Coke Zero.  If a server said "Is COke Zero ok?" he'd probbaly ask about other options.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: BB-VA on June 28, 2013, 09:34:05 PM
re: milk -

There is a very definite taste difference between milk in different parts of the country, and a big part of that is the different types of grasses the cows eat.  Different feed means different flavors in the milk.  That's more noticeable in vastly different areas of the country, but it may still be true even locally, if Company A tends to source from dairies on the mountainside (which grows one kind of grass) and Company B tends to source from dairies fifty miles away in the valley (with grows a different type of grass).  Also, milk in clear plastic jugs can change flavor more than in opaque jugs does, because the light can affect the flavor.  Third - temperature really does affect it as well, so if Company A keeps their milk perfectly cool the whole time and Company B has inadequately refrigerated trucks (or has a lazy driver who takes forever to load the milk into the store), the flavor may be different there too.

You definitely do NOT want to drink milk from a cow who has gotten into the wild onions. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: BB-VA on June 28, 2013, 09:37:07 PM
The Geo Metro is a Toyota Corolla I think

I thought it was a Suzuki.  Chevrolet definitely rebranded a Suzuki Sidekick as a Geo Tracker.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 28, 2013, 09:46:11 PM
The Geo Metro is a Toyota Corolla I think

I thought it was a Suzuki.  Chevrolet definitely rebranded a Suzuki Sidekick as a Geo Tracker.

I had the model wrong.  It was the Geo prism, not the metro.  Yes, the metro is a suzuki
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: mbbored on June 28, 2013, 09:52:56 PM
The Geo Metro is a Toyota Corolla I think

I thought it was a Suzuki.  Chevrolet definitely rebranded a Suzuki Sidekick as a Geo Tracker.

I had the model wrong.  It was the Geo prism, not the metro.  Yes, the metro is a suzuki

It is the Prism. I drive one and every time I take it to any kind of mechanic they give me a brief lecture on the fact that my car is a Toyota with a Chevy logo.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RingTailedLemur on June 29, 2013, 02:25:13 AM
I used to work in a pub.  If a customer asked for a specific brand of drink we didn't have, we had to ask them if it was okay to accept a substitute.  Even if they are pretty much the same, giving the substitute drink without saying anything is illegal and can get the pub in a huge amount of trouble.

I had a lot of conversations like this:

Cust: "Brand X please"

Me: "I'm sorry, we don't have that one, but we do have brand Y - is that okay?"

Cust: "Well they're the same thing, aren't they?  DURRRR!"

Me: "Sorry, we have to ask."

 ::)

http://www.oxfordshire.gov.uk/cms/sites/default/files/folders/documents/business/tradingstandards/licensedpremise.pdf
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Belle on June 29, 2013, 11:08:29 AM
The Ford ranger and the Mazda B-something or other were the same truck.

Mazda B2300. I had that truck, and a year later a friend bought a Ford Ranger. It was a little surreal getting into his truck for the first time, because I knew it was a completely different model than mine, but the interior was identical.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on June 29, 2013, 09:41:33 PM
The Chevrolet Trailblazer is also sold as the Isuzu Ascender.

GMC - Chevrolet - Cadillac (used to have Buick, Saturn, Hummer, and others)
Ford - Mercury - Lincoln (also owns Jaguar)
Toyota - Scion


The term for having multiple line models of the same car is rebranding, however we just call the models "rebadged".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on June 29, 2013, 09:51:05 PM
My real contribution: "Based on a true story" does NOT mean "documentary"! Tom Hanks did not go to space. Russell Crowe is not a brilliant mathematician. Et cetera. You'd be surprised!
*coughcoughBraveheartcoughcough*
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 29, 2013, 10:04:03 PM
My real contribution: "Based on a true story" does NOT mean "documentary"! Tom Hanks did not go to space. Russell Crowe is not a brilliant mathematician. Et cetera. You'd be surprised!
*coughcoughBraveheartcoughcough*

I'm sorry could you say that LOUDER please :)  I'll front the money for a billboard if you would like
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Kaymyth on June 30, 2013, 01:15:55 AM
The Geo Metro is a Toyota Corolla I think

I thought it was a Suzuki.  Chevrolet definitely rebranded a Suzuki Sidekick as a Geo Tracker.

I had the model wrong.  It was the Geo prism, not the metro.  Yes, the metro is a suzuki

It is the Prism. I drive one and every time I take it to any kind of mechanic they give me a brief lecture on the fact that my car is a Toyota with a Chevy logo.

Yep, the Metro was the little hatchback.  My first car was a Geo (before Geo went away and Chevrolet absorbed the model) Prizm, and I always knew it came off the same assembly line as the Corolla.  It wasn't so much that it "is" a Toyota, it's that GM and Toyota developed the car as a joint venture.

The Prizm shifted to being Chevrolet in 1998, and stopped production completely after 2002, but the Corolla is still being made.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: twiggy on June 30, 2013, 01:54:42 AM
I have a funny story about a mishap involving the same vehicle being sold under different brands. I drive a silver Dodge Caravan (minivan), and last week MIL and I were out running errands with the kids. We were leaving Target, and I walked up to my silver van, not noticing that there was an unusual window decal. Turns out I actually walked up to a silver Chrysler Town and Country. I had opened up the driver's door, tossed my purse on the seat, and opened the sliding door before I noticed that Baby's carseat wasn't there. I was so embarrassed, and I beat a hasty retreat. Though I did feel better knowing that I'm not the only one who occasionally forgets to lock the doors.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 30, 2013, 04:12:54 AM
I think a lot of the stuff here is part of a good basic education, which not everybody has.  I think that's why some of the things that seem "basic" to some people don't seem very basic to everybody else.  Personally?  I think everybody ought to know the names of the major sports in their country and maybe recognize the balls for them, maybe know the *very* basics, like baseball is about hitting a ball with a bat and then running around bases while others try to catch it, tennis is about hitting a fuzzy (green) ball with a racket and trying to get the other person not to hit it while not hitting it out of bounds, etc.  I don't think everybody *does* know this, but I think it's part of a basic education.  Knowing specific teams is more of a "pop culture" knowledge than a basic education.  I'd also count knowing the names and maybe something about some of the major composers and artists, general familiarity with a work or two, knowing science facts like the fact that the sun is a lot bigger than the Earth and that the Earth goes around the Sun while the moon goes around the Earth , what acceleration is and how it's different from speed, etc.  For some of these, no, I don't think that all adults know this.  But I think that in an ideal world, they *should*, that these things are part of a good basic education...

I *do* find it a little amazing that people *could* go to college, which almost always has courses required in order to claim that they give you an overall knowledge of the world, and still not know that Hawaii is a state or what country the United States fought against for independence.  That's if you're in the U.S., obviously your basic knowledge would be different in another country.

"I hear you" on what is stuff that, ideally, more or less everyone ought to know; and largely, agree with you. A bit of me, though, tends to find it rather endearing when people -- mostly intelligent and educated -- have re certain matters, glaring gaps in their knowledge; or, finding instances of this, lets me feel less bad about the areas of life on which I'm woefully ignorant.

"Planets, heavenly bodies and so on": I've always liked the mention in the Sherlock Holmes books, of how the great detective could never remember whether the Earth went round the Sun or vice versa, and didn't much care anyway -- it was stuff which he didn't need to know about for his detecting, so he preferred not to clutter his mind up with it. Of course Sherlock was an officially-paid-up Mad Genius, and thus exempted from some of the things which are expected of ordinary people...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: poundcake on June 30, 2013, 02:24:32 PM
Um. Thanks to The Bloggess, I just now learned that the song by the Moody Blues is not actually "Knights in White Satin."  :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on June 30, 2013, 02:44:43 PM
The weird thing is that not just milk, but yogurt and sour cream brands, seem to be regional. Moving across the country has meant finding a new brand of plain whole milk yogurt--the supermarkets here don't have the Dannon, they have brands that were new to me. Weirder than that, they carry the brand of butter we were used to, but only salted; in New York I could get that brand of unsalted butter.

This isn't that weird when you consider that dairy products are pretty perishable. And so they are really a local industry. You don't ship milk from Colorado to NYC, generally.
So brand names developed locally. Even if a larger company purchased the dairy, there's a name-recognition factor that makes it worthwhile to keep the name.

(Though Dannon is unusual to me, bcs yogurt is less perishable.)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on June 30, 2013, 02:47:17 PM

. . . A bit of me, though, tends to find it rather endearing when people -- mostly intelligent and educated -- have re certain matters, glaring gaps in their knowledge; or, finding instances of this, lets me feel less bad about the areas of life on which I'm woefully ignorant.


Aww!

But I agree with you, a bit. I find it amusing--or bemusing--sometimes, but I really don't suddenly decide someone's an idiot because they don't know this.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RingTailedLemur on June 30, 2013, 03:20:19 PM
Ignorance sometimes surprises me, but it's wilful ignorance that I find most disappointing and off-putting.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Syfygeek on June 30, 2013, 04:01:41 PM
Um. Thanks to The Bloggess, I just now learned that the song by the Moody Blues is not actually "Knights in White Satin."  :-[

51 years old and my mind is blown.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: WillyNilly on June 30, 2013, 04:19:43 PM
I think a lot of the stuff here is part of a good basic education, which not everybody has.  I think that's why some of the things that seem "basic" to some people don't seem very basic to everybody else.  Personally?  I think everybody ought to know the names of the major sports in their country and maybe recognize the balls for them, maybe know the *very* basics, like baseball is about hitting a ball with a bat and then running around bases while others try to catch it, tennis is about hitting a fuzzy (green) ball with a racket and trying to get the other person not to hit it while not hitting it out of bounds, etc.  I don't think everybody *does* know this, but I think it's part of a basic education.  Knowing specific teams is more of a "pop culture" knowledge than a basic education.  I'd also count knowing the names and maybe something about some of the major composers and artists, general familiarity with a work or two, knowing science facts like the fact that the sun is a lot bigger than the Earth and that the Earth goes around the Sun while the moon goes around the Earth , what acceleration is and how it's different from speed, etc.  For some of these, no, I don't think that all adults know this.  But I think that in an ideal world, they *should*, that these things are part of a good basic education...

I *do* find it a little amazing that people *could* go to college, which almost always has courses required in order to claim that they give you an overall knowledge of the world, and still not know that Hawaii is a state or what country the United States fought against for independence.  That's if you're in the U.S., obviously your basic knowledge would be different in another country.

"I hear you" on what is stuff that, ideally, more or less everyone ought to know; and largely, agree with you. A bit of me, though, tends to find it rather endearing when people -- mostly intelligent and educated -- have re certain matters, glaring gaps in their knowledge; or, finding instances of this, lets me feel less bad about the areas of life on which I'm woefully ignorant.

"Planets, heavenly bodies and so on": I've always liked the mention in the Sherlock Holmes books, of how the great detective could never remember whether the Earth went round the Sun or vice versa, and didn't much care anyway -- it was stuff which he didn't need to know about for his detecting, so he preferred not to clutter his mind up with it. Of course Sherlock was an officially-paid-up Mad Genius, and thus exempted from some of the things which are expected of ordinary people...

There is lots of stuff I just don't bother to know. Should I know some of our political leaders names? I mean i have google at home, on my ell phone and at the library - why should I bother to remember a new name every 2-4 years? I mean yeah I know the president's name, and my mayor's name, but beyond that its just not knowledge I use in day-to-day life, and I know how to instantly access the information should I need it. I'd rather use the brain space to know the local bus routes or when the local news station reports the weather, because that is information I use regularly.

Its like streets in my neighborhood - I have lived in my neighborhood for 12 years. I can't tell you what streets are 2 blocks away. because to me the names of the streets are relevant. Its the hill, or the good place to park, or the way to the library, or the way to the highway. I just know the routes (even how many traffic lights there are along the routes) and whats along them, but I don't need to know the names of the streets. I know up the side street to the park, turn right to the big corner turn right again and back home is a 1 mile jogging loop, and up the side street past and around the park and then back home is 1.5 miles but heck no I don't know what street I'm turning or the names of the multiple streets I cross along the way.

And to me, not necessarily knowing stuff makes me more intelligent - because its efficient brain energy. To me smart people aren't people who know all the answers - anyone can memorize stuff - smart people are people who know how to get answers. I make sure I'm up to date on how to get information - the other day my dad had trouble logging into NPR and was curious what the big political breaking news was. I chuckled and suggested he check Facebook. Knowing where and how to get information - and secondary sources, is way more important to me, then remembering every last thing that is supposedly important for educated people to know.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on June 30, 2013, 04:49:10 PM
Amen, WillyNilly.

I once worked with a man who was maddening.  He had a great mind for trivia and, if you didn't have immediate recall of everything he knew,  you were stupid. If you knew things  he didn't, that information wasn't important. 

His idea of knowledge was limited to facts.  He was incapable of making connections between one bit of information and another.   

It never dawned on him that intelligence lies not in knowing everything off the top of your head  but in knowing where to find reliable sources of information about things you need to know.  That's one of the first things you learn in Library School and it's one of the most important.   

Yes, everyone should know certain basic things about nutrition, history, science and geography.  Beyond the basics, everything you need to know you can find if you want to make the effort to learn.


Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on July 01, 2013, 12:05:54 AM
Amen, WillyNilly.

I once worked with a man who was maddening.  He had a great mind for trivia and, if you didn't have immediate recall of everything he knew,  you were stupid. If you knew things  he didn't, that information wasn't important. 

His idea of knowledge was limited to facts.  He was incapable of making connections between one bit of information and another.   

It never dawned on him that intelligence lies not in knowing everything off the top of your head  but in knowing where to find reliable sources of information about things you need to know.  That's one of the first things you learn in Library School and it's one of the most important.   

I gather that in this respect, King James I of England and VI of Scotland was a lot like your colleague. This led some of his less-admiring subjects to call him "the wisest fool in Christendom".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: MinAvi on July 01, 2013, 12:33:27 AM
Just Lori said:
 
I was in my 30s when my husband pointed out that "thank you" is pronounced with a soft "th" - the same way you'd say "thin," for instance.  I spent the first 30 plus years pronouncing "thanks" the same way you pronounce "then."


*Snip*


I am Australian, so maybe it is just my accent - but thanks, thin and then all have the same 'th' sound to me. Or am I going nuts?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on July 01, 2013, 12:39:08 AM
I was in my 30s when my husband pointed out that "thank you" is pronounced with a soft "th" - the same way you'd say "thin," for instance.  I spent the first 30 plus years pronouncing "thanks" the same way you pronounce "then."

*Snip*

I am Australian, so maybe it is just my accent - but thanks, thin and then all have the same 'th' sound to me. Or am I going nuts?

I'm american and I pronounce both with a soft 'th' sound.  Thanks has never been t-anks where I'm from
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: MariaE on July 01, 2013, 01:03:50 AM
And to me, not necessarily knowing stuff makes me more intelligent - because its efficient brain energy. To me smart people aren't people who know all the answers - anyone can memorize stuff - smart people are people who know how to get answers. I make sure I'm up to date on how to get information - the other day my dad had trouble logging into NPR and was curious what the big political breaking news was. I chuckled and suggested he check Facebook. Knowing where and how to get information - and secondary sources, is way more important to me, then remembering every last thing that is supposedly important for educated people to know.

I had a professor like that at uni. He was annoying in many other ways, but one thing he did that I really respected him for was to say stuff like, "Information on this can be found in chapter X of this book. I'm not going to go into that now, because you'll forget it anyway, but the important thing is not to know something, but to know where to look it up!" :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Camarynne on July 01, 2013, 01:32:18 AM
I was in my 30s when my husband pointed out that "thank you" is pronounced with a soft "th" - the same way you'd say "thin," for instance.  I spent the first 30 plus years pronouncing "thanks" the same way you pronounce "then."

*Snip*

I am Australian, so maybe it is just my accent - but thanks, thin and then all have the same 'th' sound to me. Or am I going nuts?

I'm american and I pronounce both with a soft 'th' sound.  Thanks has never been t-anks where I'm from

I sat here for a few minutes last night going "Thin...thanks.  Then...thanks" and there is a difference. Very subtle. Thin and thanks are a softer "th"...not quite the same as "then, the, there".  The tongue moves a little differently. That drove me nuts last night saying it over and over until it made sense.  :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on July 01, 2013, 01:58:26 AM
Just Lori said:
 
I was in my 30s when my husband pointed out that "thank you" is pronounced with a soft "th" - the same way you'd say "thin," for instance.  I spent the first 30 plus years pronouncing "thanks" the same way you pronounce "then."


*Snip*


I am Australian, so maybe it is just my accent - but thanks, thin and then all have the same 'th' sound to me. Or am I going nuts?
Then is a 'voiced th'; thin and thanks are 'voiceless'.  There's just a bit of vibration of your tongue on your front teeth with 'then'.   Or at least there is in US English, and I've never noticed that Canadian, UK, or Aussie English was any different.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on July 01, 2013, 02:03:08 AM
I was in my 30s when my husband pointed out that "thank you" is pronounced with a soft "th" - the same way you'd say "thin," for instance.  I spent the first 30 plus years pronouncing "thanks" the same way you pronounce "then."

*Snip*

I am Australian, so maybe it is just my accent - but thanks, thin and then all have the same 'th' sound to me. Or am I going nuts?

I'm american and I pronounce both with a soft 'th' sound.  Thanks has never been t-anks where I'm from

American here, and "thanks" is only "tanks" for me if it involves and MMORPG pun ("tanks" being a type of character one can play in an MMORPG whose main goal is to keep the enemy attacking them, rather than anyone else).

Just Lori said:
 
I was in my 30s when my husband pointed out that "thank you" is pronounced with a soft "th" - the same way you'd say "thin," for instance.  I spent the first 30 plus years pronouncing "thanks" the same way you pronounce "then."


*Snip*


I am Australian, so maybe it is just my accent - but thanks, thin and then all have the same 'th' sound to me. Or am I going nuts?
Then is a 'voiced th'; thin and thanks are 'voiceless'.  There's just a bit of vibration of your tongue on your front teeth with 'then'.   Or at least there is in US English, and I've never noticed that Canadian, UK, or Aussie English was any different.

I think I see what you mean. Maybe. Going to go make the dog think I'm crazy now...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: mrs_deb on July 01, 2013, 12:24:19 PM
If I put my hand in front of my mouth and say "thin" and "thanks", I feel a puff of air.  If I say "then", I don't. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on July 01, 2013, 12:32:03 PM
If I put my hand in front of my mouth and say "thin" and "thanks", I feel a puff of air.  If I say "then", I don't.

Also, the hard "th" sound (then, these, that) comes with a little boost from the throat.  You can feel the vibrations with your fingers on your neck.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Shoo on July 01, 2013, 01:05:15 PM
The Geo Metro is a Toyota Corolla I think

I thought it was a Suzuki.  Chevrolet definitely rebranded a Suzuki Sidekick as a Geo Tracker.

Definitely not a Toyota.  Looks (and probably is) much more like a Suzuki. 

The Chevy Tahoe and the GMC Yukon are the same vehicle.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on July 01, 2013, 01:17:20 PM
The Geo Metro is a Toyota Corolla I think

I thought it was a Suzuki.  Chevrolet definitely rebranded a Suzuki Sidekick as a Geo Tracker.

Definitely not a Toyota.  Looks (and probably is) much more like a Suzuki. 

The Chevy Tahoe and the GMC Yukon are the same vehicle.

Geo Tracker turned into a Chevy Tracker afterwards. It was hard to get parts for the Geo years. Especially a soft top. Like when someone took a knife to it and it needed to be replaced. (No, I wouldn't know from experience, what would ever give someone that idea?)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Just Lori on July 01, 2013, 01:49:25 PM
I still pronounce Mary, marry and merry the same way.  I've heard Mary pronounced Mah-ry ("It's a Wonderful Life" comes to mind), but I pronounce them the same way.  I have no idea how merry and marry can possibly sound different.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on July 01, 2013, 02:51:45 PM
I still pronounce Mary, marry and merry the same way.  I've heard Mary pronounced Mah-ry ("It's a Wonderful Life" comes to mind), but I pronounce them the same way.  I have no idea how merry and marry can possibly sound different.

I pronounce them the same, but I can see how they'd be pronounced differently.

Merry - opening sound like medicine
Marry - opening sound like mad

I still have a hard time thinking Mary and marry could be different.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: WillyNilly on July 01, 2013, 02:59:36 PM
I still pronounce Mary, marry and merry the same way.  I've heard Mary pronounced Mah-ry ("It's a Wonderful Life" comes to mind), but I pronounce them the same way.  I have no idea how merry and marry can possibly sound different.

I pronounce them the same, but I can see how they'd be pronounced differently.

Merry - opening sound like medicine
Marry - opening sound like mad

I still have a hard time thinking Mary and marry could be different.

Mary like canary  it has an "air" sound in the middle, and marry like marigold, it has a "ma" sound.

The three words to me are just so very distinctly different!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: camlan on July 01, 2013, 03:03:34 PM
I still pronounce Mary, marry and merry the same way.  I've heard Mary pronounced Mah-ry ("It's a Wonderful Life" comes to mind), but I pronounce them the same way.  I have no idea how merry and marry can possibly sound different.

I pronounce them the same, but I can see how they'd be pronounced differently.

Merry - opening sound like medicine
Marry - opening sound like mad

I still have a hard time thinking Mary and marry could be different.

It's a very subtle difference with the vowel. Think of the vowel sound in "fair" for the sound in Mary and the vowel sound in "cat" for the sound in marry. Merry is the same vowel sound as in "pet."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on July 01, 2013, 03:05:34 PM
MariaE wrote:

"He was annoying in many other ways, but one thing he did that I really respected him for was to say stuff like, "Information on this can be found in chapter X of this book. I'm not going to go into that now, because you'll forget it anyway, but the important thing is not to know something, but to know where to look it up!""

The problem with this is that there's a limit to this idea, and to my thinking this thread (and the definition of "common sense") is a discussion about where that limit is.  After all, in the extreme you could use your Professor's argument to avoid memorizing your name, since you'd be able to look it up any time you needed it.  There's a certain amount of information that should be in your head to make interacting with the world more efficient, and as I said this discussion is just feeling out what we believe that amount should be.

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: poundcake on July 01, 2013, 04:44:53 PM
Um. Thanks to The Bloggess, I just now learned that the song by the Moody Blues is not actually "Knights in White Satin."  :-[

51 years old and my mind is blown.

I am SO glad I'm not the only one!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RegionMom on July 01, 2013, 05:15:01 PM
Along the lyric lines, why do they hardly ever play the second part of that song on the radio? 
it gives me chills and inspires at the same time:

Breath deep
The gathering gloom
Watch lights fade
From every room
Bedsitter people
Look back and lament
Another day's useless
Energy spent

Impassioned lovers
Wrestle as one
Lonely man cries for love
And has none
New mother picks up
And suckles her son
Senior citizens
Wish they were young

Cold hearted orb
That rules the night
Removes the colours
From our sight
Red is gray and
Yellow white
But we decide
Which is right
And
Which is an Illusion
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on July 01, 2013, 07:22:54 PM
Just Lori said:
 
I was in my 30s when my husband pointed out that "thank you" is pronounced with a soft "th" - the same way you'd say "thin," for instance.  I spent the first 30 plus years pronouncing "thanks" the same way you pronounce "then."


*Snip*


I am Australian, so maybe it is just my accent - but thanks, thin and then all have the same 'th' sound to me. Or am I going nuts?
Then is a 'voiced th'; thin and thanks are 'voiceless'.  There's just a bit of vibration of your tongue on your front teeth with 'then'.   Or at least there is in US English, and I've never noticed that Canadian, UK, or Aussie English was any different.

Aussie here, and I get it.  They are different - I think that some people are struggling with the voiceless concept.

Try hissing.  Its the air making the sound, not your voicebox.  The "Th" in think and thanks is the same.  But the "th" in there you're physically saying.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dr. F. on July 01, 2013, 09:12:26 PM
Amen, WillyNilly.

I once worked with a man who was maddening.  He had a great mind for trivia and, if you didn't have immediate recall of everything he knew,  you were stupid. If you knew things  he didn't, that information wasn't important. 

His idea of knowledge was limited to facts.  He was incapable of making connections between one bit of information and another.   


People like this are maddening. Another former horrible boss of mine (not the one I typically talk about, but another one*) was exactly the same way. He could hold two completely opposite facts in his hands and look from one to the other and not understand why others might have an issue with them. The fact that I managed to predict several disasterous issues BEFORE they happened was considered "a lucky guess." The notion that I could perceive previous trends and predict the obvious outcome was completely baffling to him. I wasn't more insightful than average - he had no insight whatsoever.

* I have had good bosses, really! They make for less scurrilous anecdotes than the horrible ones.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Whimsyone on July 01, 2013, 09:30:29 PM
RegionMom.....I love "Tuesday Afternoon!"
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on July 01, 2013, 09:47:51 PM
Not really something I just learned, but something I did learn in adulthood, about 6 or so years ago.  I had always thought the Irish didn't have their own language, they just spoke English with a beautiful accent.  But then I met bff and she informed me that yes, the Irish do have Irish Gaelic, which isn't widely used even though all the road signs there are written in both English and Irish Gaelic.  Though there are still some parts in the west where it is still spoken on a daily basis and school children are taught it.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Vall on July 02, 2013, 09:04:23 AM
Um. Thanks to The Bloggess, I just now learned that the song by the Moody Blues is not actually "Knights in White Satin."  :-[

51 years old and my mind is blown.
This 47 year old is embarrassed to admit that I just learned it too.  I saw them in concert and they were great.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on July 02, 2013, 09:15:33 AM
Um. Thanks to The Bloggess, I just now learned that the song by the Moody Blues is not actually "Knights in White Satin."  :-[

51 years old and my mind is blown.
This 47 year old is embarrassed to admit that I just learned it too.  I saw them in concert and they were great.

Well, I've never heard of the Moody Blues or any of their songs, and I'm not embarrassed. (I just searched for them - nope, never noticed them.)

The music place in my brain is full of John Denver, Glenn Miller, and  Holst.

Another disagreement on what should be obvious!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on July 02, 2013, 09:27:18 AM
I have a story about Holst.

When I was about 16 or so, my Mom, Aunt X and I did some Saturday shopping.  Aunt X was already back in the car when I returned with my purchase--- a recording of 'The Planets'. 

When my Mom arrived, Aunt X laced into her.  Why was I allowed to spend my money on this Rock & Roll junk?  I should be listening to good music like Perry Como. 

Was someone missing something here?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dr. F. on July 02, 2013, 09:45:30 AM
I have a story about Holst.

When I was about 16 or so, my Mom, Aunt X and I did some Saturday shopping.  Aunt X was already back in the car when I returned with my purchase--- a recording of 'The Planets'. 

When my Mom arrived, Aunt X laced into her.  Why was I allowed to spend my money on this Rock & Roll junk?  I should be listening to good music like Perry Como. 

Was someone missing something here?

You should've popped that puppy in the tape player in the car right then and there (or played it as soon as you got home). I suspect Aunt X would be surprised.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Shoo on July 02, 2013, 09:57:23 AM
Um. Thanks to The Bloggess, I just now learned that the song by the Moody Blues is not actually "Knights in White Satin."  :-[

51 years old and my mind is blown.

I am SO glad I'm not the only one!

It isn't? 

Oh, wait. I get it.  It's Nights, not Knights. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on July 02, 2013, 10:40:25 AM
Not really something I just learned, but something I did learn in adulthood, about 6 or so years ago.  I had always thought the Irish didn't have their own language, they just spoke English with a beautiful accent.  But then I met bff and she informed me that yes, the Irish do have Irish Gaelic, which isn't widely used even though all the road signs there are written in both English and Irish Gaelic.  Though there are still some parts in the west where it is still spoken on a daily basis and school children are taught it.

In the Irish Republic, there has long been controversy over the Irish language, since that country gained independence in 1921. From then on, successive Irish governments have -- from perfectly fine motives of patriotism and national pride -- tried hard to foster the use of Irish as a twin language to English, for the country's citizens. This has included, as you mention, public signage of all sorts being in both languages; and its having long been a compulsory subject in school, including in non-Irish-speaking areas of the country. 

Many folk reckon that these earnest measures largely backfired: most Irish citizens from English-only-speaking-families, have tended to find the Irish tongue a nuisance, and a misery to have to learn (apparently it's a difficult language unless learnt from infancy).  Despite all official attempts to foster the language: for the past nearly-a-century, its use has steadily declined, with the numbers of those in the far west for whom it is a birth-speech, ever lessening.  Humans are contrary creatures, and tend to dislike what they feel to be stuff imposed on them without their consent -- many consider that the Irish language would probably have fared better, with more non-native-speakers taking an interest in learning it, if it had been officially "pushed" less strenuously.

The above, is what I gather, anyway: Irish participants on the board, please correct me if appropriate.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Nibsey on July 02, 2013, 12:18:54 PM
Not really something I just learned, but something I did learn in adulthood, about 6 or so years ago.  I had always thought the Irish didn't have their own language, they just spoke English with a beautiful accent.  But then I met bff and she informed me that yes, the Irish do have Irish Gaelic, which isn't widely used even though all the road signs there are written in both English and Irish Gaelic.  Though there are still some parts in the west where it is still spoken on a daily basis and school children are taught it.

In the Irish Republic, there has long been controversy over the Irish language, since that country gained independence in 1921. From then on, successive Irish governments have -- from perfectly fine motives of patriotism and national pride -- tried hard to foster the use of Irish as a twin language to English, for the country's citizens. This has included, as you mention, public signage of all sorts being in both languages; and its having long been a compulsory subject in school, including in non-Irish-speaking areas of the country. 

Many folk reckon that these earnest measures largely backfired: most Irish citizens from English-only-speaking-families, have tended to find the Irish tongue a nuisance, and a misery to have to learn (apparently it's a difficult language unless learnt from infancy).  Despite all official attempts to foster the language: for the past nearly-a-century, its use has steadily declined, with the numbers of those in the far west for whom it is a birth-speech, ever lessening.  Humans are contrary creatures, and tend to dislike what they feel to be stuff imposed on them without their consent -- many consider that the Irish language would probably have fared better, with more non-native-speakers taking an interest in learning it, if it had been officially "pushed" less strenuously.

The above, is what I gather, anyway: Irish participants on the board, please correct me if appropriate.

Pretty much. You have to learn it to get into university and you have to be able to speak it if you want to be a teacher...even if you're not teaching it. Alot of the criticism stems from it being compulsory which can hinder people who aren't fluent from getting popular courses in university. Our university system is based on a points system, you get more points for a A than a B and more points again for doing honours level over ordinary level. So for example, even though I did honour level for all my subjects except Irish, even if I had gotten all A+'s I would not have had enough points to get accepted into medicine without doing the honours level Irish. Luckily I didn't want to be a doctor.  :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Really? on July 02, 2013, 01:13:18 PM
6 of one and 1/2 dozen of the other both equal 6. I was floored when it hit me what it meant.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: baglady on July 02, 2013, 02:14:46 PM
The Geo Metro was the Chevrolet Sprint when it first came out in the U.S. in the 1980s. (I owned one.) It was a Suzuki. Chevy also brought out the Spectrum (an Isuzu) and the Nova (a Toyota Corolla). A few years later these were all rechristened Geos -- Sprint became the Metro and Nova became the Prizm. The Spectrum didn't change model name, just became the Geo Spectrum.

The Sprint/Metro was also sold in the U.S. as the Suzuki Swift, although it wasn't. Great gas mileage, though!

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: poundcake on July 02, 2013, 02:23:03 PM
I have a story about Holst.

When I was about 16 or so, my Mom, Aunt X and I did some Saturday shopping.  Aunt X was already back in the car when I returned with my purchase--- a recording of 'The Planets'. 

When my Mom arrived, Aunt X laced into her.  Why was I allowed to spend my money on this Rock & Roll junk?  I should be listening to good music like Perry Como. 

Was someone missing something here?

You should've popped that puppy in the tape player in the car right then and there (or played it as soon as you got home). I suspect Aunt X would be surprised.

Admittedly, The Planets would be a groovy name for a '60s band.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on July 02, 2013, 05:05:00 PM
I have a story about Holst.

When I was about 16 or so, my Mom, Aunt X and I did some Saturday shopping.  Aunt X was already back in the car when I returned with my purchase--- a recording of 'The Planets'. 

When my Mom arrived, Aunt X laced into her.  Why was I allowed to spend my money on this Rock & Roll junk?  I should be listening to good music like Perry Como. 

Was someone missing something here?

You should've popped that puppy in the tape player in the car right then and there (or played it as soon as you got home). I suspect Aunt X would be surprised.

Alas, Dr. F.  The year was 1963 and everything came on vinyl.  Regardless, Aunt X wouldn't have been pleased.  'The Planets' isn't exactly the sort of music you'd play while having tea. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: nuit93 on July 02, 2013, 05:48:15 PM
I have a story about Holst.

When I was about 16 or so, my Mom, Aunt X and I did some Saturday shopping.  Aunt X was already back in the car when I returned with my purchase--- a recording of 'The Planets'. 

When my Mom arrived, Aunt X laced into her.  Why was I allowed to spend my money on this Rock & Roll junk?  I should be listening to good music like Perry Como. 

Was someone missing something here?

You should've popped that puppy in the tape player in the car right then and there (or played it as soon as you got home). I suspect Aunt X would be surprised.

Alas, Dr. F.  The year was 1963 and everything came on vinyl.  Regardless, Aunt X wouldn't have been pleased.  'The Planets' isn't exactly the sort of music you'd play while having tea.

No, but it's a pretty rocking symphony!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Julian on July 02, 2013, 06:53:36 PM
The Sprint/Metro was also sold in the U.S. as the Suzuki Swift, although it wasn't. Great gas mileage, though!

I always refer to Swifts as 'the oxymoron car'.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: BB-VA on July 02, 2013, 08:51:38 PM
Um. Thanks to The Bloggess, I just now learned that the song by the Moody Blues is not actually "Knights in White Satin."  :-[

51 years old and my mind is blown.
This 47 year old is embarrassed to admit that I just learned it too.  I saw them in concert and they were great.

I remember when the album came out (and the cover does say NIGHTS).  There was a fair amount of pearl-clutching by mainstrean critics - Rock?  With an ORCHESTRA????   

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: BB-VA on July 02, 2013, 08:55:16 PM
Um. Thanks to The Bloggess, I just now learned that the song by the Moody Blues is not actually "Knights in White Satin."  :-[

51 years old and my mind is blown.
This 47 year old is embarrassed to admit that I just learned it too.  I saw them in concert and they were great.

Well, I've never heard of the Moody Blues or any of their songs, and I'm not embarrassed. (I just searched for them - nope, never noticed them.)

The music place in my brain is full of John Denver, Glenn Miller, and  Holst.

Another disagreement on what should be obvious!

You might like Every Good Boy Deserves Favour.   I was blown away when I first heard Procession

I might be prejudiced, but it's my favorite Moodies album.   And I love Denver, Miller and Holst. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dr. F. on July 02, 2013, 09:19:49 PM
Um. Thanks to The Bloggess, I just now learned that the song by the Moody Blues is not actually "Knights in White Satin."  :-[

51 years old and my mind is blown.
This 47 year old is embarrassed to admit that I just learned it too.  I saw them in concert and they were great.

Well, I've never heard of the Moody Blues or any of their songs, and I'm not embarrassed. (I just searched for them - nope, never noticed them.)

The music place in my brain is full of John Denver, Glenn Miller, and  Holst.

Another disagreement on what should be obvious!

You might like Every Good Boy Deserves Favour.   I was blown away when I first heard Procession

I might be prejudiced, but it's my favorite Moodies album.   And I love Denver, Miller and Holst.

Agreed. I like John Denver, Glen Miller, Holst, Moody Blues, Led Zeppelin, O.K. Go, Frank Black, Diamanda Galas, Steely Dan, Bartok, Handel, Mozart (non-opera), Michael Jackson etc. etc.

I am rather difficult to categorize, but am always willing to try anything!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: zyrs on July 02, 2013, 11:55:13 PM
Along the lyric lines, why do they hardly ever play the second part of that song on the radio? 
it gives me chills and inspires at the same time:

Breath deep
The gathering gloom
Watch lights fade
From every room
Bedsitter people
Look back and lament
Another day's useless
Energy spent

Impassioned lovers
Wrestle as one
Lonely man cries for love
And has none
New mother picks up
And suckles her son
Senior citizens
Wish they were young

Cold hearted orb
That rules the night
Removes the colours
From our sight
Red is gray and
Yellow white
But we decide
Which is right
And
Which is an Illusion


I think it's because cutting Nights in White Satin off before Late Lament makes sense from a time standpoint if you are needing a break for where a new song starts.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: AuntieA on July 03, 2013, 01:31:58 AM
Slightly OT, but in the same mind as the Moody Blues.

Kidsis was in the audience when Procol Harum recorded "Conquistadore" at the Northern Jubilee Auditorium with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra. I still can`t hear that song without thinking of her at that age (about 17).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on July 03, 2013, 02:03:41 PM
Not really something I just learned, but something I did learn in adulthood, about 6 or so years ago.  I had always thought the Irish didn't have their own language, they just spoke English with a beautiful accent.  But then I met bff and she informed me that yes, the Irish do have Irish Gaelic, which isn't widely used even though all the road signs there are written in both English and Irish Gaelic.  Though there are still some parts in the west where it is still spoken on a daily basis and school children are taught it.

In the Irish Republic, there has long been controversy over the Irish language, since that country gained independence in 1921. From then on, successive Irish governments have -- from perfectly fine motives of patriotism and national pride -- tried hard to foster the use of Irish as a twin language to English, for the country's citizens. This has included, as you mention, public signage of all sorts being in both languages; and its having long been a compulsory subject in school, including in non-Irish-speaking areas of the country. 

Many folk reckon that these earnest measures largely backfired: most Irish citizens from English-only-speaking-families, have tended to find the Irish tongue a nuisance, and a misery to have to learn (apparently it's a difficult language unless learnt from infancy).  Despite all official attempts to foster the language: for the past nearly-a-century, its use has steadily declined, with the numbers of those in the far west for whom it is a birth-speech, ever lessening.  Humans are contrary creatures, and tend to dislike what they feel to be stuff imposed on them without their consent -- many consider that the Irish language would probably have fared better, with more non-native-speakers taking an interest in learning it, if it had been officially "pushed" less strenuously.

The above, is what I gather, anyway: Irish participants on the board, please correct me if appropriate.

Pretty much. You have to learn it to get into university and you have to be able to speak it if you want to be a teacher...even if you're not teaching it. Alot of the criticism stems from it being compulsory which can hinder people who aren't fluent from getting popular courses in university. Our university system is based on a points system, you get more points for a A than a B and more points again for doing honours level over ordinary level. So for example, even though I did honour level for all my subjects except Irish, even if I had gotten all A+'s I would not have had enough points to get accepted into medicine without doing the honours level Irish. Luckily I didn't want to be a doctor.  :)

Thanks. I'm English, but with an interest in and liking for our "neighbour island" and its people ("of all shapes and makes"). University / teachers' training college matters, as you describe: required fluency in the language, irrelevant to the subject which one wishes to study, does seem, frankly, silly -- and potentially very resentment-causing.

I love the fact that "minority" languages still hang on in the British Isles, and hope against hope that they may long do so; but with people being the way they are -- artificial and officious fostering of them, is likely to be counter-productive. (Attempted persecution tends IMO to work better; people get keen on the thing that's being persecuted.)  If I'd been Irish, and not born in the Gaeltacht; I hope that I'd have felt moved to learn, and become as proficient as possible in, Irish, just for its own sake.

I've spent many enjoyable holidays in Wales, and once got the notion of trying to learn Welsh; but I'm a lazy so-and-so, and did not get very far. I found it difficult: I get the picture that all the Celtic languages are extremely unlike English -- they work very differently, and more complicatedly, as regards grammar and sentence structure; and there are few similarities between individual words.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on July 03, 2013, 02:47:55 PM
I was told a few years ago by one of my uncles that my great grandfather, who came over from Ireland when he was ~16, c 1900 with his cousins, he decided he did not want his children speaking Irish.  Apparently he was of the opinion that his cousins were lazy jobless layabouts and they all spoke Irish and he didn't want to be associated with them.   Now I don't know if the cousins really weren't bothering to look at all or if they had been trying and just kept butting up against the "No Irish Need Apply" attitudes, or what. 

Course some of his descendants have tried to learn some of it anyway, such as an uncle, one of my father's cousins, and myself.  Though honestly I'd be hesitant to use it in the presence of someone who's fluent in it, beyond a "slainte"!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: hobish on July 25, 2013, 07:00:19 PM

I have to tell this one on Gish  >:D  Until a few weeks ago he thought mayonnaise and mayo were two different things. Mayonnaise was mayonnaise and mayo was some strange mystery sauce he wanted no part of. I can't even type this without laughing ... maybe it should be in the Things You Shouldn't Laugh At thread.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dazi on July 25, 2013, 07:07:51 PM

I have to tell this one on Gish  >:D  Until a few weeks ago he thought mayonnaise and mayo were two different things. Mayonnaise was mayonnaise and mayo was some strange mystery sauce he wanted no part of. I can't even type this without laughing ... maybe it should be in the Things You Shouldn't Laugh At thread.

hmmm....just...wow

I wonder if he somehow got mayo confused with salad dressing (Miracle Whip).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on August 08, 2013, 10:48:07 PM
I don't know if it's under the category "all adults should know this", but regarding the cover of the album Band On The Run, up until the other day I thought all the people in the spotlight against the wall were in fact the band Wings.  Only Paul McCartney, Linda McCartney and one other were associated with the band-the others were Sigmund Freud's grandson ( :o), the actors Christopher Lee and James Coburn, and some UK celebrities probably unknown outside England.

I won't even go into how many years I thought the Wings song was "E-Hell on Wheels".  The proper title is "Helen Wheels"  ::).

(Just for trivia, Paul got the idea to record the album in Nigeria, which became a health-threatening massive mistake).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RingTailedLemur on August 09, 2013, 02:05:34 AM
I don't know if it's under the category "all adults should know this", but regarding the cover of the album Band On The Run, up until the other day I thought all the people in the spotlight against the wall were in fact the band Wings.  Only Paul McCartney, Linda McCartney and one other were associated with the band-the others were Sigmund Freud's grandson ( :o), the actors Christopher Lee and James Coburn, and some UK celebrities probably unknown outside England.


From Wikipedia:

Michael Parkinson (chat-show host and journalist)
Kenny Lynch (actor, comedian and singer)
James Coburn (actor)
Clement Freud (columnist, gourmet, raconteur, Member of Parliament, Just a Minute panellist and grandson of Sigmund)
Christopher Lee (actor)
John Conteh (Liverpool boxer who later became World Light-Heavyweight champion)

There are quite a few Freuds about - Sigmund had 6 children and 8 grandchildren.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Snooks on August 09, 2013, 01:25:51 PM
Argh I can't even hear the phrase "Band on the run" without it being stuck in my head.  I put it down to it being on the music system at a pub I used to work at.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: hobish on August 14, 2013, 05:33:51 PM

I have to tell this one on Gish  >:D  Until a few weeks ago he thought mayonnaise and mayo were two different things. Mayonnaise was mayonnaise and mayo was some strange mystery sauce he wanted no part of. I can't even type this without laughing ... maybe it should be in the Things You Shouldn't Laugh At thread.

hmmm....just...wow

I wonder if he somehow got mayo confused with salad dressing (Miracle Whip).

I think so, but my reaction was prety much the same as yours  ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on August 15, 2013, 09:02:43 AM
A little off-topic but maybe not.

In the library, one of my jobs was to go through foreign book catalogs for possible purchases.  It amused me that several German language publishers  would make the distinction between 'translated from the English' and 'translated from the American'. 

I have no idea how the German language would distinguish between the two.  A native German speaker I knew didn't know either. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: sunnygirl on August 15, 2013, 10:16:03 AM

I have to tell this one on Gish  >:D  Until a few weeks ago he thought mayonnaise and mayo were two different things. Mayonnaise was mayonnaise and mayo was some strange mystery sauce he wanted no part of. I can't even type this without laughing ... maybe it should be in the Things You Shouldn't Laugh At thread.

hmmm....just...wow

I wonder if he somehow got mayo confused with salad dressing (Miracle Whip).

I only just learned that Miracle Whip is salad dressing. For some reason I thought it was sweet, like something similar to marshmallow spread. (But in my defense I'm not sure if Miracle Whip is sold in my country - at least, I've never seen it.)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: violinp on August 15, 2013, 10:29:12 AM

I have to tell this one on Gish  >:D  Until a few weeks ago he thought mayonnaise and mayo were two different things. Mayonnaise was mayonnaise and mayo was some strange mystery sauce he wanted no part of. I can't even type this without laughing ... maybe it should be in the Things You Shouldn't Laugh At thread.

hmmm....just...wow

I wonder if he somehow got mayo confused with salad dressing (Miracle Whip).

I only just learned that Miracle Whip is salad dressing. For some reason I thought it was sweet, like something similar to marshmallow spread. (But in my defense I'm not sure if Miracle Whip is sold in my country - at least, I've never seen it.)

It's a sweet and tangy alternative to mayonnaise. My mom uses it to make deviled eggs.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on August 15, 2013, 10:33:35 AM
I normally buy Miracle Whip.  I had friends coming over so I bought some Hellman's, instead, because I knew my friends would prefer it.  I don't like it; I prefer the taste of Miracle Whip.  The mayonnaise, to me, has no flavour.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 15, 2013, 10:43:59 AM
Mayo person over here
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on August 15, 2013, 11:09:28 AM
Mayo person over here

Ditto.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on August 15, 2013, 11:19:11 AM
I have both Hellman's light mayo and Miracle Whip in my refrigerator. We use both.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: perpetua on August 15, 2013, 11:22:59 AM

I have to tell this one on Gish  >:D  Until a few weeks ago he thought mayonnaise and mayo were two different things. Mayonnaise was mayonnaise and mayo was some strange mystery sauce he wanted no part of. I can't even type this without laughing ... maybe it should be in the Things You Shouldn't Laugh At thread.

hmmm....just...wow

I wonder if he somehow got mayo confused with salad dressing (Miracle Whip).

I only just learned that Miracle Whip is salad dressing. For some reason I thought it was sweet, like something similar to marshmallow spread. (But in my defense I'm not sure if Miracle Whip is sold in my country - at least, I've never seen it.)

Me too! I thought it was some kind of dessert topping, but that's probably because we had a dessert topping called something-whip in the UK in the 80s (Can't remember its name now. Cool Whip? Super Whip?). You learn something new every day.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: blue2000 on August 15, 2013, 11:42:40 AM

I have to tell this one on Gish  >:D  Until a few weeks ago he thought mayonnaise and mayo were two different things. Mayonnaise was mayonnaise and mayo was some strange mystery sauce he wanted no part of. I can't even type this without laughing ... maybe it should be in the Things You Shouldn't Laugh At thread.

hmmm....just...wow

I wonder if he somehow got mayo confused with salad dressing (Miracle Whip).

I only just learned that Miracle Whip is salad dressing. For some reason I thought it was sweet, like something similar to marshmallow spread. (But in my defense I'm not sure if Miracle Whip is sold in my country - at least, I've never seen it.)

Me too! I thought it was some kind of dessert topping, but that's probably because we had a dessert topping called something-whip in the UK in the 80s (Can't remember its name now. Cool Whip? Super Whip?). You learn something new every day.

Cool Whip is a fake whipped cream topping over here. That might have been it.

To tell on myself, when I was a kid I thought all storebought mayo tasted like Miracle Whip. That was all we bought - any other kind we had was homemade. It was an unpleasant surprise to discover it didn't (turns out I don't like storebought mayo).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 15, 2013, 11:45:44 AM
Cool Whip is still around
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: kherbert05 on August 15, 2013, 11:59:30 AM
A little off-topic but maybe not.

In the library, one of my jobs was to go through foreign book catalogs for possible purchases.  It amused me that several German language publishers  would make the distinction between 'translated from the English' and 'translated from the American'. 

I have no idea how the German language would distinguish between the two.  A native German speaker I knew didn't know either.


There are some differences in syntax between British/Canadian/Australian/American perhaps they come across in the translation. I have some cousins with same first names similar or same surnames from different English Speaking countries. Sometimes I will open an email thinking it is Micheal from PEI, read 1/2 a paragraph and realize it is Micheal from Austin from the syntex.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on August 15, 2013, 12:22:18 PM
There was also something called 'DreamWhip' which was a powder that you mixed with milk to get a whipped cream like topping.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: sidi-ji on August 15, 2013, 12:54:03 PM
We had both spreads in my house.  The kids preferred the MW >:D, while my parents used the mayo for themselves.  My mom used MW in potato salad though.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on August 15, 2013, 12:56:55 PM
Wait, there's a difference between mayo and Miracle Whip? How did I never know this?  :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on August 15, 2013, 01:01:55 PM
There was a time, many many years ago, when most people made mayonnaise at home with real eggs.  Something about it triggered a lot of allergies, especially in children who were allergic to raw egg whites.  Miracle Whip was "safe".  Not sure what the difference is exactly, but it had something to do with the egg content.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jones on August 15, 2013, 02:07:52 PM
Wait, there's a difference between mayo and Miracle Whip? How did I never know this?  :-[
I didn't know this growing up either, I found out when I went on my own and started buying mayo on sale. I grew up in a Miracle Whip household. I like both, but don't keep both; whatever is on sale when one runs out, is what I buy.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on August 15, 2013, 02:35:11 PM
I sometimes buy a tiny jar of mayo to use after Thanksgiving on Leftover Sandwiches. Most of it always ends up in the trash.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on August 15, 2013, 06:56:56 PM
Finally reached the end of the thread!

I don't know what it is specifically about Miracle Whip that's different... all I know is I have a violent reaction to the taste.  My taste buds immediately call for an emergency evacuation of the mouth.  I love love love tuna, so you can imagine my reaction when I bite into a tuna-with-MW sandwich that I thought was going to be properly mayonnaised.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Katana_Geldar on August 15, 2013, 07:16:19 PM
There was a time, many many years ago, when most people made mayonnaise at home with real eggs.  Something about it triggered a lot of allergies, especially in children who were allergic to raw egg whites.  Miracle Whip was "safe".  Not sure what the difference is exactly, but it had something to do with the egg content.

Raw eggs can carry salmonella. Now I'm UTD I gave to make sure of the mayo I have.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 15, 2013, 08:18:18 PM
There was a time, many many years ago, when most people made mayonnaise at home with real eggs.  Something about it triggered a lot of allergies, especially in children who were allergic to raw egg whites.  Miracle Whip was "safe".  Not sure what the difference is exactly, but it had something to do with the egg content.

Raw eggs can carry salmonella. Now I'm UTD I gave to make sure of the mayo I have.

Here in the US, commercially made mayonnaise is pasteurized in order to make it shelf stable.  So the bacteria and pathogens in the sealed container are killed.  I have no idea about mayonnaise in other parts of the world.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Katana_Geldar on August 15, 2013, 08:41:01 PM
There was a time, many many years ago, when most people made mayonnaise at home with real eggs.  Something about it triggered a lot of allergies, especially in children who were allergic to raw egg whites.  Miracle Whip was "safe".  Not sure what the difference is exactly, but it had something to do with the egg content.

Raw eggs can carry salmonella. Now I'm UTD I gave to make sure of the mayo I have.

Here in the US, commercially made mayonnaise is pasteurized in order to make it shelf stable.  So the bacteria and pathogens in the sealed container are killed.  I have no idea about mayonnaise in other parts of the world.
Mayo is usually patronised here too...unless you go to a place where they make their own mayo.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: twiggy on August 16, 2013, 01:38:32 PM
This is really embarrassing. Full disclosure: I was actually going to pass this story off with my sister as the protagonist, but the search function is currently disabled.

Before we got the puppies, they were all "fixed." I know that our boys aren't ever going to be daddies. Well, one of the boys was licking himself and something came out!  :o ??? :o I was very concerned that something was wrong with him and called DH's attention to the situation. DH didn't see the problem, it's just his manly bits. If it bothered me, I shouldn't look. DH truly didn't see an issue with this, and I finally resorted to small words and speaking slowly. I told DH "he was fixed. He doesn't have that anymore."

DH just about died laughing. Yes, I really thought that they went in and surgically removed the *entire* package. Then I felt like a jerk for speaking so condescendingly on top of feeling like an idiot.  ::)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on August 16, 2013, 02:16:54 PM
...   Yes, I really thought that they went in and surgically removed the *entire* package. ...

You know, if there are other people who think like you did, that might go a long way toward explaining why some men blanch at the idea of having a vasectomy.   ???
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: faithlessone on August 16, 2013, 02:41:12 PM
...   Yes, I really thought that they went in and surgically removed the *entire* package. ...

You know, if there are other people who think like you did, that might go a long way toward explaining why some men blanch at the idea of having a vasectomy.   ???

I totally thought that was what they did. In my defence, I'm not an animal person, so I've never really thought about the details. But, huh. The things you learn on eHell!!!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Julian on August 16, 2013, 06:07:38 PM
poor little boy pups if that was the case!

Males only get their 'berries' removed when they're fixed.

Females, on the other hand, basically have a full hysterectomy including ovaries.  It's much more invasive, and the recovery time is a little longer.  That can depend on the animal though - one of mine did the sooky thing for days after being done, the other dog and the cat were business as usual.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on August 17, 2013, 09:25:51 AM
Finally reached the end of the thread!

I don't know what it is specifically about Miracle Whip that's different... all I know is I have a violent reaction to the taste.  My taste buds immediately call for an emergency evacuation of the mouth.  I love love love tuna, so you can imagine my reaction when I bite into a tuna-with-MW sandwich that I thought was going to be properly mayonnaised.

Miracle Whip is considerably sweeter than ordinary mayo.  It's supposedly more popular in the southern US than in the north.

Recently, there has been an ad campaign for Miracle Whip around here.  The ads are based on 'The Scarlet Letter' with 'MW' substituting for the 'A'. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Snooks on September 10, 2013, 06:23:58 AM
Necroposting to say I found the instruction manual for our cable box remote at the weekend.  For the past five years I've been annoyed by the fact I couldn't use the cable box remote to turn the TV off when I could use it to change the volume.  I've also been annoyed by that weird button at the bottom of the remote that apparently did nothing.  Turns out if you use it in conjunction with the off button it will turn the TV off.  So who knew, reading manuals can help out!  I'm off to read the manual for the new microwave now.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Harriet Jones on September 10, 2013, 08:08:02 AM
Miracle Whip is considerably sweeter than ordinary mayo.  It's supposedly more popular in the southern US than in the north.

Yes, if you look at the ingredients list for mayo vs. Miracle Whip, you'll see sugar pretty high in the list for MW, and, in the mayo I buy, there's no sweetener listed.  I don't mind MW if there's no mayo available, but I'd rather get my sweet flavor someplace other than my sandwich or pasta salad.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: AylaM on September 10, 2013, 09:23:02 AM
As a kid I didn't know if I liked or hated mayo.  Sometimes it made my sandwiches better and sometimes it was wrong.  It annoyed my parents that I'd sometimes tell people that I hated mayo, because I ate it all the time.

I grew up in a house with my mom and grandma.  Mom only eats mayo and grandma only eats MW.  What I got depended on who was cooking.  I can't stand miracle whip, and didn't know it existed.  So all I knew was sometimes mayo was good and sometimes it wasn't.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Pen^2 on September 10, 2013, 10:20:29 AM
I was watching the National Geographic channel today and there was a scene which involved a wildebeest. I couldn't help but think that it was the most gnu-looking wildebeest I'd ever seen, so I looked up the two animals to see how closely related they are.

Turns out they're two different words for the exact same animal. ::)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Hmmmmm on September 10, 2013, 10:35:33 AM
As a kid I didn't know if I liked or hated mayo.  Sometimes it made my sandwiches better and sometimes it was wrong.  It annoyed my parents that I'd sometimes tell people that I hated mayo, because I ate it all the time.

I grew up in a house with my mom and grandma.  Mom only eats mayo and grandma only eats MW.  What I got depended on who was cooking.  I can't stand miracle whip, and didn't know it existed.  So all I knew was sometimes mayo was good and sometimes it wasn't.

Our house always had both growing up. For a ham sandwich, I liked mayo. For a sliced chicken sandwhich I liked the extra punch of MW. For Tuna salad, I liked the MW but for making potato salad or chicken salad, it was always mayo.

One day a friend had spent the night and I was making us sandwiches as a late night snack. I asked her if she wanted mayo or MW. She said she wanted mayo. She tasted her sandwich and asked what I had put on it and I said mayo and she said it didnt' taste right so I showed her the jar and she said that wasn't the type they used then she spied the MW jar and said that's the type of mayo her family used. I made her a new sandwich and gave her old one to the cat who wasn't picky about mayo or MW.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Optimoose Prime on September 10, 2013, 02:30:06 PM
Mayo and Miracle Whip both have their uses.  Deviled Eggs = Miracle Whip.  Roast beef on rye = mayonnaise.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: daen on September 10, 2013, 03:59:06 PM
Mayo and Miracle Whip both have their uses.  Deviled Eggs = Miracle Whip.  Roast beef on rye = mayonnaise.

Ah, for me, roast beef sandwich (not necessarily on rye) = Russian dressing or Catalina dressing. But then, I do like a bit of sweetness.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: GreenHall on September 10, 2013, 04:14:07 PM
God bless Google.  Today I learned how to change fluorescent lightbulbs.  (They rotate.). Why the kitchen lights are 4 foot fluorescents remains unknown (house built 10ish years ago, everything else is twist in bulbs...)

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: VorFemme on September 10, 2013, 04:18:06 PM
Miracle Whip and thick slices of turkey breast on whole wheat with lettuce & tomato after Thanksgiving (November - USA).  Although any time I smoke a turkey (outside - it doesn't heat up the house in summer time) will work - the fresher tomatoes taste better in the summer...

Mayo - not what we had growing up - so, while I'm sure that there are foods it complements better - I don't know offhand which ones they are...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: kherbert05 on September 10, 2013, 06:25:51 PM
I sometimes buy a tiny jar of mayo to use after Thanksgiving on Leftover Sandwiches. Most of it always ends up in the trash.

Durkey's if you can get it is even better with Turkey.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Betelnut on September 10, 2013, 07:16:19 PM
The reason why everyone says to not mow the lawn when the grass is wet.  My garage smelled bad for about a month when, one day, I moved the lawn mower and rotting, composting grass--with the consistency of glue--dropped out from its innards.

Strangely enough, I had actually used the lawn mower three or four times while it had this huge plug of grass glued to the inside of it, rotting away.

I promptly scooped up the composting grass to use on my lawn but now I know--don't mow while wet unless you at least clean out the inside bottom of the mower afterwards!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: squeakers on September 10, 2013, 07:31:06 PM
The reason why everyone says to not mow the lawn when the grass is wet.  My garage smelled bad for about a month when, one day, I moved the lawn mower and rotting, composting grass--with the consistency of glue--dropped out from its innards.

Strangely enough, I had actually used the lawn mower three or four times while it had this huge plug of grass glued to the inside of it, rotting away.

I promptly scooped up the composting grass to use on my lawn but now I know--don't mow while wet unless you at least clean out the inside bottom of the mower afterwards!

That's one of the reasons to not mow... the other is that the cut grass is susceptible to fungus/bacteria.  If it is wet then you are flinging fungus/bacteria around in a nice moist environment.  It's the same reason you shouldn't pick tomatoes/beans/peppers etc after a rain or after watering.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Syfygeek on September 10, 2013, 07:44:06 PM
I was watching the National Geographic channel today and there was a scene which involved a wildebeest. I couldn't help but think that it was the most gnu-looking wildebeest I'd ever seen, so I looked up the two animals to see how closely related they are.

Turns out they're two different words for the exact same animal. ::)

No, no way. A gnu and a wildebeest are the same? They gave this poor animal 2 names, one makes sense (wild beast = wildebeest) and one is a, well, something to make jokes with. It will always be a gnu to gme....
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 10, 2013, 09:31:18 PM
I was watching the National Geographic channel today and there was a scene which involved a wildebeest. I couldn't help but think that it was the most gnu-looking wildebeest I'd ever seen, so I looked up the two animals to see how closely related they are.

Turns out they're two different words for the exact same animal. ::)

No, no way. A gnu and a wildebeest are the same? They gave this poor animal 2 names, one makes sense (wild beast = wildebeest) and one is a, well, something to make jokes with. It will always be a gnu to gme....

According to Wikipedia..  "The name "gnu" originates from the Khoikhoi name for these animals, gnou" "Wildebeest is [/size]Dutch (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_language)[/color][/size] for "wild beast" or "wild cattle" in [/size]Afrikaans (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afrikaans)[/color][/size] (bees = cattle)"[/i]
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Pen^2 on September 10, 2013, 10:35:12 PM
I was watching the National Geographic channel today and there was a scene which involved a wildebeest. I couldn't help but think that it was the most gnu-looking wildebeest I'd ever seen, so I looked up the two animals to see how closely related they are.

Turns out they're two different words for the exact same animal. ::)

No, no way. A gnu and a wildebeest are the same? They gave this poor animal 2 names, one makes sense (wild beast = wildebeest) and one is a, well, something to make jokes with. It will always be a gnu to gme....

Loads of animals have two names--there's nothing gnu (sorry :P) there! Reindeer and caribou, manul and Pallas' cat, pygmy/gracile/slender chimpanzee and bonobo, the red cat-bear and the lesser panda, moose and elk, chevrotain and mouse deer, cougar and puma, white ants and termites, etc. all spring to mind, but there are probably thousands more. I just had no idea that wildebeest were gnus! I though wildebeest were large, stocky antelope creatures, whereas gnus were more cow-like animals with funny, curvy muzzles.

I'd love to share a list of animals with alternative names, but Google isn't being helpful.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dindrane on September 10, 2013, 11:07:26 PM
Also, the sound that a wildebeest makes kind of sounds like "gnu". I kind of wonder if that isn't how they got the name to begin with.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on September 10, 2013, 11:11:13 PM
Please rethink moose and elk. The antlers and noses, body builds and coloring are way different. Even their habits are very different.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 10, 2013, 11:18:10 PM
it wasn't until I was in my 20's and looking at a reindeer that I realized that they were caribou.

Also this symbol>> | << that looks like a small vertical line.  It's called a pipe symbol and I was introduced to it way back in high school 10+ years ago and though it was super cool.  I used to break up text like PastryGoddess | City, State, Zip | 999-999-999. 


Well up until last frickin' year I was copying and pasting it from a symbol website.  And then I looked down at my year old mac and realized...hey I have a pipe symbol above my backwards slash how cool.  And then a couple of days later I was on my 6 year old PC and looked down, lo and behold I had the pipe symbol on that keyboard as well  ::)


I awarded myself the Derp award of the week.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Pen^2 on September 10, 2013, 11:36:25 PM
Sorry, Luci45, I should have said Eurasian elk, which is indeed a synonym for moose. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk)

You are quite right: a plain old elk isn't the same as a moose. It's apparently the same as a wapiti. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 11, 2013, 03:14:15 AM
Sorry, Luci45, I should have said Eurasian elk, which is indeed a synonym for moose. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk)

You are quite right: a plain old elk isn't the same as a moose. It's apparently the same as a wapiti. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk)

I gather that when Europeans (English-speaking) first arrived in North America, the first kind of truly big deer they encountered, was the wapiti; which they called the elk -- after the Eurasian elk, which they knew from back east of the Atlantic.  They later found that the same species as the Eurasian elk, lives in N. America too; so to name that one, they needed to borrow the Native American word for it, "moose".

Dreadful joke, follows -- from "Punch", the British supposedly comical magazine. "Punch" 's humour is in fact often pretty laboured; and was more so, about a hundred years ago -- the date of this offering (which revolves around the peculiarities of the Scottish accent).

There's a cartoon of two loggers, deep in the Canadian forest:  Sandy, an immigrant just off the boat from Scotland, and old-timer Jake.  A moose is walking past, just minding its own business.

Sandy: "Mon !  Whit's yon thing, for heaven's sake?"

Jake: "That's just a young moose -- nothing to worry about."

Sandy: "Och, havers !  If yon's a young moose, then show me ane o' yer auld rats !"
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on September 11, 2013, 07:22:22 AM
Cougar = Mountain Lion.
I didn't know it was the same as a puma though. So I looked it up.
According to wikipedia:
The cougar (Puma concolor), [is] also known as the mountain lion, puma, panther, mountain cat, or catamount.
That's six different names. Whew!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Carotte on September 11, 2013, 07:37:48 AM
It's not an expression used in my native tongue so I just found out what a baker's dozen is.
I was perplexed by a poster in another thread mentioning she only got 12 rolls in her dozen and it wasn't what she was expecting, I had a little  :o whaat? moment there.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on September 11, 2013, 10:46:56 AM
Sorry, Luci45, I should have said Eurasian elk, which is indeed a synonym for moose. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk)

You are quite right: a plain old elk isn't the same as a moose. It's apparently the same as a wapiti. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk)

I gather that when Europeans (English-speaking) first arrived in North America, the first kind of truly big deer they encountered, was the wapiti; which they called the elk -- after the Eurasian elk, which they knew from back east of the Atlantic.  They later found that the same species as the Eurasian elk, lives in N. America too; so to name that one, they needed to borrow the Native American word for it, "moose".

Dreadful joke, follows -- from "Punch", the British supposedly comical magazine. "Punch" 's humour is in fact often pretty laboured; and was more so, about a hundred years ago -- the date of this offering (which revolves around the peculiarities of the Scottish accent).

There's a cartoon of two loggers, deep in the Canadian forest:  Sandy, an immigrant just off the boat from Scotland, and old-timer Jake.  A moose is walking past, just minding its own business.

Sandy: "Mon !  Whit's yon thing, for heaven's sake?"

Jake: "That's just a young moose -- nothing to worry about."

Sandy: "Och, havers !  If yon's a young moose, then show me ane o' yer auld rats !"

I finally got it, and I even had a Scottish grandmother who still had a burr  :-[.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on September 11, 2013, 11:26:30 AM
I am constantly amazed by the people who preach the no white anything (flour, rice, sugar, etc) diet, but don't know the reasons behind it.

I still don't understand the reasons behind so many fad diets banning bananas though, as they are the only way I get potassium and keep me from having muscle cramps.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Vall on September 11, 2013, 11:40:33 AM
it wasn't until I was in my 20's and looking at a reindeer that I realized that they were caribou.

Also this symbol>> | << that looks like a small vertical line.  It's called a pipe symbol and I was introduced to it way back in high school 10+ years ago and though it was super cool.  I used to break up text like PastryGoddess | City, State, Zip | 999-999-999. 


Well up until last frickin' year I was copying and pasting it from a symbol website.  And then I looked down at my year old mac and realized...hey I have a pipe symbol above my backwards slash how cool.  And then a couple of days later I was on my 6 year old PC and looked down, lo and behold I had the pipe symbol on that keyboard as well  ::)


I awarded myself the Derp award of the week.
I didn't know about the pipe symbol until I read your post.  Thanks!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on September 11, 2013, 11:48:38 AM
it wasn't until I was in my 20's and looking at a reindeer that I realized that they were caribou.

Also this symbol>> | << that looks like a small vertical line.  It's called a pipe symbol and I was introduced to it way back in high school 10+ years ago and though it was super cool.  I used to break up text like PastryGoddess | City, State, Zip | 999-999-999. 


Well up until last frickin' year I was copying and pasting it from a symbol website.  And then I looked down at my year old mac and realized...hey I have a pipe symbol above my backwards slash how cool.  And then a couple of days later I was on my 6 year old PC and looked down, lo and behold I had the pipe symbol on that keyboard as well  ::)


I awarded myself the Derp award of the week.
I didn't know about the pipe symbol until I read your post.  Thanks!

 :(  I've looked and looked.  I don't seem to have one.  I wish I did.  I think it's cool.

ETA:  Oh my goodness!  I just realized it's way over there under the backspace button.  I didn't even know I had a reverse slash!!  Thank you!  I'm going to play with my newly discovered button now.  What a difference a few seconds make!   ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Carotte on September 11, 2013, 12:36:40 PM
it wasn't until I was in my 20's and looking at a reindeer that I realized that they were caribou.

Also this symbol>> | << that looks like a small vertical line.  It's called a pipe symbol and I was introduced to it way back in high school 10+ years ago and though it was super cool.  I used to break up text like PastryGoddess | City, State, Zip | 999-999-999. 


Well up until last frickin' year I was copying and pasting it from a symbol website.  And then I looked down at my year old mac and realized...hey I have a pipe symbol above my backwards slash how cool.  And then a couple of days later I was on my 6 year old PC and looked down, lo and behold I had the pipe symbol on that keyboard as well  ::)


I awarded myself the Derp award of the week.
I didn't know about the pipe symbol until I read your post.  Thanks!

 :(  I've looked and looked.  I don't seem to have one.  I wish I did.  I think it's cool.

ETA:  Oh my goodness!  I just realized it's way over there under the backspace button.  I didn't even know I had a reverse slash!!  Thank you!  I'm going to play with my newly discovered button now.  What a difference a few seconds make!   ;D

I once had to explain my work-with-computers SO that no, I never have any need for a reverse slash and that yes, it took me a few seconds to find it.
He'll use it maybe every other minutes for his work, I use it for making arms in the air smileys: \o/   
or shark attack: (the shark is one the left and the swimmer first looses one arm then gets eaten whole.)

__/\__\o/__
___/\_o/___
________/\_
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: AstiTheWestie on September 11, 2013, 01:08:29 PM
Now I am playing with my newly discovered pipe symbol key as well as making sharks. Thanks, guys! If any of my clients call me looking for their jobs, I'll have them call you.  ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on September 11, 2013, 01:51:03 PM
Sorry, Luci45, I should have said Eurasian elk, which is indeed a synonym for moose. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk)

You are quite right: a plain old elk isn't the same as a moose. It's apparently the same as a wapiti. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk)

I gather that when Europeans (English-speaking) first arrived in North America, the first kind of truly big deer they encountered, was the wapiti; which they called the elk -- after the Eurasian elk, which they knew from back east of the Atlantic.  They later found that the same species as the Eurasian elk, lives in N. America too; so to name that one, they needed to borrow the Native American word for it, "moose".

Dreadful joke, follows -- from "Punch", the British supposedly comical magazine. "Punch" 's humour is in fact often pretty laboured; and was more so, about a hundred years ago -- the date of this offering (which revolves around the peculiarities of the Scottish accent).

There's a cartoon of two loggers, deep in the Canadian forest:  Sandy, an immigrant just off the boat from Scotland, and old-timer Jake.  A moose is walking past, just minding its own business.

Sandy: "Mon !  Whit's yon thing, for heaven's sake?"

Jake: "That's just a young moose -- nothing to worry about."

Sandy: "Och, havers !  If yon's a young moose, then show me ane o' yer auld rats !"

That joke is SOOOO bad...I'm going to have to spread it.

Also, I love the word wapiti. I always went to the zoo when I was in college just go to see the wapiti. When I took friends we'd be walking down the walkway to him. They'd stop and look at the bald eagles, I'd stare at the wapiti.

Actually, I challenged my sister to be a wapiti one year for Halloween. She had almost agreed before she stopped to think and ask what it was. Darn.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Carotte on September 11, 2013, 02:04:13 PM

Also, I love the word wapiti. I always went to the zoo when I was in college just go to see the wapiti. When I took friends we'd be walking down the walkway to him. They'd stop and look at the bald eagles, I'd stare at the wapiti.

Actually, I challenged my sister to be a wapiti one year for Halloween. She had almost agreed before she stopped to think and ask what it was. Darn.

You know what, Wapiti was the name of a magazine for kids about animals when I was young, but for some reason I thought it was some kind of lemur, I might be mixing it up with another magazine that had a lemur on it...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Syfygeek on September 11, 2013, 03:06:44 PM
Now I feel really, well, dumb. This morning, in an effort to amaze my BFF, I asked her if she knew Knights in White satin was really Nights in White Satin. She said of course, that's the name on the album.

So then I whipped out the big gun- did you know a gnu and a wildebeest are the same thing? Yep, she knew that too. I've known her since we were 12, how did she know those thing and I didn't?

From the TV show "Great Space Coaster"-
No gnews is good gnews with Gary Gnu
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 11, 2013, 04:34:12 PM

Also, I love the word wapiti. I always went to the zoo when I was in college just go to see the wapiti. When I took friends we'd be walking down the walkway to him. They'd stop and look at the bald eagles, I'd stare at the wapiti.

Actually, I challenged my sister to be a wapiti one year for Halloween. She had almost agreed before she stopped to think and ask what it was. Darn.

You know what, Wapiti was the name of a magazine for kids about animals when I was young, but for some reason I thought it was some kind of lemur, I might be mixing it up with another magazine that had a lemur on it...

Thoughts prompted, of a very short offering by Ogden Nash.  Good old Ogden -- I doubt whether there was ever a word which defeated him, as regards finding a rhyme.  As with:

Here comes the wapiti;
Hippity-hoppity !
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Pen^2 on September 12, 2013, 01:24:32 AM
__/\__\o/__
___/\_o/___
________/\_

I love this! The poor swimmer! Hahahahaha!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on September 12, 2013, 09:58:05 AM

Also, I love the word wapiti. I always went to the zoo when I was in college just go to see the wapiti. When I took friends we'd be walking down the walkway to him. They'd stop and look at the bald eagles, I'd stare at the wapiti.

Actually, I challenged my sister to be a wapiti one year for Halloween. She had almost agreed before she stopped to think and ask what it was. Darn.

You know what, Wapiti was the name of a magazine for kids about animals when I was young, but for some reason I thought it was some kind of lemur, I might be mixing it up with another magazine that had a lemur on it...

Thoughts prompted, of a very short offering by Ogden Nash.  Good old Ogden -- I doubt whether there was ever a word which defeated him, as regards finding a rhyme.  As with:

Here comes the wapiti;
Hippity-hoppity !

I would love to see a wapiti go hippity-hoppity. Really. The mental image that evokes....
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on September 12, 2013, 12:13:44 PM
Okay, so does wapiti rhyme with hoppity? Because in my mind I was pronouncing it wah-PEE-tee. Because if I'm going to learn these retrospectively obvious things, I want to learn them correctly! :D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Pen^2 on September 12, 2013, 02:13:20 PM
Okay, so does wapiti rhyme with hoppity? Because in my mind I was pronouncing it wah-PEE-tee. Because if I'm going to learn these retrospectively obvious things, I want to learn them correctly! :D

In IPA it's wɒpɪtɪ, so yeah, it rhymes perfectly with "hoppity" (hɒpɪtɪ). A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.

Oh, and Syfygeek, to impress your BFF, browse this for a bit if you haven't already: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_common_misconceptions (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_common_misconceptions) I'm sure you'll find something  ;)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: blue2000 on September 12, 2013, 02:44:03 PM
Okay, so does wapiti rhyme with hoppity? Because in my mind I was pronouncing it wah-PEE-tee. Because if I'm going to learn these retrospectively obvious things, I want to learn them correctly! :D

That's how I thought it was pronounced as well. But according to the on-line dictionary, it does rhyme with hoppity.

And now I'm going to have hoppity wapitis in my head all day. ;D I suppose there are worse things...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on September 12, 2013, 02:45:08 PM
Okay, so does wapiti rhyme with hoppity? Because in my mind I was pronouncing it wah-PEE-tee. Because if I'm going to learn these retrospectively obvious things, I want to learn them correctly! :D

In IPA it's wɒpɪtɪ, so yeah, it rhymes perfectly with "hoppity" (hɒpɪtɪ).
But where are the accented syllables?  Rhythm matters in rhyming, too. "Hoppity" is accented on the first syllable.  "HOP-pit-ee" by that rule doesn't rhyme with Lynn's pronunciation wah-PEE-tee, because hers has the accent on the second syllable, even if the vowel sounds are identical.


Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.
But in my idiom, "wo" would be pronounce "woe", not "wah".  Woesp?  Woenda? Is that how you say them? 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: AuntieA on September 12, 2013, 03:49:47 PM
Albertan here, and our "second home" is Jasper National Park, which has elk everywhere! Everyone local calls them WAH-pi-tee elk. Rhymes with hoppity.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on September 12, 2013, 04:30:44 PM
Well, if they're hoppity wapitis, rhyming and in rhythm (I am now imagining a herd of them leaping like gazelle across the plains), I will try to remember that!  ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on September 12, 2013, 07:39:06 PM
Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.
But in my idiom, "wo" would be pronounce "woe", not "wah".  Woesp?  Woenda? Is that how you say them?

"Woh" not "woe".  Woe almost puts an extra w sound on the end. Wohsp, Wohnda, wohnt.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: mrs_deb on September 12, 2013, 09:20:20 PM
Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.

I pronounce "was" and "want" differently than Wanda, Wally, wand, wanton, wander, watch, wasp.  Was and Want are more like wuzz and wunt.  The other words are more wah.  wahnda, wahlly, etc.  Is this different than others?

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Pen^2 on September 12, 2013, 10:05:54 PM
Okay, so does wapiti rhyme with hoppity? Because in my mind I was pronouncing it wah-PEE-tee. Because if I'm going to learn these retrospectively obvious things, I want to learn them correctly! :D

In IPA it's wɒpɪtɪ, so yeah, it rhymes perfectly with "hoppity" (hɒpɪtɪ).
But where are the accented syllables?  Rhythm matters in rhyming, too. "Hoppity" is accented on the first syllable.  "HOP-pit-ee" by that rule doesn't rhyme with Lynn's pronunciation wah-PEE-tee, because hers has the accent on the second syllable, even if the vowel sounds are identical.


Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.
But in my idiom, "wo" would be pronounce "woe", not "wah".  Woesp?  Woenda? Is that how you say them?

My dictionary says "wapiti" is accented on the first syllable like hoppity is, also, so they'd still rhyme. But it's not a word I'm humongously familiar with, so maybe there's a bit of regional variation in where the accent falls, in which case the rhyme wouldn't be as strong.

As others have pointed out, by "wo" I do indeed mean the short "o" vowel sound, giving "wɒ". "o" (written as ɒ) is as in "lot". In received British English, as well as (non-bogan!) Australian English, the above words all begin with wɒ, but as is usual, there is a degree of regional variation in vowel pronunciation. The ɒ in American English alone can become anything form ɔː ("or" as in "for") to ʌ ("u" as in "mud"), so some of the above words will change their pronunciation depending on where the speaker is from. No biggie  :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on September 13, 2013, 01:37:51 AM
Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.

I pronounce "was" and "want" differently than Wanda, Wally, wand, wanton, wander, watch, wasp.  Was and Want are more like wuzz and wunt.  The other words are more wah.  wahnda, wahlly, etc.  Is this different than others?

They've all got the same sound to me.  You must have a different accent.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Ms_Cellany on September 13, 2013, 09:30:38 AM
Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.

I pronounce "was" and "want" differently than Wanda, Wally, wand, wanton, wander, watch, wasp.  Was and Want are more like wuzz and wunt.  The other words are more wah.  wahnda, wahlly, etc.  Is this different than others?

They've all got the same sound to me.  You must have a different accent.

I'm the same as Elfmama: wuz, wunt, Wahnda, wahsp, wahtch, wahnd.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Hmmmmm on September 30, 2013, 02:00:35 PM
When the electricity goes out at home and then comes back on, my electric oven says PF till I hit any button. Today after I power failure, I finally realized what PF stood for.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: amandaelizabeth on September 30, 2013, 02:58:51 PM
Look on you tube for Swann and Flanders gnu song.  I can't seem to post the url from my ipad.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on September 30, 2013, 04:06:27 PM
Wapiti news: I read today about a company called something like Wapiti Oil & Gas. And I knew what it was named after! I wonder if they would have named the company Elk Oil & Gas, though--wapiti definitely sounds more mysterious.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Hillia on September 30, 2013, 04:32:20 PM
Watching a Big Bang Theory rerun last night with Bob Newhart as the boys' childhood hero, Professor Proton.  (Bob may be 85, but he is hilarious.  My DH had never seen him in anything, and was blown away by how funny he is).  Anyway, the professor is doing his kids' science show for Leonard, Sheldon and Penny.  Along with Penny, I was amazed by the potato clock.  I know it's a staple science demo, but I had no idea how it worked - I had to have DH explain it to me, and I'm still not sure I understand it.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on September 30, 2013, 07:43:08 PM
When the electricity goes out at home and then comes back on, my electric oven says PF till I hit any button. Today after I power failure, I finally realized what PF stood for.

Mine always says HELP which I think is cute.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on October 01, 2013, 09:10:52 AM
Today I was looking at my box of Honey Nut Cheerios as I ate breakfast. In the bottom corner of the box it says something like, "Whole Grain Oat Cereal with Real Honey and Natural Almond Flavoring." I thought, "Oh, almond flavoring, that's nice... Wait. Honey NUT Cheerios. That's the nut!"  ::)

In a similar vein I have a friend who's allergic to nuts, so she's always pointing out things that have nuts that I never thought about before. Like Butterfingers. Which is one of my favorite candy bars. I never thought about the "butter" part trying to evoke peanut butter, they don't really taste like peanut butter to me...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: #borecore on October 01, 2013, 09:45:34 AM
Today I was looking at my box of Honey Nut Cheerios as I ate breakfast. In the bottom corner of the box it says something like, "Whole Grain Oat Cereal with Real Honey and Natural Almond Flavoring." I thought, "Oh, almond flavoring, that's nice... Wait. Honey NUT Cheerios. That's the nut!"  ::)

In a similar vein I have a friend who's allergic to nuts, so she's always pointing out things that have nuts that I never thought about before. Like Butterfingers. Which is one of my favorite candy bars. I never thought about the "butter" part trying to evoke peanut butter, they don't really taste like peanut butter to me...

The stuff in the middle of a Butterfinger is the same as a Chick-o-Stick, which is definitely a peanutty candy. I feel like the chocolate coating mitigates the peanut flavor.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on October 01, 2013, 10:54:46 AM
Homemade Butterfinger ice cream is divine.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on October 01, 2013, 11:11:24 AM
Homemade Butterfinger ice cream is divine.
Recipe please.
Or do you just mix in broken up butterfingers into vanilla ice cream? If so, I assume you'd add it in just the last few minutes of churning?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Layla Miller on October 01, 2013, 11:50:06 AM
Homemade Butterfinger ice cream is divine.
Recipe please.
Or do you just mix in broken up butterfingers into vanilla ice cream? If so, I assume you'd add it in just the last few minutes of churning?
Agreed!  Our ice cream maker has lain dormant for months, and this might be just what I need to pull it out of the cupboard again!  :D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on October 01, 2013, 12:14:25 PM
I use the simple ice cream recipe as a base, then add crushed candy, cookies, what have you toward the end.

http://tidymom.net/2013/vanilla-bean-ice-cream-recipe/ (http://tidymom.net/2013/vanilla-bean-ice-cream-recipe/) This recipe makes one quart, ideal for canister style ice cream freezers. Multiply as needed for larger models.

You don't use eggs, so you don't have to cook the custard first. Divine.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Layla Miller on October 01, 2013, 12:19:30 PM
Thank you!  :D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on October 01, 2013, 12:58:14 PM
I need do NOT need to make some ice cream. But I think I might anyway.  >:D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: White Dragon on October 03, 2013, 01:57:00 PM
We were chatting the other day and our daughter (who will be 22 next month) casually mentioned that she only recently realized that what "black market" means.

She thought it was an actual, physical place - a street market in a shady alley some where.

I blame too much Harry Potter and all the shopping in Diagon Alley!  :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 03, 2013, 02:47:12 PM
We were chatting the other day and our daughter (who will be 22 next month) casually mentioned that she only recently realized that what "black market" means.

She thought it was an actual, physical place - a street market in a shady alley some where.

I blame too much Harry Potter and all the shopping in Diagon Alley!  :)

Boring super-nerdy nitpick -- re HP, aren't you thinking of Knockturn Alley -- where the dealings of the dodgy kind take place?   Diagon Alley is where the wizarding world's legitimate and above-board commerce, goes on.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: turnip on October 03, 2013, 02:54:04 PM
We were chatting the other day and our daughter (who will be 22 next month) casually mentioned that she only recently realized that what "black market" means.

She thought it was an actual, physical place - a street market in a shady alley some where.

I blame too much Harry Potter and all the shopping in Diagon Alley!  :)

I knew someone who thought the same thing about black markets!  She said she always wondered why the police didn't just go there and arrest everyone!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jaxsue on October 03, 2013, 03:23:36 PM
Watching a Big Bang Theory rerun last night with Bob Newhart as the boys' childhood hero, Professor Proton.  (Bob may be 85, but he is hilarious.  My DH had never seen him in anything, and was blown away by how funny he is).  Anyway, the professor is doing his kids' science show for Leonard, Sheldon and Penny.  Along with Penny, I was amazed by the potato clock.  I know it's a staple science demo, but I had no idea how it worked - I had to have DH explain it to me, and I'm still not sure I understand it.

Per the bolded: Your DH has been deprived of some great stuff! I was a kid when the first Newhart show was on its first run. It was, and still is, a great show. It holds up. And as for age and being funny, let me suggest a few more guys (male and female) who are freaking funny and  over 80: Betty White, Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner. Those are the ones living. Some now deceased people are worth looking into, as well.

My honest opinion: some of these people are more entertaining/funny than a lot of younger celebrities!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 03, 2013, 03:59:13 PM
Watching a Big Bang Theory rerun last night with Bob Newhart as the boys' childhood hero, Professor Proton.  (Bob may be 85, but he is hilarious.  My DH had never seen him in anything, and was blown away by how funny he is).  Anyway, the professor is doing his kids' science show for Leonard, Sheldon and Penny.  Along with Penny, I was amazed by the potato clock.  I know it's a staple science demo, but I had no idea how it worked - I had to have DH explain it to me, and I'm still not sure I understand it.

Per the bolded: Your DH has been deprived of some great stuff! I was a kid when the first Newhart show was on its first run. It was, and still is, a great show. It holds up. And as for age and being funny, let me suggest a few more guys (male and female) who are freaking funny and  over 80: Betty White, Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner. Those are the ones living. Some now deceased people are worth looking into, as well.

My honest opinion: some of these people are more entertaining/funny than a lot of younger celebrities!

Jonathan Winters: The Stick.  Classic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwWDa1xPTPA
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Syfygeek on October 03, 2013, 04:08:25 PM
Today I was looking at my box of Honey Nut Cheerios as I ate breakfast. In the bottom corner of the box it says something like, "Whole Grain Oat Cereal with Real Honey and Natural Almond Flavoring." I thought, "Oh, almond flavoring, that's nice... Wait. Honey NUT Cheerios. That's the nut!"  ::)

In a similar vein I have a friend who's allergic to nuts, so she's always pointing out things that have nuts that I never thought about before. Like Butterfingers. Which is one of my favorite candy bars. I never thought about the "butter" part trying to evoke peanut butter, they don't really taste like peanut butter to me...

The stuff in the middle of a Butterfinger is the same as a Chick-o-Stick, which is definitely a peanutty candy. I feel like the chocolate coating mitigates the peanut flavor.

Mmmmm, Chick-o-Sticks, I love them!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Twik on October 03, 2013, 04:12:06 PM
Boring super-nerdy nitpick -- re HP, aren't you thinking of Knockturn Alley -- where the dealings of the dodgy kind take place?   Diagon Alley is where the wizarding world's legitimate and above-board commerce, goes on.

Aaaaand, of course, I just sounded that out so that I realized Knockturn Alley is "nocturnally".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: White Dragon on October 03, 2013, 09:08:23 PM
Boring super-nerdy nitpick -- re HP, aren't you thinking of Knockturn Alley -- where the dealings of the dodgy kind take place?   Diagon Alley is where the wizarding world's legitimate and above-board commerce, goes on.

Aaaaand, of course, I just sounded that out so that I realized Knockturn Alley is "nocturnally".

You're quite right, I had the wrong alley. :)

I knew that Diagon Alley was "Diagonally", but I also never realized that about Knockturn.  ::)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on October 04, 2013, 10:12:24 AM
White Dragon wrote:

"She thought it was an actual, physical place - a street market in a shady alley some where."

In her defense, the "black market" describes both the concept of a way to sell wares illegally and the places that pop up on occasion to do that.

turnip wrote:

"I knew someone who thought the same thing about black markets!  She said she always wondered why the police didn't just go there and arrest everyone!"

These days that sort of thing is almost always handled online but back before widespread Internet the black market was often a place.  It was just usually either well hidden or kept moving, and police often did do exactly that when they could find such a meetup.

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: bopper on October 04, 2013, 10:39:40 AM
I am constantly amazed by the people who preach the no white anything (flour, rice, sugar, etc) diet, but don't know the reasons behind it.

I still don't understand the reasons behind so many fad diets banning bananas though, as they are the only way I get potassium and keep me from having muscle cramps.

Because bananas are gross!!! :-)  Yogurt and potatoes and spinach have more potassium than bananas.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Twik on October 04, 2013, 02:49:38 PM
And spinach isn't gross?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lady_disdain on October 04, 2013, 03:33:23 PM
No, it isn't. :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on October 04, 2013, 03:49:26 PM
And spinach isn't gross?
No, it isn't. :)

Canned is gross. That's the way I knew it and even refused to serve it when I worked in food service at University. It made me quite ill, as I illustrated to the boss quite graphically. (Didn't make a mess, but close.)

Then I discovered fresh spinach salad, and now, fresh spinach cooked with onion and bacon -- oh my! It's even worth adjusting my daily intake of protein and fat to get it! You won't get guest salad without spinach in it if you eat here!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lady_disdain on October 04, 2013, 03:50:13 PM
Oooh, that sounds marvelous!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 04, 2013, 03:52:02 PM
Everything is better with bacon.

Luci, have you tried fresh spinach and orange salad with balsamic vinaigrette and crumbled bacon?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: VorFemme on October 04, 2013, 04:09:46 PM
And spinach isn't gross?

Raw spinach isn't gross - it's quite nice in a salad or sandwich.

It is cooked (especially if overcooked) spinach that is gross.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: VorFemme on October 04, 2013, 04:11:54 PM
Everything is better with bacon.

Luci, have you tried fresh spinach and orange salad with balsamic vinaigrette and crumbled bacon?

Orwith fresh strawberries cut in quarters and sliced almonds in the spinach salad.  It even makes raspberry vinaigrette taste good!  I don't usually like raspberry anything...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on October 04, 2013, 04:25:16 PM
And spinach isn't gross?

Raw spinach isn't gross - it's quite nice in a salad or sandwich.

It is cooked (especially if overcooked) spinach that is gross.

I'll do cooked spinach if it's IN something - lasagne, spinach and artichoke dip, etc. But I won't do just cooked spinach. It's disgusting.

RAW spinach, on the other hand..... mmmmmmm!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on October 04, 2013, 04:31:42 PM
Everything is better with bacon.

Luci, have you tried fresh spinach and orange salad with balsamic vinaigrette and crumbled bacon?

Ooooo. Notes taken.

Winter, the time when strawberries aren't so good, but Cuties appear! Spinach and bacon are always available

Thanks!

I get a kick that this thread has turned into a temporary sidecar: a spinach recipe thread. Thanks, everyone.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lady_disdain on October 04, 2013, 05:22:36 PM
I love spinach in all its forms, except slimy and overcooked. Raw, cooked, wilted, creamed, curried, with ricotta. You name it, I probably like it.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Optimoose Prime on October 04, 2013, 08:22:00 PM
Spinach at it's nastyist: brown, from a can, and smelling like decaying seaweed.  We used to get this served for hot lunch in elementary school.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on October 04, 2013, 08:44:18 PM
Spinach at it's nastyist: brown, from a can, and smelling like decaying seaweed.  We used to get this served for hot lunch in elementary school.

If it had a rainbow colored oil slick on it, you must have attended my elementary school! 

Sadly I was well into adulthood before I knew what spinach was supposed to look and taste like.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on October 04, 2013, 09:00:36 PM
Watching a Big Bang Theory rerun last night with Bob Newhart as the boys' childhood hero, Professor Proton.  (Bob may be 85, but he is hilarious.  My DH had never seen him in anything, and was blown away by how funny he is).  Anyway, the professor is doing his kids' science show for Leonard, Sheldon and Penny.  Along with Penny, I was amazed by the potato clock.  I know it's a staple science demo, but I had no idea how it worked - I had to have DH explain it to me, and I'm still not sure I understand it.

Per the bolded: Your DH has been deprived of some great stuff! I was a kid when the first Newhart show was on its first run. It was, and still is, a great show. It holds up. And as for age and being funny, let me suggest a few more guys (male and female) who are freaking funny and  over 80: Betty White, Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner. Those are the ones living. Some now deceased people are worth looking into, as well.

My honest opinion: some of these people are more entertaining/funny than a lot of younger celebrities!


The funniest man ever to live: Tim Conway.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on October 04, 2013, 09:02:34 PM
Watching a Big Bang Theory rerun last night with Bob Newhart as the boys' childhood hero, Professor Proton.  (Bob may be 85, but he is hilarious.  My DH had never seen him in anything, and was blown away by how funny he is).  Anyway, the professor is doing his kids' science show for Leonard, Sheldon and Penny.  Along with Penny, I was amazed by the potato clock.  I know it's a staple science demo, but I had no idea how it worked - I had to have DH explain it to me, and I'm still not sure I understand it.

Per the bolded: Your DH has been deprived of some great stuff! I was a kid when the first Newhart show was on its first run. It was, and still is, a great show. It holds up. And as for age and being funny, let me suggest a few more guys (male and female) who are freaking funny and  over 80: Betty White, Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner. Those are the ones living. Some now deceased people are worth looking into, as well.

My honest opinion: some of these people are more entertaining/funny than a lot of younger celebrities!


The funniest man ever to live: Tim Conway.

That is the weirdest way I've ever seen Gene Wilder spelled.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: andi on October 04, 2013, 09:11:05 PM
:snort laugh:

I still love Bob Hope
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on October 04, 2013, 10:39:14 PM
Steven Wright. Followed by Bob Hope. George Burns. Betty White. John Ritter was a good transition man between the old slapstick and the wit. Johnny Carson was dry and clean. Betty White and Carl Reiner have gone to the dark side, but I'm thinking about forgiving them.

George Carlin could be really funny if he would cut out the offensive language.

Rats! I forgot where this post is going.. Actually, it was obvious a few years ago that we don't need sexual nuances and bad words for humor.

That's what I realized.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: nuit93 on October 05, 2013, 12:27:40 AM

George Carlin could be really funny if he would cut out the offensive language.


Except there's one problem: he's deceased.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: squeakers on October 05, 2013, 12:34:30 AM
Harvey Kormen ... and in that vein: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFyVs_766S4&feature=share

A riff from the 70's that seems apropos given the govt. shutdown going on right now.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on October 05, 2013, 01:24:54 AM
Steven Wright. Followed by Bob Hope. George Burns. Betty White. John Ritter was a good transition man between the old slapstick and the wit. Johnny Carson was dry and clean. Betty White and Carl Reiner have gone to the dark side, but I'm thinking about forgiving them.

George Carlin could be really funny if he would cut out the offensive language.

Rats! I forgot where this post is going.. Actually, it was obvious a few years ago that we don't need sexual nuances and bad words for humor.

That's what I realized.

Carlin was funnier dirty than most comedians are clean, and I prefer clean comedians (check out Jim Gaffigan!)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: zyrs on October 05, 2013, 01:57:47 AM
Spinach at it's nastyist: brown, from a can, and smelling like decaying seaweed.  We used to get this served for hot lunch in elementary school.

Did you go to school in the Pacific Northwest?  It sounds like our cafeteria.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Snooks on October 07, 2013, 02:21:41 PM
Everything is better with bacon.

Nothing is better with bacon, it ruins everything it goes near.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on October 07, 2013, 02:33:07 PM
Everything is better with bacon.

Nothing is better with bacon, it ruins everything it goes near.

I'm in between. I love good bacon. Not too crispy, definitely on the soft side, but not rubbery. Preferrably smoked.

And lucky me, I got a half pound of smoked bacon when I went camping. Oh darn, I suppose since it's not laden with preservatives I'll have to eat it.  ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Hmmmmm on October 07, 2013, 02:45:08 PM
Everything is better with bacon.

Nothing is better with bacon, it ruins everything it goes near.

I'm in between. I love good bacon. Not too crispy, definitely on the soft side, but not rubbery. Preferrably smoked.

And lucky me, I got a half pound of smoked bacon when I went camping. Oh darn, I suppose since it's not laden with preservatives I'll have to eat it.  ;D

I love eating good bacon but I don't like it added to most things as I think it overpowers. I don't like it on cheeseburgers at all.

I do like it crumbled on baked potatoes or with spinach salad. But keep it away from my donuts please.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on October 07, 2013, 03:19:42 PM
Everything is better with bacon.

Nothing is better with bacon, it ruins everything it goes near.

I'm in between. I love good bacon. Not too crispy, definitely on the soft side, but not rubbery. Preferrably smoked.

And lucky me, I got a half pound of smoked bacon when I went camping. Oh darn, I suppose since it's not laden with preservatives I'll have to eat it.  ;D

If you change "love" to "like", I could have posted this.  I am of the mind that bacon is a topping, not an item unto itself.  Burgers, yes.  Pizza, yes.  Breakfast sandwiches, yes.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 07, 2013, 05:03:08 PM
More bacon for me! :D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: hobish on October 07, 2013, 06:15:06 PM

I have bacon lip balm ... weirdly, it is the only one my dog won't eat.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 07, 2013, 06:25:14 PM

I have bacon lip balm ... weirdly, it is the only one my dog won't eat.

Ugh, DH gave me some bacon chapstick for my birthday a few years ago.  One of the dogs got into it and managed to get bits of rancid-bacon-scented chapstick all over the master bathroom.  It reeked for weeks.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on October 07, 2013, 06:59:29 PM
Just posted a recipe for bacon-scallion cornbread on the "What's for dinner?" thread. I love it, it reminds me of a baked hushpuppy.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 07, 2013, 07:03:23 PM
Ok that's where I draw the line.  I like bacon and things flavored with bacon (real bacon)  Chemically produced bacon things are just wrong and an abomination.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 08, 2013, 06:27:21 PM
So "Smells Like Teen Spirit" came on the radio today, and it hit me for the first time in my life that it's probably not a song about  deodorant.  (Not that the lyrics help - Weird Al's version has the line "It's hard to bargle nawdle zouss(?) / With all these marbles in my mouth" and it's scary how much those lyrics sound exactly like the original . . .)

I went and looked up the lyrics and yeah, nothing deodorant-like in there.  But then I found the Wikipedia page and discovered that the title came from when one of Kurt Cobain's friends spray-painted "Kurt Smells Like Teen Spirit" and he assumed it was some statement about him being a revolutionary and it turns out she really was saying he smelled like his girlfriend's deodorant, which was indeed called Teen Spirit.

So my assumption that the song was about deodorant was only half wrong  :P
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Iris on October 08, 2013, 08:29:41 PM
So "Smells Like Teen Spirit" came on the radio today, and it hit me for the first time in my life that it's probably not a song about  deodorant.  (Not that the lyrics help - Weird Al's version has the line "It's hard to bargle nawdle zouss(?) / With all these marbles in my mouth" and it's scary how much those lyrics sound exactly like the original . . .)

I went and looked up the lyrics and yeah, nothing deodorant-like in there.  But then I found the Wikipedia page and discovered that the title came from when one of Kurt Cobain's friends spray-painted "Kurt Smells Like Teen Spirit" and he assumed it was some statement about him being a revolutionary and it turns out she really was saying he smelled like his girlfriend's deodorant, which was indeed called Teen Spirit.

So my assumption that the song was about deodorant was only half wrong  :P

I really hope that's true, because if so, that's hilarious! I'm slightly older than DH and *the* key difference that results because of that is that he was at high school when Smells Like Teen Spirit was released and considers it ground breaking, earth shattering stuff, whereas I was already at uni and it was just that thing that stupid high school-ers were getting all worked up about  ::).  You know, quite catchy, not a bad song, but certainly not a religious experience. The deodorant story is good for at least one good teasing session  >:D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: WolfWay on October 09, 2013, 07:13:28 AM
It was only in the last year or so it finally dawned on me that Madness's "House of Fun" was about a teen boy trying to buy condoms on the sly. <facepalm>
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 09, 2013, 07:42:09 AM
Not sure if I already posted this, but I just had ANOTHER conversation with my grandfather about corn.  specifically farina and hominy. 

I went to the grocery store last night and he asked me to find a box of farina.  I couldn't so I picked up Cream of Wheat which is a brand name farina product.  He insisted that Cream of Wheat was hominy and he HATED it, even after I pointed out the word farina on the box.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on October 09, 2013, 09:08:14 AM
Not sure if I already posted this, but I just had ANOTHER conversation with my grandfather about corn.  specifically farina and hominy. 

I went to the grocery store last night and he asked me to find a box of farina.  I couldn't so I picked up Cream of Wheat which is a brand name farina product.  He insisted that Cream of Wheat was hominy and he HATED it, even after I pointed out the word farina on the box.

Excuse me?  Hominy is made from corn.  cream of Wheat is made from wheat. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 09, 2013, 09:59:25 AM
Not sure if I already posted this, but I just had ANOTHER conversation with my grandfather about corn.  specifically farina and hominy. 

I went to the grocery store last night and he asked me to find a box of farina.  I couldn't so I picked up Cream of Wheat which is a brand name farina product.  He insisted that Cream of Wheat was hominy and he HATED it, even after I pointed out the word farina on the box.

Excuse me?  Hominy is made from corn.  cream of Wheat is made from wheat. 

sigh...let me see if I can explain better.

He thought:
Farina = wheat
hominy = corn/grits
Cream of wheat = hominy that was milled more finely and rebranded to make people believe it's not corn

He likes farina, but refused to eat Cream of Wheat because of this.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: andi on October 09, 2013, 08:47:29 PM
Check the baby food isle - that's where I found Farina last time. I prefer Cream of Wheat
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 09, 2013, 09:15:39 PM
Check the baby food isle - that's where I found Farina last time. I prefer Cream of Wheat

thank you!  the only place that I know to find it is the Super Walmart in the completely opposite direction of where I was going.  The grocery store is somewhere he can walk to.    If I can find it there, I'll let him know
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on October 10, 2013, 09:51:13 AM
Not sure if I already posted this, but I just had ANOTHER conversation with my grandfather about corn.  specifically farina and hominy. 

I went to the grocery store last night and he asked me to find a box of farina.  I couldn't so I picked up Cream of Wheat which is a brand name farina product.  He insisted that Cream of Wheat was hominy and he HATED it, even after I pointed out the word farina on the box.

Excuse me?  Hominy is made from corn.  cream of Wheat is made from wheat. 

sigh...let me see if I can explain better.

He thought:
Farina = wheat
hominy = corn/grits
Cream of wheat = hominy that was milled more finely and rebranded to make people believe it's not corn

He likes farina, but refused to eat Cream of Wheat because of this.

Wait, grits are corn? No wonder I've never liked them...

I'm very particular with corn. It has to be still in-kernel for me to consider eating it, and not in weird foods (like egg drop soup). It all makes so much sense now...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Betelnut on October 10, 2013, 10:23:23 AM
Not sure if I already posted this, but I just had ANOTHER conversation with my grandfather about corn.  specifically farina and hominy. 

I went to the grocery store last night and he asked me to find a box of farina.  I couldn't so I picked up Cream of Wheat which is a brand name farina product.  He insisted that Cream of Wheat was hominy and he HATED it, even after I pointed out the word farina on the box.

Excuse me?  Hominy is made from corn.  cream of Wheat is made from wheat. 

sigh...let me see if I can explain better.

He thought:
Farina = wheat
hominy = corn/grits
Cream of wheat = hominy that was milled more finely and rebranded to make people believe it's not corn

He likes farina, but refused to eat Cream of Wheat because of this.

Wait, grits are corn? No wonder I've never liked them...

I'm very particular with corn. It has to be still in-kernel for me to consider eating it, and not in weird foods (like egg drop soup). It all makes so much sense now...

<sniff  :'(>  No cornbread, tortillas, Fritos...?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 10, 2013, 10:29:10 AM
Not sure if I already posted this, but I just had ANOTHER conversation with my grandfather about corn.  specifically farina and hominy. 

I went to the grocery store last night and he asked me to find a box of farina.  I couldn't so I picked up Cream of Wheat which is a brand name farina product.  He insisted that Cream of Wheat was hominy and he HATED it, even after I pointed out the word farina on the box.

Excuse me?  Hominy is made from corn.  cream of Wheat is made from wheat. 

sigh...let me see if I can explain better.

He thought:
Farina = wheat
hominy = corn/grits
Cream of wheat = hominy that was milled more finely and rebranded to make people believe it's not corn

He likes farina, but refused to eat Cream of Wheat because of this.

Wait, grits are corn? No wonder I've never liked them...

I'm very particular with corn. It has to be still in-kernel for me to consider eating it, and not in weird foods (like egg drop soup). It all makes so much sense now...

<sniff  :'(>  No cornbread, tortillas, Fritos...?

It's ok...more for us :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on October 10, 2013, 12:51:48 PM
Not sure if I already posted this, but I just had ANOTHER conversation with my grandfather about corn.  specifically farina and hominy. 

I went to the grocery store last night and he asked me to find a box of farina.  I couldn't so I picked up Cream of Wheat which is a brand name farina product.  He insisted that Cream of Wheat was hominy and he HATED it, even after I pointed out the word farina on the box.

Excuse me?  Hominy is made from corn.  cream of Wheat is made from wheat. 

sigh...let me see if I can explain better.

He thought:
Farina = wheat
hominy = corn/grits
Cream of wheat = hominy that was milled more finely and rebranded to make people believe it's not corn

He likes farina, but refused to eat Cream of Wheat because of this.

Wait, grits are corn? No wonder I've never liked them...

I'm very particular with corn. It has to be still in-kernel for me to consider eating it, and not in weird foods (like egg drop soup). It all makes so much sense now...

<sniff  :'(>  No cornbread, tortillas, Fritos...?

It's ok...more for us :)

Cornbread is iffy, I don't usually like it but there are rare exceptions. I'm okay with corn tortillas, but like flour ones better. Something in Fritos gives me migraines. Not worth it, even if I did like them before.

So yes, much more for you.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on October 10, 2013, 02:39:39 PM
Betelnut wrote:

"<sniff  :'(>  No cornbread, tortillas, Fritos...?"

She said "...not in weird foods."

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Harriet Jones on October 10, 2013, 06:44:14 PM


Cornbread is iffy, I don't usually like it but there are rare exceptions. I'm okay with corn tortillas, but like flour ones better. Something in Fritos gives me migraines. Not worth it, even if I did like them before.

So yes, much more for you.

Maybe your body just doesn't like corn -- the ingredients in regular Fritos are just corn, corn oil, and salt.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on October 11, 2013, 08:57:16 AM


Cornbread is iffy, I don't usually like it but there are rare exceptions. I'm okay with corn tortillas, but like flour ones better. Something in Fritos gives me migraines. Not worth it, even if I did like them before.

So yes, much more for you.

Maybe your body just doesn't like corn -- the ingredients in regular Fritos are just corn, corn oil, and salt.

It's not the corn, it has something to do with the processing most likely. Corn I'm fine with. Processed corn in tortillas I'm okay with, I just prefer flour. Cornbread is okay. Corn in soup is bizarre most times, but fine. But Fritos? Migraine. And it's not salt either, I can add that to anything if I wanted without any problems.

But it's okay, I don't like Fritos too much anyway, so I'm not missing out. Starburst, and Skittles, though, I am missing out on. :( (Again, with the migraines, but that's some sort of reddish dye they use.)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: squeakers on October 11, 2013, 03:17:56 PM


Cornbread is iffy, I don't usually like it but there are rare exceptions. I'm okay with corn tortillas, but like flour ones better. Something in Fritos gives me migraines. Not worth it, even if I did like them before.

So yes, much more for you.

Maybe your body just doesn't like corn -- the ingredients in regular Fritos are just corn, corn oil, and salt.

It's not the corn, it has something to do with the processing most likely. Corn I'm fine with. Processed corn in tortillas I'm okay with, I just prefer flour. Cornbread is okay. Corn in soup is bizarre most times, but fine. But Fritos? Migraine. And it's not salt either, I can add that to anything if I wanted without any problems.

But it's okay, I don't like Fritos too much anyway, so I'm not missing out. Starburst, and Skittles, though, I am missing out on. :( (Again, with the migraines, but that's some sort of reddish dye they use.)

Could be one of the dyes used or MSG: http://www.fritolay.com/your-health/explaining-ingredients.html
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 16, 2013, 02:56:43 AM
As a child of the 90s, of course I knew about Yogi Bear.  And it wasn't until I was in my 20s that I fully realized the guy who played baseball and said all those famous "yogi-isms" was Yogi Berra, a completely separate person.  It wasn't until a friend was talking about yoga this morning that it hit me

a) Yogi probably wasn't Yogi Berra's real first name, but he may very well have gotten it for saying all those crazy zen-like things (such as "It's not over until it's over" or "half of the game is 90% mental"), and

b) it's probably not a coincidence that "Yogi Berra" and "Yogi Bear" sound so similar.  Seeing as that was kind of the fashion in cartoons and all.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 16, 2013, 05:36:27 AM
As a child of the 90s, of course I knew about Yogi Bear.  And it wasn't until I was in my 20s that I fully realized the guy who played baseball and said all those famous "yogi-isms" was Yogi Berra, a completely separate person.  It wasn't until a friend was talking about yoga this morning that it hit me

a) Yogi probably wasn't Yogi Berra's real first name, but he may very well have gotten it for saying all those crazy zen-like things (such as "It's not over until it's over" or "half of the game is 90% mental"), and

b) it's probably not a coincidence that "Yogi Berra" and "Yogi Bear" sound so similar.  Seeing as that was kind of the fashion in cartoons and all.

Oddly enough, I was recently reading a correspondence on a completely different forum, about the Yogi Bear / Yogi Berra question.  General consensus there, was that it's got to be be that -- name-wise at least -- the baseball player provided some inspiration re the cartoon bear.  It was learnt that Berra's real forenames are Lawrence Peter (apparently, by the way, he's still alive); reputedly, the nickname "Yogi" came from some friends who thought he looked like a Hindu yogi from a movie.

According to Wikipedia: in early days for Yogi Bear, his creators -- the cartoon film makers Hanna-Barbera -- were sued for defamation, by Berra. "H-B's management claimed that the similarity of the names was just a coincidence. Berra withdrew his suit, but the defence was considered implausible, and sources now report that Berra was the inspiration for the name."

The Wiki item gave a wonderful Berra-ism which I'd never encountered before: "Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't go to yours."

(I'm wondering now whether Yoda in "Star Wars", owes at least something to this overall vein of inspiration.)

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 16, 2013, 06:11:34 AM
As a child of the 90s, of course I knew about Yogi Bear.  And it wasn't until I was in my 20s that I fully realized the guy who played baseball and said all those famous "yogi-isms" was Yogi Berra, a completely separate person.  It wasn't until a friend was talking about yoga this morning that it hit me

a) Yogi probably wasn't Yogi Berra's real first name, but he may very well have gotten it for saying all those crazy zen-like things (such as "It's not over until it's over" or "half of the game is 90% mental"), and

b) it's probably not a coincidence that "Yogi Berra" and "Yogi Bear" sound so similar.  Seeing as that was kind of the fashion in cartoons and all.

Oddly enough, I was recently reading a correspondence on a completely different forum, about the Yogi Bear / Yogi Berra question.  General consensus there, was that it's got to be be that -- name-wise at least -- the baseball player provided some inspiration re the cartoon bear.  It was learnt that Berra's real forenames are Lawrence Peter (apparently, by the way, he's still alive); reputedly, the nickname "Yogi" came from some friends who thought he looked like a Hindu yogi from a movie.

According to Wikipedia: in early days for Yogi Bear, his creators -- the cartoon film makers Hanna-Barbera -- were sued for defamation, by Berra. "H-B's management claimed that the similarity of the names was just a coincidence. Berra withdrew his suit, but the defence was considered implausible, and sources now report that Berra was the inspiration for the name."

The Wiki item gave a wonderful Berra-ism which I'd never encountered before: "Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't go to yours."

(I'm wondering now whether Yoda in "Star Wars", owes at least something to this overall vein of inspiration.)



My favorite quote is "90% of the game is half mental."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: JenJay on October 16, 2013, 07:20:50 AM
Leaving the tab on a zipper up allows it to unzip with a bit of gentle pressure. Putting the tab down locks it in place so the zipper won't come undone. I really wish I'd had that lightbulb moment before I tossed DD's jeans that kept coming unzipped.  :P

And yes, I went all around the house trying it on various items to see if it worked on everything. Lol!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on October 16, 2013, 07:57:44 AM
Replacing zippers in clothing is such a PITA. I have a beautiful embroidered skirt that needs to have the zipper replaced. I am just going to do it!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on October 16, 2013, 09:45:47 AM
I've seen another magic trick for zipper tabs. Put a small keyring in the end of the zipper pull and you can hook it over the button on the jeans before you button the fabric on. It stays hidden and keeps the zipper from falling. It's a brilliant plan, I tell you.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Syfygeek on October 16, 2013, 09:57:10 AM
Boring super-nerdy nitpick -- re HP, aren't you thinking of Knockturn Alley -- where the dealings of the dodgy kind take place?   Diagon Alley is where the wizarding world's legitimate and above-board commerce, goes on.

Aaaaand, of course, I just sounded that out so that I realized Knockturn Alley is "nocturnally".

You're quite right, I had the wrong alley. :)

I knew that Diagon Alley was "Diagonally", but I also never realized that about Knockturn.  ::)

And I didn't know either until now, wonder what else I've missed?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on October 16, 2013, 05:37:20 PM
Leaving the tab on a zipper up allows it to unzip with a bit of gentle pressure. Putting the tab down locks it in place so the zipper won't come undone. I really wish I'd had that lightbulb moment before I tossed DD's jeans that kept coming unzipped.  :P

And yes, I went all around the house trying it on various items to see if it worked on everything. Lol!

Not all zippers have that locking mechanism though.  I'm seeing it less and less, and I seem to recall it only being on smaller zippers..
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Moonie on October 17, 2013, 08:26:56 AM
I've seen another magic trick for zipper tabs. Put a small keyring in the end of the zipper pull and you can hook it over the button on the jeans before you button the fabric on. It stays hidden and keeps the zipper from falling. It's a brilliant plan, I tell you.

What a brilliant idea! I would have never thought of that. Also, it would make it so much easier for little boys to zip back up after restroom trips. My grandson would always have a zipper that travelled too far down, and it was hard for his little fingers to dig the tab out so he could zip back up.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on October 17, 2013, 10:28:40 AM
I've seen another magic trick for zipper tabs. Put a small keyring in the end of the zipper pull and you can hook it over the button on the jeans before you button the fabric on. It stays hidden and keeps the zipper from falling. It's a brilliant plan, I tell you.

What a brilliant idea! I would have never thought of that. Also, it would make it so much easier for little boys to zip back up after restroom trips. My grandson would always have a zipper that travelled too far down, and it was hard for his little fingers to dig the tab out so he could zip back up.
I had to dig a tab out for DH yesterday, because his fingers were too big!  8)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on October 17, 2013, 12:33:58 PM
Elfmama wrote:

"I had to dig a tab out for DH yesterday, because his fingers were too big!"

In Man class, they teach you that this is the reason why you always carry a screwdriver or pocket knife.  He must have been the one who got sent for pizza during that lesson.

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on October 17, 2013, 02:12:35 PM
Elfmama wrote:

"I had to dig a tab out for DH yesterday, because his fingers were too big!"

In Man class, they teach you that this is the reason why you always carry a screwdriver or pocket knife.  He must have been the one who got sent for pizza during that lesson.

Virg
He was upstairs, and he came wandering into my sewing room because I keep small screwdrivers in the tool drawer of my sewing machine.  His screwdrivers were downstairs, and I suspect that he didn't want to have a knife that close to his manly bits! :D 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on October 18, 2013, 09:50:01 AM
Elfmama wrote:

"He was upstairs, and he came wandering into my sewing room because I keep small screwdrivers in the tool drawer of my sewing machine."

Well, alright, then.  I won't send the Man police for his card.  This time.

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Snooks on October 20, 2013, 08:48:45 AM
I'm incredibly thankful for the locking mechanism on my jeans zip due to the fact that if I let the zip go all the way down to the bottom the zip comes off.  I am only wearing the jeans places I can disappear to take them off and rethread the zip if need be.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lady_disdain on October 21, 2013, 10:50:16 AM
I'm incredibly thankful for the locking mechanism on my jeans zip due to the fact that if I let the zip go all the way down to the bottom the zip comes off.  I am only wearing the jeans places I can disappear to take them off and rethread the zip if need be.

Could you stitch together the ends with some strong thread, so the zip can't come off?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on October 21, 2013, 11:01:57 AM
Oh, I've been meaning to tell on myself about this one. You know how when you're paying a utility bill or rent or something, there's often a little code they want you to write on your check, like a customer number? Yeah, I was in my early 20s and living in my third apartment on my own before I realized that was actually important. ::) I honestly thought that was just some persnickety thing companies wanted me to do to irritate me. Ah, the brilliance of youth. Then one day I was waiting at my landlord's office and watched someone inputting rent checks on the computer, and I saw that she was looking up accounts by the customer number so she could be sure and assign the check to the right person. In case the name on the check didn't match the account name (like if a parent was paying the rent--college students) or something like that.

Lightbulb moment.

Of course these days I pay only one bill with an actual check, the rest are all online and they know who I am from logging in, so maybe this will become a thing of the past soon.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on October 21, 2013, 12:16:39 PM
Snooks wrote:

"I'm incredibly thankful for the locking mechanism on my jeans zip due to the fact that if I let the zip go all the way down to the bottom the zip comes off.  I am only wearing the jeans places I can disappear to take them off and rethread the zip if need be."

Bend a staple or other small piece of metal around the bottom teeth on the zipper and the slide won't be able to drop off the teeth.

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on October 21, 2013, 12:19:32 PM
Oh, I've been meaning to tell on myself about this one. You know how when you're paying a utility bill or rent or something, there's often a little code they want you to write on your check, like a customer number? Yeah, I was in my early 20s and living in my third apartment on my own before I realized that was actually important. ::) I honestly thought that was just some persnickety thing companies wanted me to do to irritate me. Ah, the brilliance of youth. Then one day I was waiting at my landlord's office and watched someone inputting rent checks on the computer, and I saw that she was looking up accounts by the customer number so she could be sure and assign the check to the right person. In case the name on the check didn't match the account name (like if a parent was paying the rent--college students) or something like that.

Lightbulb moment.

Of course these days I pay only one bill with an actual check, the rest are all online and they know who I am from logging in, so maybe this will become a thing of the past soon.

I had that explained to me in high school. That's why I always give the "remit this portion with payment" part back. A friend said that it was useless, that if the check had all the information that it was fine, but I try to make it easier on whoever's job it is to input payments.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: CuriousParty on October 21, 2013, 12:48:30 PM

I had that explained to me in high school. That's why I always give the "remit this portion with payment" part back. A friend said that it was useless, that if the check had all the information that it was fine, but I try to make it easier on whoever's job it is to input payments.

And all of us who have ever done data entry bless you.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on October 21, 2013, 12:52:56 PM

I had that explained to me in high school. That's why I always give the "remit this portion with payment" part back. A friend said that it was useless, that if the check had all the information that it was fine, but I try to make it easier on whoever's job it is to input payments.

And all of us who have ever done data entry bless you.

Oh yeah, that part, I at least did. :) But I swear, I would look at the instruction that said, "Write your Customer Number on your check," and think, "That's stupid. They're just trying to annoy me. I'm not doing it." ::) Why I thought that was a reasonable motivation for a utility provider or landlord to have, I don't know...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on November 15, 2013, 06:42:05 PM
I looked back six pages in the Coffee Break folder so I could resurrect this thread and tell on myself.

So, okay, this evening I had an... incident with the toilet, and I had to get out the plunger--serious-looking black rubber thing on a wooden handle. Not just the simple rubber suction cup, this is one my dad got me with extra... shape. Anyway, so I dealt with the toilet successfully and then I was trying to clean the plunger, because... ew.

After trying without much success to rinse the inside of the plunger without touching it or indeed even looking at it, I decided to let it soak in the bathroom sink for a while, so I plugged the drain of the sink, filled it with water, and let the plunger soak there. Now, my bathroom sink and I have also had our differences. I've been liberal with the Draino and I finally got it draining slightly faster than molasses and thought I would just have to live with that.

So I let the toilet plunger soak for a while, then I unplugged the sink drain to let the water out. Then I decided to do a little plunging in the sink with the plunger, in the hopes that this would get fresh water inside the plunger in the same places nasty water goes, to help rinse it out. So I plunged a little, over the drain of the sink because there wasn't really any place else, and all of a sudden there was this roaring noise, and then the water just... shot straight down the sink drain, emptying the entire sink in seconds.

I swear to you, I had no idea you could use a toilet plunger to clear a clogged sink drain. I'm going to try it on the bathtub drain next.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: squeakers on November 15, 2013, 07:18:17 PM
I looked back six pages in the Coffee Break folder so I could resurrect this thread and tell on myself.

So, okay, this evening I had an... incident with the toilet, and I had to get out the plunger--serious-looking black rubber thing on a wooden handle. Not just the simple rubber suction cup, this is one my dad got me with extra... shape. Anyway, so I dealt with the toilet successfully and then I was trying to clean the plunger, because... ew.

After trying without much success to rinse the inside of the plunger without touching it or indeed even looking at it, I decided to let it soak in the bathroom sink for a while, so I plugged the drain of the sink, filled it with water, and let the plunger soak there. Now, my bathroom sink and I have also had our differences. I've been liberal with the Draino and I finally got it draining slightly faster than molasses and thought I would just have to live with that.

So I let the toilet plunger soak for a while, then I unplugged the sink drain to let the water out. Then I decided to do a little plunging in the sink with the plunger, in the hopes that this would get fresh water inside the plunger in the same places nasty water goes, to help rinse it out. So I plunged a little, over the drain of the sink because there wasn't really any place else, and all of a sudden there was this roaring noise, and then the water just... shot straight down the sink drain, emptying the entire sink in seconds.

I swear to you, I had no idea you could use a toilet plunger to clear a clogged sink drain. I'm going to try it on the bathtub drain next.

They work pretty good on kitchen sinks too.  Unless there is a clog made of small forks that are trying to mate in the drain.  That required DH to open the pipes and buy a new sink drain thingamabob (the crap catcher).  The crosshatch part of the drain has dissolved so stuff would fall down into the pipes.  Since it is part of the sink itself one can't easily replace it.  So the drainer/strainer whatever is now used on that side of the sink.  It doesn't close so can't fill the sink but at least nothing can fall down that side anymore.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on November 15, 2013, 08:02:43 PM
Leaving the tab on a zipper up allows it to unzip with a bit of gentle pressure. Putting the tab down locks it in place so the zipper won't come undone. I really wish I'd had that lightbulb moment before I tossed DD's jeans that kept coming unzipped.  :P

And yes, I went all around the house trying it on various items to see if it worked on everything. Lol!

This isn't true of *every* zipper in the world--I sewed a hook-and-eye onto a coworker's skirt because her zipper would *not* stay up.

And some zippers have an extra pokey-out part on the underside of the tab to enhance the locking part. I'd never heard of this being true with the non-locking zippers.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on November 15, 2013, 08:13:39 PM
...  Then I decided to do a little plunging in the sink with the plunger, in the hopes that this would get fresh water inside the plunger in the same places nasty water goes, to help rinse it out. So I plunged a little, over the drain of the sink because there wasn't really any place else, and all of a sudden there was this roaring noise, and then the water just... shot straight down the sink drain, emptying the entire sink in seconds.

I swear to you, I had no idea you could use a toilet plunger to clear a clogged sink drain. I'm going to try it on the bathtub drain next.

Though, I tried this on the kitchen sink, and the pipe popped off. Apparently the drain isn't firmly locked into the elbow pipe. So that air can pass or something. Or, maybe it's just my sink.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: snowfire on November 15, 2013, 08:32:02 PM
Your pipe should NOT have popped off.  There has to be a vent in the plumbing in order for everything to drain properly, but the drain pipe and trap is not supposed to be that loose!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: baglady on November 15, 2013, 09:13:25 PM
I never understood the "write your account number on your check" thing, because I always mail the portion of the bill you're instructed to enclose back *with* my check, so why do I have to put it on the check as well? I do it, but I don't know why it's important.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on November 15, 2013, 09:18:25 PM
I never understood the "write your account number on your check" thing, because I always mail the portion of the bill you're instructed to enclose back *with* my check, so why do I have to put it on the check as well? I do it, but I don't know why it's important.
If the check should happen to get separated from the bill, they still know where to post it.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: m2kbug on November 15, 2013, 10:54:05 PM
It was just a few years ago I learned what those little tabs on the sides of the saran wrap/tin foil/wax paper were for.

In case someone else doesn't know, you push them in to keep the roll in place and from popping out when you pull out the wrap/foil.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: NyaChan on November 15, 2013, 11:42:52 PM
It was just a few years ago I learned what those little tabs on the sides of the saran wrap/tin foil/wax paper were for.

In case someone else doesn't know, you push them in to keep the roll in place and from popping out when you pull out the wrap/foil.

Seriously??  Well I've learned another new thing today...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Nikko-chan on November 15, 2013, 11:56:19 PM
It was just a few years ago I learned what those little tabs on the sides of the saran wrap/tin foil/wax paper were for.

In case someone else doesn't know, you push them in to keep the roll in place and from popping out when you pull out the wrap/foil.

Seriously??  Well I've learned another new thing today...

me too
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: blue2000 on November 16, 2013, 07:10:26 AM

I swear to you, I had no idea you could use a toilet plunger to clear a clogged sink drain. I'm going to try it on the bathtub drain next.

Didn't work on mine. I got the most disgusting black goop out of the drain (seriously, I have no idea what this stuff is ??? :-X ) but it is still running slow as heck. Also tried boiling hot water, vinegar, and baking soda. Nada.

I am allergic to some ingredients in chemical drain cleaners, but I may have to put a mask and gloves on and go for it anyway.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: oogyda on November 16, 2013, 10:18:01 AM
Have you disconnected and cleaned the "p" trap?  You should be able to loosen it by hand.  Have something under it to catch the water and be prepared to be grossed out. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on November 16, 2013, 10:19:00 AM
It was just a few years ago I learned what those little tabs on the sides of the saran wrap/tin foil/wax paper were for.

In case someone else doesn't know, you push them in to keep the roll in place and from popping out when you pull out the wrap/foil.

Seriously??  Well I've learned another new thing today...

Don't feel too bad--I don't think they used to be there .
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on November 16, 2013, 12:16:30 PM
Have you disconnected and cleaned the "p" trap?  You should be able to loosen it by hand.  Have something under it to catch the water and be prepared to be grossed out.

Even before we got to discussing pipes popping off, I went and checked my bathroom sink pipe, to make sure the remarkably fast draining water wasn't just draining into the cabinet because the pipe broke. All seemed fine. I don't know what the blockage was--old toothpaste, maybe? But it is sure gone now.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: blue2000 on November 16, 2013, 12:27:29 PM
Have you disconnected and cleaned the "p" trap?  You should be able to loosen it by hand.  Have something under it to catch the water and be prepared to be grossed out. 

Well, there's something I didn't know! ;D

I don't think it is possible in my case though. A search under the sink produced a very corroded pipe and no pipe wrench. Don't know where the dang thing got to. I think I might have to keep trying with the other methods and leave the pipe to the landlord.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dindrane on November 16, 2013, 12:28:28 PM
My bathroom sink gets a lot of hair in it (even though I never brush my hair over the sink, I have to at least style it there, as the only mirror in the apartment is right over that sink). Chemicals don't work, vinegar and baking soda don't work, hot water doesn't work. The hair gets wrapped around just about everything and won't budge. I finally went out and bought a plastic tool called a Zip-it that has little sharp prongs sticking out from a flexible strip of plastic. You stick it down your drain and pull it back up again, and it catches the hair so you can pull it out.

It did end up popping the drain stopper off the little metal thing that makes it go up and down, but it didn't break it. Since I live in an apartment complex, we're going to have the maintenance people come and fix that, but I don't think it's all that complicated to fix yourself.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: oogyda on November 16, 2013, 07:30:58 PM
It was just a few years ago I learned what those little tabs on the sides of the saran wrap/tin foil/wax paper were for.

In case someone else doesn't know, you push them in to keep the roll in place and from popping out when you pull out the wrap/foil.

Seriously??  Well I've learned another new thing today...

I learned that little trick from my Grandma about 45 years ago.  Didn't think to ask if they've "always" been like that.
Don't feel too bad--I don't think they used to be there .
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on November 16, 2013, 07:37:14 PM
It was just a few years ago I learned what those little tabs on the sides of the saran wrap/tin foil/wax paper were for.

In case someone else doesn't know, you push them in to keep the roll in place and from popping out when you pull out the wrap/foil.

Seriously??  Well I've learned another new thing today...

I learned that little trick from my Grandma about 45 years ago. Didn't think to ask if they've "always" been like that.
Don't feel too bad--I don't think they used to be there .

I have a feeling that that's just how virtually all boxes were made at the time and you just had a brilliant Grandmother who came up with that excellent trick!  I can't wait to go downstairs, pull out all my waxed paper, aluminum foil and plastic wrap rolls to try it out.   :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: #borecore on November 16, 2013, 07:42:39 PM
How to flip a coin without having it go helter-skelter. My husband was flipping a coin over and over in his hand to entertain the cat and I asked him how he could get it to keep going straight up and down, each time. Has to do with flicking the finger with the thumb, I guess.

He couldn't believe I didn't know how to do it; I got better but still am not as steady as him.

He still hasn't figured out how to teach me to skip stones--one of those things I probably will never master, while his skim for dozens of yards.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Seraphia on November 19, 2013, 09:40:24 AM
DH just boggled my mind the other day with this one.

I've been doing some baking recently, which meant we had to stock up on some things. I was in the kitchen dithering between two containers, trying to remember which one I had put the baking powder in. I said to DH: "Now, I know one of them is fizzy when you taste it, but I can never remember which one."

"Oh, that's easy," says DH, "Soda - that's where soda pop gets its name."

....I had never, ever, realized that. Derp!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Blondie on November 19, 2013, 04:20:18 PM
How to flip a coin without having it go helter-skelter. My husband was flipping a coin over and over in his hand to entertain the cat and I asked him how he could get it to keep going straight up and down, each time. Has to do with flicking the finger with the thumb, I guess.

He couldn't believe I didn't know how to do it; I got better but still am not as steady as him.

He still hasn't figured out how to teach me to skip stones--one of those things I probably will never master, while his skim for dozens of yards.

When trying to skip stones, flick your wrist like you are throwing a frisbee in a straight line. That is what it finally took for me to figure it out.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on November 20, 2013, 07:57:37 AM
Sourdough bread starter is flour, water and yeast. Food for sourdough starter is flour and water. All containers that have been used for either starter or food must be washed up INSTANTLY and not left until the dishwasher is full or you have a sink full. That stuff is the same as the flour and water glue that the nursery children use, and if you let it dry, it hardens on and sticks like...

Well, like glue.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on November 20, 2013, 09:48:16 AM
How to flip a coin without having it go helter-skelter. My husband was flipping a coin over and over in his hand to entertain the cat and I asked him how he could get it to keep going straight up and down, each time. Has to do with flicking the finger with the thumb, I guess.

He couldn't believe I didn't know how to do it; I got better but still am not as steady as him.

He still hasn't figured out how to teach me to skip stones--one of those things I probably will never master, while his skim for dozens of yards.

When trying to skip stones, flick your wrist like you are throwing a frisbee in a straight line. That is what it finally took for me to figure it out.

See, when I was taught, it was different. You bring your hand back to the side, and as it's being let go, you snap your wrist forward to give it backspin to skip it. Dad could always get it all the way across the river, I could only get it halfway, but if I tried the frisbee method, it just plopped and sank. Like a stone.

I'm telling on BF for this one. When he was cleaning the last of the ick out of his basement, he accidentally managed to kill the pilot light on the water heater. So no hot water. I had to wash the dishes anyway, they were getting RANK (a week of not being washed and in standing water will do that). So I rinsed one pan out well, filled it, and put it on the stove. What could wait for the hot water and dishwasher got a cold water pre-wash with soap and loaded, and all the pots and pans that are hand wash anyway waited for the hot water and got a good scrubbing. Then I started cooking dinner.

He came home and was surprised that I had managed to wash the dishes with hot water. Because if it doesn't come hot out of a pipe, there's obviously no way to do it, I suppose? I told him his stove was working, and could heat water very well if necessary, and he just started laughing because he never would have thought of that.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: perpetua on November 20, 2013, 11:57:43 AM
OK, this is really embarrassing, but I figure it's time to out myself if only to give you all a good laugh at my expense.

My mum, gawd rest her soul, was blessed with the gift of... perkiness. Sadly I did not inherit her genes in this department and am very definitely not. Consequently, when she put her bra on, she never had to do any... adjusting; she just did it up and was good to go. I learned how to do mine from watching her.

It wasn't until I went for my first proper bra fitting at about the age of 35 - until then I'd always measured myself using the sizing guides - that I realised you were supposed to... adjust yourself so all of you was pointing in the same direction, so to speak.

I dread to think how many years I walked around with the girls looking like Marty Feldman as a result.  :-[

BTW, whoever posted the zip tip - thank you! I never knew that either. You saved me from chucking away my favourite pair of jeans.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TOLady on November 20, 2013, 12:34:10 PM
I've got 2:

Gorilla (guerrilla) warfare - how the heck did they get apes to fire guns?  :o
Trading chairs (shares) on the stock market - I had this image of people trading stacking chairs in a big room  ;D

Oh - and my brother can't whistle. I can, but can't use my fingers to do that screeching, ear-piercing whistle with my mouth.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on November 20, 2013, 12:37:42 PM
Oh - and my brother can't whistle. I can, but can't use my fingers to do that screeching, ear-piercing whistle with my mouth.

I can't either.  I know the theory, and with a lot of work I can eventually make that breathy pre-whistling noise a teakettle makes before it gets going, but I have never been able to whistle for real.

I did teach myself to sing two notes at once, though (like this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPu9XMMY1Y8)), which I think is way cooler  ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on November 20, 2013, 01:10:20 PM
My bathroom sink gets a lot of hair in it (even though I never brush my hair over the sink, I have to at least style it there, as the only mirror in the apartment is right over that sink). Chemicals don't work, vinegar and baking soda don't work, hot water doesn't work. The hair gets wrapped around just about everything and won't budge. I finally went out and bought a plastic tool called a Zip-it that has little sharp prongs sticking out from a flexible strip of plastic. You stick it down your drain and pull it back up again, and it catches the hair so you can pull it out.

It did end up popping the drain stopper off the little metal thing that makes it go up and down, but it didn't break it. Since I live in an apartment complex, we're going to have the maintenance people come and fix that, but I don't think it's all that complicated to fix yourself.

We have those at home, we get a lot of hair everywhere (and none of it from the dogs....darn it, wish I could blame them), and those are like the only things that will actually work! Now in our shower we have a "hair catcher" type thing. It's a little plastic deal, goes right over the drain and catches all the hair. You do have to clean it out after a few showers, but it's better then dealing with a gunk of gross hair.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TOLady on November 20, 2013, 01:58:07 PM
Just thought of another one - not mine, but a previous boss.

He would dictate and I would transcribe his notes. I could talk until I was blue in the face, but he would not believe that it is "for all intents and purposes", not "for all intensive purposes" and it's NOT "at first blood", but it's "at first blush".  ::)

Drove me nuts!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on November 20, 2013, 02:16:37 PM
Just had a co-worker, an otherwise intelligent woman, who tried to convince me that Puerto Rico became the 51st state of the United States last year. I don't know if she thought it was a conspiracy that nobody knew about it, or why she thought we didn't have the fancy new flag she used as evidence, but it took her a bit of convincing to prove otherwise.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on November 20, 2013, 02:57:02 PM
Oh - and my brother can't whistle. I can, but can't use my fingers to do that screeching, ear-piercing whistle with my mouth.

I can't either.  I know the theory, and with a lot of work I can eventually make that breathy pre-whistling noise a teakettle makes before it gets going, but I have never been able to whistle for real.

I did teach myself to sing two notes at once, though (like this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPu9XMMY1Y8)), which I think is way cooler  ;D

You know that song about the kid who wants 2 front teeth for Christmas so he can learn to whistle?

I was 6 when I knocked out my (permanent) front teeth. Learned to whistle fine. When I later got braces and fake teeth to go with them, and haven't been able to whistle well since.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Syfygeek on November 20, 2013, 04:06:56 PM
Just thought of another one - not mine, but a previous boss.

He would dictate and I would transcribe his notes. I could talk until I was blue in the face, but he would not believe that it is "for all intents and purposes", not "for all intensive purposes" and it's NOT "at first blood", but it's "at first blush".  ::)

Drove me nuts!

The President's Assistant sent out a company wide email using "for all intensive purposes" her second or third week here and I almost choked on my coffee!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on November 21, 2013, 06:35:45 AM
Gorilla (guerrilla) warfare - how the heck did they get apes to fire guns?  :o

Well, there was a rumour at the height of the Cold War, to the effect that Stalin's scientists were working to develop a strain of half-human-half-ape, immensely big and strong, super-soldiers -- maybe using yetis which lived in the wild in Russia, but whose existence was hushed-up by the Soviet government.  If any such thing was attempted; it would seem that it didn't work...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Ms_Cellany on November 21, 2013, 10:34:09 AM

Gorilla (guerrilla) warfare - how the heck did they get apes to fire guns?  :o


"Guerilla" is Spanish. It means "little war."  (The Spanish for war is "guerra.")

In Spanish, it's pronounced "gair-ee-ya" or "wair-ee-ya."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TOLady on November 21, 2013, 01:33:23 PM
"Guerilla" is Spanish. It means "little war."  (The Spanish for war is "guerra.")

In Spanish, it's pronounced "gair-ee-ya" or "wair-ee-ya."

I was so young and didn't really read at that age, I just heard it on the news and thought it amazing that apes were trained to handle guns  ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on November 21, 2013, 02:45:00 PM
"Guerilla" is Spanish. It means "little war."  (The Spanish for war is "guerra.")

In Spanish, it's pronounced "gair-ee-ya" or "wair-ee-ya."

I was so young and didn't really read at that age, I just heard it on the news and thought it amazing that apes were trained to handle guns  ;D

Well, for all intensive purposes, it is a miracle that they trained those apes.  >:D  >:D  >:D

I kid, I kid, I thought it was giant apes waging wars as well.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on November 21, 2013, 03:27:52 PM
Gorilla (guerrilla) warfare - how the heck did they get apes to fire guns?  :o

When I first learned about guerrilla marketing (in college), I couldn't get the image of a gorilla walking around handing out flyers out of my head. In fact when we took a test and had our little note card of notes, mine said "Apes with flyers" under Marketing Types.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on November 22, 2013, 03:27:41 AM
Before posts are made, to the effect of "shut up about 'guerrilla / gorilla', already"; I gather that this word-similarity has been a source of confusion and mirth for the past two centuries.  If I have things rightly, the Spanish word "guerrilla" (little war) originated in reference to the resistance on the part of the ordinary folk, to the 1808 -- 1814 occupation of Spain by Napoleon's armies.

One place where this word-mix-up jest shows up, is in the IMO hilariously funny little book "1066 And All That", by the British writers Sellar and Yeatman, published 1930. The book is a satire on the often stilted and unimaginative teaching of history in schools; and the confused memories of it long after, on the part of those who were taught.  The book refers to the Napoleonic episode as the "gorilla" war in Spain, "so called because of the primitive Spanish method of fighting".  Alongside is a little cartoon showing a Spanish peasant advancing with a snarl, in great-ape "tear the human apart" pose, on a terrified French soldier.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: hobish on November 25, 2013, 02:45:57 PM
Oh - and my brother can't whistle. I can, but can't use my fingers to do that screeching, ear-piercing whistle with my mouth.

I can't either.  I know the theory, and with a lot of work I can eventually make that breathy pre-whistling noise a teakettle makes before it gets going, but I have never been able to whistle for real.

I did teach myself to sing two notes at once, though (like this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPu9XMMY1Y8)), which I think is way cooler  ;D

You know that song about the kid who wants 2 front teeth for Christmas so he can learn to whistle?

I was 6 when I knocked out my (permanent) front teeth. Learned to whistle fine. When I later got braces and fake teeth to go with them, and haven't been able to whistle well since.

That is too weird. The same thing happened to me, except I was around 12 when I knocked my teeth out in an ice skating accident.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Katana_Geldar on November 25, 2013, 09:44:33 PM
Gorilla (guerrilla) warfare - how the heck did they get apes to fire guns?  :o

When I first learned about guerrilla marketing (in college), I couldn't get the image of a gorilla walking around handing out flyers out of my head. In fact when we took a test and had our little note card of notes, mine said "Apes with flyers" under Marketing Types.

That would work, I'd be too intimidated by the gorilla not to take one.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Twik on November 25, 2013, 10:57:46 PM
Just had a co-worker, an otherwise intelligent woman, who tried to convince me that Puerto Rico became the 51st state of the United States last year. I don't know if she thought it was a conspiracy that nobody knew about it, or why she thought we didn't have the fancy new flag she used as evidence, but it took her a bit of convincing to prove otherwise.

I ... she had her own flag with 51 stars? Seriously?

I know last year was an election year down there, but I think a whole new state would have made the news at some point.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: zyrs on November 26, 2013, 11:52:24 AM
Just had a co-worker, an otherwise intelligent woman, who tried to convince me that Puerto Rico became the 51st state of the United States last year. I don't know if she thought it was a conspiracy that nobody knew about it, or why she thought we didn't have the fancy new flag she used as evidence, but it took her a bit of convincing to prove otherwise.

This seems to be something that a few people are confused about - I have seen a couple stories of people being convinced that Peurto Rico is now the 51st state.  I think it is because they voted to seek statehood and other people don't understand that that still needs to be approved.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on November 26, 2013, 12:43:54 PM
Just had a co-worker, an otherwise intelligent woman, who tried to convince me that Puerto Rico became the 51st state of the United States last year. I don't know if she thought it was a conspiracy that nobody knew about it, or why she thought we didn't have the fancy new flag she used as evidence, but it took her a bit of convincing to prove otherwise.

I ... she had her own flag with 51 stars? Seriously?

I know last year was an election year down there, but I think a whole new state would have made the news at some point.

Well, she didn't have the flag herself, but she found pictures online. So it must be true, right? Because there was a website that said it was true.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on November 26, 2013, 08:34:24 PM
Just had a co-worker, an otherwise intelligent woman, who tried to convince me that Puerto Rico became the 51st state of the United States last year. I don't know if she thought it was a conspiracy that nobody knew about it, or why she thought we didn't have the fancy new flag she used as evidence, but it took her a bit of convincing to prove otherwise.

I ... she had her own flag with 51 stars? Seriously?

I know last year was an election year down there, but I think a whole new state would have made the news at some point.

Well, she didn't have the flag herself, but she found pictures online. So it must be true, right? Because there was a website that said it was true.
Might have been this one: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/08/puerto-rico-state-flag_n_2090769.html

Googling for "51 Star Flag" brings up a number of images.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on November 26, 2013, 08:50:05 PM
Just had a co-worker, an otherwise intelligent woman, who tried to convince me that Puerto Rico became the 51st state of the United States last year. I don't know if she thought it was a conspiracy that nobody knew about it, or why she thought we didn't have the fancy new flag she used as evidence, but it took her a bit of convincing to prove otherwise.

I ... she had her own flag with 51 stars? Seriously?

I know last year was an election year down there, but I think a whole new state would have made the news at some point.

Well, she didn't have the flag herself, but she found pictures online. So it must be true, right? Because there was a website that said it was true.
Might have been this one: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/08/puerto-rico-state-flag_n_2090769.html

Googling for "51 Star Flag" brings up a number of images.

When I was 7 during the first Eisenhower convention, I got really confused about why Puerto Rico was at the convention. Mom said it was a protectorate, and now I'm still confused. But at least I know it's not a state!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on November 27, 2013, 04:44:07 AM
US flag matters -- going off from the real world, into speculative fiction...  considerable play is made with these things, in Harry Turtledove's "Southern Victory" alternative-history novel series.  The premise: the Confederacy wins the Civil War in 1862, and successfully secedes -- there ensues a protracted rather nasty situation, in which the United States and the Confederate States are permanently at each other's throats, and fight war after war with each other.

In this time-line of Turtledove's, the "political" map differs considerably from that in "our time-line".  For whatever reason, there are overall fewer separate states in the United States -- for instance, North and South Dakota are just the one state of Dakota. Various states on the USA / CSA border change hands, or appear / disappear, from time to time. IIRC -- Puerto Rico, as mentioned in PPs, still belongs to Spain in this time-line, in which there is no Spanish-American War. Certainly, in Turtledove's time-line, Alaska is still Russian territory.

What with all the above, it can be something of a puzzle to keep track of how many states the United States has, at any particular point in time.  People who are geeks over this series, have lots of fun homing in on references in the text, to the number of stars on the United States' flag, and discoursing / disputing over whether the cited number is in fact correct...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: sunnygirl on November 27, 2013, 07:46:13 PM
There's a very famous British fictional character named Bulldog Drummond (who James Bond is based on), and in his first book, he actually fights a gorilla with his bare hands and wins.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Tea Drinker on November 27, 2013, 08:10:37 PM
US flag matters -- going off from the real world, into speculative fiction...  considerable play is made with these things, in Harry Turtledove's "Southern Victory" alternative-history novel series.  The premise: the Confederacy wins the Civil War in 1862, and successfully secedes -- there ensues a protracted rather nasty situation, in which the United States and the Confederate States are permanently at each other's throats, and fight war after war with each other.

In this time-line of Turtledove's, the "political" map differs considerably from that in "our time-line".  For whatever reason, there are overall fewer separate states in the United States -- for instance, North and South Dakota are just the one state of Dakota. Various states on the USA / CSA border change hands, or appear / disappear, from time to time. IIRC -- Puerto Rico, as mentioned in PPs, still belongs to Spain in this time-line, in which there is no Spanish-American War. Certainly, in Turtledove's time-line, Alaska is still Russian territory.

What with all the above, it can be something of a puzzle to keep track of how many states the United States has, at any particular point in time.  People who are geeks over this series, have lots of fun homing in on references in the text, to the number of stars on the United States' flag, and discoursing / disputing over whether the cited number is in fact correct...

I believe we have two states of North and South Dakota in part because that meant two more northern senators when the Dakotas became states rather than a territory. (I think Maine was given statehood to balance a new state in the south, on the same basis.)

And yes, in that sort of alternate timeline the United States wouldn't have had the money to buy Alaska in 1867, though if I were doing world-building I might make it part of British Canada, since the Russians would still have wanted the money.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: blue2000 on November 27, 2013, 11:12:01 PM
US flag matters -- going off from the real world, into speculative fiction...  considerable play is made with these things, in Harry Turtledove's "Southern Victory" alternative-history novel series.  The premise: the Confederacy wins the Civil War in 1862, and successfully secedes -- there ensues a protracted rather nasty situation, in which the United States and the Confederate States are permanently at each other's throats, and fight war after war with each other.

In this time-line of Turtledove's, the "political" map differs considerably from that in "our time-line".  For whatever reason, there are overall fewer separate states in the United States -- for instance, North and South Dakota are just the one state of Dakota. Various states on the USA / CSA border change hands, or appear / disappear, from time to time. IIRC -- Puerto Rico, as mentioned in PPs, still belongs to Spain in this time-line, in which there is no Spanish-American War. Certainly, in Turtledove's time-line, Alaska is still Russian territory.

What with all the above, it can be something of a puzzle to keep track of how many states the United States has, at any particular point in time.  People who are geeks over this series, have lots of fun homing in on references in the text, to the number of stars on the United States' flag, and discoursing / disputing over whether the cited number is in fact correct...

I believe we have two states of North and South Dakota in part because that meant two more northern senators when the Dakotas became states rather than a territory. (I think Maine was given statehood to balance a new state in the south, on the same basis.)

And yes, in that sort of alternate timeline the United States wouldn't have had the money to buy Alaska in 1867, though if I were doing world-building I might make it part of British Canada, since the Russians would still have wanted the money.

Canada was actively trying to get it, so yes. If the US did not want it, it would be a province of Canada.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on November 28, 2013, 04:41:40 AM
Only in these books of Mr. Turtledove's, he has other plans for Canada -- not nice ones.  The novels tell of, altogether, a pretty miserable "time-line"...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Yarnspinner on December 08, 2013, 01:07:10 PM
Never had a dishwasher before.  For the last nine years, I have had one.  Could not figure out why there was goop left over on my glasses and why I had to keep washing them by hand, why utensils got all streaky, why there was build up in the bottom of the washer.

And then I realized that when people were talking about "rinsing" the dishes, they weren't referring to a rinse cycle....they were referring to a lovely little liquid you poured into a special spot inside the washer which would spray the dishes and make them less likely to have junk left behind, decreased the scum that builds up (which I was cleaning out every time I used the machine) and made utensils shiny! 

How could I have gotten to this age and not known that?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: VorFemme on December 08, 2013, 02:49:38 PM
If you have lime in the local water - either white vinegar, cider vinegar, or a lime & scale remover will do wonders on the dishwasher.

If the glasses are really scummy looking - I leave them in the dishwasher with the lime & scale remover & run it immediately with the hottest water that I can get to the dishwasher.  Clean glasses look so much nicer...but I don't use that stuff with metal in the dishwasher.  Metal gets run with vinegar only...partly because it doesn't seem to have the gunk build up nearly as much & partly to protect the metal.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on December 08, 2013, 03:28:15 PM
If you have lime in the local water - either white vinegar, cider vinegar, or a lime & scale remover will do wonders on the dishwasher.

If the glasses are really scummy looking - I leave them in the dishwasher with the lime & scale remover & run it immediately with the hottest water that I can get to the dishwasher.  Clean glasses look so much nicer...but I don't use that stuff with metal in the dishwasher.  Metal gets run with vinegar only...partly because it doesn't seem to have the gunk build up nearly as much & partly to protect the metal.

Where do you put that? I used to use a rinse aid in the little Jet Dry thing, but haven't had to lately. I always hand rinse my dishes before washing and only use liquid dishwasher detergent - it doesn't eat the dishes so much.

I don't use the dishwasher for just the two of us.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on December 08, 2013, 04:08:34 PM
If you have lime in the local water - either white vinegar, cider vinegar, or a lime & scale remover will do wonders on the dishwasher.

If the glasses are really scummy looking - I leave them in the dishwasher with the lime & scale remover & run it immediately with the hottest water that I can get to the dishwasher.  Clean glasses look so much nicer...but I don't use that stuff with metal in the dishwasher.  Metal gets run with vinegar only...partly because it doesn't seem to have the gunk build up nearly as much & partly to protect the metal.

Where do you put that? I used to use a rinse aid in the little Jet Dry thing, but haven't had to lately. I always hand rinse my dishes before washing and only use liquid dishwasher detergent - it doesn't eat the dishes so much.

I don't use the dishwasher for just the two of us.

You put it in the rinse fluid container
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: VorFemme on December 08, 2013, 04:27:47 PM
I just pour it into the bottom of the dishwasher & start the thing running right away - no detergent.  Just vinegar & hot water or lime remover & hot water - then a rinse of hot water.

It can be amazing what just hot water will get off some things....

Same thing in the clothes washer - towels & hot water once in a while to get the detergent scum & stuff scrubbed out of the tub (and out of the towels) - then bleach in a second run through without the towels - just in case there is anything growing in there....lots of bleach.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Snooks on December 08, 2013, 04:50:10 PM
When wrapping gifts rather than trying to wrestle the paper around the gift to see which way you need to wrap it (length wise or width wise) cut a strip off the roll and see which way it wraps the best.  If anyone has a way of stopping the cat from investigating gift wrapping I'd like to hear it...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on December 08, 2013, 05:06:54 PM
When wrapping gifts rather than trying to wrestle the paper around the gift to see which way you need to wrap it (length wise or width wise) cut a strip off the roll and see which way it wraps the best.  If anyone has a way of stopping the cat from investigating gift wrapping I'd like to hear it...

I set up a table in my bedroom and close the door to wrap presents.  I used to wrap on the floor in the living room.  Yeah, that didn't work so well.

Yoga and cats doesn't work very well, either.   ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on December 08, 2013, 05:58:11 PM
I enjoy the show 'Revolution' and I always wondered where I knew the actor who plays Miles from.  And I never think to Google it - hard to teach an old dog new tricks.   :)

I'm embarrassed to admit that I recorded 'Breaking Dawn, Part 1' and suddenly realized that the same actor plays Bella's father, Charlie.

Embarrassed that I didn't make the connection and embarrassed further still that I'm watching this thing but there isn't much on TV these days, unless you want to watch endless Christmas specials.  I do love sappy movies with Disney endings but you can only take so many of them before you start losing it.   ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on December 08, 2013, 07:17:31 PM
When wrapping gifts rather than trying to wrestle the paper around the gift to see which way you need to wrap it (length wise or width wise) cut a strip off the roll and see which way it wraps the best.  If anyone has a way of stopping the cat from investigating gift wrapping I'd like to hear it...

I set up a table in my bedroom and close the door to wrap presents.  I used to wrap on the floor in the living room.  Yeah, that didn't work so well.

Yoga and cats doesn't work very well, either.   ;D

I've just resigned myself to the fact that my gift recipients can tell what color dogs I have just by looking at the scotch tape on their presents  :P
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: squeakers on December 08, 2013, 09:39:56 PM
I had a "D'oh" moment when I was chopping up the leftover turkey.  I was thinking that my turkey meat looked nothing like the turkey bits in potpies nor like the slices in TV dinners.  Then I got to thinking about the texture and color and... yeah, I finally figured out those "perfect" bits and slices were because the meat was processed, extruded and then cut into perfect bits or slices.

I still like the taste of squished meat... but my turkey noodle was better than the potpies etc LOL
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on December 08, 2013, 09:45:41 PM
I just pour it into the bottom of the dishwasher & start the thing running right away - no detergent.  Just vinegar & hot water or lime remover & hot water - then a rinse of hot water.

It can be amazing what just hot water will get off some things....


At my old job, there was a dishwasher in the employee kitchenette, but no soap. People ran it anyway, without detergent. Stuff still came out apparently clean.

When wrapping gifts rather than trying to wrestle the paper around the gift to see which way you need to wrap it (length wise or width wise) cut a strip off the roll and see which way it wraps the best.  If anyone has a way of stopping the cat from investigating gift wrapping I'd like to hear it...

This is brilliant! There are (at least in my collection) only 3 basic sizes. I'd only need 3 strips, and I could use them over and over again!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on December 08, 2013, 10:24:51 PM
When wrapping gifts rather than trying to wrestle the paper around the gift to see which way you need to wrap it (length wise or width wise) cut a strip off the roll and see which way it wraps the best.  If anyone has a way of stopping the cat from investigating gift wrapping I'd like to hear it...

I set up a table in my bedroom and close the door to wrap presents.  I used to wrap on the floor in the living room.  Yeah, that didn't work so well.

Yoga and cats doesn't work very well, either.   ;D

Wrap the cat first?  :) There was a u tube a couple of years ago demonstrating how......
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Ms_Cellany on December 08, 2013, 11:46:36 PM

Wrap the cat first?  :) There was a u tube a couple of years ago demonstrating how......


That would be this one How to Wrap a Cat for Christmas (http://youtu.be/jm3dm5J5r0A)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on December 09, 2013, 12:07:08 PM
When wrapping gifts rather than trying to wrestle the paper around the gift to see which way you need to wrap it (length wise or width wise) cut a strip off the roll and see which way it wraps the best.  If anyone has a way of stopping the cat from investigating gift wrapping I'd like to hear it...

This is brilliant! There are (at least in my collection) only 3 basic sizes. I'd only need 3 strips, and I could use them over and over again!

A long time ago I demonstrated my budding scientific ability by creating cardboard templates for the amount of gift wrap needed for a typical video tape, CD, and later DVD.  :P Then I would just cut out a pile of paper in the right size and push the rolls away. It's not so useful now because I don't tend to give as many standard-size gifts any more.

On another note, sometimes I read things about dishwashers and clothes washers and I think, gosh, someday I will be in a situation where I need to know that, and I just don't, and someone will think I'm an idiot and wonder how I got to this age without knowing that. ::) <--at self. I don't pre-wash my dishes, for example. Okay, if it had oatmeal I will let the bowl soak with water, because I know from experience that if it dries, it's hard for my dishwasher to remove. Other things will get, at best, a less-than-10-second rinse with water before I put them down in the sink to wait for my next dishwasher loading. 99% of things come out visibly clean in my dishwasher using this method, so I figure, why add additional steps? My friend Amy (briefly) scrubs all her freshly-used dishes with a scrubbie, water, and sometimes detergent before putting them in the dishwasher. I assume this is what works for her, but IMO I have an automatic dishwasher so I don't HAVE to touch dirty dishes extensively. I also don't put anything special in the dishwasher as detergent--just one little pod of Cascade or whatever. And I wash EVERYTHING in the dishwasher--pots and pans, good glasses, mixing bowls. If it won't go in the dishwasher I won't use it. Not bragging or invalidating what others do, I'm just saying this works for me right now, thus leading me to believe it will always work for me, which is not necessarily the right conclusion.  :P
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Aunt4God on December 09, 2013, 04:04:30 PM

*snip quote tree*

On another note, sometimes I read things about dishwashers and clothes washers and I think, gosh, someday I will be in a situation where I need to know that, and I just don't, and someone will think I'm an idiot and wonder how I got to this age without knowing that. ::) <--at self. I don't pre-wash my dishes, for example. Okay, if it had oatmeal I will let the bowl soak with water, because I know from experience that if it dries, it's hard for my dishwasher to remove. Other things will get, at best, a less-than-10-second rinse with water before I put them down in the sink to wait for my next dishwasher loading. 99% of things come out visibly clean in my dishwasher using this method, so I figure, why add additional steps? My friend Amy (briefly) scrubs all her freshly-used dishes with a scrubbie, water, and sometimes detergent before putting them in the dishwasher. I assume this is what works for her, but IMO I have an automatic dishwasher so I don't HAVE to touch dirty dishes extensively. I also don't put anything special in the dishwasher as detergent--just one little pod of Cascade or whatever. And I wash EVERYTHING in the dishwasher--pots and pans, good glasses, mixing bowls. If it won't go in the dishwasher I won't use it. Not bragging or invalidating what others do, I'm just saying this works for me right now, thus leading me to believe it will always work for me, which is not necessarily the right conclusion.  :P

Regarding the bolded - My stepfather used to be (and is still to some extent) obsessed with washing the dishes before they went in the dishwasher.  I'm talking full on washing, most people would just put them away, dish washing.  One day, their dishwasher starting sudsing out into the kitchen (no, they didn't put in the wrong soap) and water was going all over.  They called in a repairman.  He looked that thing over and asked if it was brand new.  No, it was about 8 years old or so.  He couldn't believe it.  He said that was the cleanest dishwasher he had ever seen, other than brand new ones.  He asked other questions and it came out how my Step-father cleaned everything before it went in. The repairman then informed him that he shouldn't be doing that, he wasn't leaving enough for the soap to cling to and clean off.  That's why it was sudsing out of the machine, it had nothing else to do!  Now my mom and step-sisters work on getting dishes in there with something on them for it to actually clean!


And regarding present wrapping with animals, try wrapping presents with two ferrets "helping" out.....yeah, there's a list somewhere that is hilariously correct in how to do that.  I'll see if I can find it....
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on December 09, 2013, 07:09:49 PM
I was in Bed, Bath and Beyond tonight.  The couple in front of me was purchasing a VitaMix (I think that's what it is called).

It had some endorsements on it and one of them was, 'endorsed by the CIA'.  I commented on the CIA and laughed.  Then realized that CIA didn't stand for Central Intelligence Agency; it stood for Culinary Institute of America!  Yeah, I watch far too much TV.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dazi on December 09, 2013, 07:42:31 PM
I was in Bed, Bath and Beyond tonight.  The couple in front of me was purchasing a VitaMix (I think that's what it is called).

It had some endorsements on it and one of them was, 'endorsed by the CIA'.  I commented on the CIA and laughed.  Then realized that CIA didn't stand for Central Intelligence Agency; it stood for Culinary Institute of America!  Yeah, I watch far too much TV.

I dunno...the VitaMix is pretty bad-bacon-fed knave.   ;)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: andi on December 09, 2013, 07:44:07 PM
:lol:

I work for BBB amd I demo the Vitamix - I explain the CIA thing to a lot of people. And it makes me giggle every time.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on January 02, 2014, 01:10:58 PM
A recent bit of extreme ignorance and cluelessness -- about popular culture, anyway -- on my part, of which I've just become aware.  I'll admit to seeing few films, and not being at all well up on contemporary films / actors in general.  Shortly after Christmas I saw on DVD, with relatives, the 2013 film of The Lone Ranger. If this is any kind of excuse, I was tired, and periodically dropping off to sleep during the film: but at the time, I mistakenly thought (Piratelvr1121, you'll likely be appalled here) that the LR was played by Johnny Depp.  It's only today that I've happened to become aware that Depp played Tonto, and that the Ranger was someone called Armie Hammer -- a name unknown to me before today.  All this stuff is, as mentioned, basically "not my bag" -- but I feel a bit ashamed to be that out of touch...

My personal opinion of the film (what of it I was awake for) was that it was beyond awful; but tastes differ !
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on January 02, 2014, 01:27:30 PM
I was in Bed, Bath and Beyond tonight.  The couple in front of me was purchasing a VitaMix (I think that's what it is called).

It had some endorsements on it and one of them was, 'endorsed by the CIA'.  I commented on the CIA and laughed.  Then realized that CIA didn't stand for Central Intelligence Agency; it stood for Culinary Institute of America!  Yeah, I watch far too much TV.

We think it's hilarious that the USA has the CIA (Culinary Institute of America) and the UK has the FBI (Food and Beverage Institute). 

Wouldn't glassware from these schools be great fun to use for a mystery party?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: OSUJillyBean on January 02, 2014, 03:59:07 PM
I just learned a few minutes ago that adult humans need vaccines too.  I do not have medical records from my childhood and no idea what was given to me when but as we're about to leave the country we are required to get one vaccine and when the nurse heard my uncertain vaccination status (ie: I have not had a tetanus shot in 20+ years), she seemed shocked.  So now I get to schedule Yellow fever, typhoid, Hep A, and tetanus shots.  I'm going to be a pin cushion!

Is there a list of vaccines adult humans are supposed to receive?  I am always aware of my pets' vaccine status but it never occurred to me to get myself up-to-date.   :-\
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: sunnygirl on January 02, 2014, 04:09:32 PM
I just learned a few minutes ago that adult humans need vaccines too.  I do not have medical records from my childhood and no idea what was given to me when but as we're about to leave the country we are required to get one vaccine and when the nurse heard my uncertain vaccination status (ie: I have not had a tetanus shot in 20+ years), she seemed shocked.  So now I get to schedule Yellow fever, typhoid, Hep A, and tetanus shots.  I'm going to be a pin cushion!

Is there a list of vaccines adult humans are supposed to receive?  I am always aware of my pets' vaccine status but it never occurred to me to get myself up-to-date.   :-\
I didn't receive any vaccinations between the ages of 10-26 first because I was in a difficult living situation and didn't have access to medical care, and after that because it just never occurred to me. I had an awful lot of fun trying to make my surgery's nurse understand that when I showed up for travel inoculations. I think I wound up having to have about seven within two weeks.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jedikaiti on January 02, 2014, 04:10:24 PM
Let's see... There's the HPV vaccine (optional), annual flu vaccine, and I think meningitis is done every 5 or 10 years? Also, ask about chicken pox vaccine, especially if you didn't have it as a kid. I understand that is AWFUL to get as an adult.

Otherwise, ask your doc.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Luci on January 02, 2014, 04:48:13 PM
Let's see... There's the HPV vaccine (optional), annual flu vaccine, and I think meningitis is done every 5 or 10 years? Also, ask about chicken pox vaccine, especially if you didn't have it as a kid. I understand that is AWFUL to get as an adult.

Otherwise, ask your doc.

In my senior years I have added pneumonia and zoster (shingles - espectially if you have had chicken pox) to the list.

For our natural disaster team, we have to have Hepatitus A and B and extra tetanus vaccines. I am amazed that we don't need typhoid.

I promised my doctor that I would start flu shots it I ever get the flu, but I haven't, for 35 years. Probably this year, since I said that. Sigh
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on January 02, 2014, 04:51:22 PM
Adult vaccines tend to be for specific occasions, not just because of an age schedule like children's vaccines are.  My vaccines have all either been seasonal (flu) or because I'm traveling and I need to be vaccinated against bugs they have there but aren't an issue here (malaria, yellow fever, etc).  You may need more vaccines if you missed some in childhood, but most adults don't *need* vaccines/boosters the way children do.  Several which are recommended in certain populations, sure, but not "you'll get polio and die" kind of vaccines.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: nuit93 on January 02, 2014, 05:21:00 PM
I got the whooping cough booster last year since there was an outbreak due to increased number of non-vaccinated kids.  I didn't want to find out the hard way that I was one of the unlucky ones for whom the original childhood vaccine wore off.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 02, 2014, 05:22:35 PM
Adult vaccines tend to be for specific occasions, not just because of an age schedule like children's vaccines are.  My vaccines have all either been seasonal (flu) or because I'm traveling and I need to be vaccinated against bugs they have there but aren't an issue here (malaria, yellow fever, etc).  You may need more vaccines if you missed some in childhood, but most adults don't *need* vaccines/boosters the way children do.  Several which are recommended in certain populations, sure, but not "you'll get polio and die" kind of vaccines.

The major exception is tetanus.  You should have a tetanus shot every 10 years, minimum, and if you are an active gardener, you should go for a booster every 5 years.  I had my last one in 2010 to make it easy for me to remember when I have to do it again.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Julsie on January 02, 2014, 05:45:15 PM
I learned that the Rubella (German Measles) vaccine wears off after about 15 years.  So if you got it as a toddler, you might not be protected once you reach your 20s.  That is scary because Rubella can be catastrophic for the baby if a woman comes down with it in the first trimester.

Don't be like me and find out at your second prenatal appointment that your immunity has worn off.  Have them run a quick blood test before you get pregnant.  (If that's possible.  If not, don't over-worry.  The odds of being exposed to Rubella are very slim.)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lady_disdain on January 02, 2014, 05:49:34 PM
Let's see... There's the HPV vaccine (optional), annual flu vaccine, and I think meningitis is done every 5 or 10 years? Also, ask about chicken pox vaccine, especially if you didn't have it as a kid. I understand that is AWFUL to get as an adult.

Otherwise, ask your doc.

In my senior years I have added pneumonia and zoster (shingles - espectially if you have had chicken pox) to the list.

For our natural disaster team, we have to have Hepatitus A and B and extra tetanus vaccines. I am amazed that we don't need typhoid.

I promised my doctor that I would start flu shots it I ever get the flu, but I haven't, for 35 years. Probably this year, since I said that. Sigh

The medical lab I worked for had my position described as "at risk" for some reason, which meant that I had to have a full set of vaccines, including a few unusual ones, as well as a TB baseline test. That was not fun at all, specially since one of them had to be given at a public health facility, instead of a general health clinic. Between that and the "prevent all" military vaccine I had to get in college, I am pretty much covered.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Tea Drinker on January 02, 2014, 10:29:00 PM
The CDC has lists of recommended vaccines for children, for teens, and for adults to get at various ages and/or situations--for example, the hepatitis B vaccine is given young these days, and it's also recommended for certain adults, including people working in childcare. The adult schedule is here: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/adult/adult-schedule-easy-read-bw.pdf

That said, you might also want to consult your doctor. In particular, this is for people in North America, so it doesn't include some vaccines against tropical diseases (such as yellow fever), or the polio booster that's advised for visiting certain countries.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: MariaE on January 02, 2014, 11:54:19 PM
I don't know if giving out recommendations for vaccines count as medical advice, but perhaps it had better be taken to PM so as not to ger this thread locked?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PeterM on January 03, 2014, 12:43:27 AM
My personal opinion of the film (what of it I was awake for) was that it was beyond awful; but tastes differ !

I'm glad I saw it but think it wasn't very good. Except for the last act, the big chase. That was pretty awesome, especially that they unselfconsciously used The William Tell Overture.

Also, the horse. It had to be 95% CGI, but Silver was definitely the star of the movie.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on January 03, 2014, 12:44:48 AM
I just learned a few minutes ago that adult humans need vaccines too.  I do not have medical records from my childhood and no idea what was given to me when but as we're about to leave the country we are required to get one vaccine and when the nurse heard my uncertain vaccination status (ie: I have not had a tetanus shot in 20+ years), she seemed shocked.  So now I get to schedule Yellow fever, typhoid, Hep A, and tetanus shots.  I'm going to be a pin cushion!

Is there a list of vaccines adult humans are supposed to receive?  I am always aware of my pets' vaccine status but it never occurred to me to get myself up-to-date.   :-\
Be aware that one or more of these might make you feel ill, similar to flu, as your immune system ramps up to churn out antibodies.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on January 03, 2014, 01:20:04 AM
My personal opinion of the film (what of it I was awake for) was that it was beyond awful; but tastes differ !

I'm glad I saw it but think it wasn't very good. Except for the last act, the big chase. That was pretty awesome, especially that they unselfconsciously used The William Tell Overture.

Also, the horse. It had to be 95% CGI, but Silver was definitely the star of the movie.

I'm afraid I thought the final chase scene was dire.  Mind you, I'm a railway enthusiast, which tends to spoil me for goofy and impossible stuff involving trains -- such as a horse being ridden along the roofs of the coaches (cars) -- even a magical spirit animal !  Well, life would be dull if all of us liked and disliked the same things...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Iris on January 03, 2014, 01:45:34 AM
My personal opinion of the film (what of it I was awake for) was that it was beyond awful; but tastes differ !

I'm glad I saw it but think it wasn't very good. Except for the last act, the big chase. That was pretty awesome, especially that they unselfconsciously used The William Tell Overture.

Also, the horse. It had to be 95% CGI, but Silver was definitely the star of the movie.

I'm afraid I thought the final chase scene was dire.  Mind you, I'm a railway enthusiast, which tends to spoil me for goofy and impossible stuff involving trains -- such as a horse being ridden along the roofs of the coaches (cars) -- even a magical spirit animal !  Well, life would be dull if all of us liked and disliked the same things...

I'm sure this is an obvious thing that adults should know, but although I didn't see the movie when I saw the trailer I wondered why it isn't racist for Johnny Depp to be painting his face to play a Native American? I'm not from the US so maybe there's something I don't know, or perhaps the makeup wasn't as dire as the previews made it look...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: blue2000 on January 03, 2014, 02:56:01 AM
My personal opinion of the film (what of it I was awake for) was that it was beyond awful; but tastes differ !

I'm glad I saw it but think it wasn't very good. Except for the last act, the big chase. That was pretty awesome, especially that they unselfconsciously used The William Tell Overture.

Also, the horse. It had to be 95% CGI, but Silver was definitely the star of the movie.

I'm afraid I thought the final chase scene was dire.  Mind you, I'm a railway enthusiast, which tends to spoil me for goofy and impossible stuff involving trains -- such as a horse being ridden along the roofs of the coaches (cars) -- even a magical spirit animal !  Well, life would be dull if all of us liked and disliked the same things...

I'm sure this is an obvious thing that adults should know, but although I didn't see the movie when I saw the trailer I wondered why it isn't racist for Johnny Depp to be painting his face to play a Native American? I'm not from the US so maybe there's something I don't know, or perhaps the makeup wasn't as dire as the previews made it look...

From what I have heard, he actually consulted some Native Americans to get the right look and feel of the character. He was trying for an authentic look for someone of that era, not a frivolous Halloween costume type. Much less offensive that way.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Katana_Geldar on January 04, 2014, 03:24:05 PM
But he looks like someone going to a KISS concert with that face paint.

I prefer the reovirus film Disney did, John Carter, which is rather underrated.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: KenveeB on January 04, 2014, 07:53:12 PM
But he looks like someone going to a KISS concert with that face paint.

I prefer the reovirus film Disney did, John Carter, which is rather underrated.

I thought they did a great job with John Carter. That movie suffered from criminally poor marketing. I hate that it was a flop, because I would've loved to see more in the series.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on January 04, 2014, 08:08:23 PM
Adult vaccines tend to be for specific occasions, not just because of an age schedule like children's vaccines are.  My vaccines have all either been seasonal (flu) or because I'm traveling and I need to be vaccinated against bugs they have there but aren't an issue here (malaria, yellow fever, etc).  You may need more vaccines if you missed some in childhood, but most adults don't *need* vaccines/boosters the way children do.  Several which are recommended in certain populations, sure, but not "you'll get polio and die" kind of vaccines.

The major exception is tetanus.  You should have a tetanus shot every 10 years, minimum, and if you are an active gardener, you should go for a booster every 5 years. I had my last one in 2010 to make it easy for me to remember when I have to do it again.

Brilliant!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Ereine on January 04, 2014, 11:30:21 PM
But he looks like someone going to a KISS concert with that face paint.

I prefer the reovirus film Disney did, John Carter, which is rather underrated.

The look is based on a painting (I Am Crow by Kirby Sattler) that's apparently not very historically accurate or isn't even meant to be, the artist isn't interested in depicting certain tribes.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cwm on January 06, 2014, 02:53:58 PM
Adult vaccines tend to be for specific occasions, not just because of an age schedule like children's vaccines are.  My vaccines have all either been seasonal (flu) or because I'm traveling and I need to be vaccinated against bugs they have there but aren't an issue here (malaria, yellow fever, etc).  You may need more vaccines if you missed some in childhood, but most adults don't *need* vaccines/boosters the way children do.  Several which are recommended in certain populations, sure, but not "you'll get polio and die" kind of vaccines.

The major exception is tetanus.  You should have a tetanus shot every 10 years, minimum, and if you are an active gardener, you should go for a booster every 5 years. I had my last one in 2010 to make it easy for me to remember when I have to do it again.

Brilliant!

We were told every 3-5 years for dog grooming. Work wouldn't pay for it, neither would the insurance for work. But if you happened to get bit at work (much more common than you'd think) and needed a work comp claim, work comp would pay for it. Nobody actually paid for a tetanus shot at that job.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 06, 2014, 09:20:00 PM
Taking my first science class with an actual lab component. I did not realize there is absolutely no eating, drinking, taking of medication, lip balm application, mints or gum allowed in the lab. It was very difficult for me to go three hours without a drink. I hope to adjust to it by next week's lab.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: fountainof on January 06, 2014, 10:29:04 PM
Wow those are major lab restrictions.  I only took physics in university so the labs had no chemicals.  Can you leave for a drink?  I wonder what people with illnesses do?  A diabetic probably couldn't go that long without a snack. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Mel the Redcap on January 06, 2014, 10:55:48 PM
Taking my first science class with an actual lab component. I did not realize there is absolutely no eating, drinking, taking of medication, lip balm application, mints or gum allowed in the lab. It was very difficult for me to go three hours without a drink. I hope to adjust to it by next week's lab.

In my uni courses, all the three-hour classes either had a ten-minute break in the middle or let out ten minutes early - students got to vote on which they'd prefer. Most ended up going for the mid-class break and used it for leg stretches and grabbing snacks. I'm guessing you're working with potentially hazardous chemicals? If you're gowned and gloved up, a break might not be practical. :-\

There was a post in the Student Darwinism thread about somebody who brought a granola bar into a class working with potentially carcinogenic chemicals, and started eating it without taking his gloves off. :o
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: menley on January 07, 2014, 04:11:38 AM
Oh dear. I'm a living example of why those eating and drinking rules exist. We were working with some equipment and I was super hungry, so I snuck (sneaked?) a snack, but I wasn't as diligent as I should have been about washing my hands because I was trying to be surreptitious. The next week I had a massive infection in my throat and the doctor said something like "This is truly impressive, normally we only see this level of infection in patients with CF or other compromised immune systems." After I answered no to the medical history questions about a suppressed immune system, he said "It looks almost like you've dumped the contents of a petri dish in your throat!" That was a bit of a light bulb moment and I asked if I could possibly have gotten it from working on the equipment we'd been using without washing hands properly - he promptly gave me a lecture on handwashing, lab sanitation, and incubation of diseases in crevices of poorly cleansed lab equipment :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: mbbored on January 07, 2014, 12:54:21 PM
Taking my first science class with an actual lab component. I did not realize there is absolutely no eating, drinking, taking of medication, lip balm application, mints or gum allowed in the lab. It was very difficult for me to go three hours without a drink. I hope to adjust to it by next week's lab.

As a long time lab worker, I still don't like this component. What I usually do is drink a lot of fluids, then stop an hour or so before hand. As soon as I leave, I drink about 16 ounces of water.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: JoW on January 07, 2014, 10:04:11 PM
Taking my first science class with an actual lab component. I did not realize there is absolutely no eating, drinking, taking of medication, lip balm application, mints or gum allowed in the lab. It was very difficult for me to go three hours without a drink. I hope to adjust to it by next week's lab.
Welcome to my world.  I work for a major pharmaceutical manufacturing company.  I've been in this industry for 30 years.  Thats 30 years of no food except in the break room/lunch room.  No gum.  No candy.  No beverages.  And thats just for office workers in the production building.  For operators - the people who actually make the product - its no chapstick.  Meds only in the locker room or break room.  We get lunch about 1/2 way through our 8-hour day, and 2 breaks.  Extra bathroom breaks happen, but you have to fit them in around the needs of the process you are running. 

Yes, you do get used to it.  And its a great dieting aid.  You cannot snack in this environment. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: JadeGirl on January 08, 2014, 12:15:57 AM
Taking my first science class with an actual lab component. I did not realize there is absolutely no eating, drinking, taking of medication, lip balm application, mints or gum allowed in the lab. It was very difficult for me to go three hours without a drink. I hope to adjust to it by next week's lab.

As a long time lab worker, I still don't like this component. What I usually do is drink a lot of fluids, then stop an hour or so before hand. As soon as I leave, I drink about 16 ounces of water.

It's amazing how quickly you can get through something in the biohazard hood if you have a full bladder  :P

We were lucky enough to have a water fountain very close to the door of the lab so I could remove my mask, gown and gloves, wash up and nip out for a quick drink if I had a 10 minute incubation.  Toilet breaks were more problematic so I learned to drink small amounts and often.  The airconditioning environment in the lab is very dehydrating so small amounts of liquid (a mouthful or two) didn't seem to add up over time.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 08, 2014, 08:07:11 AM
I have a need for high amounts of fluids due to two different medical issues. My plan for the two days I have this class is to increase fluid consumption from 7am - 3pm, then decrease consumption until after the lab ends at 9 pm. We get one 5 minute break in a 3 hour lab.

I am now prepared to eat a heavy snack during my 30 minute commute to class, and will bring a tightly capped bottle of water that stays in a bag when in the lab. There is a drinking fountain 2 minutes away from the lab.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: English1 on January 08, 2014, 11:33:22 AM
The gorilla thing - me too. I used to find the news really confusing when I was a kid.  :D Glad to find out I wasn't a especially dumb kid.

Something very silly. I found out I put bread in the toaster the wrong way round, only this weekend.  When I do it, some sticks out the top and halfway through toasting I flip it over so it all gets cooked. Watching OH make toast like a normal person Sunday morning = lightbulb moment. For an intelligent person I can be really dumb in some ways.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: mbbored on January 08, 2014, 11:50:08 AM
Taking my first science class with an actual lab component. I did not realize there is absolutely no eating, drinking, taking of medication, lip balm application, mints or gum allowed in the lab. It was very difficult for me to go three hours without a drink. I hope to adjust to it by next week's lab.

As a long time lab worker, I still don't like this component. What I usually do is drink a lot of fluids, then stop an hour or so before hand. As soon as I leave, I drink about 16 ounces of water.

It's amazing how quickly you can get through something in the biohazard hood if you have a full bladder  :P

We were lucky enough to have a water fountain very close to the door of the lab so I could remove my mask, gown and gloves, wash up and nip out for a quick drink if I had a 10 minute incubation.  Toilet breaks were more problematic so I learned to drink small amounts and often.  The airconditioning environment in the lab is very dehydrating so small amounts of liquid (a mouthful or two) didn't seem to add up over time.

I've figured out how to strip my gloves and respirator, go through 5 doors, strip my lab coat and scrub cap, change shoes, grab my keys, go through 2 more doors and down the hall to the bathroom and then all of it in reverse in 5 minutes, without running. And almost any time I have a 5 minute break, I do just that.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: KenveeB on January 08, 2014, 08:06:31 PM
Something very silly. I found out I put bread in the toaster the wrong way round, only this weekend.  When I do it, some sticks out the top and halfway through toasting I flip it over so it all gets cooked. Watching OH make toast like a normal person Sunday morning = lightbulb moment. For an intelligent person I can be really dumb in some ways.

...So what's the right way to put bread in a toaster? I'm suddenly not sure if I'm doing it right!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on January 08, 2014, 08:48:09 PM
Something very silly. I found out I put bread in the toaster the wrong way round, only this weekend.  When I do it, some sticks out the top and halfway through toasting I flip it over so it all gets cooked. Watching OH make toast like a normal person Sunday morning = lightbulb moment. For an intelligent person I can be really dumb in some ways.

...So what's the right way to put bread in a toaster? I'm suddenly not sure if I'm doing it right!

Me too.  I didn't even know there was more than one way to do it in a pop-up style toaster!   ???
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Mel the Redcap on January 08, 2014, 08:56:06 PM
Something very silly. I found out I put bread in the toaster the wrong way round, only this weekend.  When I do it, some sticks out the top and halfway through toasting I flip it over so it all gets cooked. Watching OH make toast like a normal person Sunday morning = lightbulb moment. For an intelligent person I can be really dumb in some ways.

...So what's the right way to put bread in a toaster? I'm suddenly not sure if I'm doing it right!

Me too.  I didn't even know there was more than one way to do it in a pop-up style toaster!   ???

If your slices of bread are rectangular instead of square, and you put them in the toaster so that they're resting on one of the short edges, a bit of the other edge may stick out. If you put them in resting on one of the long edges, that won't happen... unless your toaster's slots aren't wide enough to take the bread that way, in which case you're stuck flipping it to get it all toasted. :P
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on January 08, 2014, 09:04:17 PM


Me too.  I didn't even know there was more than one way to do it in a pop-up style toaster!   ???

If your slices of bread are rectangular instead of square, and you put them in the toaster so that they're resting on one of the short edges, a bit of the other edge may stick out. If you put them in resting on one of the long edges, that won't happen... unless your toaster's slots aren't wide enough to take the bread that way, in which case you're stuck flipping it to get it all toasted. :P

Where's that head slap icon?  I get it now.  I wasn't thinking of those longer pieces of bread like Beefsteak Rye or whatever.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on January 08, 2014, 09:35:16 PM
Something very silly. I found out I put bread in the toaster the wrong way round, only this weekend.  When I do it, some sticks out the top and halfway through toasting I flip it over so it all gets cooked. Watching OH make toast like a normal person Sunday morning = lightbulb moment. For an intelligent person I can be really dumb in some ways.

...So what's the right way to put bread in a toaster? I'm suddenly not sure if I'm doing it right!

Me too.  I didn't even know there was more than one way to do it in a pop-up style toaster!   ???

If your slices of bread are rectangular instead of square, and you put them in the toaster so that they're resting on one of the short edges, a bit of the other edge may stick out. If you put them in resting on one of the long edges, that won't happen... unless your toaster's slots aren't wide enough to take the bread that way, in which case you're stuck flipping it to get it all toasted. :P

That's funny,  I've always put my bread in that way. I've never had a toaster that couldn't fit them in that way.

It's amazing the things you learn on ehell
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: KenveeB on January 08, 2014, 09:43:00 PM


Me too.  I didn't even know there was more than one way to do it in a pop-up style toaster!   ???

If your slices of bread are rectangular instead of square, and you put them in the toaster so that they're resting on one of the short edges, a bit of the other edge may stick out. If you put them in resting on one of the long edges, that won't happen... unless your toaster's slots aren't wide enough to take the bread that way, in which case you're stuck flipping it to get it all toasted. :P

Where's that head slap icon?  I get it now.  I wasn't thinking of those longer pieces of bread like Beefsteak Rye or whatever.

Yeah, my slices are pretty much square (slightly taller, but not much), so I don't have an issue. Phew! I was really worried I was doing it wrong and had no idea why.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Mel the Redcap on January 08, 2014, 09:46:16 PM


Me too.  I didn't even know there was more than one way to do it in a pop-up style toaster!   ???

If your slices of bread are rectangular instead of square, and you put them in the toaster so that they're resting on one of the short edges, a bit of the other edge may stick out. If you put them in resting on one of the long edges, that won't happen... unless your toaster's slots aren't wide enough to take the bread that way, in which case you're stuck flipping it to get it all toasted. :P

Where's that head slap icon?  I get it now.  I wasn't thinking of those longer pieces of bread like Beefsteak Rye or whatever.

Yeah, my slices are pretty much square (slightly taller, but not much), so I don't have an issue. Phew! I was really worried I was doing it wrong and had no idea why.

We buy a lot of different brands and types of bread depending on what's on sale, what we're in the mood for etc (and for a while it was "what can Mel eat this week that hasn't been sold out yet" :P), so we've run into a bajillion different sizes and shapes. Some of them were clearly never intended to fit into a toaster - or at least not one that will fit next to our microwave!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: katycoo on January 08, 2014, 10:58:45 PM
Something very silly. I found out I put bread in the toaster the wrong way round, only this weekend.  When I do it, some sticks out the top and halfway through toasting I flip it over so it all gets cooked. Watching OH make toast like a normal person Sunday morning = lightbulb moment. For an intelligent person I can be really dumb in some ways.

...So what's the right way to put bread in a toaster? I'm suddenly not sure if I'm doing it right!

Me too.  I didn't even know there was more than one way to do it in a pop-up style toaster!   ???

If your slices of bread are rectangular instead of square, and you put them in the toaster so that they're resting on one of the short edges, a bit of the other edge may stick out. If you put them in resting on one of the long edges, that won't happen... unless your toaster's slots aren't wide enough to take the bread that way, in which case you're stuck flipping it to get it all toasted. :P

You need a double slice toaster to do this (one that can fit 2 slices of square loaf in each slot).  Mine is only a sinlge (1 slice in each slot)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on January 09, 2014, 09:29:15 AM
I'll tell you something else about some toasters that I can't think too much about, or it will blow my mind. So, most toasters, you can set how toasted you want the bread to be, from barely warm to black and charred. A lot of them just have an imprecise dial with an icon of a white piece of bread at one extreme, and a black piece of bread at the other extreme.

But which end is which?

IME, on some toasters, the white icon means "lightly toasted," like the color of the bread before toasting; and the dark icon means "heavily toasted," again like the dark color toasted bread has.

But on other toaster brands, it's the opposite, especially if the toaster itself is dark-colored--then the "dark" icon is actually supposed to be an empty outline of a piece of bread, like an empty cup icon on a coffee maker--very little heat applied. The "white" icon is actually supposed to mean "full" as in fully toasted, turn the heat all the way up.

I discovered this because I used to like my bread only lightly toasted. Now I get so confused with new toasters that I just set the knob in the middle.  :P
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on January 09, 2014, 09:42:45 AM
^^^  Regardless of the 'color' of the icon, usually in most toasters I've seen the dial works something like a water spigot.  The farther to the right you turn in the more "on" it is, or in this case, the heating elements stay on longer giving you darker toast.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: artk2002 on January 09, 2014, 09:48:18 AM
I'll tell you something else about some toasters that I can't think too much about, or it will blow my mind. So, most toasters, you can set how toasted you want the bread to be, from barely warm to black and charred. A lot of them just have an imprecise dial with an icon of a white piece of bread at one extreme, and a black piece of bread at the other extreme.

But which end is which?

IME, on some toasters, the white icon means "lightly toasted," like the color of the bread before toasting; and the dark icon means "heavily toasted," again like the dark color toasted bread has.

But on other toaster brands, it's the opposite, especially if the toaster itself is dark-colored--then the "dark" icon is actually supposed to be an empty outline of a piece of bread, like an empty cup icon on a coffee maker--very little heat applied. The "white" icon is actually supposed to mean "full" as in fully toasted, turn the heat all the way up.

I discovered this because I used to like my bread only lightly toasted. Now I get so confused with new toasters that I just set the knob in the middle.  :P

Good product design is actually much harder than it seems. Things like this happen because the designer knows what the icons mean but has trouble approaching this from the perspective of someone who doesn't.

Many years ago, a company I worked for had a user interface to control several types of hardware. One type was a "Communications Processor" which was (for odd reasons) called a "COP". The user interface icon had the picture of a policeman with his hand up, palm out. Somebody who didn't know the system would assume that that icon was to stop something, not to access the "COP". Take this out of the cultural environment (this was the US and we were internationalizing the product for Japan) and it gets even more confusing.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: lowspark on January 09, 2014, 10:16:23 AM
^^^  Regardless of the 'color' of the icon, usually in most toasters I've seen the dial works something like a water spigot.  The farther to the right you turn in the more "on" it is, or in this case, the heating elements stay on longer giving you darker toast.

This.
Mine has numbers. The higher the number, the darker the toast. But yeah, the farther right, the darker the toast. The numbers, pictures or whatever are just arbitrary anyway.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Virg on January 09, 2014, 10:20:48 AM
The way I suggest for finding out how a toaster  (or toaster oven) works is just to sacrifice two slices, cooking one with the dial to the far left and one to the far right.  It becomes very obvious which is which that way.

For the best toaster, I always suggest getting an extra wide, extra long toaster.  The one we saw that I liked best had a single slot about a foot and a half wide and three inches across.  It was supposed to be for toasting thick stuff like bagels.  It was big enough that I could have toasted a trout if I cared to.

Virg
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on January 09, 2014, 11:43:52 AM
I'll tell you something else about some toasters that I can't think too much about, or it will blow my mind. So, most toasters, you can set how toasted you want the bread to be, from barely warm to black and charred. A lot of them just have an imprecise dial with an icon of a white piece of bread at one extreme, and a black piece of bread at the other extreme.

But which end is which?
And along that line, appliances like toaster ovens that have tiny, discreet markings on a gray background, in a slightly lighter or darker gray.  My vision is such that I can't see them until I get my face six inches away!  I take a marker of some kind and write over them so that I can see them from a normal distance.  I can't do that with the bread machine, though.  It's LED display, so I can't change it. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jilly on January 16, 2014, 02:05:16 AM
I live in the UK I passed my driving test about 16 years ago. Yesterday I learnt that what makes a dual carriageway is not the road being 2 lanes in each direction but some sort of central reservation. It doesn't have to be much just a small fence or a bit of grass, anything more than a mere painted white line separating each direction and you have a duel carriageway even if its only a single lane either side!! two lanes in each direction and just paint separating them is only a single carriageway.
Since finding this out I have blown many drivers minds including people who have much more and much less experience than me.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: oogyda on January 25, 2014, 02:48:51 PM
I just made a batch of potato gnocchi for chicken and gnocchi soup. 

Gnocchi is (I believe) Italian. 

It's very similar to the Kluski, or potato dumplings my Polish grandmother used to make.  These are much easier, though as they are dropped into the liquid in a glob as opposed to being rolled and cut. 

I'll have to remember that for next time.  For now...the gnocchi is made and I will use it. 

I guess there are a lot of foods that most cultures have their own version of. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: MommyPenguin on January 25, 2014, 11:13:55 PM
I realized during a sermon last week that "go the extra mile" is based on a Bible verse.  I had never really given it much thought before, just assumed it meant to "go further" for somebody without thinking about the origin of the phrase.

I found myself looking at our toaster this morning to see how they labeled the settings.  :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on January 27, 2014, 06:18:41 PM
I found myself looking at our toaster this morning to see how they labeled the settings.  :)

My work here is done.  8)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Bobbie on January 29, 2014, 05:20:19 PM
I grew up in the military and had only went to the base commissaries growing up.  I never went to a civilian grocery store.  When I was 18 and moved to Oregon, my older sister took great delight in taking me to Safeway, the local grocery store.  I never know that these stores had bakeries, delis, a floral dept....I was blown away lol.  People must of thought I was keep locked in a dark basement.....

Me: Oh my gosh!! Fresh doughnuts!!!
My sister: I know its so cool.
Me: Is this how it is in all these store?!?
My sis: Yes, and some are even better then others.

Also, there were no baggers.  At the commissaries there are always baggers and long lines at the checkouts.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Bobbie on January 29, 2014, 05:21:54 PM
I never tried sour cream till I was married at 21 because Japanese don't eat it.  Now a taco or burrito without it is sacrilege.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: marcel on February 01, 2014, 09:49:17 AM
^^^  Regardless of the 'color' of the icon, usually in most toasters I've seen the dial works something like a water spigot.  The farther to the right you turn in the more "on" it is, or in this case, the heating elements stay on longer giving you darker toast.

This.
Mine has numbers. The higher the number, the darker the toast. But yeah, the farther right, the darker the toast. The numbers, pictures or whatever are just arbitrary anyway.
Just comenting to agree. Toasting bread is not very common in The Netherlands (it is mostly for old bread) so i do not use toasters a lot and then only at other peoples places, but every toaster i have encountered turns to the right for longer toasting.

Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on February 01, 2014, 10:20:55 AM
And in the same spirit, my sewing machine.  The one I've had for 20+ years.  :-[   The dial for upper thread tension is marked from 0 to 9, and I could never remember which direction I wanted to turn it when I use the nylon monofilament "invisible" thread.  Then due to this thread, I realized that it was probably the same "righty-tighty, lefty-loosy" as most other things...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on February 06, 2014, 01:29:25 PM
This was several years ago, but I was an adult.

I was watching a DVD of either Sesame Street or the Muppets, and for some reason I muted it. I was shocked to realize that I couldn't read the Muppets' lips.

::facepalm::
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: minky on February 08, 2014, 02:08:35 PM
This was several years ago, but I was an adult.

I was watching a DVD of either Sesame Street or the Muppets, and for some reason I muted it. I was shocked to realize that I couldn't read the Muppets' lips.

::facepalm::

LOL!  I just did something similar.  I was watching a youtube of the Avenue Q song "If You Were G*y" but with clips of Bert and Ernie from Sesame Street and I said to myself, "Wow, it looks like they're really singing the song instead of saying the lines from the original clips."  Then I went "duh".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on February 08, 2014, 03:33:18 PM
This was several years ago, but I was an adult.

I was watching a DVD of either Sesame Street or the Muppets, and for some reason I muted it. I was shocked to realize that I couldn't read the Muppets' lips.

::facepalm::

LOL!  I just did something similar.  I was watching a youtube of the Avenue Q song "If You Were G*y" but with clips of Bert and Ernie from Sesame Street and I said to myself, "Wow, it looks like they're really singing the song instead of saying the lines from the original clips."  Then I went "duh".

Ha ha ha! I'm glad you admitted that. I felt like a sudden silence had descended after I posted that, because y'all were all so stupefied by my brilliance. ;)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dr. F. on February 09, 2014, 02:59:59 PM
This was several years ago, but I was an adult.

I was watching a DVD of either Sesame Street or the Muppets, and for some reason I muted it. I was shocked to realize that I couldn't read the Muppets' lips.

::facepalm::

LOL!  I just did something similar.  I was watching a youtube of the Avenue Q song "If You Were G*y" but with clips of Bert and Ernie from Sesame Street and I said to myself, "Wow, it looks like they're really singing the song instead of saying the lines from the original clips."  Then I went "duh".

Ha ha ha! I'm glad you admitted that. I felt like a sudden silence had descended after I posted that, because y'all were all so stupefied by my brilliance. ;)

I'd've been willing to swear that Miss Piggy fluttered her eyelashes. Imagine my surprise when I found out that she can't - th eyelashes are fixed on her face.  :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: daen on February 10, 2014, 04:36:07 PM

I'd've been willing to swear that Miss Piggy fluttered her eyelashes. Imagine my surprise when I found out that she can't - th eyelashes are fixed on her face.  :-[

Somewhat similar:

I've seen a few performances of a series of plays (the Wingfield Chronicles, by Dan Needles). They're all one-man shows, so actor Rod Beattie plays all the characters - the old man, the dimwitted brothers, the newspaper editor, the opinionated neighbor, stockbroker-turned-farmer Walt Wingfield... and Maggie, who marries Walt.

After a performance, I have to keep reminding myself that I haven't actually seen Maggie, much less any of the other characters, because Beattie's performance is so pitch-perfect he creates these characters with a change in mannerisms and voice... amazing.

I need to see another of those plays soon. I've only seen three of the seven so far...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Carotte on February 10, 2014, 05:36:12 PM
Do you see those space saving bags where you put things like sweaters or pillows and suck the air out?
I knew they could be used with a vacuum cleaner, but for the strangest reason always thought it would need a special one that could go in reverse  :o (not just a special apparatus that fits the bag, a special vacuum)
The "you need to suck the air out" and "vacuums suck the air out" did not click until very recently  :-[ .
At least, when I admitted that to my SO he said he had thought the same thing, that you had to use a special one and that a normal vacuum wouldn't work.

Maybe I had it mixed with the thing you use to blow up air mattres and things like that.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: kckgirl on February 10, 2014, 05:54:22 PM
Do you see those space saving bags where you put things like sweaters or pillows and suck the air out?
I knew they could be used with a vacuum cleaner, but for the strangest reason always thought it would need a special one that could go in reverse  :o (not just a special apparatus that fits the bag, a special vacuum)
The "you need to suck the air out" and "vacuums suck the air out" did not click until very recently  :-[ .

I used a space bag to take my shaped pillow with me on a quick trip. It had to fit in my carry-on bag. When I got to my destination, I had planned to borrow a vacuum to repack the pillow, but I figured out that I could put it in a chair and gently sit on it to push the air out through the one-way valve. Worked like a charm and is easier that getting the vacuum out. That's the way I always do it now.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Margo on February 11, 2014, 07:48:00 AM
I live in the UK I passed my driving test about 16 years ago. Yesterday I learnt that what makes a dual carriageway is not the road being 2 lanes in each direction but some sort of central reservation. It doesn't have to be much just a small fence or a bit of grass, anything more than a mere painted white line separating each direction and you have a duel carriageway even if its only a single lane either side!! two lanes in each direction and just paint separating them is only a single carriageway.
Since finding this out I have blown many drivers minds including people who have much more and much less experience than me.
I did know this, but because my grandmother used to live near the 'first dual carriageway in England', and it is exactly that - 2 single track roads with a grassy bank in the middle.

And more recently because there is a stretch of the North Devon Relief Road which has 2 lanes in each direction but no central reservation, and there is a big sign up reminding everyone of  the speed limits. As I know that dual carriageway = 70mph, the reminder that the limit is 60mph reinforces the 'not a dual carriageway' . Although I've notices that going 60 along there I get overtaken a lot. Maybe most people either don't read the sign, or don't know about the speed camera which comes next?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 11, 2014, 07:53:46 AM
In Ontario, we call it a 'divided highway'.  If there is a grassy median between the lanes, the speed limit is usually 100 km/hour.  If there isn't a median but there is a guardrail, it's usually 90 km/hr.  If there is no median or guardrail, it's usually 80 km/hr.  But of course, there are lots of exceptions so you really have to watch the signs.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: guihong on February 11, 2014, 08:07:22 AM
Do you see those space saving bags where you put things like sweaters or pillows and suck the air out?
I knew they could be used with a vacuum cleaner, but for the strangest reason always thought it would need a special one that could go in reverse  :o (not just a special apparatus that fits the bag, a special vacuum)
The "you need to suck the air out" and "vacuums suck the air out" did not click until very recently  :-[ .
At least, when I admitted that to my SO he said he had thought the same thing, that you had to use a special one and that a normal vacuum wouldn't work.

Maybe I had it mixed with the thing you use to blow up air mattres and things like that.

 :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on February 11, 2014, 09:39:08 AM
I've always been confused about those vacuum storage bags. Wouldn't they damage the thing they're compressing that much? Maybe not for a short use, like a day of traveling, but often they're advertising for storing out of season clothes for months at a time. Times like this are when I'm torn between "seems obvious to me" and "surely someone thought of this before they marketed it."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: #borecore on February 11, 2014, 09:56:36 AM
My vacuum bags (Space Bags brand) were great for a few uses! Kept things stored beautifully, collapsed easily with vacuuming or squeezing. But they ALWAYS got a rip or a pinhole-size leak within a few uses, probably less than a year of storage with one or two re-vacuumings. Sometimes it could be fixed with duct tape, sometimes not.

It's just thin plastic, so it doesn't surprise me, but it is disappointing.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on February 11, 2014, 11:46:58 AM
I've always been confused about those vacuum storage bags. Wouldn't they damage the thing they're compressing that much? Maybe not for a short use, like a day of traveling, but often they're advertising for storing out of season clothes for months at a time. Times like this are when I'm torn between "seems obvious to me" and "surely someone thought of this before they marketed it."

I use my for off season storage of quilts and sweaters. I'm not sure how compression fabric for long lengths of time is bad.  They come out wrinkled, but fluff up pretty quickly.

I also use them for traveling as well. 2 medium size bags fit perfectly in my carry-on
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: gramma dishes on February 11, 2014, 11:49:35 AM
For smaller "packages" (e.g. a couple of sweaters or something) you can do basically the same thing by using oversized jumbo 2-1/2 gallon Hefty bags.  Just fold your stuff neatly, stick it in there and then sit on it to sqeeze out extra air.  Zip shut and you're done! 

You can use them over and over and so far I've never had one 'leak'.  I do this often when traveling and don't want to carry a big suitcase.  It does make a difference how much stuff you can put in even a tiny "overnight" bag or a standard 20" or 21" suitcase.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Snooks on February 11, 2014, 12:40:10 PM
Do you see those space saving bags where you put things like sweaters or pillows and suck the air out?
I knew they could be used with a vacuum cleaner, but for the strangest reason always thought it would need a special one that could go in reverse  :o (not just a special apparatus that fits the bag, a special vacuum)
The "you need to suck the air out" and "vacuums suck the air out" did not click until very recently  :-[ .
At least, when I admitted that to my SO he said he had thought the same thing, that you had to use a special one and that a normal vacuum wouldn't work.

Maybe I had it mixed with the thing you use to blow up air mattres and things like that.

If it makes you feel better I've just had a lightbulb moment that we don't have to use the vacuum for ours we could use the nice handheld pump for the air mattress (which deflates as well as inflates).
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Katana_Geldar on February 11, 2014, 11:37:54 PM
I've found to Rhode Island is not actually an island. What is up with that?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Two Ravens on February 12, 2014, 03:38:36 AM
I've found to Rhode Island is not actually an island. What is up with that?

Rhode Island is an island. (Or actually was, it's not called that anymore. What used to be called Rhode Island now goes by its Native American name.) it's just not the entire state. The official name of the state is "The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations." Providence Plantations being every else...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Katana_Geldar on February 12, 2014, 03:45:41 AM
I had an idea in my head that it was a little island. DH knew, he tells me Manhattan Island isn't an island either.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: StarFaerie on February 12, 2014, 04:13:52 AM
I've always been confused about those vacuum storage bags. Wouldn't they damage the thing they're compressing that much? Maybe not for a short use, like a day of traveling, but often they're advertising for storing out of season clothes for months at a time. Times like this are when I'm torn between "seems obvious to me" and "surely someone thought of this before they marketed it."

I use my for off season storage of quilts and sweaters. I'm not sure how compression fabric for long lengths of time is bad.  They come out wrinkled, but fluff up pretty quickly.

I also use them for traveling as well. 2 medium size bags fit perfectly in my carry-on

I use them to store my son's old plush toys. We packed them away a while ago as he couldn't bear the idea of losing his old friends but also felt they didn't belong in a teenaged boys bedroom. I had used them for quilts and pillows but had never considered them for plush. He pointed it out to me when I claimed we had no room to store them. That should have been obvious.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Thipu1 on February 12, 2014, 06:39:34 AM
I had an idea in my head that it was a little island. DH knew, he tells me Manhattan Island isn't an island either.

Manhattan is most definitely an island.  The only part of NYC that isn't on an island is the Bronx. 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RingTailedLemur on February 12, 2014, 11:39:19 AM
Watching a video the other day, I learned that foxes wag their tails when they are happy.

It's not that I thought they didn't, I just never thought about it before.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Ms_Cellany on February 12, 2014, 12:06:11 PM
Watching a video the other day, I learned that foxes wag their tails when they are happy.

It's not that I thought they didn't, I just never thought about it before.

Would that be Dawn the fox (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw3bK_zFGoc)?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on February 12, 2014, 12:24:13 PM
I've found to Rhode Island is not actually an island. What is up with that?

Oh, that's awesome, I never thought of that before! I'm just so used to saying "Rhode Island"... The one that gets me is a town in Maine called "Mount Desert Island." I'm like, make up your mind! Are you a mountain? Are you a desert? Are you an island?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on February 12, 2014, 12:53:21 PM
Do you see those space saving bags where you put things like sweaters or pillows and suck the air out?
I knew they could be used with a vacuum cleaner, but for the strangest reason always thought it would need a special one that could go in reverse  :o (not just a special apparatus that fits the bag, a special vacuum)
The "you need to suck the air out" and "vacuums suck the air out" did not click until very recently  :-[ .
At least, when I admitted that to my SO he said he had thought the same thing, that you had to use a special one and that a normal vacuum wouldn't work.

Maybe I had it mixed with the thing you use to blow up air mattres and things like that.

If it makes you feel better I've just had a lightbulb moment that we don't have to use the vacuum for ours we could use the nice handheld pump for the air mattress (which deflates as well as inflates).

Depending on how it attaches to the space bag, though--there's a flat collar intended to provide a flat surface for any width of vacuum-hose opening; you place the nozzle/hose flat against it. If your deflator has a poky nozzle, it won't work.

Most fibers aren't damaged by being compressed. Foam can be; I decided against -really- squeezing the plush toys, and just sort of squeezing them. And it can break the stiff parts of feathers, so I'm not keen on squishing the down stuff all that firmly.



Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on February 12, 2014, 12:59:55 PM
w/ Manhattan:

Manhattan Island is indeed an island.

However, the borough of Manhattan (in NYC's political divisions) comprises the island of Manhattan and a small section of land across the Harlem River that is on the mainland plus a few smaller islands.

Wikipedia has a map.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:New_York_City_location_Manhattan.svg

That tiny bit on the mainland was originally part of the island, but it was difficult to navigate, so they dug the Harlem River Ship Canal, which turned Marble Hill into an island. Later they filled in the original channel of the river itself, joining Marble Hill to the mainland, but they kept the political membership.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on February 12, 2014, 01:18:24 PM
Do you see those space saving bags where you put things like sweaters or pillows and suck the air out?
I knew they could be used with a vacuum cleaner, but for the strangest reason always thought it would need a special one that could go in reverse  :o (not just a special apparatus that fits the bag, a special vacuum)
The "you need to suck the air out" and "vacuums suck the air out" did not click until very recently  :-[ .
At least, when I admitted that to my SO he said he had thought the same thing, that you had to use a special one and that a normal vacuum wouldn't work.

Maybe I had it mixed with the thing you use to blow up air mattres and things like that.

If it makes you feel better I've just had a lightbulb moment that we don't have to use the vacuum for ours we could use the nice handheld pump for the air mattress (which deflates as well as inflates).

Depending on how it attaches to the space bag, though--there's a flat collar intended to provide a flat surface for any width of vacuum-hose opening; you place the nozzle/hose flat against it. If your deflator has a poky nozzle, it won't work.

Most fibers aren't damaged by being compressed. Foam can be; I decided against -really- squeezing the plush toys, and just sort of squeezing them. And it can break the stiff parts of feathers, so I'm not keen on squishing the down stuff all that firmly.
Depends on how long they're kept squished and where.  I just dragged down a box of my daughters' stuffies that had been in the attic for the last 20 years or so.  Not vac-packed, just in a box.  The stuffies on the bottom were all squashed out of shape.  :( 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on February 12, 2014, 01:33:13 PM
Yeah, I had that experience with my childhood stuffed animals, which is why I didn't want to really squish my kids'. And I don't really plan on letting them keep them that long.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Snooks on February 12, 2014, 04:17:43 PM
Do you see those space saving bags where you put things like sweaters or pillows and suck the air out?
I knew they could be used with a vacuum cleaner, but for the strangest reason always thought it would need a special one that could go in reverse  :o (not just a special apparatus that fits the bag, a special vacuum)
The "you need to suck the air out" and "vacuums suck the air out" did not click until very recently  :-[ .
At least, when I admitted that to my SO he said he had thought the same thing, that you had to use a special one and that a normal vacuum wouldn't work.

Maybe I had it mixed with the thing you use to blow up air mattres and things like that.

If it makes you feel better I've just had a lightbulb moment that we don't have to use the vacuum for ours we could use the nice handheld pump for the air mattress (which deflates as well as inflates).

Depending on how it attaches to the space bag, though--there's a flat collar intended to provide a flat surface for any width of vacuum-hose opening; you place the nozzle/hose flat against it. If your deflator has a poky nozzle, it won't work.

Most fibers aren't damaged by being compressed. Foam can be; I decided against -really- squeezing the plush toys, and just sort of squeezing them. And it can break the stiff parts of feathers, so I'm not keen on squishing the down stuff all that firmly.

The hole to deflate our air mattress from is about the same size as the one on the vac-pac so I'll give it a go next time I need to.

We can't put our duvet in the bag because it's feather.  Similarly you're not supposed to store sleeping bags compressed because it makes them less effective at keeping you warm.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: RingTailedLemur on February 12, 2014, 04:37:19 PM
Watching a video the other day, I learned that foxes wag their tails when they are happy.

It's not that I thought they didn't, I just never thought about it before.

Would that be Dawn the fox (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw3bK_zFGoc)?

Yes!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: blue2000 on February 12, 2014, 05:22:06 PM
Watching a video the other day, I learned that foxes wag their tails when they are happy.

It's not that I thought they didn't, I just never thought about it before.

Would that be Dawn the fox (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw3bK_zFGoc)?

Yes!

Oh my word, that's adorable!! ;D
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Library Dragon on February 12, 2014, 05:34:39 PM
Yeah, I had that experience with my childhood stuffed animals, which is why I didn't want to really squish my kids'. And I don't really plan on letting them keep them that long.

Your plans may not mesh with the kid's  :D . We have one stuffed dog that was DS1's then went to DS2. Whenever I try and find it a new home I'm vetoed. DIL told me she had a talk with DS2 about it, but no, it stays. DS1 backs him up. Fortunately Go-Go doesn't take up much space.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: VorFemme on February 12, 2014, 06:46:06 PM
Ambrosia Hino left a stuffed dog behind by accident at a hotel at 8(?) - we had to have it mailed to us so she could sleep.  I think it was a "Pound Puppy" and you could no longer buy them.

She loaned it to her baby brother while he was sick when he was about three or so...no more in the stores and he absolutely fell in love with the thing. 

I went looking and found one - at a store with a play area (quilt, crafting supplies, and framing shop).  The owner's not-so-dear-husband asked for a divorce and she had to sell the business.  I bought the Pound Puppy (not quite the same color) immediately...she has hers and his is somewhere, still packed since the move in 2005 (he was almost twelve and hadn't slept with it for years, but it got a lot of use when he was younger)!

I am not allowed to get rid of it when I find it because it might be needed for a grandbaby...."it's traditional to sleep with Pound Puppy".
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Jones on February 12, 2014, 06:54:42 PM
I still have a life size Cookie Monster (he's about 3.5 feet tall right?) that I received for my first birthday. He lives in DD's room on the bottom bunk and we all take turns sleeping with him occasionally. Sadly, DS recently threw up on him and I had to figure out the best way to give his faux fur a proper cleaning without destroying the old guy. He's still doing great!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on February 12, 2014, 07:03:52 PM
We've got a vacuum-packed stuffed lemur in the attic.  I sent it to DH over the summer when we were first dating in college.  (My parents have one of those vacuum-sealer thingies.)  Clear plastic, so I wrote "I've never mailed a lemur before" and DH's address on it and mailed it with the little lemur eyes staring out from inside.  Got a strange look at the post office.

Six months later, MIL mailed it to DH at college - apparently it was among some packages that had gotten lost when someone abandoned their mail truck in rural Alabama, and it took several months for it to eventually get delivered.  That was ~14 years ago and we've never opened the package.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on February 12, 2014, 08:43:57 PM
Ambrosia Hino left a stuffed dog behind by accident at a hotel at 8(?) - we had to have it mailed to us so she could sleep.  I think it was a "Pound Puppy" and you could no longer buy them.

She loaned it to her baby brother while he was sick when he was about three or so...no more in the stores and he absolutely fell in love with the thing. 

I went looking and found one - at a store with a play area (quilt, crafting supplies, and framing shop).  The owner's not-so-dear-husband asked for a divorce and she had to sell the business.  I bought the Pound Puppy (not quite the same color) immediately...she has hers and his is somewhere, still packed since the move in 2005 (he was almost twelve and hadn't slept with it for years, but it got a lot of use when he was younger)!

I am not allowed to get rid of it when I find it because it might be needed for a grandbaby...."it's traditional to sleep with Pound Puppy".

*jumpy claps and happy flail*  I love love love Pound Puppies. 

I had passed all my old ones down to my cousin and then they had a fire and were destroyed.  I still miss those guys.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: #borecore on February 12, 2014, 09:19:30 PM
My mother has the toy given to her at the hospital the day she was born. At her house, also, are the toys my brother and I were given on the days we were born. None of these were beloved cuddly things -- hers was actually all rubber, and my stuffed rabbit's hand became partially detached and has a sharp inner edge -- but getting rid of them would be sad at this point. No vacuum storage.


On topic: I was next to a table of students in the same American graduate program as me, all Americans in their early 20s, and one asked the others, "Who was the president before Reagan?"

None of them knew. Not even with clues about peanut farming, charitable work, Iran ...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on February 13, 2014, 12:58:33 AM
w/ Manhattan:

Manhattan Island is indeed an island.

However, the borough of Manhattan (in NYC's political divisions) comprises the island of Manhattan and a small section of land across the Harlem River that is on the mainland plus a few smaller islands.

Wikipedia has a map.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:New_York_City_location_Manhattan.svg

That tiny bit on the mainland was originally part of the island, but it was difficult to navigate, so they dug the Harlem River Ship Canal, which turned Marble Hill into an island. Later they filled in the original channel of the river itself, joining Marble Hill to the mainland, but they kept the political membership.

Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Snooks on February 14, 2014, 05:11:14 PM
Ambrosia Hino left a stuffed dog behind by accident at a hotel at 8(?) - we had to have it mailed to us so she could sleep.  I think it was a "Pound Puppy" and you could no longer buy them.

She loaned it to her baby brother while he was sick when he was about three or so...no more in the stores and he absolutely fell in love with the thing. 

I went looking and found one - at a store with a play area (quilt, crafting supplies, and framing shop).  The owner's not-so-dear-husband asked for a divorce and she had to sell the business.  I bought the Pound Puppy (not quite the same color) immediately...she has hers and his is somewhere, still packed since the move in 2005 (he was almost twelve and hadn't slept with it for years, but it got a lot of use when he was younger)!

I am not allowed to get rid of it when I find it because it might be needed for a grandbaby...."it's traditional to sleep with Pound Puppy".

*jumpy claps and happy flail*  I love love love Pound Puppies. 

I had passed all my old ones down to my cousin and then they had a fire and were destroyed.  I still miss those guys.

I had one that had puppies. My parents are clearing out the attic so mine may come to light soon. Mom's dreading getting to the stuffed animals because she's convinced things will be living in them, Dad's dreading it because he knows I'll want to keep them all when I see them.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Octavia on February 16, 2014, 12:25:20 PM
I just found out that the ice in skating rinks is painted white. I mean, I know that logos and markings for hockey games are painted into the ice. But I figured the ice was white because the concrete or whatever underneath it was white. Am I the only person who didn't know this?  :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on February 16, 2014, 12:30:25 PM
I just found out that the ice in skating rinks is painted white. I mean, I know that logos and markings for hockey games are painted into the ice. But I figured the ice was white because the concrete or whatever underneath it was white. Am I the only person who didn't know this?  :-[
Nope. I didn't know it either!  And thinking about it, I don't think it can be.  Because unless the Zamboni paints it as well as smoothing the ice, it would be scraped off on the Zamboni's first pass, right?
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 16, 2014, 12:36:23 PM
I didn't think the white part was painted, unless it was part of a logo.  When you use the Zamboni to flood the ice, if the water was tinted white, it would obscure the lines and logos.  I suppose it is possible that the base layer is painted white.  And it wouldn't surprise me if the curling ice was painted white.  It isn't flooded the same way a rink is, once the ice is established.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Octavia on February 16, 2014, 12:54:01 PM
I didn't think the white part was painted, unless it was part of a logo.  When you use the Zamboni to flood the ice, if the water was tinted white, it would obscure the lines and logos.  I suppose it is possible that the base layer is painted white.  And it wouldn't surprise me if the curling ice was painted white.  It isn't flooded the same way a rink is, once the ice is established.
Yep, the base layer is what's painted white using a big paint sprayer (or in the case of the Sochi Olympic speed skating rink, the inner part is painted light blue while the racing lanes are painted white). Then they paint logos, stripes, etc. Then they add the rest of the water over a couple of days so the painted layer is well-sealed and will last all season. The Zamboni only scrapes up and replenishes the top layer or two of ice, so it never gets down to the paint. I just learned all of this from my hockey player friend.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Elfmama on February 16, 2014, 01:08:49 PM
I didn't think the white part was painted, unless it was part of a logo.  When you use the Zamboni to flood the ice, if the water was tinted white, it would obscure the lines and logos.  I suppose it is possible that the base layer is painted white.  And it wouldn't surprise me if the curling ice was painted white.  It isn't flooded the same way a rink is, once the ice is established.
Yep, the base layer is what's painted white using a big paint sprayer (or in the case of the Sochi Olympic speed skating rink, the inner part is painted light blue while the racing lanes are painted white). Then they paint logos, stripes, etc. Then they add the rest of the water over a couple of days so the painted layer is well-sealed and will last all season. The Zamboni only scrapes up and replenishes the top layer or two of ice, so it never gets down to the paint. I just learned all of this from my hockey player friend.
Now that makes a lot more sense!  What kind of paint do they use? 
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Octavia on February 16, 2014, 01:37:06 PM
I didn't think the white part was painted, unless it was part of a logo.  When you use the Zamboni to flood the ice, if the water was tinted white, it would obscure the lines and logos.  I suppose it is possible that the base layer is painted white.  And it wouldn't surprise me if the curling ice was painted white.  It isn't flooded the same way a rink is, once the ice is established.
Yep, the base layer is what's painted white using a big paint sprayer (or in the case of the Sochi Olympic speed skating rink, the inner part is painted light blue while the racing lanes are painted white). Then they paint logos, stripes, etc. Then they add the rest of the water over a couple of days so the painted layer is well-sealed and will last all season. The Zamboni only scrapes up and replenishes the top layer or two of ice, so it never gets down to the paint. I just learned all of this from my hockey player friend.
Now that makes a lot more sense!  What kind of paint do they use?
I'm so fascinated by the process myself that I went looking for more info. Here is a thorough Youtube video that explains it all - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hT3yfuLPIU . I think it's really interesting!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: TootsNYC on February 16, 2014, 01:57:39 PM

Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I love the story of how it ended up in NYC--a rowboat race around the island.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: HenrysMom on February 16, 2014, 04:38:36 PM

Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I love the story of how it ended up in NYC--a rowboat race around the island.

I recently saw an episode of "How the States got their Shapes," focusing on Ellis Island.  I always thought it was in New York, but apparently there was some court fight and the ruling was the main building is in New York, the rest of the island is in New Jersey.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: PastryGoddess on February 16, 2014, 06:43:47 PM

Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I love the story of how it ended up in NYC--a rowboat race around the island.

I recently saw an episode of "How the States got their Shapes," focusing on Ellis Island.  I always thought it was in New York, but apparently there was some court fight and the ruling was the main building is in New York, the rest of the island is in New Jersey.

I love that show :)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on February 17, 2014, 02:53:39 AM

Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I love the story of how it ended up in NYC--a rowboat race around the island.

Ah, Captain Christopher Billopp's exploit, isn't that right? (I looked it up.)

Caused to come to mind, a gruesome legend from long ago: supposedly explaining why the badge of Ireland's northernmost province of Ulster, is a red hand.  A tale of rival chieftains racing each other by boat toward the coast of the area -- the first one to lay hand on it, would be acknowledged as its overlord.  One guy, super-keen to win but his boat falling behind, cut his hand off and, with his other arm, threw it forward on to the shore, ahead of his competitors...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: jaxsue on February 17, 2014, 03:52:55 AM
w/ Manhattan:

Manhattan Island is indeed an island.

However, the borough of Manhattan (in NYC's political divisions) comprises the island of Manhattan and a small section of land across the Harlem River that is on the mainland plus a few smaller islands.

Wikipedia has a map.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:New_York_City_location_Manhattan.svg

That tiny bit on the mainland was originally part of the island, but it was difficult to navigate, so they dug the Harlem River Ship Canal, which turned Marble Hill into an island. Later they filled in the original channel of the river itself, joining Marble Hill to the mainland, but they kept the political membership.

Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I moved to this area (NY/ NJ) 7 yrs ago. I had also thought that Staten Island was closer to NY, and much smaller. I was surprised to find out the truth. Now in Central Jersey, I live where I can be in Staten Island in about 7 minutes!
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: bansidhe on February 17, 2014, 12:46:54 PM
This is so embarrassing...
For the first year or so that I used Photoshop, the Rotate Canvas dialog box mystified me. It looks like this:
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v31/jenniferjo/rotate_canvas_zps59cd575e.png)

I couldn't figure out what CW and CCW meant, so I'd just click one of them and hope for the best and if it didn't work, I'd cancel the action and click the other one. It was quite annoying, because I use that feature quite frequently and could never remember which one rotated left and which one rotated right.

Finally, one day, I clicked the wrong option for the umpteenth time and grumbled to myself, "I wanted that to go counter-clockwise, not clockwise - - OHHHHH!" 

Hey, it only took me a year to figure out what should have been obvious.  :-[
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Lynn2000 on February 17, 2014, 01:09:35 PM
Okay, I will top that, because it's only in the last few years that I've realized where I live.  :P I remembered I was in the "East Central" part of the state because everything is called that... "Covering East Central news" from the TV and newspaper, for example. I did not realize the county I grew up in actually borders the neighboring state--granted we're in the part on the opposite side, but still. We're closer to the neighboring state than we are to a lot of places inside our own state. I had some relatives in the neighboring state and it was always a huge deal to visit them, or for them to come visit us--like, "Okay, gear up, we're going to Neighboring State, do we have food and water, overnight bag..."

Also, there is a large city in my state, and for my entire childhood it was like the city of Oz, shining on the horizon. I think we went there like twice in my life (not counting purely airport trips). I now live even further away from that city... but many people here will drive to that city and back in one day, and don't see it as a big deal at all. It's like two, two and a half hours away. It takes longer to get to my grandma's house (other direction) but we seemed to be able to do that often enough when I was a kid, even a round trip in the same day. So obviously some of that is my parents' reluctance to go to the city, but I looked pretty dumb when I grew up and goggled at people for treating a trip to the city so casually. ::)
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Iris on February 17, 2014, 01:45:58 PM

Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I love the story of how it ended up in NYC--a rowboat race around the island.

Ah, Captain Christopher Billopp's exploit, isn't that right? (I looked it up.)

Caused to come to mind, a gruesome legend from long ago: supposedly explaining why the badge of Ireland's northernmost province of Ulster, is a red hand.  A tale of rival chieftains racing each other by boat toward the coast of the area -- the first one to lay hand on it, would be acknowledged as its overlord.  One guy, super-keen to win but his boat falling behind, cut his hand off and, with his other arm, threw it forward on to the shore, ahead of his competitors...

I'm picturing the "defeated" captain standing there, looking at a severed hand, back at the guy, back at the hand, and saying "Okay. Okay, if you want it that badly..." All the while backing sloooowly towards his boat and making frantic hand signals at his crew behind his back to get the boat ready so they could get the heck away from the crazy person...
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Slartibartfast on February 17, 2014, 02:09:18 PM
Okay, I will top that, because it's only in the last few years that I've realized where I live.  :P I remembered I was in the "East Central" part of the state because everything is called that... "Covering East Central news" from the TV and newspaper, for example. I did not realize the county I grew up in actually borders the neighboring state--granted we're in the part on the opposite side, but still. We're closer to the neighboring state than we are to a lot of places inside our own state. I had some relatives in the neighboring state and it was always a huge deal to visit them, or for them to come visit us--like, "Okay, gear up, we're going to Neighboring State, do we have food and water, overnight bag..."

Also, there is a large city in my state, and for my entire childhood it was like the city of Oz, shining on the horizon. I think we went there like twice in my life (not counting purely airport trips). I now live even further away from that city... but many people here will drive to that city and back in one day, and don't see it as a big deal at all. It's like two, two and a half hours away. It takes longer to get to my grandma's house (other direction) but we seemed to be able to do that often enough when I was a kid, even a round trip in the same day. So obviously some of that is my parents' reluctance to go to the city, but I looked pretty dumb when I grew up and goggled at people for treating a trip to the city so casually. ::)

I've actually felt the same way after moving across the country  :)  I grew up in a city of 35,000 people - we were the "big city" for my portion of my state.  The nearest actual big city (i.e. something someone would have heard of) was ~45 minutes away.  They were special because they had a MALL.  A few of my mom's friends would go shopping at the mall just because, but I remember it being a really big deal - like, you might get to go there for your prom dress kind of big deal.  Mom always thought it was crazy to drive 45 minutes just to go shopping - in my hometown, pretty much nothing is more than 10 minutes away, and "rush hour" means having to wait through two cycles of the light on main street.

Now I live somewhere approximately the same size as the "big city."  And we have THREE malls.  And 45 minutes isn't an uncommon commute if you live on one side of the city and work on the other, especially if you do your driving during rush hour.  My mental estimate of "how early do I have to leave for X?" has gone from 10 minutes to 30 minutes most of the time  :P
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: cabbageweevil on February 17, 2014, 05:40:51 PM
Caused to come to mind, a gruesome legend from long ago: supposedly explaining why the badge of Ireland's northernmost province of Ulster, is a red hand.  A tale of rival chieftains racing each other by boat toward the coast of the area -- the first one to lay hand on it, would be acknowledged as its overlord.  One guy, super-keen to win but his boat falling behind, cut his hand off and, with his other arm, threw it forward on to the shore, ahead of his competitors...

I'm picturing the "defeated" captain standing there, looking at a severed hand, back at the guy, back at the hand, and saying "Okay. Okay, if you want it that badly..." All the while backing sloooowly towards his boat and making frantic hand signals at his crew behind his back to get the boat ready so they could get the heck away from the crazy person...

Making mental note: "for ever after, for me and mine -- stay far away from Ulster..."
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: Dindrane on February 17, 2014, 07:21:05 PM
I've actually felt the same way after moving across the country  :)  I grew up in a city of 35,000 people - we were the "big city" for my portion of my state.  The nearest actual big city (i.e. something someone would have heard of) was ~45 minutes away.  They were special because they had a MALL.  A few of my mom's friends would go shopping at the mall just because, but I remember it being a really big deal - like, you might get to go there for your prom dress kind of big deal.  Mom always thought it was crazy to drive 45 minutes just to go shopping - in my hometown, pretty much nothing is more than 10 minutes away, and "rush hour" means having to wait through two cycles of the light on main street.

Now I live somewhere approximately the same size as the "big city."  And we have THREE malls.  And 45 minutes isn't an uncommon commute if you live on one side of the city and work on the other, especially if you do your driving during rush hour.  My mental estimate of "how early do I have to leave for X?" has gone from 10 minutes to 30 minutes most of the time  :P

I've had almost the complete opposite adjustment. I grew up in one of the biggest cities in the US. Anything you could get to within half an hour was super close by. Driving 45 minutes to an hour to get somewhere was not the kind of thing you'd do for every little thing (especially if that was the non-rush-hour travel time), but it wasn't that big a deal, and a lot of people had daily commutes that took that long. But, because I lived in the biggest city in the area, I rarely drove to other nearby cities unless it was to visit family or something. Basically none of them had really anything my city didn't, or at least nothing sufficiently different/better to get me to travel.

Now, I live in the 2nd largest city in my state...but at just about 200,000 residents, it's roughly 1/10th to 1/20th (depending upon how you count) the size of the city I grew up in. Most people have not heard of where I live unless they are at least a little bit familiar with the state. I'd never heard of it before my husband moved here.

But what's funny is that half an hour of driving now takes me completely out of the urban area of the city. Most things within the city are 10 minutes away (or less). My commute to work is 3.5 miles, and I get super grumpy if it takes me more than 10 minutes to drive it.

Even though the closest at-least-as-big cities are at least an hour away (and the closest truly big city, which is still smaller than the one I grew up in, is 2 hours away), I go to other cities at least once every couple of months. It's often just a day trip to shop and spend some time in a more urban environment, not for any particular reason or to visit anyone. But deity forbid I have to drive more than 15 minutes within my own city to get anywhere.
Title: Re: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 18, 2014, 12:45:39 PM
This is completely stupid and inane, but in playing my umpteenth level of candy crush, i just realized that the stripes on the striped candies go either vertically, or horizontally, and as such, that's the way they move when you play them! I couldn't figure out why sometimes they went one way, and sometimes, the other. DUH. and I&#