Etiquette Hell

Hostesses With The Mostest => Recipe Requests => Topic started by: MommyPenguin on June 26, 2013, 09:00:38 PM

Title: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: MommyPenguin on June 26, 2013, 09:00:38 PM
My husband and I got a bread machine for our wedding, uh, 9 years ago.  Today, I actually tried using it.  :(  Yes, we've been carting it around for 9 years without having used it once.  We loved the idea, just never got around to it.  So, we'd really like to try making bread at home instead of buying it at the grocery store.  I found a great recipe that I wanted to try.

It turned out to taste really good, but there was a slight issue.  It overflowed the little "bucket" part.  I'm not just talking about it having a bit of a muffin-top, which I think is normal, but it filled the entire top of the bread machine such that it was pressed up against the little window on the top.  When it finished, I had to turn the bread machine on its side and sort of dig the bread out.  When it came out, I discovered that the whole "muffin top" section (i.e. the overflow stuff) didn't really cook and was still doughy, so I cut that part off and baked it a bit in the oven.  The rest of the bread turned out perfectly baked and was absolutely delicious!  My kids are thrilled at the idea of having this as their regular bread every day.  Just wait 'til I start replacing more and more of the bread flour with whole wheat...

Anyway, I'm wondering if anybody can tell what I did wrong to cause so much overflow?  This is the recipe I used: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/honey-of-an-oatmeal-bread/  It makes a one-pound loaf.  I have a two-pound loaf machine, so I doubled the recipe exactly.  Was I not supposed to double the yeast when I doubled the recipe?  Or is my machine just not actually able to handle that amount, and I should try making the recipe without doubling and see how that does?  The only change I made to the recipe was to replace one of the cups of bread flour with whole wheat flour (so, when doubled, it was 4 2/3 cups bread flour, and I used 3 2/3 bread flour and 1 cup whole wheat).  I had *planned* to gradually start replacing more of the bread flour with whole wheat to find a good mix.

Any ideas?  I'm not sure if I should try not doubling the recipe next time, or doubling it but not doubling the yeast.  I feel like the bread was heavy enough already, if I double the recipe but *don't* double the yeast, won't it be even heavier?  So I guess I'm inclined to try just doing the recipe without doubling and see what happens.  But I'd love any pointers that you veteran bread machine users might have!
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 26, 2013, 09:06:25 PM
I make bread, but not in a machine.  My brother uses his a lot, though.

What I would try first is using 1.5 times the recipe and see how that works.  It may be that your yeast was really fresh and just rose more.  Double check that it was the right kind of yeast - did you use active dry yeast (traditional) or quick rise yeast or bread machine yeast, etc.

If you double the rest of the ingredients, you should definitely increase the yeast.  If the 1.5 times the recipe doesn't work, try doubling everything else but only use 1.5 times the yeast.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 26, 2013, 09:12:10 PM
I make bread, but not in a machine.  My brother uses his a lot, though.

What I would try first is using 1.5 times the recipe and see how that works.  It may be that your yeast was really fresh and just rose more.  Double check that it was the right kind of yeast - did you use active dry yeast (traditional) or quick rise yeast or bread machine yeast, etc.

If you double the rest of the ingredients, you should definitely increase the yeast.  If the 1.5 times the recipe doesn't work, try doubling everything else but only use 1.5 times the yeast.

POD Outdoor Girl.  Try doing a 1.5x batch.  If that doesn't work then do a 1x batch and see how full the machine gets.

Do you have a kitchenaid/stand mixer?  If so I highly recommend making bread from scratch.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: MommyPenguin on June 26, 2013, 09:32:49 PM
Out of curiosity, what's the advantage of doing the bread from scratch?  I do have a Kitchenaid, but while it technically has a dough hook, my husband has asked me firmly *not* to ever attempt to use it to knead bread, because of the amount of wear it puts on the machine.  I was hoping that with the bread machine, I could just measure and dump in the ingredients, then go do other stuff (I homeschool and I have four children, so doing a lot of kneading and such every day wouldn't be likely to happen).  I even thought about maybe making some pre-measured bags of the dry ingredients that I could just dump in every day and then add the wet ingredients on top.  Hmm, I guess that wouldn't work with the yeast needing to be refrigerated now that it's open.

The yeast is actually very fresh, as I just bought it last night!  It's one of those little jars of Fleischmann's and it's actually "bread machine" yeast.  I thought that would be a good thing.  I'm a little new at this, though!

I could definitely try to do 1.5 times the recipe, it just makes the math a little more complicated, especially when it comes to that 1/3 cup.  :)  But it does sound reasonable, so I guess I'll try it! 
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: veryfluffy on June 26, 2013, 10:51:44 PM
Depending on what model of machine you have, my recommendation is to use it as a dough-maker, not as a bread-maker. I've had a bread machine for about 5 years, and use it about three times a week -- after the first three or four loaves, I stopped using it to bake the bread and have only used the "dough" programme. Chuck in the ingredients, turn it on, then 90 minutes later your dough is perfectly ready to form into whatever shape you like -- then you wait for the rise, and bake in the oven. You can find recipes for everything adapted for the bread machine dough programme: bagels, ciabatta, cinnamon buns, challah, etc.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: blarg314 on June 27, 2013, 01:05:45 AM

As far as I understand it, bread machine yeast is more finely textured than active dry yeast, and faster rising. That's not a problem, as long as your recipe calls for that type of yeast - it looks like the recipe you use calls for active dry yeast, which rises more slowly.

Other things that might affect it are ambient temperature and humidity. I find that in the summer I need less yeast compared to the winter, due to the 20C difference in room temperature.

Flour gluten content varies from country to country, which may require some adjustments. 

The thing with bread machines is that you need a good recipe, and you need to follow it carefully, as you can't adjust as you go along the way you do when you're making it by hand (add a little flour, let it rise a little longer, etc).

You can do mixes - mix up all the dry ingredients except the yeast.  My bread machine calls for liquid on the bottom, then the dry ingredients, then you put the yeast in a little hollow in the dry ingredients at the top.

Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 27, 2013, 01:15:24 AM
Out of curiosity, what's the advantage of doing the bread from scratch?  I do have a Kitchenaid, but while it technically has a dough hook, my husband has asked me firmly *not* to ever attempt to use it to knead bread, because of the amount of wear it puts on the machine.  I was hoping that with the bread machine, I could just measure and dump in the ingredients, then go do other stuff (I homeschool and I have four children, so doing a lot of kneading and such every day wouldn't be likely to happen).  I even thought about maybe making some pre-measured bags of the dry ingredients that I could just dump in every day and then add the wet ingredients on top.  Hmm, I guess that wouldn't work with the yeast needing to be refrigerated now that it's open.

The yeast is actually very fresh, as I just bought it last night!  It's one of those little jars of Fleischmann's and it's actually "bread machine" yeast.  I thought that would be a good thing.  I'm a little new at this, though!

I could definitely try to do 1.5 times the recipe, it just makes the math a little more complicated, especially when it comes to that 1/3 cup.  :)  But it does sound reasonable, so I guess I'll try it! 

I turn my bread measurements into metric, it's much easier measuring in whole numbers. I have a $8 kitchen scale that goes between pounds and grams.  being a little off won't hurt your dough, it's pretty tough and it can't fight back

I'm biased, but when you make the dough from scratch, I think that is rises higher and has a more developed flavor than from a bread machine.  You can also play with braiding and other stacking techniques.

Bread is not something that you need to watch all the time.  My timeline is the following
Depending on the dough, I'll mix it for 7-10 min.  Then I form into a ball and put into a greased bowl with a towel or plastic over top.  I walk away and leave it alone for a few hours.  I come back.  Give it quick knead and form it back into a ball and back in the bowl it goes for another hour or so.  At this point, if you don't have time to finish shaping your loaves you can wrap it in plastic and throw it in the fridge to ******* the yeast.  If it will be a couple of days before you can get to it, then throw it in the freezer

I do my final shaping/braiding or put it in the pan, give it an egg wash, let it proof for 20-30 min and then into the oven it goes
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 27, 2013, 07:44:45 AM
The bread machine yeast would likely rise more than traditional yeast.  You could try a double batch, cutting the yeast down to 1.5 times the recipe and see if that works.  But if you can figure out the measurements for 1.5 times the recipe and still use 1.5 times the yeast, it should be lighter.  (You said it seemed like a dense, heavy bread.)

And a tip for the measuring:  if it calls for 1/3 cup, go ahead and use your 1/3 cup measure, measuring out 1 full portion and then guestimating 1/2 a portion in the same measuring cup.  Or you convert everything to the same common denominator, if you can do fractions.  1/2 of 1/3 would be 1/6 and 1/3 would be 2/6 so adding them together gives you 3/6 or 1/2.  You could even use a calculator and just round everything to the nearest measure.  1 divided by 3 times 1.5 equals 0.5
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Specky on June 27, 2013, 08:44:28 AM
I have found that a 1.5x the recipe for a 1 lb loaf does quite nicely in my 2lb bread machine. 

Last night, I got brave and programmed a sourdough course into the machine.  This morning, I have an honest-to-Betsy real sourdough loaf (no yeast, just the sourdough starter to leaven) waiting for us.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Miss Unleaded on June 27, 2013, 09:13:51 AM
I have found that a 1.5x the recipe for a 1 lb loaf does quite nicely in my 2lb bread machine. 

Last night, I got brave and programmed a sourdough course into the machine.  This morning, I have an honest-to-Betsy real sourdough loaf (no yeast, just the sourdough starter to leaven) waiting for us.
Does it taste good?  I have never had any luck getting sourdough to work in a real bread machine.  It never cooks right.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Specky on June 27, 2013, 09:24:50 AM
"Does it taste good?  I have never had any luck getting sourdough to work in a real bread machine.  It never cooks right."

My sourdough loving son just pronounced it "great" and "save that recipe", so it is OK.  I used spelt flour instead of wheat (the recipe was for wheat), so I will tweak it the next time by adding a little less water.  Being spelt, it rose way better than I had anticipated.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Sophia on June 27, 2013, 12:13:01 PM
I love my bread machine but I do something a little different (was recommended in a bread machine recipe cookbook).

Use regular yeast not bread machine yeast.
Follow the recipe except microwave the water until it is 110F.  Add the sugar and yeast.  Set timer for 10 minutes.
Add other stuff to the basket.  make sure the top surface is flour (salt kills yeast)
When timer dings add water/yeast/sugar mixture.
start bread machine  (not on delay)


(Oh, and weighing the flour is much more accurate)
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: MommyPenguin on June 27, 2013, 12:26:07 PM
If I tried using the machine to make the dough (it has that option) and then cooked it in the oven, could I get a lighter crust, do you think?  The one complaint we have about the bread is the very thick, hard crust.  We're "eat the crust first to get rid of it so we can get to the good part" girls (not sure my husband cares one way or the other).

I had no idea what order to put the stuff in the machine, as I didn't have the manual handy and the recipe and yeast both said to put the ingredient in "in the order recommended by the bread machine."  So I put the yeast on the bottom, then the flour to protect it, then the salt and other dry ingredients, and then the wet ingredients on top.  I'm not sure if there's a better order to do it, if you are going to put everything in and let the bread machine make the dough, at least.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 27, 2013, 01:15:42 PM
If I tried using the machine to make the dough (it has that option) and then cooked it in the oven, could I get a lighter crust, do you think?  The one complaint we have about the bread is the very thick, hard crust.  We're "eat the crust first to get rid of it so we can get to the good part" girls (not sure my husband cares one way or the other).

I had no idea what order to put the stuff in the machine, as I didn't have the manual handy and the recipe and yeast both said to put the ingredient in "in the order recommended by the bread machine."  So I put the yeast on the bottom, then the flour to protect it, then the salt and other dry ingredients, and then the wet ingredients on top.  I'm not sure if there's a better order to do it, if you are going to put everything in and let the bread machine make the dough, at least.

Yes you'll get a lighter crust than in the machine
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: veryfluffy on June 27, 2013, 01:19:54 PM

I had no idea what order to put the stuff in the machine, as I didn't have the manual handy and the recipe and yeast both said to put the ingredient in "in the order recommended by the bread machine."  So I put the yeast on the bottom, then the flour to protect it, then the salt and other dry ingredients, and then the wet ingredients on top.  I'm not sure if there's a better order to do it, if you are going to put everything in and let the bread machine make the dough, at least.

The usual order is liquids first, then dry, and yeast on top.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: MommyPenguin on June 27, 2013, 07:11:21 PM
Okay, thanks!  I'll try that tonight.  I found a bread pan, so I'll give it a try with making the dough and then having it bake in the oven.  I'll see how that works out in terms of effort.  If I'm going to plan on making bread regularly at home, it needs to be something I can stay on top of.  If it takes forever to get the dough out of the machine or I have to monitor the oven constantly, it might be a problem.  So hopefully it will come out easily and I can quickly figure out the golden amount of time to cook it for.  :)  I'll let you know how it goes!  It would be *awesome* if the dough came out cleanly enough that I could maybe make a second loaf immediately, so that I could kind of mass produce them.  Although I could only find one bread pan (one ended up getting too rusty after many moves).
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: VorFemme on June 27, 2013, 07:39:59 PM
If you cook the dough in the oven, my maternal grandmother made an accidental discovery when she had to shut off the oven halfway through baking bread to take grandpa to the ER.

A preheated oven that has been turned off halfway through the baking time will remain hot enough to finish baking the bread (especially in the summer time in Texas) AND when you pull the bread out at the normal time, it will have a much thinner, more tender crust.  Something between artisan bakery bread and "name brand bread in the plastic wrapper".
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Sophia on June 28, 2013, 07:06:37 AM

You might also look into whether or not your maker has a "crust" setting.  Mine has Light, Medium, Dark.  I think light bakes at a lower temp.  Baking bread in the oven is wonderful, but it would be nice to have an easy back-up plan when you get busy with the kids.

I bought mine for $5 at Goodwill and found the manual online.  So, you might look online for the manual. 

If you find a bread routine that works for you, you might look into buying bulk yeast and keeping it in the fridge.  Price of yeast can add up. 
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: MommyPenguin on June 28, 2013, 09:16:34 AM
It does have a crust setting and I did have it set to light.  While the crust is definitely light in color, it's still thick and chewy.  I know it was like that in the bread machine my parents had when I was growing up, so maybe that's just an aspect of bread machine cooking.

The yeast I have is actually in a little jar, rather than separate little packs.  Is that what people mean by buying in bulk, or do they mean *big* jars or something?  It's a little bigger than a baby food jar in size.

My husband also suggested that, if this really works and I'm doing it regularly, we could get a few more bread machines.  Then I could do a lot of batches at once.

Anyway, I'm currently doing a 1.5 pound loaf.  I hope it works!  It's been a bit... interesting.  I made the dough in the machine last night, but it was too late to cook it.  So even though it had risen in the machine, I set it up in the bread pan and put it in a warm but off oven to rise overnight.  Well, it rose, but it really liked one side of the bread pan, so it sort of overflowed over that side!  So I had to scoop it back in, as it was hanging on the side of the pan and wouldn't have cooked well, but then I lost the benefit of the rising.  So this morning I fixed it *back* up in the bread pan and am trying to get it to rise just enough to bake but not so much that it overflows everywhere.  I am not really sure how well this will work... it will have risen three times!  Is that bad?  Next time I'll make it during the day and keep an eye on it so it doesn't overflow to begin with.  I'm going to try the "turn the oven off halfway" technique when I bake it to see how that works.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Sophia on June 28, 2013, 10:44:01 AM
You should have put it the dough in the fridge.  It will still rise only extremely extremely slowly.  You put it in the fridge and then the next day you take it out and put it on the counter until it doubles. 

Keep an eye on Goodwill type places.  Lots of people donate their bread machine wedding presents after a couple of uses.  Just make sure that the turning blade is in there. 

I believe it is possible to buy bigger quantities really cheaply at Sam's or Costco.  (It was mentioned in the Tightwad Gazette)
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 28, 2013, 11:37:57 AM
Putting the bread on for a third rise won't hurt it at all.  It might even make it lighter in texture.  But as Sophia suggested, if it happens again, put the loaf in the fridge.

I've had my Kitchenaid mixer for over 20 years now, using it for icing and bread, primarily.  I've never had an issue with it.  I make 8 loaves of bread at a time (because that's what fits in my oven), which is 4 batches.  So if you have a Kitchenaid, as opposed to a cheaper model mixer, you should be fine to use the mixer for your bread.  8 loaves take me about 4 hours, start to finish, using my oven set at 100 F to proof the yeast and the dough.

I've had trouble buying bulk yeast lately because Costco doesn't carry it any more and I haven't seen other places with it.  So I'm just buying the little jars, as opposed to the packets, too.  But it sounds like you are going to be making a lot more bread than I do so you might want to see if you can find a bulk source.

I don't have a bread machine because if I did, I'd eat the whole loaf in a day or two!
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: MommyPenguin on June 28, 2013, 12:05:40 PM
So, I am currently eating lunch (pbj) with the results!  It worked out okay.  So I did a 1.5 pound loaf in the bread machine just to dough, then it got to rise a bunch of times, as I mentioned.  Well, I think it rose way too high for the height of my bread pan.  Got awfully close to the top of my oven!  I think 1.5 pounds may be too large a loaf for the size of bread pan I have.  I tried turning the oven off halfway through.  The verdict?  The top part of the loaf that extended above the bread pan made a pretty hard, crunchy crust, much thicker and crunchier than I'd like.  The rest of it that stayed in the bread pan had very little, light crust, but the bread ended up doughy in the middle.


So, I have a 1-lb. loaf currently working its way towards dough in the bread machine.  I'm going to try baking this one in the oven as well.  But I'm going to lower the rack so I keep the bread farther from the top of the oven, and I'm going to hope that maybe a 1-lb. loaf will stay lower in the bread pan.  Maybe then I will get that lighter crust!  I'm probably going to have to let it rise again once I get it in the bread pan, because I'm not really sure how to transfer it from the bread machine to the bread pan without it dropping.  We'll see!
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 28, 2013, 01:52:38 PM
It may also have a crunchier crust because of the kind of bread it is - I think you said it had oatmeal in it.  The crust will also soften if you don't eat the bread right away (difficult, I know) and store it in a plastic bag.

Most bread pans are geared to a 1 lb loaf so that should definitely work better.

My bread pans are kind of special - they used to be head cheese pans!  They are a little narrower and have higher sides on them so they make a really nice loaf of bread.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: MommyPenguin on June 28, 2013, 05:37:20 PM
Okay, so I finally managed to make a loaf that cooked all the way through without the crust getting *too* crisp.  It's still crisper than I would have liked, but... oh, well.  It was a little funny, though.  So, about half of the bread rose above the edges of the bread pan, and half was below the edges.  When I checked the cake, the top part (outside of the cake pan) was getting a bit crisp.  But when I took the bread out and put it on a pan to look at it, I realized the part that had been in the cake pan really wasn't cooked all the way through yet and would still be doughy inside.

So... I flipped the bread upside down in the bread pan and put it back in for about 10 more minutes.  It worked perfectly.  The bread is cooked through without overdoing the top part anymore.  I'm sure there's a better solution, but at least this worked for now.

Do I need a larger bread pan, so it doesn't rise up out of it so much?  Or... is there another way of fixing it, so it cooks through without too much crust?  The bread is really, really good, so I don't *really* want to change the recipe if possible.  I used a higher proportion of whole wheat flour this time, and it was still good.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 28, 2013, 06:32:58 PM
See if you can find pans with higher sides.  The loaf pans I've seen are great for loaf cakes/quick breads but I don't like them for yeast bread.  Antique shops might have the head cheese pans, depending on where you live.  If you are anywhere near farm country, you might be in luck.

Another option would be to make rolls.  Grease a couple of 8" cake pans, take bits of dough about the size of an extra large egg and put them in the pans, nestled up to each other but not jammed in.  Then let them rise.  It'll take 1/2 to 2/3 of the amount of time to rise that your loaf did.  Then bake as you would the loaf.  When you tap on the top of the loaf or the rolls, it should sound hollow to tell you it is cooked through.  The advantage to the rolls is that it would minimize the amount of crust.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Sophia on June 28, 2013, 09:44:12 PM
Or you could try putting less than normal in the pan and covering with foil. 
We prefer a good solid crust, so I can't give you too much advice on minimizing it.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 28, 2013, 10:05:07 PM
Are you still making a 1.5 times batch of dough?  Do you proof your bread before you put it in the oven?  I second the idea to make rolls from some extra dough.  You can also freeze a little bit of dough for later if you don't want rolls.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: magicdomino on July 01, 2013, 10:41:31 AM
King Arthur Flour sells yeast by the pound bag:

http://search.kingarthurflour.com/search?p=Q&asug=&af=type%3Aproducts&w=yeast

I keep some in the refrigerator, and the rest in the freezer. 
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Sophia on July 01, 2013, 12:21:28 PM
ooooh, that looks great.  Why did I never think to look there?  I've even been to the website. 
And, "cake enhancer" and "bread salt" ... Who would have thought?

----

On a related note, pizza dough comes out nice from the bread machine.  You have to remember to let it rest after you divide it out into round lumps.  Don't remember what it does, but the rest improves the handling. 
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Chip2 on July 25, 2013, 01:22:14 PM
Out of curiosity, what's the advantage of doing the bread from scratch?  I do have a Kitchenaid, but while it technically has a dough hook, my husband has asked me firmly *not* to ever attempt to use it to knead bread, because of the amount of wear it puts on the machine.  I was hoping that with the bread machine, I could just measure and dump in the ingredients, then go do other stuff (I homeschool and I have four children, so doing a lot of kneading and such every day wouldn't be likely to happen).  I even thought about maybe making some pre-measured bags of the dry ingredients that I could just dump in every day and then add the wet ingredients on top.  Hmm, I guess that wouldn't work with the yeast needing to be refrigerated now that it's open.

The yeast is actually very fresh, as I just bought it last night!  It's one of those little jars of Fleischmann's and it's actually "bread machine" yeast.  I thought that would be a good thing.  I'm a little new at this, though!

I could definitely try to do 1.5 times the recipe, it just makes the math a little more complicated, especially when it comes to that 1/3 cup.  :)  But it does sound reasonable, so I guess I'll try it!

I have a 20+ year old Kitchenaid that I use to knead bread dough all the time and it's still going strong. The only problem is that larger batches of dough try to climb the dough hook and crawl out of the bowl. Still, it beats kneading the stuff by hand and I think the texture ends up being superior to what I get from my (unused in years) bread machine.

The problem with baking bread in the bread machine is that when the baking cycle starts the dough is in a cold oven. The heating process cooks the outer layer of dough before getting hot enough to bake the interior so you end up with a thicker, heavier crust. (Not necessarily a bad thing, but maybe not what you're looking for.) With a preheated oven the exterior isn't exposed to the heat as long so you'll get a thinner crust.

The premeasured bags of dry ingredients are a great idea. Go ahead and prep them and add the yeast to them and keep the bags in the fridge so the wee beasties stay in hibernation.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: MommyPenguin on July 25, 2013, 02:13:29 PM
I guess if I make pre-measured bags, I'd want to reverse the dry ingredients, so they'd drop into the bread machine in order?  So yeast on the bottom, salt on the top, so they're separated by the flours and oatmeal?

Thanks for the explanation of why the bread machine works as it does!  That's really interesting to see why it is.  I just bought two new bread pans, and now I have a bread slicer!  Except my husband said that we ought to finish up the (store bought) bread in the freezer, as it won't last there forever.  So I had to take a short break from making bread.  The girls are very sad about having to eat store bought bread now, and are anxious to finish it so I can make bread again.  :)  The only difficulty with using all homemade bread so far is that I can't feed it to the baby, as this recipe includes honey and she's not 1 year yet.  Supposedly oven temperatures are not necessarily high enough to kill the spores from honey that can be dangerous to babies.  So I've been feeding her the leftover matzah from Passover instead.  :)  Nobody else wants it, and she doesn't mind.  Hee hee.
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: veryfluffy on July 25, 2013, 05:15:56 PM
Just finished reading 52 Loaves, by William Alexander -- very interesting if you are into making bread.

http://williamalexander.com/bread/
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: MommyPenguin on July 26, 2013, 01:07:59 PM
I'll have to check it out!
Title: Re: First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!
Post by: Chip2 on July 29, 2013, 03:29:41 PM
I guess if I make pre-measured bags, I'd want to reverse the dry ingredients, so they'd drop into the bread machine in order?  So yeast on the bottom, salt on the top, so they're separated by the flours and oatmeal?

Thanks for the explanation of why the bread machine works as it does!  That's really interesting to see why it is.  I just bought two new bread pans, and now I have a bread slicer!  Except my husband said that we ought to finish up the (store bought) bread in the freezer, as it won't last there forever.  So I had to take a short break from making bread.  The girls are very sad about having to eat store bought bread now, and are anxious to finish it so I can make bread again.  :)  The only difficulty with using all homemade bread so far is that I can't feed it to the baby, as this recipe includes honey and she's not 1 year yet.  Supposedly oven temperatures are not necessarily high enough to kill the spores from honey that can be dangerous to babies.  So I've been feeding her the leftover matzah from Passover instead.  :)  Nobody else wants it, and she doesn't mind.  Hee hee.

You could reverse the ingredient order but it's been my experience that it doesn't matter too much as long as the salt doesn't start in direct contact with the yeast or is at least dispersed through the other ingredients.

Internal temperature for a finished loaf of bread should be in the 200-205 degree (Farenheit, of course) range, but I don't know if the temp stays there long enough to kill the spores. However, you could substitute brown sugar for the honey.