Etiquette Hell

General Etiquette => All In A Day's Work => Topic started by: weschicky on August 27, 2013, 12:32:51 PM

Title: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: weschicky on August 27, 2013, 12:32:51 PM
We are on a floor of a building with two offices.  For the last five years, the other office has been vacant.  We have new neighbors.  All of a sudden, someone in the ladies' room has terrible aim, resulting in wet toilet seats.  This was never a problem before they moved in a month ago.

Is it ok to post a sign that says "If you sprinkle when you tinkle, please be sweet and wipe the seat"?  I know signs can seem passive-aggressive, but trying to figure out who in their company might be the best one to address the problem seems inefficient.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: LeveeWoman on August 27, 2013, 12:35:01 PM
We are on a floor of a building with two offices.  For the last five years, the other office has been vacant.  We have new neighbors.  All of a sudden, someone in the ladies' room has terrible aim, resulting in wet toilet seats.  This was never a problem before they moved in a month ago.

Is it ok to post a sign that says "If you sprinkle when you tinkle, please be sweet and wipe the seat"?  I know signs can seem passive-aggressive, but trying to figure out who in their company might be the best one to address the problem seems inefficient.

I don't see anything wrong with it.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Goosey on August 27, 2013, 12:37:12 PM
I think for a work environment, I would be less cutesy, but that's just my personal preference.

"Please make sure the seat is clean when you leave. Thank you."
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: gramma dishes on August 27, 2013, 12:52:25 PM
I think for a work environment, I would be less cutesy, but that's just my personal preference.

"Please make sure the seat is clean and dry when you leave. Thank you."

Added a couple of words there.   ;D
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: veronaz on August 27, 2013, 01:07:05 PM
eewww.   ::)  I think a note is fine.

After a few messes in the ladies' room at one of my old jobs (I'll spare the details) a "Please flush" note was posted in the stalls.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Shoo on August 27, 2013, 01:09:31 PM
I think for a work environment, I would be less cutesy, but that's just my personal preference.

"Please make sure the seat is clean when you leave. Thank you."

I think this is a good idea.  Direct and to the point. 

Does your ladies' room have seat covers?  If not, I'd get some pronto.  Yuck.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: doodlemor on August 27, 2013, 01:10:33 PM
This behavior is a great annoyance to me - I find it incredibly egregious.

How about a sign that says something like, "If you plan to hover, please lift the seat first so that it stays clean and dry for others."  Evil doodlemor can think of many things to post, but they are not within the realm of polite.

The seats in the ladies room at Wegman's are always clean, because the store provides seat covers.  Perhaps you could get management to supply seat covers and dispensers.

You know, the problem will end up being worse than the seats, because these squatting female canines will end up spattering the floor, too.  So disgusting. 
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: SlitherHiss on August 27, 2013, 01:19:38 PM
I think for a work environment, I would be less cutesy, but that's just my personal preference.

"Please make sure the seat is clean and dry when you leave. Thank you."

Added a couple of words there.   ;D

This. Absolutely. No need for cutesy euphemisms. Just be direct, and to the point.


This behavior is a great annoyance to me - I find it incredibly egregious.

How about a sign that says something like, "If you plan to hover, please lift the seat first so that it stays clean and dry for others."  Evil doodlemor can think of many things to post, but they are not within the realm of polite.

The seats in the ladies room at Wegman's are always clean, because the store provides seat covers.  Perhaps you could get management to supply seat covers and dispensers.

You know, the problem will end up being worse than the seats, because these squatting female canines will end up spattering the floor, too.  So disgusting. 

You know, finding the urine of others on the toilet seat is pretty heinous in my book, too, but I don't really think calling the offenders *itches is appropriate in the slightest.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: ------ on August 27, 2013, 01:20:35 PM
I think this issue goes beyond a lack of seat covers (even though they are a wonderful thing.)

We leased a small office when we had our company. We also encountered a similar problem with the facilities when a new neighbor moved in. We contacted management and explained the problem - within a month, the problem was over. Three months later the problem neighbor was gone. This sounds like something to me that I would take to the building management that your company pays rent to. Let them find out who is doing this and make it stop.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: cicero on August 27, 2013, 01:23:22 PM
i would go with direct and not cutesy.

But i hate to say that my experience in life has been that there are those who keep the restrooms clean and have no need of a sign, and there are those who don't and all the signs in the world aren't going to help.

*I* don't get it. I don't understand how anyone over the age of 5 can walk away from a toilet without flushing. or why women leave all sorts of used parephenlia just out there in the open. or if they drip on the seat, to not wipe it off. i don't get it.

Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: shhh its me on August 27, 2013, 01:30:09 PM
  I might start by letting building maintenance know just in case they want to offer seat covers and so the new neighbors can get an "unofficial" complaint , who knows all the innocent woman in the new office may think its you guys and let them post the sign.   Also if its an office with 2 single use bathrooms if this continues I may ask for one keyed unisex bathroom for both offices.

It's gross enough that I'd become a squeaky wheel.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Sharnita on August 27, 2013, 01:43:33 PM
Is there any way it is flushing with such force there is splash? I do agree the note should not be cute.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: gramma dishes on August 27, 2013, 01:46:20 PM
Is there any way it is flushing with such force there is splash? I do agree the note should not be cute.

The OP said it hadn't been a problem for the previous five years -- until the new neighbors moved in.  So unless it's a very recent malfunction, probably not.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: ladyknight1 on August 27, 2013, 01:50:38 PM
I am very interested in this thread. We have college aged women and older in our building and our housekeeping person is run ragged trying to keep everything clean. I can't believe some of the things I and my co-workers find in our bathrooms.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Library Dragon on August 27, 2013, 01:54:10 PM
Is there any way it is flushing with such force there is splash? I do agree the note should not be cute.

The OP said it hadn't been a problem for the previous five years -- until the new neighbors moved in.  So unless it's a very recent malfunction, probably not.

It is possible.  The school where I worked we were fine for the first several years.  Then there was a change in the water pressure lines.  I was mentally berating other faculty members for leaving a mess when someone mentioned in passing that they hated that the toilet now made such a splash. 

We hadn't changed equipment, but there had been a change in the city's water lines. 
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Twik on August 27, 2013, 01:55:13 PM
A building I've been in several times has a sign in each stall in the restroom that says "Please wipe the seat when finished - there is nothing more disgusting than sitting in someone else's urine".

It's blunt, but it might make an impact.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: White Lotus on August 27, 2013, 03:23:38 PM
Sometimes it is a flush splash and sometimes it, uh, isn't.  A sign is a start.

"Please flush, and make sure the seat is clean and dry, before you leave.  Please dispose of all non-flushable materials in the container provided."

I hope those in need of direction bother to read it.  I would feel perfectly comfortable calling a culprit on it, if I caught her at it.  A courteous person is considerate of others, and would naturally, one would think, pick up after herself.  Sheesh!

There are a few places I have been where the plumbing won't handle even paper, waste baskets are not provided and the customary solution is "that corner, there."  I don't like that system.  Why not a lined waste basket with a lid?  People do that on boats and RVs, where paper is known to clog the plumbing.  Just...why not?

Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: spookycatlady on August 27, 2013, 03:28:37 PM
I called our facilities management when dried urine remained on a seat for a week (I went to a different stall).

I *could* have cleaned it.  But it wasn't my pee to clean and I had no access to cleansers. Any number of women could have cleaned it, but didn't for similar reasons. What was especially gauling was that our *cleaners* didn't address it. The facilities manger called me without checking on the problem and tried to say that the marks were from a chemical burn.

An hour later he came and apologized for arguing. After our first convo, he had come up to our floor to replace the seat and was shocked, shocked I say that it really was dried urine.

A polite, direct sign may help. Out issue continues because Megacorp prohibits unofficial signage and no one reads official signage.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: daen on August 27, 2013, 03:47:47 PM
At one point, the company I worked for moved into larger quarters that had been hastily converted from an agricultural-products warehouse. There was a single bathroom in the building (as I said, hastily), and it was filthy. I expected this, due to the large amount of dirt that comes with this particular crop.

What I did not expect was the sign lying on the floor that said "Use the toilet, not the floor!!!" It was a cement floor, sloped toward a central drain, but still - ack!

I backed out of the room, went across the street to the hardware store, bought a bottle of bleach and some rubber gloves, and washed that room down with a vengeance. Walls were scrubbed (tile, thankfully) as high as I could reach; the fixtures were cleaned to within an inch of their lives; the floor was washed multiple times. I destroyed the cleaning rag and bleached spots into my sweatshirt, but it was worth it - I could use the bathroom without being completely squicked out.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: amylouky on August 27, 2013, 03:56:02 PM
Urgh. I hate squatters. Especially when they don't wipe the seat, but even if they do, it doesn't get off EVERYTHING.

We had to put up a sign in our restroom that says,
"Ladies, please be respectful of your coworkers and do not soil the toilet seat. If you do, please clean with the provided wipes and dry with a paper towel."  We keep a container of disinfecting wipes in there for that purpose.

In this case, since it's pretty obvious that it's one of the new tenants, I would probably complain to building management and ask them to put up signs/supply seat covers/speak to the new tenants.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: SingMeAway on August 27, 2013, 05:58:32 PM
I would go with a sign and speaking to the building manager. I say both because of a previous experience.....

A few jobs ago, I worked for a company in a small building. It was only us and the management company on the floor and my coworker and I were the only women in our company. The women's bathroom on our floor (which only had three stalls, so not much choice) sometimes was nasty. I mean, lumps of feces on the floor. It was appalling and these were supposed professionals working on the floor.

Coworker was a self-described germaphobe, so you can imagine this just about sent her around the bend. She printed up signs for all the stalls basically saying, "Please clean up after yourself, other people have to use these facilities.".

Every. single. sign. she put up was torn down. Repeatedly. Then someone, in other words, someone from the management company, complained to the building manager that someone was putting up signs in the bathroom >:(. Did they not also notice that someone was pooping on the floor?!!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: cwm on August 28, 2013, 10:11:48 AM
If I saw a cutesy rhyming sign in the bathroom I would wonder if I was still in elementary school. I hate cutesy signs like that. This is an office environment, there is nothing wrong with direct wording.

Talk to the office management and ask if signs would be appropriate and allowed. At several buildings we weren't allowed to put up signs, no matter what. We had to spread through word of mouth that there were problems that needed to be addressed. Finally, emails were sent out companywide (which included several people from several other branches/locations/subsidiary companies) so everyone knew we were having problems with someone missing the toilet.

Now that we're in a new building, there are still problems. The cleaning people won't clean the bathrooms. People miss. I've heard some horror stories about the men's room, and with the people who were discussing it, I have no reason to believe they were exaggerating. It's sad to think that we are all adults, but some of us seem to be forgetting what we learned as toddlers.

ETA: I really do know all the words to put in sentences. Promise.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: gramma dishes on August 28, 2013, 11:14:37 AM
...

Now that we're in a new building, there are still problems. The cleaning people won't clean the bathrooms. ...

 :o  Sounds like it's time for a new cleaning crew.  If they won't clean the bathrooms, what DO they clean? 
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: cwm on August 28, 2013, 12:38:37 PM
...

Now that we're in a new building, there are still problems. The cleaning people won't clean the bathrooms. ...

 :o  Sounds like it's time for a new cleaning crew.  If they won't clean the bathrooms, what DO they clean?

They vacuum the floors, do the trash at every single cube, do basic cleaning of the kitchen surfaces (wipe them down, no more), and do take the bathroom trash out and refill the paper towels and toilet paper and soap. But they weren't contracted to do surface cleaning in the bathroom past maybe wiping down the counters and mirrors with an all-purpose cleaning wipe. That's it. Technically it's not their job to clean it, though I don't know what the building management has in place to get it cleaned. It's above my pay grade.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: *inviteseller on August 28, 2013, 01:06:08 PM
This happened at my sister's office when a new lady started and they did post signs about cleaning up after yourself. 
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yvaine on August 28, 2013, 01:14:37 PM
Urgh. I hate squatters. Especially when they don't wipe the seat, but even if they do, it doesn't get off EVERYTHING.

It's a vicious cycle. People are so afraid the seat is dirty that they do all these convolutions to not sit on it--and in the process make it dirty. Or maybe they are snowflakes and think only other people's urine is dirty while theirs is made of unicorn tears.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: weschicky on August 29, 2013, 07:38:30 PM
Sorry to post and run--it's been a crazy week!

We DO have seat covers in the bathroom.  They're just not being used.

Our bathrooms are cleaned daily, after hours, so someone dripping on the seat at 9.30 am is cleaned up by the next user or left in place until 7ish pm.

Sanitizing wipes/foams are not an option--we have a fragrance free bathroom policy because of allergies (mine and a coworker's) and it's been hard enough to train the building maintenance staff to use products that don't make me have to run away from my office that I'm not about to start trying to find a product that can be used by anyone at any time during the day and still give me a fragrance-free place to pee.

The neighbors are web designers, so I posted the cutesy sign in the font I know makes web designer skin crawl (Comic Sans, if you're wondering), which is most appropriate in the cutesy option.  We'll see how this plays out.  If it fails, we'll try the clean and dry option.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Luci on August 29, 2013, 07:55:58 PM
Seat covers still have a soak through problem. If a couple of drops have been wiped off, there is still resudue. So never assume a seat is clean.

I drop a few drops of hand sanitizer on the seat, wipe it down with a couple of sheets of toilet paper, then I'm good to go.  :)  Even if the sanitizer is supposed to sit for a couple of minutes, it makes me feel better.

I did this when I worked and do it when I travel. Yeah, I'm weird.

Good luck with the sign!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Raintree on August 29, 2013, 09:38:43 PM
Just today I was in the washroom of an office building, and inside was the sign, "Please clean up after yourself and leave this washroom tidy for others" or something to that effect. I was thinking how pathetic it is that this even needs to be said. Of COURSE I will leave the washroom as I found it; how hard is it? I've been quite capable of using a washroom since I was a toddler, so who ARE these people?

But I know this problem exists. The washroom of an office building I used to work in was usually clean until about 3 PM, but after 3 the middle stall was always disgusting. Always the same stall, always some time mid-afternoon. I wanted to do a stake-out some time and see who it was, but I was busy working.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 29, 2013, 09:55:40 PM
I have that stupid "Meeting in the Ladies Room" song stuck in my head now
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: TootsNYC on August 31, 2013, 12:58:09 PM
This behavior is a great annoyance to me - I find it incredibly egregious.

How about a sign that says something like, "If you plan to hover, please lift the seat first so that it stays clean and dry for others."  Evil doodlemor can think of many things to post, but they are not within the realm of polite.


I agree.

I mean, really--men stand to urinate into toilets, right? In places where there aren't urinals.

And we expect them to *lift the seat* out of the way, right?

I want those signs to say, "When men stand to urinate, they lift the seat so it doesn't get pee splatters on the top. If you plan to not sit, please be a gentleman, and lift the seat."

As for the OP's situation, I'd vote for plain English on the sign. And put one in every stall.

"Recently we've discovered that someone is peeing on the seat. If you are someone who does not want to sit on the actual toilet seat, please lift it out of the way so that you do not splatter urine on it."

As for fragrance-free--what about rubbing alcohol or bleach? Are there bleach wipes you could make available?
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: FauxFoodist on August 31, 2013, 07:59:18 PM
Just today I was in the washroom of an office building, and inside was the sign, "Please clean up after yourself and leave this washroom tidy for others" or something to that effect. I was thinking how pathetic it is that this even needs to be said. Of COURSE I will leave the washroom as I found it; how hard is it? I've been quite capable of using a washroom since I was a toddler, so who ARE these people?

But I know this problem exists. The washroom of an office building I used to work in was usually clean until about 3 PM, but after 3 the middle stall was always disgusting. Always the same stall, always some time mid-afternoon. I wanted to do a stake-out some time and see who it was, but I was busy working.

20+ years ago, I used to work for a drug store.  Our restrooms were open to the public; we were in a nice area so most of our customers looked and acted like normal people.  However, there were 2-3 times that someone happened upon our women's restroom during our regular business hours and found it filthy (someone had gone in there and got her feces all over the inside of the stall, including all over the toilet and the stall walls, so I was told).

I guess management finally did do a stakeout to try to figure out which one of our customers kept doing it.  One day, one of our managers was recounting how he stopped the culprit.  Apparently, it was one of our elderly female customers who was a regular shopper; I think she was in her 70s at the youngest.  She was buying a Fleets enema then going into our restroom to use it.  The manager was alerted one day when she showed up and was buying one.  He planted himself in her path in front of the warehouse entrance she was going to go through to go towards the restroom.  He said to her, "Hi, you're not going back there."  Her response?  "It's not me."  He then looked at her quizzically and "innocently" asked her, "What's not you?  How would you know what I'm talking about?" and then just kept looking at her.  She said nothing and backed off.  It never happened again after that.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: lady_disdain on August 31, 2013, 08:17:19 PM
The neighbors are web designers, so I posted the cutesy sign in the font I know makes web designer skin crawl (Comic Sans, if you're wondering), which is most appropriate in the cutesy option.  We'll see how this plays out.  If it fails, we'll try the clean and dry option.

Choosing to make the sign something that will annoy the other users is childish and passive aggressive. Handling this matter in a direct and professional way would have gone a lot further in having a cordial relationship with your neighbours.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Shoo on August 31, 2013, 08:42:36 PM
Just today I was in the washroom of an office building, and inside was the sign, "Please clean up after yourself and leave this washroom tidy for others" or something to that effect. I was thinking how pathetic it is that this even needs to be said. Of COURSE I will leave the washroom as I found it; how hard is it? I've been quite capable of using a washroom since I was a toddler, so who ARE these people?

But I know this problem exists. The washroom of an office building I used to work in was usually clean until about 3 PM, but after 3 the middle stall was always disgusting. Always the same stall, always some time mid-afternoon. I wanted to do a stake-out some time and see who it was, but I was busy working.

20+ years ago, I used to work for a drug store.  Our restrooms were open to the public; we were in a nice area so most of our customers looked and acted like normal people.  However, there were 2-3 times that someone happened upon our women's restroom during our regular business hours and found it filthy (someone had gone in there and got her feces all over the inside of the stall, including all over the toilet and the stall walls, so I was told).

I guess management finally did do a stakeout to try to figure out which one of our customers kept doing it.  One day, one of our managers was recounting how he stopped the culprit.  Apparently, it was one of our elderly female customers who was a regular shopper; I think she was in her 70s at the youngest.  She was buying a Fleets enema then going into our restroom to use it.  The manager was alerted one day when she showed up and was buying one.  He planted himself in her path in front of the warehouse entrance she was going to go through to go towards the restroom.  He said to her, "Hi, you're not going back there."  Her response?  "It's not me."  He then looked at her quizzically and "innocently" asked her, "What's not you?  How would you know what I'm talking about?" and then just kept looking at her.  She said nothing and backed off.  It never happened again after that.

You mean she was doing it on purpose? 
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Shoo on August 31, 2013, 08:43:48 PM
The neighbors are web designers, so I posted the cutesy sign in the font I know makes web designer skin crawl (Comic Sans, if you're wondering), which is most appropriate in the cutesy option.  We'll see how this plays out.  If it fails, we'll try the clean and dry option.

Choosing to make the sign something that will annoy the other users is childish and passive aggressive. Handling this matter in a direct and professional way would have gone a lot further in having a cordial relationship with your neighbours.

I agree.  The cutesy sign was a mistake.  Professionalism would have been a better tactic.  I hope it works for you, but don't be surprised it if doesn't.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: VorFemme on August 31, 2013, 09:09:55 PM
Just today I was in the washroom of an office building, and inside was the sign, "Please clean up after yourself and leave this washroom tidy for others" or something to that effect. I was thinking how pathetic it is that this even needs to be said. Of COURSE I will leave the washroom as I found it; how hard is it? I've been quite capable of using a washroom since I was a toddler, so who ARE these people?

But I know this problem exists. The washroom of an office building I used to work in was usually clean until about 3 PM, but after 3 the middle stall was always disgusting. Always the same stall, always some time mid-afternoon. I wanted to do a stake-out some time and see who it was, but I was busy working.

20+ years ago, I used to work for a drug store.  Our restrooms were open to the public; we were in a nice area so most of our customers looked and acted like normal people.  However, there were 2-3 times that someone happened upon our women's restroom during our regular business hours and found it filthy (someone had gone in there and got her feces all over the inside of the stall, including all over the toilet and the stall walls, so I was told).

I guess management finally did do a stakeout to try to figure out which one of our customers kept doing it.  One day, one of our managers was recounting how he stopped the culprit.  Apparently, it was one of our elderly female customers who was a regular shopper; I think she was in her 70s at the youngest.  She was buying a Fleets enema then going into our restroom to use it.  The manager was alerted one day when she showed up and was buying one.  He planted himself in her path in front of the warehouse entrance she was going to go through to go towards the restroom.  He said to her, "Hi, you're not going back there."  Her response?  "It's not me."  He then looked at her quizzically and "innocently" asked her, "What's not you?  How would you know what I'm talking about?" and then just kept looking at her.  She said nothing and backed off.  It never happened again after that.

You mean she was doing it on purpose? 

Almost forty years ago, when I was working in retail - we had a dotty old lady who would ask questions about a hair dryer (actually heard this from the sales lady "waiting" on her) while standing there in a growing puddle of yellow fluid....then walk off without a word about what she'd just done.  She didn't always mention that she'd decided not to get a hair dryer (or whatever it was that week) after all...just turn & walk off.

This would have been 1976 or so - it's been a LONG time.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Otterpop on August 31, 2013, 09:53:37 PM
Just today I was in the washroom of an office building, and inside was the sign, "Please clean up after yourself and leave this washroom tidy for others" or something to that effect. I was thinking how pathetic it is that this even needs to be said. Of COURSE I will leave the washroom as I found it; how hard is it? I've been quite capable of using a washroom since I was a toddler, so who ARE these people?

But I know this problem exists. The washroom of an office building I used to work in was usually clean until about 3 PM, but after 3 the middle stall was always disgusting. Always the same stall, always some time mid-afternoon. I wanted to do a stake-out some time and see who it was, but I was busy working.

20+ years ago, I used to work for a drug store.  Our restrooms were open to the public; we were in a nice area so most of our customers looked and acted like normal people.  However, there were 2-3 times that someone happened upon our women's restroom during our regular business hours and found it filthy (someone had gone in there and got her feces all over the inside of the stall, including all over the toilet and the stall walls, so I was told).

I guess management finally did do a stakeout to try to figure out which one of our customers kept doing it.  One day, one of our managers was recounting how he stopped the culprit.  Apparently, it was one of our elderly female customers who was a regular shopper; I think she was in her 70s at the youngest.  She was buying a Fleets enema then going into our restroom to use it.  The manager was alerted one day when she showed up and was buying one.  He planted himself in her path in front of the warehouse entrance she was going to go through to go towards the restroom.  He said to her, "Hi, you're not going back there."  Her response?  "It's not me."  He then looked at her quizzically and "innocently" asked her, "What's not you?  How would you know what I'm talking about?" and then just kept looking at her.  She said nothing and backed off.  It never happened again after that.

You mean she was doing it on purpose? 

Almost forty years ago, when I was working in retail - we had a dotty old lady who would ask questions about a hair dryer (actually heard this from the sales lady "waiting" on her) while standing there in a growing puddle of yellow fluid....then walk off without a word about what she'd just done.  She didn't always mention that she'd decided not to get a hair dryer (or whatever it was that week) after all...just turn & walk off.

This would have been 1976 or so - it's been a LONG time.

CRUD MONKEYS! to all of that :o
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: FauxFoodist on September 04, 2013, 02:21:04 PM
Just today I was in the washroom of an office building, and inside was the sign, "Please clean up after yourself and leave this washroom tidy for others" or something to that effect. I was thinking how pathetic it is that this even needs to be said. Of COURSE I will leave the washroom as I found it; how hard is it? I've been quite capable of using a washroom since I was a toddler, so who ARE these people?

But I know this problem exists. The washroom of an office building I used to work in was usually clean until about 3 PM, but after 3 the middle stall was always disgusting. Always the same stall, always some time mid-afternoon. I wanted to do a stake-out some time and see who it was, but I was busy working.

20+ years ago, I used to work for a drug store.  Our restrooms were open to the public; we were in a nice area so most of our customers looked and acted like normal people.  However, there were 2-3 times that someone happened upon our women's restroom during our regular business hours and found it filthy (someone had gone in there and got her feces all over the inside of the stall, including all over the toilet and the stall walls, so I was told).

I guess management finally did do a stakeout to try to figure out which one of our customers kept doing it.  One day, one of our managers was recounting how he stopped the culprit.  Apparently, it was one of our elderly female customers who was a regular shopper; I think she was in her 70s at the youngest.  She was buying a Fleets enema then going into our restroom to use it.  The manager was alerted one day when she showed up and was buying one.  He planted himself in her path in front of the warehouse entrance she was going to go through to go towards the restroom.  He said to her, "Hi, you're not going back there."  Her response?  "It's not me."  He then looked at her quizzically and "innocently" asked her, "What's not you?  How would you know what I'm talking about?" and then just kept looking at her.  She said nothing and backed off.  It never happened again after that.

You mean she was doing it on purpose?

She sure was.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: FauxFoodist on September 04, 2013, 02:23:53 PM
Just today I was in the washroom of an office building, and inside was the sign, "Please clean up after yourself and leave this washroom tidy for others" or something to that effect. I was thinking how pathetic it is that this even needs to be said. Of COURSE I will leave the washroom as I found it; how hard is it? I've been quite capable of using a washroom since I was a toddler, so who ARE these people?

But I know this problem exists. The washroom of an office building I used to work in was usually clean until about 3 PM, but after 3 the middle stall was always disgusting. Always the same stall, always some time mid-afternoon. I wanted to do a stake-out some time and see who it was, but I was busy working.

20+ years ago, I used to work for a drug store.  Our restrooms were open to the public; we were in a nice area so most of our customers looked and acted like normal people.  However, there were 2-3 times that someone happened upon our women's restroom during our regular business hours and found it filthy (someone had gone in there and got her feces all over the inside of the stall, including all over the toilet and the stall walls, so I was told).

I guess management finally did do a stakeout to try to figure out which one of our customers kept doing it.  One day, one of our managers was recounting how he stopped the culprit.  Apparently, it was one of our elderly female customers who was a regular shopper; I think she was in her 70s at the youngest.  She was buying a Fleets enema then going into our restroom to use it.  The manager was alerted one day when she showed up and was buying one.  He planted himself in her path in front of the warehouse entrance she was going to go through to go towards the restroom.  He said to her, "Hi, you're not going back there."  Her response?  "It's not me."  He then looked at her quizzically and "innocently" asked her, "What's not you?  How would you know what I'm talking about?" and then just kept looking at her.  She said nothing and backed off.  It never happened again after that.

You mean she was doing it on purpose? 

Almost forty years ago, when I was working in retail - we had a dotty old lady who would ask questions about a hair dryer (actually heard this from the sales lady "waiting" on her) while standing there in a growing puddle of yellow fluid....then walk off without a word about what she'd just done.  She didn't always mention that she'd decided not to get a hair dryer (or whatever it was that week) after all...just turn & walk off.

This would have been 1976 or so - it's been a LONG time.

Mine were within several months sometime during 1988-1992.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: TootsNYC on September 04, 2013, 03:17:36 PM

20+ years ago, I used to work for a drug store.  Our restrooms were open to the public; we were in a nice area so most of our customers looked and acted like normal people.  However, there were 2-3 times that someone happened upon our women's restroom during our regular business hours and found it filthy (someone had gone in there and got her feces all over the inside of the stall, including all over the toilet and the stall walls, so I was told).

I guess management finally did do a stakeout to try to figure out which one of our customers kept doing it.  One day, one of our managers was recounting how he stopped the culprit.  Apparently, it was one of our elderly female customers who was a regular shopper; I think she was in her 70s at the youngest.  She was buying a Fleets enema then going into our restroom to use it.  The manager was alerted one day when she showed up and was buying one.  He planted himself in her path in front of the warehouse entrance she was going to go through to go towards the restroom.  He said to her, "Hi, you're not going back there."  Her response?  "It's not me."  He then looked at her quizzically and "innocently" asked her, "What's not you?  How would you know what I'm talking about?" and then just kept looking at her.  She said nothing and backed off.  It never happened again after that.

You mean she was doing it on purpose?

She sure was.

She may have needed the enema, and known that it would be hard to handle, and decided to have the mess be in the pharmacists' facility instead of hers.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: sleepy59 on September 06, 2013, 12:51:30 PM
We have two unisex cubicles at work, the staff is made up of about 28 women and 2 men.

We have had signs up in the cubicles for years about properly disposing of sanitary items.  We have just had some new signs added, one telling people not to place used hand towels in the sanitary disposal bins but in the rubbish bin provided and the other is about the state the cubicles are being left in.

Some days the two cubicles downstairs are such a mess by mid afternoon that the whole staff try to use the only cubicle upstairs which can be difficult.

It just seems ridiculous that we are having to tell a building full of adults how to leave the cubicle clean when they are finished. Having seen the mess I really don't want to see what their bathrooms at home might look like!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: siamesecat2965 on September 07, 2013, 08:55:26 AM
i would go with direct and not cutesy.

But i hate to say that my experience in life has been that there are those who keep the restrooms clean and have no need of a sign, and there are those who don't and all the signs in the world aren't going to help.

*I* don't get it. I don't understand how anyone over the age of 5 can walk away from a toilet without flushing. or why women leave all sorts of used parephenlia just out there in the open. or if they drip on the seat, to not wipe it off. i don't get it.

I don't either. The toilets in my building at work don't always get everything down with one flush. So i will wait, and if that's the case, flush again. It's really NOT that difficult. We also have small wastebaskets in each stall for disposal of "non-flushable" items. I can't tell you how many times someone just throws it in their, without wrapping it in tp, so you can see it, in plain view. Just disgusting. I often wonder how their bathrooms at home look!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Pen^2 on September 07, 2013, 09:28:08 AM
i would go with direct and not cutesy.

But i hate to say that my experience in life has been that there are those who keep the restrooms clean and have no need of a sign, and there are those who don't and all the signs in the world aren't going to help.

*I* don't get it. I don't understand how anyone over the age of 5 can walk away from a toilet without flushing. or why women leave all sorts of used parephenlia just out there in the open. or if they drip on the seat, to not wipe it off. i don't get it.

Re the bolded: people who need to be told, "Oh by the way, urinating all over the floor isn't really acceptable. Not sure if you were aware of this bizarre social convention called hygiene," probably aren't going to be suddenly enlightened by a sign. But they might realise that someone is on to them and possibly put the effort into being vaguely hygienic so that it doesn't escalate to them getting personally caught somehow. That's really all you can hope for, sadly.

This whole thing is revolting, by the way. What kind of adult hasn't been potty trained yet? That's despicable. And we all have the odd explosive emergency, but what kind of disgustingly filthy troglodyte doesn't clean up after themselves?
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: VorFemme on September 07, 2013, 10:48:31 AM
i would go with direct and not cutesy.

But i hate to say that my experience in life has been that there are those who keep the restrooms clean and have no need of a sign, and there are those who don't and all the signs in the world aren't going to help.

*I* don't get it. I don't understand how anyone over the age of 5 can walk away from a toilet without flushing. or why women leave all sorts of used parephenlia just out there in the open. or if they drip on the seat, to not wipe it off. i don't get it.

Re the bolded: people who need to be told, "Oh by the way, urinating all over the floor isn't really acceptable. Not sure if you were aware of this bizarre social convention called hygiene," probably aren't going to be suddenly enlightened by a sign. But they might realise that someone is on to them and possibly put the effort into being vaguely hygienic so that it doesn't escalate to them getting personally caught somehow. That's really all you can hope for, sadly.

This whole thing is revolting, by the way. What kind of adult hasn't been potty trained yet? That's despicable. And we all have the odd explosive emergency, but what kind of disgustingly filthy troglodyte doesn't clean up after themselves?

Someone who grew up with a helicopter parent who did clean up after them.....?
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: AnnaJ on September 07, 2013, 12:42:13 PM
Adding that if you wish to squat on the toilet seat, clean it - your shoes are dirty and leave germs on the seat.  This seems to be a cultural thing based on the fact it occurs in waves at our college dependent on the makeup of each new freshman class.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: veronaz on September 07, 2013, 03:17:20 PM
Adding that if you wish to squat on the toilet seat, clean it - your shoes are dirty and leave germs on the seat.  This seems to be a cultural thing based on the fact it occurs in waves at our college dependent on the makeup of each new freshman class.

This post had me frowning and thinking……shoes? ??? …….then, suddenly I got it.  Okay.

I often use seat covers, but I’ve seen enough reports which prove the really nasty germs and bacteria are not on the toilet seat.  Think about it – the outside part of our bums are not that dirty.  The restroom door handle, the toilet flush knob, and the kitchen counter top are MUCH worse.

And I will never touch a grocery cart handle without cleaning it first, if I can help it.  :o
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: AnnaJ on September 07, 2013, 09:34:47 PM
Quote
I often use seat covers, but I’ve seen enough reports which prove the really nasty germs and bacteria are not on the toilet seat.  Think about it – the outside part of our bums are not that dirty.  The restroom door handle, the toilet flush knob, and the kitchen counter top are MUCH worse.

My brain knows it but I still  :o at footprints on the toilet seat.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 07, 2013, 11:13:01 PM
Adding that if you wish to squat on the toilet seat, clean it - your shoes are dirty and leave germs on the seat.  This seems to be a cultural thing based on the fact it occurs in waves at our college dependent on the makeup of each new freshman class.

Just curious, where are you AnnaJ?
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: The TARDIS on September 07, 2013, 11:19:56 PM
I often use seat covers, but I’ve seen enough reports which prove the really nasty germs and bacteria are not on the toilet seat.  Think about it – the outside part of our bums are not that dirty.  The restroom door handle, the toilet flush knob, and the kitchen counter top are MUCH worse.

And I will never touch a grocery cart handle without cleaning it first, if I can help it.  :o


That's why I always use my foot to flush the toilet and use a paper towel to open the bathroom door. I avoid hand dryers. They blow germs back onto your hands. I'll flap my hands to dry them, and if the door has a knot I can't push with my elbow, I'll use a fresh tissue between my hand and the door. I always carry tissues with me.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: doodlemor on September 08, 2013, 11:17:15 AM

That's why I always use my foot to flush the toilet and use a paper towel to open the bathroom door. I avoid hand dryers. They blow germs back onto your hands. I'll flap my hands to dry them, and if the door has a knot I can't push with my elbow, I'll use a fresh tissue between my hand and the door. I always carry tissues with me.

Me too, and I learned this at a work seminar run by the county health nurse.  Also, if the bathroom has a paper towel holder with a hand crank, get yours cranked down before you wash your hands, as the crank is a source of germs.  I use the paper towel to turn off the water, too, if it is not automatic.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: greencat on September 08, 2013, 12:35:02 PM
While the ladies I share a bathroom with at work do a wonderful job keeping the ladies room clean, one of them has evidently got some very personal hygiene issues.  The office has two sets of bathrooms for each sex - one with a pair of stalls and a shower, and a pair of "single seater" restrooms.  I'm not sure who it is - and it must be an employee, because people must have an activated keycard to get into our office - but she uses one of the single-seater restrooms at about 4PM every day, and when I go in there afterward, the odor of unwashed female parts assaults me.  I've actually just stopped using that particular bathroom after a certain point in the day, because it's truly rank - think "didn't wash or change the undies for a week while camping."

Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: VorFemme on September 08, 2013, 01:00:06 PM
While the ladies I share a bathroom with at work do a wonderful job keeping the ladies room clean, one of them has evidently got some very personal hygiene issues.  The office has two sets of bathrooms for each sex - one with a pair of stalls and a shower, and a pair of "single seater" restrooms.  I'm not sure who it is - and it must be an employee, because people must have an activated keycard to get into our office - but she uses one of the single-seater restrooms at about 4PM every day, and when I go in there afterward, the odor of unwashed female parts assaults me.  I've actually just stopped using that particular bathroom after a certain point in the day, because it's truly rank - think "didn't wash or change the undies for a week while camping."


I'm wondering if she is changing an adult incontinence or feminine hygeine product - that she has not changed since that morning (or possibly the day before)....because that is the ONLY way I can come up with to get that strong an odor without being noticed as being "unwashed" elsewhere in the office.

I suppose it is possible that there is some kind of medical situation that would cause the strong odor issue - but - sheesh - how do you tell someone to see a doctor about their female bits without staking out the ladies' room and mentioning that "there's an app for that" - it's called "see your doctor"!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: greencat on September 08, 2013, 01:32:27 PM
I think I can generally rule out the feminine hygiene product, because the issue seems to be a daily thing.

I suspect that the person can get away with a little personal odor because almost everyone has her own office - except for the one woman that I work directly with, who I was able to rule out as the odor source by virtue of it occurring on multiple days that she wasn't present.  A lot of people eat lunch in their office as well.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: edgypeanuts on September 08, 2013, 04:22:25 PM
I think I can generally rule out the feminine hygiene product, because the issue seems to be a daily thing.

Not necessarily.  I had a client who was having issues (basically needed a D&C or hysterectomy) but could not get it covered financially until she tried several other meds (that didn't help) first.  She was miserable as she was changing pads every few hours all the time and was very scared that she would smell bad.  If the person is otherwise clean I would tend to think something is wrong, but then again you never know.

I have also had clients whose hair seemed freshly washed and clothes seemed clean but they smelled of BO so bad it was overwhelming.  My staff pointed out that those are always the ones who want to use our bathroom as well!  Luckily being a medical building, we have LOTS of gloves and strong things to clean the bathroom with.

I have never understood the hovering over the toilet thing.  If you sit on it correctly, nothing should be touching the seat but your thighs and maybe cheeks!

Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: veronaz on September 08, 2013, 05:38:19 PM
Quote
If you sit on it correctly, nothing should be touching the seat but your thighs and maybe cheeks!

Exactly.  And not even that if you use a seat cover or pieces of toilet tissue.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: TootsNYC on September 08, 2013, 06:09:13 PM
Adding that if you wish to squat on the toilet seat, clean it - your shoes are dirty and leave germs on the seat.  This seems to be a cultural thing based on the fact it occurs in waves at our college dependent on the makeup of each new freshman class.

Just curious, where are you AnnaJ?

I'm wondering too.

Because I can guarantee you that I've just proved I'm an American.

I couldn't figure out whether you really meant that people are *standing ON* the toilet seat, and then squatting.

I always assumed that people squatted -over- the toilet seat, with their feet on the floor. Not a true squat, of course, but a semi-squat.

I would never put my feet ON a toilet seat--one of them would absolutely end up IN the toilet.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: AnnaJ on September 08, 2013, 06:45:10 PM
Adding that if you wish to squat on the toilet seat, clean it - your shoes are dirty and leave germs on the seat.  This seems to be a cultural thing based on the fact it occurs in waves at our college dependent on the makeup of each new freshman class.

Just curious, where are you AnnaJ?

I'm wondering too.

Because I can guarantee you that I've just proved I'm an American.

I couldn't figure out whether you really meant that people are *standing ON* the toilet seat, and then squatting.

I always assumed that people squatted -over- the toilet seat, with their feet on the floor. Not a true squat, of course, but a semi-squat.

I would never put my feet ON a toilet seat--one of them would absolutely end up IN the toilet.

I'm in the US, and 'hovering' is certainly popular; the squatting on the toilet seat - yes, literally putting feet onto the seat an squatting - was not something I'd heard of, and only became aware of it when I said something to an admin assistant about seeing what looked like shoeprints on the seats.  She's from another country and said that in parts of her country (and some surrounding ones) toilets like this are common:  http://www.wikihow.com/Use-a-Squat-Toilet (note, this may be more info than some may want). 

Apparently some students (this is at a college) from that region prefer that sort of toilet and insist on using 'sitting' toilets in that fashion.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: veronaz on September 08, 2013, 07:02:46 PM
I've lived a lot of years, I'm in the US (lived in 3 different states), I also lived in a college dorm many years ago.  I have never, ever seen or heard of anyone standing on a toilet seat and I've certainly never done it.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 08, 2013, 07:43:54 PM
I've been in countries where squat toilets are common, so it's not that I've never heard of it.  However, it just seems rather odd that this is a problem where the whole class of incoming freshman needs to be spoken to. 

Are there a lot of people from that particular country emigrating to your area AnnaJ? Are they all 1st generation immigrants?
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: veronaz on September 08, 2013, 08:14:13 PM
Quote
I've been in countries where squat toilets are common, so it's not that I've never heard of it.

Yes, I have a few well-traveled friends and I've heard of toilet designs in some other countries.    I've even seen pictures.  But as far as the regular/standard toilets one sees here in the US, I've never heard of anyone standing on them to use them.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: VorFemme on September 08, 2013, 08:41:40 PM
I live in an area of Houston, Texas with a lot of first generation immigrants or resident foreigners (there are consulates in the area as this is a very large and very active port city).  Based on the numbers of people that I see wearing "clothing from other cultures" (I have a sari store less than a mile from my home, I see salwar kameez, African robes, Muslim head scarves on students at the local high school {DH teaches} and college {DS just started his second year}, with a very few women in full burqua & some in the long black over robes with embroidery & scarf - but with face, hands, and feet exposed (in shoes or sandals), and you may see other cultural outfits at formal dress events - one student's mother wore the most gorgeous gold embroidered sari to the December formal awards banquet - one of the few times I haven't been the one with the most formal outfit....loved it!  I can't remember the names for Thai or Korean garb - but they don't get worn to school on a daily basis - the hajib scarf and one or two black over robes (don't know the name) do.

And the toilets in various stores & buildings have had soiled tissue placed in the trash can intended for used women's products, footprints on the toilet seats, and other "they aren't from around here or they wouldn't be doing that" situations.......

There are times when I wonder how long it takes to pick up the unspoken assumptions if nobody speaks up and tells anyone about "we don't NEED to put the toilet tissue in the trash can" or "please don't stand on the toilet seat - it'll break".  Or don't stand on the wall hung toilets in some of the stores....I've heard of those being broken off the wall, once in a while - just haven't seen it myself (well, saw where the cubicle was boarded up while they waited for the replacement to come in & scheduled the plumber & tile worker to do the repairs).  That was years ago, though - maybe over twenty years.....just can't remember where it was....maybe college?  Maybe in a town with a lot of military brides from overseas.....I just don't remember right now.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: AnnaJ on September 08, 2013, 09:47:03 PM
I've been in countries where squat toilets are common, so it's not that I've never heard of it.  However, it just seems rather odd that this is a problem where the whole class of incoming freshman needs to be spoken to. 

Are there a lot of people from that particular country emigrating to your area AnnaJ? Are they all 1st generation immigrants?

We have a large number of international students from a variety of countries - I've never taught a class that does not have at least three or four international students (out of a class of 30-35).  I've never heard of anyone addressing the issue with any incoming class - thought as VorFemme says above, maybe it would be beneficial.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Curly Wurly Doggie Breath on September 09, 2013, 05:44:57 AM
This topic has come up on E'hell a few times. I remember. Mostly on the first forum and the second.

Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: medowynd on September 09, 2013, 12:56:30 PM
When I was in college living in a dorm, there was one toilet seat with footprints on it, every day.  Turned out, that one of the freshman was checking her outfit in the mirror every morning.  It finally stopped after several complaints from the maintenance staff.  And we all knew who was admiring herself every morning.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: gramma dishes on September 09, 2013, 03:29:16 PM
When I was in college living in a dorm, there was one toilet seat with footprints on it, every day.  Turned out, that one of the freshman was checking her outfit in the mirror every morning.  ...

Am I a truly horrible person for hoping that the reason it stopped happening was that one day when she was admiring herself, she slipped a little and fell in?   :-\
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Pen^2 on September 09, 2013, 03:49:10 PM
When I was in college living in a dorm, there was one toilet seat with footprints on it, every day.  Turned out, that one of the freshman was checking her outfit in the mirror every morning.  ...

Am I a truly horrible person for hoping that the reason it stopped happening was that one day when she was admiring herself, she slipped a little and fell in?   :-\

Somewhat off-topic: this reminds me of a joke/urban legend wherein a gaggle of schoolgirls thought it was fun to put on lipstick and leave kiss marks on the bathroom mirrors in their school. The unimpressed staff decided that the punishment would be that they'd have to clean it up. Enter the cleaner to show them how he cleaned the mirrors so they could copy: he casually dipped his mop in the toilet bowl to wet it, then wiped it thoroughly on the mirror until the lipstick marks were gone. The girls stopped kissing mirrors after seeing that.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: gramma dishes on September 09, 2013, 03:56:09 PM


Somewhat off-topic: this reminds me of a joke/urban legend wherein a gaggle of schoolgirls thought it was fun to put on lipstick and leave kiss marks on the bathroom mirrors in their school. The unimpressed staff decided that the punishment would be that they'd have to clean it up. Enter the cleaner to show them how he cleaned the mirrors so they could copy: he casually dipped his mop in the toilet bowl to wet it, then wiped it thoroughly on the mirror until the lipstick marks were gone. The girls stopped kissing mirrors after seeing that.

 ;D  I don't know whether or not that ever really happened, but if it did, the custodian at that school was very clever indeed.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: heathert on September 09, 2013, 09:33:02 PM
It's not just universities.  My husband used to work for a company known for its diversified workforce and shoeprints on the toilet was a common problem.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: cicero on September 10, 2013, 01:25:04 AM
When I was in college living in a dorm, there was one toilet seat with footprints on it, every day.  Turned out, that one of the freshman was checking her outfit in the mirror every morning.  ...

Am I a truly horrible person for hoping that the reason it stopped happening was that one day when she was admiring herself, she slipped a little and fell in?   :-\

Somewhat off-topic: this reminds me of a joke/urban legend wherein a gaggle of schoolgirls thought it was fun to put on lipstick and leave kiss marks on the bathroom mirrors in their school. The unimpressed staff decided that the punishment would be that they'd have to clean it up. Enter the cleaner to show them how he cleaned the mirrors so they could copy: he casually dipped his mop in the toilet bowl to wet it, then wiped it thoroughly on the mirror until the lipstick marks were gone. The girls stopped kissing mirrors after seeing that.
that's hysterical!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: MissRose on September 10, 2013, 06:19:48 PM
My office's women's bathrooms have signs inside each stall's door stating: please do not flush feminine products, and I thought it was common sense!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: HelenB on September 11, 2013, 12:39:53 PM
It's not just universities.  My husband used to work for a company known for its diversified workforce and shoeprints on the toilet was a common problem.
My company had the same issue. We had a large number of 1st generation immigrants working for us and it hadn't occurred to anyone that they wouldn't just know that the typical American toilet isn't intended to be stood upon.

At our sites in other world areas where the squat toilet is more prevalent, there are signs in the stalls that have "western" toilets that say they are to sat on.

And when I visited some of the other sites, I wouldn't have known to put toilet paper into the little baskets in the stalls if they hadn't had signs.

Sometimes, you need a sign.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: fountainof on September 12, 2013, 10:15:29 AM
I work with some people who think just the thought of being in a men's washroom is gross as they kind of assume all men are dirty as they tough their junk to use the toilet.  However, in my experience woman's washrooms can be nasty, much worse now than I remember as a child.  I had to do washroom checks at my teenage job and had to do the men's too and it was always pretty clean, it was the woman's room that we found all the nasty stuff.

For the odor question a page back.  I once worked with an obese woman who smelled okay generally but when she went to the washroom she had a kind of sweet BO smell.  It was bad and odd at the same time and maybe her urine just had a weird smell like it happens with eating some foods.  The funny thing was she placed a formal complaint that people should not be allowed to number 2 in the staff washroom but then her whatever it was smelled way worse than a number 2.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Betelnut on September 12, 2013, 11:50:46 AM
  The funny thing was she placed a formal complaint that people should not be allowed to number 2 in the staff washroom ...

 :o

Wow!  She expected people to hold it until they got home?  That is cruel!

Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: fountainof on September 12, 2013, 01:07:34 PM
Quote
Wow!  She expected people to hold it until they got home?  That is cruel!
She wanted them to learn to schedule themselves so they went at home, or to use the public washrooms which employees in uniform were not supposed to use.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Editeer on September 12, 2013, 02:23:19 PM
She's the second person I've heard of who actually thought (and said) that people shouldn't do #2 at work. There was a poster on craigslist many years ago who called it rude and asked people to agree with her. Nope--it is not rude to use a facility for the purpose it was designed for!

Maybe she would also like us to schedule our sweating so that we don't ever offend her nose, or schedule our meals so that our stomachs never rumble at lunchtime.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yvaine on September 12, 2013, 02:33:31 PM
I work with some people who think just the thought of being in a men's washroom is gross as they kind of assume all men are dirty as they tough their junk to use the toilet.  However, in my experience woman's washrooms can be nasty, much worse now than I remember as a child.  I had to do washroom checks at my teenage job and had to do the men's too and it was always pretty clean, it was the woman's room that we found all the nasty stuff.

It's not because they touch their junk, it's because some men miss. I've cleaned both men's and women's restrooms and they each have their own particular issues. The men's room is pretty clean from a paper standpoint, but often times the whole place smells of urine because guys miss the target, and sometimes you get visible puddles too. Women's restrooms increasingly have "missing" problems too as hovering has become more popular, but the big problem I encountered there was paper messes--paper towels and TP on the floor, pads and diapers not put in the trash, etc. Apparently some women tear off the first sheet of TP and throw it on the floor on purpose, figuring it's contaminated?  ::) I first heard of that a few years ago and it made a lot of messes make sense suddenly.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: TootsNYC on September 12, 2013, 04:30:41 PM
Even when they don't miss, they can splatter. Of course, that's maybe less so with urinals. And I think there's a stereotype that men will live with a bigger mess and aren't as fastidious as women, so they will let things drop and leave them, etc.

Re: the toilet paper:

I've discovered that the vast majority of restrooms that I think are icky are actually cluttered with little schnibbles of TP, or pieces people dropped because it ripped off too soon, etc.

I do my "service to humanity" thing and scoop them all up, and wow! The washroom looks fine!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: o_gal on September 13, 2013, 11:12:09 AM
For the odor question a page back.  I once worked with an obese woman who smelled okay generally but when she went to the washroom she had a kind of sweet BO smell.  It was bad and odd at the same time and maybe her urine just had a weird smell like it happens with eating some foods.  The funny thing was she placed a formal complaint that people should not be allowed to number 2 in the staff washroom but then her whatever it was smelled way worse than a number 2.

She's a SS for not wanting people to poop, but she may have a medical condition called Maple Syrup Urine Disease.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: lady_disdain on September 14, 2013, 06:18:02 PM
That's why I always use my foot to flush the toilet and use a paper towel to open the bathroom door.

Excuse me, you use your foot - the foot that was walking around on the bathroom floor - on something most people touch with their hands? That is gross, inconsiderate and rude. You are making everyone that goes after you to unwittingly touch something that is now a lot grosser than it was before you used it.

If you feel that the flush lever is too gross to touch, then use a tissue or toilet paper. Not your foot.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Shoo on September 14, 2013, 06:25:05 PM
That's why I always use my foot to flush the toilet and use a paper towel to open the bathroom door.

Excuse me, you use your foot - the foot that was walking around on the bathroom floor - on something most people touch with their hands? That is gross, inconsiderate and rude. You are making everyone that goes after you to unwittingly touch something that is now a lot grosser than it was before you used it.

If you feel that the flush lever is too gross to touch, then use a tissue or toilet paper. Not your foot.

I bet most people use their foot.  But we will never know, unless someone does a worldwide poll.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yvaine on September 14, 2013, 06:32:29 PM
That's why I always use my foot to flush the toilet and use a paper towel to open the bathroom door.

Excuse me, you use your foot - the foot that was walking around on the bathroom floor - on something most people touch with their hands? That is gross, inconsiderate and rude. You are making everyone that goes after you to unwittingly touch something that is now a lot grosser than it was before you used it.

If you feel that the flush lever is too gross to touch, then use a tissue or toilet paper. Not your foot.

I bet most people use their foot.  But we will never know, unless someone does a worldwide poll.

Well, I use my hand (and since it came up in the last thread about this, not the same hand I use for the restroom "paperwork")...or occasionally, my be-panted knee.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: lady_disdain on September 14, 2013, 06:37:26 PM
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Betelnut on September 14, 2013, 06:41:21 PM
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.

Me neither.  It would never cross my mind to use my foot.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: menley on September 14, 2013, 06:43:01 PM
Almost everyone I know uses their foot! It's bizarre to me as I'm a bit clumsy, I think I'd probably fall into the toilet trying to flush with a foot. But one time I saw someone do it (they had opened the stall before flushing, which I also thought was weird) and commented to my friends at the lunch table... they all thought *I* was weird for using my hand.

Now I live in a country where, the way that the flush buttons are designed, it's not physically possible to use your foot. So I think I'm not the weird one after all :)
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: LeveeWoman on September 14, 2013, 06:48:32 PM
I am not putting my hand on any part of a public toilet.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Erich L-ster on September 14, 2013, 06:49:52 PM
Count me as another foot flusher.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: lady_disdain on September 14, 2013, 06:53:38 PM
But why use your foot and make it worse instead of using some toilet paper? Sorry, I can't get my head around being so inconsiderate to others when there is a perfectly easy alternative. Specially since you will be washing your hands not a minute later.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yvaine on September 14, 2013, 06:58:02 PM
But why use your foot and make it worse instead of using some toilet paper? Sorry, I can't get my head around being so inconsiderate to others when there is a perfectly easy alternative. Specially since you will be washing your hands not a minute later.

And the toilet's flushing anyway, so you can just chuck the TP in the toilet while everything else is on its way down.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: LeveeWoman on September 14, 2013, 07:07:03 PM
But why use your foot and make it worse instead of using some toilet paper? Sorry, I can't get my head around being so inconsiderate to others when there is a perfectly easy alternative. Specially since you will be washing your hands not a minute later.

I don't consider it inconsiderate at all because it would never occur to me that someone would touch it with her hand.

Edited to fix grammar.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: gramma dishes on September 14, 2013, 07:37:06 PM
If the flush handle is on the tank, I use my hand.

If the flush handle is on the wall lower than the level of the toilet seat and well behind it, I use my foot because it seems to me that's how it was designed to be flushed.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: lady_disdain on September 14, 2013, 07:38:36 PM
If the flush handle is on the wall lower than the level of the toilet seat and well behind it, I use my foot because it seems to me that's how it was designed to be flushed.

I've never seen those but I agree - that doesn't seem designed to be operated by hand. Obviously, it is not rude to use as it is meant to.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Shoo on September 14, 2013, 08:34:10 PM
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.

Who has determined it is supposed to be operated by hand?  It's right down there where it's so easy to use one's foot.  And one has to bend over quite a bit to use one's hand.  And a lot of them are flat and hard to push, making me think they were designed to be used by the foot.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: lady_disdain on September 14, 2013, 08:42:01 PM
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.

Who has determined it is supposed to be operated by hand?  It's right down there where it's so easy to use one's foot.  And one has to bend over quite a bit to use one's hand.  And a lot of them are flat and hard to push, making me think they were designed to be used by the foot.

Shoo, are we talking about the same thing? The flush lever is usually quite high on the tank. Like this: http://www.amazonsupply.com/american-standard-4021-800-020-complete-right-hand/dp/B001A0BQQ6
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Shoo on September 14, 2013, 08:44:43 PM
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.

Who has determined it is supposed to be operated by hand?  It's right down there where it's so easy to use one's foot.  And one has to bend over quite a bit to use one's hand.  And a lot of them are flat and hard to push, making me think they were designed to be used by the foot.

Shoo, are we talking about the same thing? The flush lever is usually quite high on the tank. Like this: http://www.amazonsupply.com/american-standard-4021-800-020-complete-right-hand/dp/B001A0BQQ6

I thought we were talking about the kind you find in most public restrooms, not private bathrooms.  I agree it doesn't make sense to use one's foot on the kind you find in someone's home.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: lady_disdain on September 14, 2013, 08:54:56 PM
So, what do you find in most public bathrooms? This is what I saw when I was in the US.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 14, 2013, 09:11:22 PM
These are the kind of toilets you find in most US public restrooms.  The green part is the flusher.  Shoo maybe you could show a picture of the type of toilet you are talking about.  Since I will wash my hands right afterwards, I will use my hand to push the lever down. 


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-yVjhCqVcJ9c/TVMwZ2nVc3I/AAAAAAAABHc/AdgwXiLz26Q/s1600/pictures_of_toilets3.jpg)


This image shoes a toilet with an automatic sensor that flushes when you get up.  They also have a button on the side or front in case the sensor doesn't work


(https://i.chzbgr.com/maxW500/6997830144/h15867120/)
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Psychopoesie on September 14, 2013, 09:16:27 PM
I've never come across a public loo in Australia that has had the flush button or lever close to the floor. Most buttons or levers are set in the wall above the toilet or on top of the cistern (or are like the one pastrygoddess posted). A few older style toilets have chains that you reach up and pull. They all seem designed to be pushed by hand, not by foot.

This is the first time I've ever heard of anyone using their foot to flush.

If it was a pedal type arrangement, I can see why someone would do that. Otherwise, no. It's inconsiderate to other users and risks damaging the toilet.

Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Erich L-ster on September 14, 2013, 09:30:49 PM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-yVjhCqVcJ9c/TVMwZ2nVc3I/AAAAAAAABHc/AdgwXiLz26Q/s1600/pictures_of_toilets3.jpg)

Yes this is the kind I meant too. I almost never see a regular home style toilet in a public restroom.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Twik on September 14, 2013, 10:39:28 PM
If it's at foot level, it's intended to be stepped on. If it's at hand level, it's meant to be used by hand.

Getting rather funny mental images of legions of women doing the Crane Stance to flush.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Psychopoesie on September 14, 2013, 10:49:05 PM
If it's at foot level, it's intended to be stepped on. If it's at hand level, it's meant to be used by hand.

Getting rather funny mental images of legions of women doing the Crane Stance to flush.

Same here. Found this when i was searching for a pic of toilets:

http://www.someecards.com/usercards/viewcard/MjAxMi1iNjIxMmE5NDUyMGY5YjIy

 :)
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Miss Understood on September 14, 2013, 10:53:36 PM
When I was in college living in a dorm, there was one toilet seat with footprints on it, every day.  Turned out, that one of the freshman was checking her outfit in the mirror every morning.  It finally stopped after several complaints from the maintenance staff.  And we all knew who was admiring herself every morning.

I'm confused. Why would she need to stand on the toilet seat to look at herself in the mirror?  I've never seen a stall with a mirror in it much less one that would require the person to stand on the seat to see herself.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Mel the Redcap on September 14, 2013, 11:35:26 PM
When I was in college living in a dorm, there was one toilet seat with footprints on it, every day.  Turned out, that one of the freshman was checking her outfit in the mirror every morning.  It finally stopped after several complaints from the maintenance staff.  And we all knew who was admiring herself every morning.

I'm confused. Why would she need to stand on the toilet seat to look at herself in the mirror?  I've never seen a stall with a mirror in it much less one that would require the person to stand on the seat to see herself.

My guess is that the mirror was small and high on the wall, so to see herself below the waist she had to open the stall door (i.e. the mirror wasn't in the stall, the stall just faced the be-mirror-ed wall) and stand on the loo, raising herself to the right height?
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 15, 2013, 01:59:23 AM
When I was in college living in a dorm, there was one toilet seat with footprints on it, every day.  Turned out, that one of the freshman was checking her outfit in the mirror every morning.  It finally stopped after several complaints from the maintenance staff.  And we all knew who was admiring herself every morning.

I'm confused. Why would she need to stand on the toilet seat to look at herself in the mirror?  I've never seen a stall with a mirror in it much less one that would require the person to stand on the seat to see herself.

My guess is that the mirror was small and high on the wall, so to see herself below the waist she had to open the stall door (i.e. the mirror wasn't in the stall, the stall just faced the be-mirror-ed wall) and stand on the loo, raising herself to the right height?

That's exactly correct.  Me and my friends used to do the same thing in Jr. High school.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: medowynd on September 15, 2013, 10:24:19 AM
It was a large mirror above the sinks, so she could see herself from the waist up.  To see her skirt or pants, she had to stand on the toilet.

I don't know why she didn't buy a mirror for her bedroom door.  The toilet mirror viewing stopped after maintenance complained.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: perpetua on September 15, 2013, 12:05:04 PM
These are the kind of toilets you find in most US public restrooms.  The green part is the flusher.  Shoo maybe you could show a picture of the type of toilet you are talking about.  Since I will wash my hands right afterwards, I will use my hand to push the lever down. 


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-yVjhCqVcJ9c/TVMwZ2nVc3I/AAAAAAAABHc/AdgwXiLz26Q/s1600/pictures_of_toilets3.jpg)


Goodness, no wonder I was so confused in the other thread when people were talking about flushing with their foot; I've never seen anything like that. In most public toilets here the handles are at hand height, coming out of the wall. Something like this, although this appears to be a particularly posh one:

(http://www.partyoffers.co.uk/showthumbnail.php?width=300&image=9119&type=images)

Sometimes there might be a tank with the handle on it, like a domestic loo, but the handle is almost always half way up the wall like this; I couldn't imagine how it would even be possible to use your foot to flush it unless you were a contortionist.

Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: lady_disdain on September 15, 2013, 12:56:25 PM
Ok, now I am even more confused. It seems too high to use a foot comfortably (specially in a skirt and heels or for someone with back or knee problems) but also awkwardly placed for hand operation.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Betelnut on September 15, 2013, 02:16:32 PM
These are the kind of toilets you find in most US public restrooms.  The green part is the flusher.  Shoo maybe you could show a picture of the type of toilet you are talking about.  Since I will wash my hands right afterwards, I will use my hand to push the lever down. 


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-yVjhCqVcJ9c/TVMwZ2nVc3I/AAAAAAAABHc/AdgwXiLz26Q/s1600/pictures_of_toilets3.jpg)


This image shoes a toilet with an automatic sensor that flushes when you get up.  They also have a button on the side or front in case the sensor doesn't work


(https://i.chzbgr.com/maxW500/6997830144/h15867120/)

I don't use my foot for either of these.  Actually, for the first one, you can use your elbow if you flush while still sitting.  I've done this before.  But usually, I use my hand.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Dorrie78 on September 15, 2013, 02:45:10 PM
These are the kind of toilets you find in most US public restrooms.  The green part is the flusher.  Shoo maybe you could show a picture of the type of toilet you are talking about.  Since I will wash my hands right afterwards, I will use my hand to push the lever down. 


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-yVjhCqVcJ9c/TVMwZ2nVc3I/AAAAAAAABHc/AdgwXiLz26Q/s1600/pictures_of_toilets3.jpg)


This image shoes a toilet with an automatic sensor that flushes when you get up.  They also have a button on the side or front in case the sensor doesn't work


(https://i.chzbgr.com/maxW500/6997830144/h15867120/)
I use my foot to flush these types of toilets because if I bent over to use my hand, my face would be only a couple of feet away from the spray from a flushing toilet - if even just for a second.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 15, 2013, 03:49:16 PM
Dorrie, how tall are you? Because the lever is at hand height between 32-42 inches off the ground.  I don't understand how your face can be that close to the toilet when flushing it.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: MariaE on September 16, 2013, 04:17:13 AM
Thank you for the photos. That makes a lot more sense than what I was envisioning. Many public toilets in Denmark have the flush handle up high on the wall behind the toilet - I was wondering how on earth people reached that with their foot!

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-u4hvloVPbr4/UjbMEnKDTXI/AAAAAAAAQ_I/dIpjiD7MKsw/s288/Photo%252016-09-13%252011.10.32.jpg)

I'd never even heard of people using their foot to flush rather than their hand before reading this board. I'd still always use my hand unless the handle is at floor level or close to it - I'm simply not able to lift up my foot very high due to a disability.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: veronaz on September 16, 2013, 11:03:50 AM
I never understood the overwhelming ICK factor in bathrooms.   Why not flush with your hand?  You're going to wash it anyway, and usually within 10 seconds!   Just how much *damage* can a few germs do in 10 seconds??
The doors in my workplace all have those pads that you push for automatic door-opening.  It seems that every woman I've seen gets a paper towel to touch that pad.  Again, why?  Has nobody noticed that those pads are hip-high?  Just lean over a little, and voila, the door opens!    But I use the door.  The bathroom gets cleaned at least 3 times a day, including those handles. (Yes, I've seen them cleaned).  As one of the perhaps THREE women who actually touches said handles, I figured they're cleaner than my desk anyway.

I fully undertand the ick factor.

http://literockz951.com/sherry-taylor/q-a-study-from-michigan-state-university-says-that-people-were-more-likely-to-wash-their-hands-in-a-public-restroom-is-this-was-in-there/

By far, not all people wash their hands after using the toilet, and certainly not all public restrooms are cleaned three times a day.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: scarlett on September 16, 2013, 11:32:14 AM
I also agree with LadyJane, just flush the danged thing with your hand! There is nothing worse then using the restroom- finding sprinkles on the seat and a shoe print on the flushing handle! After all, YOU are going to be washing your hands so what does it matter is someone else didn't?

Yes, some public restroom are dirty; but using your foot to flush is only making them worse. I can tolerate pretty much any facilities after traveling to India, Sri Lanka and even France...and have never got any sickness or disease from them.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: EllenS on September 16, 2013, 11:33:48 AM
Dorrie, how tall are you? Because the lever is at hand height between 32-42 inches off the ground.  I don't understand how your face can be that close to the toilet when flushing it.

The type of toilet with the tubular metal side-handle (highlighted in green above) was always referred to as a "flushomatic" toilet when I lived in NYC.  And many apartment buildings used them in private apts.

My mother was extremely adamant when I was growing up that those type toilets were meant to be flushed ONLY with the foot.  Now I think back, she did look a sight in her heels and old-fashioned girdle, hiking up her skirt and balancing to flush.  She and I are both very tall, and yes I would have to bend my head over the bowl to flush with my hand.

I also think it's icky to flush sitting down and get my bum splashed.  I have to say, the idea "you're going to wash your hands in ten seconds" goes both ways.  If you don't care about touching the handle because you're going to wash the germs off, why does it matter whether they're toilet germs or shoe germs?

For the sake of this thread, though I will try today using TP to hold the handle, and see how it goes.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: TootsNYC on September 16, 2013, 12:47:10 PM
That's why I always use my foot to flush the toilet and use a paper towel to open the bathroom door.

Excuse me, you use your foot - the foot that was walking around on the bathroom floor - on something most people touch with their hands? That is gross, inconsiderate and rude. You are making everyone that goes after you to unwittingly touch something that is now a lot grosser than it was before you used it.

If you feel that the flush lever is too gross to touch, then use a tissue or toilet paper. Not your foot.

Well, considering that most people have just wiped their private parts before THEY touch the lever, I don't think someone's foot is all that bad.

And everyone is SUPPOSED to immediately wash their hands, so any foot germs will go away along with the pee/poop germs, no?
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: lady_disdain on September 16, 2013, 12:53:00 PM
That's why I always use my foot to flush the toilet and use a paper towel to open the bathroom door.

Excuse me, you use your foot - the foot that was walking around on the bathroom floor - on something most people touch with their hands? That is gross, inconsiderate and rude. You are making everyone that goes after you to unwittingly touch something that is now a lot grosser than it was before you used it.

If you feel that the flush lever is too gross to touch, then use a tissue or toilet paper. Not your foot.

Well, considering that most people have just wiped their private parts before THEY touch the lever, I don't think someone's foot is all that bad.

And everyone is SUPPOSED to immediately wash their hands, so any foot germs will go away along with the pee/poop germs, no?

Most people (around 90%, I believe) are right handed and will use their right hand to wipe themselves. Flush levers are normally installed on the left side of the toilet, which leads most people to automatically use their left hand. I find this an interesting little social manipulation.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yvaine on September 16, 2013, 01:00:42 PM
That's why I always use my foot to flush the toilet and use a paper towel to open the bathroom door.

Excuse me, you use your foot - the foot that was walking around on the bathroom floor - on something most people touch with their hands? That is gross, inconsiderate and rude. You are making everyone that goes after you to unwittingly touch something that is now a lot grosser than it was before you used it.

If you feel that the flush lever is too gross to touch, then use a tissue or toilet paper. Not your foot.

Well, considering that most people have just wiped their private parts before THEY touch the lever, I don't think someone's foot is all that bad.

And everyone is SUPPOSED to immediately wash their hands, so any foot germs will go away along with the pee/poop germs, no?

Most people (around 90%, I believe) are right handed and will use their right hand to wipe themselves. Flush levers are normally installed on the left side of the toilet, which leads most people to automatically use their left hand. I find this an interesting little social manipulation.

This explains why I've always done it this way. I thought about it a few months ago, realized I was unconsciously using my non-wiping hand (I'm a righty), decided that was a good policy even if I'd been doing it by accident, and kept doing it. I guess the restroom design herded me into it!  ;D
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: veronaz on September 16, 2013, 02:09:30 PM
Quote
And everyone is SUPPOSED to immediately wash their hands, so any foot germs will go away along with the pee/poop germs, no?

People don't always do what they are SUPPOSED to do.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: SlitherHiss on September 16, 2013, 02:36:29 PM
Quote
And everyone is SUPPOSED to immediately wash their hands, so any foot germs will go away along with the pee/poop germs, no?

People don't always do what they are SUPPOSED to do.

Yeah, but if you do, then your hands will be clean at the end, regardless of what anyone else does or doesn't do.

My personal bathroom commandments are:

Don't be gross, especially in an attempt to avoid another's grossness. 
If you are accidentally gross, clean that stuff up. No one else should have to deal with your bodily excretions.
Wash thy hands, and properly dispose of any papertowels in the trash. (see also, rule 1)
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yvaine on September 16, 2013, 02:46:34 PM
Quote
And everyone is SUPPOSED to immediately wash their hands, so any foot germs will go away along with the pee/poop germs, no?

People don't always do what they are SUPPOSED to do.

Yeah, but if you do, then your hands will be clean at the end, regardless of what anyone else does or doesn't do.

My personal bathroom commandments are:

Don't be gross, especially in an attempt to avoid another's grossness. 
If you are accidentally gross, clean that stuff up. No one else should have to deal with your bodily excretions.
Wash thy hands, and properly dispose of any papertowels in the trash. (see also, rule 1)

I like your rules, SlitherHiss.  ;D
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Miss Understood on September 16, 2013, 02:52:01 PM
It was a large mirror above the sinks, so she could see herself from the waist up.  To see her skirt or pants, she had to stand on the toilet.

I don't know why she didn't buy a mirror for her bedroom door.  The toilet mirror viewing stopped after maintenance complained.

Thanks to you and Mel the Redcap and PastryGoddess for explaining.  I couldn't figure out what she was doing!  But that makes perfect sense now.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: VorFemme on September 16, 2013, 04:49:00 PM
It was a large mirror above the sinks, so she could see herself from the waist up.  To see her skirt or pants, she had to stand on the toilet.

I don't know why she didn't buy a mirror for her bedroom door.  The toilet mirror viewing stopped after maintenance complained.

Thanks to you and Mel the Redcap and PastryGoddess for explaining.  I couldn't figure out what she was doing!  But that makes perfect sense now.

I could - I just couldn't figure out how she was standing on the toilet SAFELY in the dorm!

Some of those are wall hung instead of sitting on the floor - so standing on them is more weight being supported than just someone sitting on them (some weight would be on the person's feet).  Which might not be safe...depending on the person...and how long the toilet had been there - corrosion on the bolts that was hidden behind the walls is still going to weaken the support for the toilet.

I have never had a toilet break when I sat on it - the very idea sounds painful, though. And standing on it would give you that much further to fall on what is usually a solid floor (maybe not in homes - but hotels, dorm rooms, stores, and other business locations).
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: WillyNilly on September 16, 2013, 04:55:12 PM
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.

Before reading e-Hell it never crossed my mind anyone would ever use their hand on the prong type flushers. On a tank toilet I use my hand but not on one like this: http://image.ec21.com/image/greenkorea/oimg_GC00196484_CA01440165/Automatic_Toilet_Flusher_With_Manual_Lever_.jpg unless its in someone's home.
As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage (and I say as someone who does have this type in my home. Yes I use my hand at home, but I'm not convinced it was designed exclusively for hand flushing.)

If its like this: http://www.luxury-gadgets.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Royal-Flush-14k-Solid-Gold-Toilet-Flusher2.jpg I use my hand.

Also in regard to the idea of "use your hands, you're about to wash them anyway" - I guess we go to very different places! Because I would say a solid 65% of public restrooms have no soap. so no, no one is washing their hands after they go, people are merely rinsing their hands and drying them. Minimizing touching surfaces likely to be germ ridden, like flushers that people flush with their shoes, is simply prudent.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yvaine on September 16, 2013, 05:22:50 PM
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.

Before reading e-Hell it never crossed my mind anyone would ever use their hand on the prong type flushers. On a tank toilet I use my hand but not on one like this: http://image.ec21.com/image/greenkorea/oimg_GC00196484_CA01440165/Automatic_Toilet_Flusher_With_Manual_Lever_.jpg unless its in someone's home.
As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage (and I say as someone who does have this type in my home. Yes I use my hand at home, but I'm not convinced it was designed exclusively for hand flushing.)

If its like this: http://www.luxury-gadgets.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Royal-Flush-14k-Solid-Gold-Toilet-Flusher2.jpg I use my hand.

Also in regard to the idea of "use your hands, you're about to wash them anyway" - I guess we go to very different places! Because I would say a solid 65% of public restrooms have no soap. so no, no one is washing their hands after they go, people are merely rinsing their hands and drying them. Minimizing touching surfaces likely to be germ ridden, like flushers that people flush with their shoes, is simply prudent.

Usually when something's designed for feet, though, it's really obvious that it's a foot pedal. It's not going to be up in the air. Like if you see a trash can with a foot pedal, the pedal is down on the ground and it's pretty obvious that it's for feet. I have a preference for using hands, but I'm not horribly fussed about people using feet...but I do find it hard to believe when people say they never even imagined someone might use their hand.

Once in a while, sure, a restroom is out of soap, but in my experience it's nowhere near that common, and when there is no soap it's not because that's actually policy but because they've run out and the staff hasn't been in to notice it yet. In fact, I think it's the law that soap be provided, along with those signs about how employees must wash their hands.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: camlan on September 16, 2013, 05:28:17 PM
Soap merely helps the water remove dirt and germs. Briskly rubbing your hands together in a washing motion under running water for the recommended length of time will remove the majority of dirt and germs from your hands.

Briskly rubbing your hands together in a washing motion *without* any water for the recommended length of time will remove some of the dirt and germs.

Soap helps get your hands cleaner, but it's the water and the hand rubbing that count.

Some interesting info on soap here: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/06/soap-how-much-cleaner-does-it-actually-make-your-hands/258839/ (http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/06/soap-how-much-cleaner-does-it-actually-make-your-hands/258839/)
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: WillyNilly on September 16, 2013, 05:33:13 PM
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.

Before reading e-Hell it never crossed my mind anyone would ever use their hand on the prong type flushers. On a tank toilet I use my hand but not on one like this: http://image.ec21.com/image/greenkorea/oimg_GC00196484_CA01440165/Automatic_Toilet_Flusher_With_Manual_Lever_.jpg unless its in someone's home.
As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage (and I say as someone who does have this type in my home. Yes I use my hand at home, but I'm not convinced it was designed exclusively for hand flushing.)

If its like this: http://www.luxury-gadgets.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Royal-Flush-14k-Solid-Gold-Toilet-Flusher2.jpg I use my hand.

Also in regard to the idea of "use your hands, you're about to wash them anyway" - I guess we go to very different places! Because I would say a solid 65% of public restrooms have no soap. so no, no one is washing their hands after they go, people are merely rinsing their hands and drying them. Minimizing touching surfaces likely to be germ ridden, like flushers that people flush with their shoes, is simply prudent.

Usually when something's designed for feet, though, it's really obvious that it's a foot pedal. It's not going to be up in the air. Like if you see a trash can with a foot pedal, the pedal is down on the ground and it's pretty obvious that it's for feet. I have a preference for using hands, but I'm not horribly fussed about people using feet...but I do find it hard to believe when people say they never even imagined someone might use their hand.

Once in a while, sure, a restroom is out of soap, but in my experience it's nowhere near that common, and when there is no soap it's not because that's actually policy but because they've run out and the staff hasn't been in to notice it yet. In fact, I think it's the law that soap be provided, along with those signs about how employees must wash their hands.

I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

As for soap, often yes there are dispensers, although certainly not always, but more often then not they are empty IME. Your experience might very well differ, I don't doubt it, but my point is I would never count on there being soap.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yvaine on September 16, 2013, 05:40:01 PM
I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

But why would they design it round, and up in the air, then? I'm genuinely confused. Stuff to be operated with the feet is usually lower to the ground, and also flat. It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear. And I'm kind of skeeved out by the idea that people are watching people's feet in the bathroom long enough to see whether they're going up on one foot during the process (maybe a quick glance to see if the stall is really occupied or just has the door closed, but this seems more like intent study!).
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: menley on September 16, 2013, 05:45:38 PM
I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

But why would they design it round, and up in the air, then? I'm genuinely confused. Stuff to be operated with the feet is usually lower to the ground, and also flat. It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear. And I'm kind of skeeved out by the idea that people are watching people's feet in the bathroom long enough to see whether they're going up on one foot during the process (maybe a quick glance to see if the stall is really occupied or just has the door closed, but this seems more like intent study!).

Yes, I agree. If it was actually intended to be used by a foot, it would be on the ground - foot-level. Instead it's hand-level.

I honestly don't care which people use, as I always carry hand sanitizer so if there isn't soap in the bathroom, I scrub my hands underwater, dry them, and then use hand sanitizer. But to suggest that it's designed for foot use is just ... baffling.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: esposita on September 16, 2013, 06:06:34 PM
I use my foot and lean waaaay back, because once those things start flushing who knows what they are throwing up into the air. I don't want that stuff on my face. And some of them flush so strongly, I'm afraid of getting sucked into the vortex. :P Okay not really, but having the top part of me over the toilet just grosses me out.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: WillyNilly on September 16, 2013, 08:11:50 PM
I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

But why would they design it round, and up in the air, then? I'm genuinely confused. Stuff to be operated with the feet is usually lower to the ground, and also flat. It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear. And I'm kind of skeeved out by the idea that people are watching people's feet in the bathroom long enough to see whether they're going up on one foot during the process (maybe a quick glance to see if the stall is really occupied or just has the door closed, but this seems more like intent study!).

Well you left out my original quote where I wrote:
Quote
...As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage...

Designing something that can be used in more then one fashion seems like a much better design for a public space then something that can only be used in one way.

As for watching feet, its a matter of a line in a ladies room. If you are waiting several minutes for a stall to open where do you look? I look at the row of stalls, so I can you know, see when one opens, immediately. And sometimes the angle is such that one can see the feet of the people inside.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yvaine on September 16, 2013, 08:23:04 PM
I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

But why would they design it round, and up in the air, then? I'm genuinely confused. Stuff to be operated with the feet is usually lower to the ground, and also flat. It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear. And I'm kind of skeeved out by the idea that people are watching people's feet in the bathroom long enough to see whether they're going up on one foot during the process (maybe a quick glance to see if the stall is really occupied or just has the door closed, but this seems more like intent study!).

Well you left out my original quote where I wrote:
Quote
...As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage...

Designing something that can be used in more then one fashion seems like a much better design for a public space then something that can only be used in one way.

Oh, sorry, I must have misunderstood you somehow--it sounded like you were saying you never imagined anyone would use their hands, based on the bolded, but that other quote makes it sound like you do know both methods might be used. I'm just confused, I suppose.

As for watching feet, its a matter of a line in a ladies room. If you are waiting several minutes for a stall to open where do you look? I look at the row of stalls, so I can you know, see when one opens, immediately. And sometimes the angle is such that one can see the feet of the people inside.

I look at the doors and head toward one if I see it starting to open. I don't watch what people are doing behind or under it.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: wolfie on September 16, 2013, 08:43:35 PM
It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear.
I have read at least one article asking what exactly the designer's intent was - hand or foot - since the placement is really not ideal for either. SO I think that for many people the designer's intent is not clear at all.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: WillyNilly on September 16, 2013, 09:19:14 PM
I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

But why would they design it round, and up in the air, then? I'm genuinely confused. Stuff to be operated with the feet is usually lower to the ground, and also flat. It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear. And I'm kind of skeeved out by the idea that people are watching people's feet in the bathroom long enough to see whether they're going up on one foot during the process (maybe a quick glance to see if the stall is really occupied or just has the door closed, but this seems more like intent study!).

Well you left out my original quote where I wrote:
Quote
...As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage...

Designing something that can be used in more then one fashion seems like a much better design for a public space then something that can only be used in one way.

Oh, sorry, I must have misunderstood you somehow--it sounded like you were saying you never imagined anyone would use their hands, based on the bolded, but that other quote makes it sound like you do know both methods might be used. I'm just confused, I suppose.

As for watching feet, its a matter of a line in a ladies room. If you are waiting several minutes for a stall to open where do you look? I look at the row of stalls, so I can you know, see when one opens, immediately. And sometimes the angle is such that one can see the feet of the people inside.

I look at the doors and head toward one if I see it starting to open. I don't watch what people are doing behind or under it.

It never really occurred to me people used their hands on those prongs in public restrooms. As I initially stated I have that type of flusher in my home. At home I use my hand. But in public I have always known them to be foot operated.

Sort of like at home I might lick my fingers while eating but in public I would never do that.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yvaine on September 16, 2013, 09:26:08 PM
It never really occurred to me people used their hands on those prongs in public restrooms. As I initially stated I have that type of flusher in my home. At home I use my hand. But in public I have always known them to be foot operated.

Sort of like at home I might lick my fingers while eating but in public I would never do that.

Just to be sure of what you're saying, are you implying that flushing a public toilet with one's hand is as gauche as licking one's fingers while eating in public?
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: WillyNilly on September 16, 2013, 10:52:55 PM
It never really occurred to me people used their hands on those prongs in public restrooms. As I initially stated I have that type of flusher in my home. At home I use my hand. But in public I have always known them to be foot operated.

Sort of like at home I might lick my fingers while eating but in public I would never do that.

Just to be sure of what you're saying, are you implying that flushing a public toilet with one's hand is as gauche as licking one's fingers while eating in public?

No I'm saying its just not something I would ever consider doing under normal circumstances and never really thought other people did under normal circumstances.

I have to say I'm not really sure why you are fighting me on this so hard. I'm 37 years old. Before e-hell (4-5 years ago?) I never heard of someone flushing a (public wand stye) toilet with their hand. I admit its not a conversation I've had with any sort of frequency but none the less it truly never ever occurred to me. To me, it was just absolutely unconditionally normal and taken for granted that everyone flushed with their foot unless there was some major reason they could not. Its what we did in my elementary school, and junior high and high school. Its what my parents and grandparents and extended family taught me. Its what my friends do. Its just the norm in my experience. I don't know why that statement is shocking or unbelievable or offensive. It simply is what it is. I'm not insulting anyone, or judging anyone. I'm just surprised its not as common place as I believed it to be (although I'm not convinced its not the more popular method - other posters have also said they always flush with their foot).
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 16, 2013, 10:55:12 PM
It never really occurred to me people used their hands on those prongs in public restrooms. As I initially stated I have that type of flusher in my home. At home I use my hand. But in public I have always known them to be foot operated.

Sort of like at home I might lick my fingers while eating but in public I would never do that.

Just to be sure of what you're saying, are you implying that flushing a public toilet with one's hand is as gauche as licking one's fingers while eating in public?

I think you might be reading more into that quote than is necessary...I got what she was saying just fine
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Erich L-ster on September 16, 2013, 11:12:54 PM
I wish there could be a poll added because i my experience too, most people are foot flushers. That wand style flusher is practically all I ever see in public restrooms It's actually been many years since I've seen a regular home type toilet in a public restroom.

If poll is possible it should be stipulated that it pertains to that type of toilet with the stick/wand flusher.

It would be great if polls could be added in threads after we see a divide of opinions.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Psychopoesie on September 16, 2013, 11:25:46 PM
I'd also be interested to know where people are from. Curious if this is a US specific thing or broader. The handshake thread has been really interesting in this regard.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 17, 2013, 12:53:35 AM
I'm in the US.  Maryland
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: MariaE on September 17, 2013, 01:27:46 AM
Denmark - never heard of flushing using your foot till this board. It'd be pretty impossible to do in most public toilets here.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Psychopoesie on September 17, 2013, 01:36:09 AM
Australia. & the same - never heard of foot flushing before now.

There are some public toilets like the one pictured with what I'd call a hand lever - they're flushed by hand (AFAIK). Most have buttons on the cistern or wall above the toilet. A few older style public loos (mostly in small country towns) still have a chain that's pulled to flush.

I vaguely remember a toilet on some form of public transport (long distance train, maybe) having a pedal flush arrangement. The pedal was on the floor though and looked a bit like the pedal used to open a kitchen rubbish bin. Don't remember if that was here or overseas tho.

Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: RingTailedLemur on September 17, 2013, 01:36:49 AM
Denmark - never heard of flushing using your foot till this board. It'd be pretty impossible to do in most public toilets here.

UK, same thing.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: perpetua on September 17, 2013, 03:18:39 AM
Denmark - never heard of flushing using your foot till this board. It'd be pretty impossible to do in most public toilets here.

UK, same thing.

UK too, and as far as I know we don't have those type of toilets here. I've never even seen one before. I posted upthread somewhere a picture of what our flushers are like, they are, I would think, impossible to flush with your foot unless you're some kind of circus performer. I'd also never heard of foot flushing until I came here and thought it most odd until I saw the picture of the toilets in question.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Goosey on September 17, 2013, 06:29:23 AM
I just got to say, I'm so thankful most public toilets are becoming automatic from what I've seen! Sure, they may flush at inconvenient times occasionally, but they DO flush and you don't have to worry about putting your hand in whatever dirt people have tracked in on their shoes when you try to flush them!

Now we just need to work on the sprinklers. Although I did go to an airport bathroom once that had automatic disposable seat covers. You just pressed a button and it replaced it for you!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Twik on September 17, 2013, 08:50:36 AM
I'm not sure what the horrors of touching the flushing mechanism with your hand are. I'm pretty sure that the odds are in your favor that the previous occupant did not have leprosy.

And honestly, if the previous occupant had something icky on *their* hand when they used the flush mechanism, they're likely to have spread it to the door handle, sink, faucet handles (if not automatic), etc. You're not escaping any contamination.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: stargazer on September 17, 2013, 09:11:26 AM

I have to say I'm not really sure why you are fighting me on this so hard. I'm 37 years old. Before e-hell (4-5 years ago?) I never heard of someone flushing a (public wand stye) toilet with their hand.

Funny, I'm the same age and in the US and until EHell never considered someone would flush a handle with their foot.  A pedal close to the floor - I would get it.  But it's up in the air a few feet so it seemed obvious to me it was for hand use.  Interesting.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: VorFemme on September 17, 2013, 09:12:43 AM
I've used my foot only when the toilet is so low that it is easier to stand on one foot to flush (I'm slightly over average height for a woman - 5' 8" - although I tower over the women in some ethnic populations - and have since I was eleven).  Tower would mean that the top of their heads is even with or below my shoulders.

My mother and grandmothers always used their hand to flush - unless their hands were full with a baby sister or brother - or possibly cousin - then I might be told to flush for them. 

The only time I remember using my foot - there was "something" caked on the toilet handle that was clearly in need of being cleaned off of it - I don't remember now what it was - might have been chocolate, dried blood, something nastier, or even just a bad case of rust - but I didn't want to touch it, even if I was going to wash my hands afterward...
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: WillyNilly on September 17, 2013, 09:57:12 AM
I'm not sure what the horrors of touching the flushing mechanism with your hand are. I'm pretty sure that the odds are in your favor that the previous occupant did not have leprosy.

And honestly, if the previous occupant had something icky on *their* hand when they used the flush mechanism, they're likely to have spread it to the door handle, sink, faucet handles (if not automatic), etc. You're not escaping any contamination.

I think the practice of using one's foot is more for two reasons:

1. Simply put, habit. Long ingrained habit. If its what someone has always done, they are simply going to keep doing it.

2. If a person comes from a position of 'this is what is done by everyone, always' then its never a consideration of what the previous person had on their hand, so much as what the previous persons - possibly hundreds of them - had on the bottom of their shoes. And the bottom of the shoe germs are not nearly as likely to have been spread to the door handle, sink, faucet handles because those aren't operated with one's foot.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: esposita on September 17, 2013, 10:00:05 AM
I'm not sure what the horrors of touching the flushing mechanism with your hand are. I'm pretty sure that the odds are in your favor that the previous occupant did not have leprosy.

And honestly, if the previous occupant had something icky on *their* hand when they used the flush mechanism, they're likely to have spread it to the door handle, sink, faucet handles (if not automatic), etc. You're not escaping any contamination.

At least for me, its not about what is on the handle from previous users, its about what will be sprayed into the air when the water is stirred up by the flushing. Its the leaning over the toilet with my face that bothers me.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: gramma dishes on September 17, 2013, 10:16:01 AM

I have to say I'm not really sure why you are fighting me on this so hard. I'm 37 years old. Before e-hell (4-5 years ago?) I never heard of someone flushing a (public wand stye) toilet with their hand. I admit its not a conversation I've had with any sort of frequency but none the less it truly never ever occurred to me. To me, it was just absolutely unconditionally normal and taken for granted that everyone flushed with their foot unless there was some major reason they could not. Its what we did in my elementary school, and junior high and high school. Its what my parents and grandparents and extended family taught me. Its what my friends do. Its just the norm in my experience. I don't know why that statement is shocking or unbelievable or offensive. It simply is what it is. I'm not insulting anyone, or judging anyone. I'm just surprised its not as common place as I believed it to be (although I'm not convinced its not the more popular method - other posters have also said they always flush with their foot).

WillyNilly, I'm almost twice your age and your experience is the same as mine.  I've never known anyone who flushed that type of toilet with their hand.  Isn't it interesting what is so surprising (and apparently disgusting) to some of the people here is totally 100% "normal" to the rest of us to the point that trying to imagine someone flushing with their hand is just ... almost unimaginable.   Not a BAD thing.  Just a new concept!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Carotte on September 17, 2013, 10:29:47 AM
As an industrial designer I must say that barring an entire chain of designer/marketing/makers being absolutely stupid and (never having heard of ergonomic), no one will build something that is intended to be used with a foot more than 4 inches off the ground.
And barring a very high level of everyone being stupid it should never be approved for sale and public use.

That might be how everyone will use it, it doesn't mean it was made that way.
It doesn't mean I think you are wrong to use it that way either, just that it wasn't marketed as such.
Can you imagine trying to pass that on any board of 'let's check this before it's realleased' or 'let's approve this for public use'?

How does a little old lady that's not that steady on he feet anymore do that whitout tumbling down?
How does a little kid or little person do it?

 
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Judah on September 17, 2013, 10:31:04 AM

I have to say I'm not really sure why you are fighting me on this so hard. I'm 37 years old. Before e-hell (4-5 years ago?) I never heard of someone flushing a (public wand stye) toilet with their hand. I admit its not a conversation I've had with any sort of frequency but none the less it truly never ever occurred to me. To me, it was just absolutely unconditionally normal and taken for granted that everyone flushed with their foot unless there was some major reason they could not. Its what we did in my elementary school, and junior high and high school. Its what my parents and grandparents and extended family taught me. Its what my friends do. Its just the norm in my experience. I don't know why that statement is shocking or unbelievable or offensive. It simply is what it is. I'm not insulting anyone, or judging anyone. I'm just surprised its not as common place as I believed it to be (although I'm not convinced its not the more popular method - other posters have also said they always flush with their foot).

WillyNilly, I'm almost twice your age and your experience is the same as mine.  I've never known anyone who flushed that type of toilet with their hand.  Isn't it interesting what is so surprising (and apparently disgusting) to some of the people here is totally 100% "normal" to the rest of us to the point that trying to imagine someone flushing with their hand is just ... almost unimaginable.   Not a BAD thing.  Just a new concept!

I'm another one that's never even considered that people flush with their hand.  My mother flushed with her foot, so she taught me to, and since I've never seen anyone flush with their hand, it never entered my mind that anyone would. 
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Tabby Uprising on September 17, 2013, 10:38:10 AM

I have to say I'm not really sure why you are fighting me on this so hard. I'm 37 years old. Before e-hell (4-5 years ago?) I never heard of someone flushing a (public wand stye) toilet with their hand. I admit its not a conversation I've had with any sort of frequency but none the less it truly never ever occurred to me. To me, it was just absolutely unconditionally normal and taken for granted that everyone flushed with their foot unless there was some major reason they could not. Its what we did in my elementary school, and junior high and high school. Its what my parents and grandparents and extended family taught me. Its what my friends do. Its just the norm in my experience. I don't know why that statement is shocking or unbelievable or offensive. It simply is what it is. I'm not insulting anyone, or judging anyone. I'm just surprised its not as common place as I believed it to be (although I'm not convinced its not the more popular method - other posters have also said they always flush with their foot).

WillyNilly, I'm almost twice your age and your experience is the same as mine.  I've never known anyone who flushed that type of toilet with their hand.  Isn't it interesting what is so surprising (and apparently disgusting) to some of the people here is totally 100% "normal" to the rest of us to the point that trying to imagine someone flushing with their hand is just ... almost unimaginable.   Not a BAD thing.  Just a new concept!

I'm another one that's never even considered that people flush with their hand. My mother flushed with her foot, so she taught me to, and since I've never seen anyone flush with their hand, it never entered my mind that anyone would.

That's what this thread made me realize.  When we were all kids and were shuffled into the stall with our parent, we learned to flush it the way they did.  After that stage in your life, when are you ever sharing a public toilet stall with a peer?  You don't see how other people flush.  And frankly, aside from a thread like this, how often do you ever give it thought?  Flushing is such an ordinary, every day, habit that isn't going to spur much introspection.  I know I've never had this conversation with any of my friends. 

Maybe I can bring it up next time we get together and just be the life of the party  ;D
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: gramma dishes on September 17, 2013, 10:46:08 AM
...   I know I've never had this conversation with any of my friends. 

Maybe I can bring it up next time we get together and just be the life of the party  ;D

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Betelnut on September 17, 2013, 12:09:37 PM
This is fascinating.  I'm with the "flush using my hand" crowd.  I cannot imagine using my foot!  It just doesn't look like it was designed to work that way.  It seems unsanitary to me.  It seems awkward.  I wasn't taught to do it that way.  Plus, recently, when I was undergoing chemo, I would have been way too unsteady on my feet to use my foot.

Please foot flushers don't be insulted--I'm just saying that's how I see it!

Very interesting divergence!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: EllenS on September 17, 2013, 12:14:53 PM
Field report:  I did try flushing the "wand" style toilet at work with my hand yesterday.

BOY, that felt awkward.  I really felt like I was sticking my head INTO the john in order to reach.  As I mentioned upthread, I was one of those brought up on foot-flushing and never thought of doing otherwise till this thread.  I think keeping one's face as far as possible from the toilet spray may have been the original motivation for the foot flush.

Which brings up another "regional difference" aspect: When I have traveled in Europe and the UK, one of the things I noticed was that the average toilet flush seemed much less strong than in the US.  Over here, you really get a "WHOOSH" and there can sometimes be a lot of overspray.

I traveled to Germany for the first time this year, and saw a rather ingenious arrangement of wall-button flushers : you pushed the top half for a "light" flush, and the bottom for a "strong" flush, depending on what was needed.  I just thought that was so clever and useful, to save water but make sure you can get the job done.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: menley on September 17, 2013, 12:20:06 PM
<snip>
I traveled to Germany for the first time this year, and saw a rather ingenious arrangement of wall-button flushers : you pushed the top half for a "light" flush, and the bottom for a "strong" flush, depending on what was needed.  I just thought that was so clever and useful, to save water but make sure you can get the job done.

My flat in Budapest has these on all the toilets and I love it!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Judah on September 17, 2013, 12:40:29 PM
<snip>
I traveled to Germany for the first time this year, and saw a rather ingenious arrangement of wall-button flushers : you pushed the top half for a "light" flush, and the bottom for a "strong" flush, depending on what was needed.  I just thought that was so clever and useful, to save water but make sure you can get the job done.

My flat in Budapest has these on all the toilets and I love it!

I'm seeing them more often here in the U.S. too.  I think they're a great idea.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: RingTailedLemur on September 17, 2013, 12:48:07 PM
When in Canada, I was surprised by how deep the water in the bowl was.  There was much more than in UK loos.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: TootsNYC on September 17, 2013, 02:26:30 PM
That's why I always use my foot to flush the toilet and use a paper towel to open the bathroom door.

Excuse me, you use your foot - the foot that was walking around on the bathroom floor - on something most people touch with their hands? That is gross, inconsiderate and rude. You are making everyone that goes after you to unwittingly touch something that is now a lot grosser than it was before you used it.

If you feel that the flush lever is too gross to touch, then use a tissue or toilet paper. Not your foot.

Well, considering that most people have just wiped their private parts before THEY touch the lever, I don't think someone's foot is all that bad.

And everyone is SUPPOSED to immediately wash their hands, so any foot germs will go away along with the pee/poop germs, no?

Most people (around 90%, I believe) are right handed and will use their right hand to wipe themselves. Flush levers are normally installed on the left side of the toilet, which leads most people to automatically use their left hand. I find this an interesting little social manipulation.

I'm definitely not "most people"--I always use my right hand to flush. I use my right hand to do most things. (In fact, at home I use my right hand because I flush as I stand; I use my right hand at work because it needs some strength to push the flushometer lever, and my right arm is stronger).
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 17, 2013, 02:47:21 PM
EllenS,  I have one of those toilets.  Although my buttons are side by side, not top and bottom
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Figgie on September 17, 2013, 02:57:52 PM
My spouse works for a plumbing supply chain.  I told him about this thread and he was interested enough that he talked with the people at work about the standing on the toilet to go and flushing with a foot.

According to what they told him, toilets in the USA are definitely not designed to be stood on and there is a strong likelihood of the toilet breaking from having that done over time.  As for the flushing with a foot...while they aren't specifically designed for that, they are designed to accommodate flushing via the foot. 

When I asked him what that meant, he said that designers definitely know that people flush with their foot as well as their hand and that the handle is designed to handle the increased stress from flushing with a foot...unlike the standing on the toilet, there will be no breakage from flushing with your foot rather than your hand.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: VorFemme on September 17, 2013, 03:00:31 PM
There are NEW toilets out with the same horizontal "bar" that some people are saying that they were taught was "meant"
 to be operated with the foot.

The "new" design is that you push it down for a heavy flush when there are waste solids to be disposed of and pull it up when flushing liquids (and a little toilet tissue - which will go down either way).  The heavy flush uses at least twice as much water as the lighter flush...  So now the "you're doing it wrong" critics can add "you're wasting water" to their litany of complaints about people who aren't doing things THEIR way.

And we all know that there are people who probably looked over anyone's shoulder and complain about what they are doing - they just have to complain about something!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: WillyNilly on September 17, 2013, 03:43:40 PM
There are NEW toilets out with the same horizontal "bar" that some people are saying that they were taught was "meant"
 to be operated with the foot.

The "new" design is that you push it down for a heavy flush when there are waste solids to be disposed of and pull it up when flushing liquids (and a little toilet tissue - which will go down either way).  The heavy flush uses at least twice as much water as the lighter flush...  So now the "you're doing it wrong" critics can add "you're wasting water" to their litany of complaints about people who aren't doing things THEIR way.

And we all know that there are people who probably looked over anyone's shoulder and complain about what they are doing - they just have to complain about something!

I don't understand what your point is. I can still quite easily operate those flushers with my foot in either an up or down motion.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: lady_disdain on September 17, 2013, 03:59:59 PM
There are NEW toilets out with the same horizontal "bar" that some people are saying that they were taught was "meant"
 to be operated with the foot.

The "new" design is that you push it down for a heavy flush when there are waste solids to be disposed of and pull it up when flushing liquids (and a little toilet tissue - which will go down either way).  The heavy flush uses at least twice as much water as the lighter flush...  So now the "you're doing it wrong" critics can add "you're wasting water" to their litany of complaints about people who aren't doing things THEIR way.

And we all know that there are people who probably looked over anyone's shoulder and complain about what they are doing - they just have to complain about something!

I don't understand what your point is. I can still quite easily operate those flushers with my foot in either an up or down motion.

You can but a pregnant woman, an elderly person, someone with joint problems, someone with balance issues, woman in heels, etc, would have problems.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: White Lotus on September 17, 2013, 04:31:28 PM
I come from a hand-flush background and was surprised to learn some people use their feet.  It seems a bit awkward to me, especially in a skirt -- yes, I went out to experiment -- but I think it is a "to each her own" kind of thing. Different isn't bad.  I would think each side could visualize looking at the fixture, trying to figure it out, and saying, "Hmm.  Guess you do it with your (hand/foot)" -- whatever is the opposite of what they personally do -- thus creating a habit set in stone.  I have seen use directions on a wide variety of toilets all over the world, but I have never seen directions for flushing this kind of toilet. 
I now know people put their feet up there.  I doubt it will change my behavior at all.  I note, FTR, that when using the kind of Asian toilet that looks like a urinal standing on its back on or in the ground, with the same kind of flusher, I do use my foot, as it makes logical sense to me to do so. 
I like the large or small flush choices, built in bidets, heated seats, funny flush sounds at the press of a button, and now, the automatic seat cover and flush models.  Plumbing is very interesting these days.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: EllenS on September 17, 2013, 04:36:31 PM
  Plumbing is very interesting these days.

LOL!  More than I ever realized!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: VorFemme on September 17, 2013, 08:59:08 PM
There are NEW toilets out with the same horizontal "bar" that some people are saying that they were taught was "meant"
 to be operated with the foot.

The "new" design is that you push it down for a heavy flush when there are waste solids to be disposed of and pull it up when flushing liquids (and a little toilet tissue - which will go down either way).  The heavy flush uses at least twice as much water as the lighter flush...  So now the "you're doing it wrong" critics can add "you're wasting water" to their litany of complaints about people who aren't doing things THEIR way.

And we all know that there are people who probably looked over anyone's shoulder and complain about what they are doing - they just have to complain about something!

I don't understand what your point is. I can still quite easily operate those flushers with my foot in either an up or down motion.

Maybe you can - but I have tendinitis in my feet (thank you small child running around like a squirrel on crack that I avoided running over in Wal*Mart two years ago - I remember you every time I walk because I bent the middle three toes on my right foot backwards at least 90 degrees (they aren't supposed to go that way) when I rammed my foot into the wheel.  But the kid ran off unscathed with Mom still ignoring it - and my scream of pain while half falling to the floor. 

I no longer use my feet do anything that doesn't have a foot pedal within an inch or so of the floor...I am not into pain.

Moving the pole upward with a foot would probably involve leaning backwards to keep my balance - and many public toilets are in cubicles without enough space in front of the toilet to stand in while leaning backwards.

I've also seen some (in homes and hardware stores) that have a knob on the middle of the tank top that is the flush button - it looked pretty - but I couldn't see how it could be operated with a foot.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 17, 2013, 11:08:13 PM
There are NEW toilets out with the same horizontal "bar" that some people are saying that they were taught was "meant"
 to be operated with the foot.

The "new" design is that you push it down for a heavy flush when there are waste solids to be disposed of and pull it up when flushing liquids (and a little toilet tissue - which will go down either way).  The heavy flush uses at least twice as much water as the lighter flush...  So now the "you're doing it wrong" critics can add "you're wasting water" to their litany of complaints about people who aren't doing things THEIR way.

And we all know that there are people who probably looked over anyone's shoulder and complain about what they are doing - they just have to complain about something!

I don't understand what your point is. I can still quite easily operate those flushers with my foot in either an up or down motion.

Maybe you can - but I have tendinitis in my feet (thank you small child running around like a squirrel on crack that I avoided running over in Wal*Mart two years ago - I remember you every time I walk because I bent the middle three toes on my right foot backwards at least 90 degrees (they aren't supposed to go that way) when I rammed my foot into the wheel.  But the kid ran off unscathed with Mom still ignoring it - and my scream of pain while half falling to the floor. 

I no longer use my feet do anything that doesn't have a foot pedal within an inch or so of the floor...I am not into pain.

Moving the pole upward with a foot would probably involve leaning backwards to keep my balance - and many public toilets are in cubicles without enough space in front of the toilet to stand in while leaning backwards.

I've also seen some (in homes and hardware stores) that have a knob on the middle of the tank top that is the flush button - it looked pretty - but I couldn't see how it could be operated with a foot.

Mine is like that
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: VorFemme on September 18, 2013, 05:06:19 PM
There are NEW toilets out with the same horizontal "bar" that some people are saying that they were taught was "meant"
 to be operated with the foot.

The "new" design is that you push it down for a heavy flush when there are waste solids to be disposed of and pull it up when flushing liquids (and a little toilet tissue - which will go down either way).  The heavy flush uses at least twice as much water as the lighter flush...  So now the "you're doing it wrong" critics can add "you're wasting water" to their litany of complaints about people who aren't doing things THEIR way.

And we all know that there are people who probably looked over anyone's shoulder and complain about what they are doing - they just have to complain about something!

I don't understand what your point is. I can still quite easily operate those flushers with my foot in either an up or down motion.

Maybe you can - but I have tendinitis in my feet (thank you small child running around like a squirrel on crack that I avoided running over in Wal*Mart two years ago - I remember you every time I walk because I bent the middle three toes on my right foot backwards at least 90 degrees (they aren't supposed to go that way) when I rammed my foot into the wheel.  But the kid ran off unscathed with Mom still ignoring it - and my scream of pain while half falling to the floor. 

I no longer use my feet do anything that doesn't have a foot pedal within an inch or so of the floor...I am not into pain.

Moving the pole upward with a foot would probably involve leaning backwards to keep my balance - and many public toilets are in cubicles without enough space in front of the toilet to stand in while leaning backwards.

I've also seen some (in homes and hardware stores) that have a knob on the middle of the tank top that is the flush button - it looked pretty - but I couldn't see how it could be operated with a foot.

Mine is like that

Okay - I was at three different places today - a store, a restaurant, and a college.  One had the automatic flush mechanism.  The other two had the horizontal bar (I have no idea if it was the two levels of flush or not).  It was about hip height on me - easier when I was in my twenties and thirties.  I *could* do it - but I don't think that I'll be doing it often - it was just an awkward height.  Now - if it had been a foot lower, it would have been easier to use my foot - but at hip height - I'm going to keep using one hand...

Now if only they made the danged cubicles either a little wider or didn't have the toilet tissue holders at hip height in front of the toilet.  My purse got tangled with the danged thing while I was trying to get it off my shoulder to hang it on the hook on the door and get my clothes out of the way....not much of a delay, but I'd been sitting in the car and I didn't really want to delay things at all.

Getting older means a lot of things aren't as easy as they were when you were in your thirties.

Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Yarnspinner on September 18, 2013, 06:42:08 PM
We have a sign reading "Ladies, Please be respectful of your sisters!  If you make a mess clean it up and leave the place the way you would like it to be if you were using it."
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: medowynd on September 18, 2013, 11:29:48 PM
According to a plumbing salesman I spoke too, commercial toilets have an electric pump to move the water faster.  He got a laugh out of my fascination with a toilet attached to the electric.  Fry's Electronics have signs in all of their stalls asking customers not to flush with their foot, because it could damage the toilet.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: camlan on September 19, 2013, 06:01:16 AM
As an industrial designer I must say that barring an entire chain of designer/marketing/makers being absolutely stupid and (never having heard of ergonomic), no one will build something that is intended to be used with a foot more than 4 inches off the ground.
And barring a very high level of everyone being stupid it should never be approved for sale and public use.

That might be how everyone will use it, it doesn't mean it was made that way.
It doesn't mean I think you are wrong to use it that way either, just that it wasn't marketed as such.
Can you imagine trying to pass that on any board of 'let's check this before it's realleased' or 'let's approve this for public use'?

How does a little old lady that's not that steady on he feet anymore do that whitout tumbling down?
How does a little kid or little person do it?

This is kind of what I was thinking. Would a designer design a toilet that a 4 year old child would have difficulties using correctly?

While I can kind of understand why the foot flushers use their feet, it is an alien concept to me, just as my using my hand is to them.

I'm beginning to appreciate the auto-flushing toilets more and more.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: gramma dishes on September 19, 2013, 10:02:06 AM


I'm beginning to appreciate the auto-flushing toilets more and more.

Yeah, sometimes.

For some reason they don't always work right for me.  Sometimes they randomly flush while I'm still ... uh ... seated, which is startling and sometimes sprays water all over me.  Yet other times when I want them to flush (after I'm standing) they just sit there doing absolutely nothing.  Sometimes if I partially open the door they will flush, but it makes me nervous not knowing which way it's going to go!   :-\
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: VorFemme on September 19, 2013, 10:43:14 AM
I'm hypothyroid - my theory is that my body temperature isn't quite high enough to trigger an infra-red sensor OR that a light sensor might have been knocked askew so it isn't registering my shadow properly.

Because it could not possibly be that I am not casting a shadow.....I accept the reality that I am more solid than I was thirty years ago - make that a larger & more solid person.  It's going to take a HIGH wind to blow me away...and I don't go outside in hurricanes!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Carotte on September 19, 2013, 10:54:49 AM
I'm hypothyroid - my theory is that my body temperature isn't quite high enough to trigger an infra-red sensor OR that a light sensor might have been knocked askew so it isn't registering my shadow properly.

Because it could not possibly be that I am not casting a shadow.....I accept the reality that I am more solid than I was thirty years ago - make that a larger & more solid person.  It's going to take a HIGH wind to blow me away...and I don't go outside in hurricanes!

A few years ago I had a subway trip where I started wondering if I was still alive and on the same time/space plan as the rest, every sensor door (either pressure or movement sensitive) were  snubbing me. A guy that was making the same 'route' started snickering (not in a bad, making fun of me way) after the third door refusing to open  ::).
I also have auto-flushing ones that don't cooperate but usually triggering it with my hand seems to do the trick. Put it in front of the sensor for 2 sec. and take it away, the light change should trigger it.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Jones on September 19, 2013, 11:05:52 AM
I first hear about foot-flushing about 3-4 years ago. Tried it, didn't care for it. Stalls too small, levers too high, I was too fat at the time. Most of the public toilets in the areas I frequent have the small, high-up knob, or an auto-flush, anyhow. I used to go to Houston regularly and all the toilets there seemed to have the lever sticking out, but they are uncommon in these parts. I will say I was surprised the first time I heard about it, it was a totally alien concept to me.

Rocky Mountain, USA area, here.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 19, 2013, 02:29:07 PM


I'm beginning to appreciate the auto-flushing toilets more and more.

Yeah, sometimes.

For some reason they don't always work right for me.  Sometimes they randomly flush while I'm still ... uh ... seated, which is startling and sometimes sprays water all over me.  Yet other times when I want them to flush (after I'm standing) they just sit there doing absolutely nothing.  Sometimes if I partially open the door they will flush, but it makes me nervous not knowing which way it's going to go!   :-\

If they don't flush there is usually a small button on the top or side to force it to flush
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: EllenS on September 19, 2013, 02:29:25 PM
My DD1 was terrified by auto-flush toilets while potty training, and she still does not like them.  If she's in a jumpy mood, she will refuse to use them until I cover the sensor with TP so that it doesn't accidentally flush while she's on there. 
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Peregrine on September 19, 2013, 07:03:16 PM
Hand flusher, west coast.  My mom actually taught me never to use my foot.  She felt it had the potential to damage public facilities....and in her words was acting "precious and prissy".  While I personally wouldn't describe someone that way for flushing with their foot....it is a little irritating to find foot prints, dirt, dried grass, and damp toilet paper stuck to the flush handle.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: squeakers on September 20, 2013, 01:46:23 PM
While browsing the internet to see how other forums have talked about this subject I came across a very pithy sentence: "It's called a flush HANDle and not a flush pedal."

For the people who flush with their foot: how do you get out of the stall? Do you grab a piece of toilet paper and slide the lock? And do you do that before or after you foot flush?

Because if you don't use some tp you are now touching where countless others have touched (and who knows how often a cleaner will think to wipe that knob down). And if you flush and then open the door... you are now covered in aerosol anyway.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: EllenS on September 20, 2013, 01:58:16 PM
For me, foot flushing was not a conscious choice as a result of any sort of chain of reasoning.  Like many others, it was simply what we were taught/shown to do and it never occured to us to do otherwise.

How many people actually spend time trying to make their bathroom habits perfectly logical? Or cooking habits, or the way you hold your fork or tie your shoes?  It's an ingrained habit from early childhood, and trying to do differently feels awkward and "wrong" for no logical reason.

Although I have to say, the levers I usually encounter are nowhere near the 36-42 inches cited elsewhere in this thread.  The ones in the bathroom at work are exactly knee-high to me.  (I just checked).  The "head in the toilet" feeling of trying to reach my hand back there is quite skeevy.

A lever 42 inches off the ground?  No way I could/would hike my foot up there.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: esposita on September 20, 2013, 03:40:00 PM
While browsing the internet to see how other forums have talked about this subject I came across a very pithy sentence: "It's called a flush HANDle and not a flush pedal."

For the people who flush with their foot: how do you get out of the stall? Do you grab a piece of toilet paper and slide the lock? And do you do that before or after you foot flush?

Because if you don't use some tp you are now touching where countless others have touched (and who knows how often a cleaner will think to wipe that knob down). And if you flush and then open the door... you are now covered in aerosol anyway.

I may be covered in aerosol anyway, but my face hasn't been in the spot where the aerosol exploded out of the toilet. Its a few feet away, where the concentration of spray is less.

I honestly could not care less about what gets on my hands in a normal toilet space because I'm about to wash my hands.

When I was younger, I leaned over a toilet to flush it in a public restroom that was a bit dirty and run down. As soon as I pressed the handle down, a drop splashed from the bowl up into my eye. It freaked me out and I just knew I was going to get an infection and go blind. I don't remember who introduced me to the idea of flushing with my foot, but once I learned that it was just what was done (she was surprised that I used my hand) by some, I never went back!
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: WillyNilly on September 20, 2013, 05:29:46 PM
While browsing the internet to see how other forums have talked about this subject I came across a very pithy sentence: "It's called a flush HANDle and not a flush pedal."

For the people who flush with their foot: how do you get out of the stall? Do you grab a piece of toilet paper and slide the lock? And do you do that before or after you foot flush?

Because if you don't use some tp you are now touching where countless others have touched (and who knows how often a cleaner will think to wipe that knob down). And if you flush and then open the door... you are now covered in aerosol anyway.

Wile yes touching the lock is touching an object countless have touched before, but not in likelihood with the bottom of their shoe.
I do sympathize with those who don't care for the foot flushing habit, but the reality it is a very widespread practice [when it comes to certain toilet designs] and not likely to go anywhere soon.

...Although I have to say, the levers I usually encounter are nowhere near the 36-42 inches cited elsewhere in this thread.  The ones in the bathroom at work are exactly knee-high to me.  (I just checked).  The "head in the toilet" feeling of trying to reach my hand back there is quite skeevy.

A lever 42 inches off the ground?  No way I could/would hike my foot up there.

I just measured the lever in my home bathroom, which I do flush by hand simply because its my home (and because I have a toilet seat lid, something most public restrooms do not have) and it is 19.5 inches from the floor. And to look at it, its no lower, in fact probably a bit higher, then most one would see out in public; Out in public they are often the same height as the toilet seat itself (which in my home, a standard toilet) is 16 inches high, my lever at home is a bit raised up the pipe.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: TootsNYC on September 20, 2013, 08:27:01 PM
I had a flushometer toilet in which the handle was actually just below the seat. But I've never seen that design anywhere else, sigh! (for non-handle reasons--it used an 8" rough-in and only stuck out into the room by something like 15". The handle & pipe were attached to the side.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: perpetua on September 21, 2013, 01:53:54 AM
While browsing the internet to see how other forums have talked about this subject I came across a very pithy sentence: "It's called a flush HANDle and not a flush pedal."

For the people who flush with their foot: how do you get out of the stall? Do you grab a piece of toilet paper and slide the lock? And do you do that before or after you foot flush?

Because if you don't use some tp you are now touching where countless others have touched (and who knows how often a cleaner will think to wipe that knob down). And if you flush and then open the door... you are now covered in aerosol anyway.

Wile yes touching the lock is touching an object countless have touched before, but not in likelihood with the bottom of their shoe.
I do sympathize with those who don't care for the foot flushing habit, but the reality it is a very widespread practice [when it comes to certain toilet designs] and not likely to go anywhere soon.

I think the point that squeakers was making - and something I've wondered about too - is if someone's flushed with the hand they used to wipe with and therefore got 'matter' on the handle (which presumably is why people flush with their foot in the first place, so they don't touch it?), then it's also going to be on the door handle and anything else the hand flusher has touched on the way out. So foot flushing seems rather pointless, since you're going to touch it on all these other surfaces anyway. Unless the foot-flusher also uses paper when they open the door, operate the taps, etc.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: WillyNilly on September 21, 2013, 02:34:41 PM
While browsing the internet to see how other forums have talked about this subject I came across a very pithy sentence: "It's called a flush HANDle and not a flush pedal."

For the people who flush with their foot: how do you get out of the stall? Do you grab a piece of toilet paper and slide the lock? And do you do that before or after you foot flush?

Because if you don't use some tp you are now touching where countless others have touched (and who knows how often a cleaner will think to wipe that knob down). And if you flush and then open the door... you are now covered in aerosol anyway.

Wile yes touching the lock is touching an object countless have touched before, but not in likelihood with the bottom of their shoe.
I do sympathize with those who don't care for the foot flushing habit, but the reality it is a very widespread practice [when it comes to certain toilet designs] and not likely to go anywhere soon.

I think the point that squeakers was making - and something I've wondered about too - is if someone's flushed with the hand they used to wipe with and therefore got 'matter' on the handle (which presumably is why people flush with their foot in the first place, so they don't touch it?), then it's also going to be on the door handle and anything else the hand flusher has touched on the way out. So foot flushing seems rather pointless, since you're going to touch it on all these other surfaces anyway. Unless the foot-flusher also uses paper when they open the door, operate the taps, etc.

Regarding the bolded - the thing is, I don't think that is the reason people flush with their foot. Maybe its the reason some people do it, but I don't think it can be said it is the reason everyone or even most foot flushers use their foot.

In this thread several foot flushers have chimed in with various reasons for using their foot:

So the hand germs on the handle/lock don't really for many foot flushers even come into play, or if they do, they are simply one reason of many not the primary reason.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Petticoats on September 23, 2013, 12:24:34 PM
I'm hypothyroid - my theory is that my body temperature isn't quite high enough to trigger an infra-red sensor OR that a light sensor might have been knocked askew so it isn't registering my shadow properly.

Because it could not possibly be that I am not casting a shadow.....I accept the reality that I am more solid than I was thirty years ago - make that a larger & more solid person.  It's going to take a HIGH wind to blow me away...and I don't go outside in hurricanes!

A few years ago I had a subway trip where I started wondering if I was still alive and on the same time/space plan as the rest, every sensor door (either pressure or movement sensitive) were  snubbing me. A guy that was making the same 'route' started snickering (not in a bad, making fun of me way) after the third door refusing to open  ::).
I also have auto-flushing ones that don't cooperate but usually triggering it with my hand seems to do the trick. Put it in front of the sensor for 2 sec. and take it away, the light change should trigger it.

I had a really similar experience at a conference this past summer. The hotel toilets, faucets, and soap dispensers were all on motion sensors, and most of the time they wouldn't respond to me. I started feeling as if I were Bruce Willis in The Sixth Sense.
Title: Re: Problems in the ladies' room
Post by: Ki on October 11, 2013, 05:59:30 AM
I was taught to foot-flush and to hover in public bathrooms but do neither anymore. I'm curious about the "face over the bowl" comments from foot-flushers, as I don't normally experience this.

Now that I hand-flush, I typically turn to the side as I stand and use the nearer hand (usually the right) to grasp the lever and flush on the way up. Sometimes I need to lean back a touch if the lever is especially low. I never really thought about it until now, but this way my back is to the toilet, not my face.