Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Time For a Coffee Break! => Topic started by: Slartibartfast on September 16, 2013, 07:41:28 PM

Title: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 16, 2013, 07:41:28 PM
I literally did a spit-take at today's Cakewrecks (http://www.cakewrecks.com/home/2013/9/16/run-to-the-dictionary-baby.html) - who orders a cake with "Ther'e Bach!"?  I may get grumpier about bad grammar and spelling than many folks, but it makes me twitchy  :P

And then driving home today, I came across a new Mexican place which has a ton of signs out front: "Best nacho's in town!  Best taco's here!  Open for lunch's and dinner's!"

*twitch twitch*

What are the most egregious violations you've come across?
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Shea on September 16, 2013, 07:46:18 PM
Yeah, apostrophe abuse gets to me big-time. Also, it annoys me when people confuse "faze" and "phase" (as in, "He noticed the cat was on fire, but it didn't phase him, he just dumped the champagne bottle on her and went on talking to the Prime Minister". It's faze).
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BigBadBetty on September 16, 2013, 07:47:41 PM
I literally did a spit-take at today's Cakewrecks (http://www.cakewrecks.com/home/2013/9/16/run-to-the-dictionary-baby.html) - who orders a cake with "Ther'e Bach!"?  I may get grumpier about bad grammar and spelling than many folks, but it makes me twitchy  :P

And then driving home today, I came across a new Mexican place which has a ton of signs out front: "Best nacho's in town!  Best taco's here!  Open for lunch's and dinner's!"

*twitch twitch*

What are the most egregious violations you've come across?

Check out Apostrophe Abuse: http://www.apostropheabuse.com/.

Apostrophe abuse is a pet peeve. The other thing is quotation marks in strange places.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: diesel_darlin on September 16, 2013, 07:59:27 PM
The Chinese place in my hometown has a buffert.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: veronaz on September 16, 2013, 08:03:23 PM
OP, you might want to correct the misspelling in your thread title.
Grammar (not grammer)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 16, 2013, 08:11:05 PM
Your grammar's not your grammer, it's your Grammar Rock!"

Slartibartfast, you got caught by McKean's Law.

And that's why, even though I'm a professional copyeditor, I don't make snarky remarks about other people's grammar or spelling.

I often make admiring remarks, when their end result if actually sort of clever (my favorite is "whoa is me!")
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: diesel_darlin on September 16, 2013, 08:12:03 PM
I think that's meant to be like that. Notice the three l's in spelling.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Julian on September 16, 2013, 08:12:56 PM
OP, you might want to correct the misspelling in your thread title.
Grammar (not grammer)

Isn't it a rule on the Internet that every post pointing out bad spelling or grammar must contain at least one spelling or grammar error?   ;D

Oops, beaten to it!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Layla Miller on September 16, 2013, 08:18:37 PM
I think that's meant to be like that. Notice the three l's in spelling.

That's what I thought, too.  Not just one, but two errors put in on purpose for irony.  :)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: CakeBeret on September 16, 2013, 08:19:09 PM
A new bar opened up that I pass every day to work, with a huge handpainted sign that says Alabis Lounge. I spent the first month wondering every.single.day whether they intentionally misspelled Alibis. They now have a banner on the lawn that says Alibis Lounge: Open for Business. Guess whoever painted the sign did it wrong. ::)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: veronaz on September 16, 2013, 08:20:26 PM
I think that's meant to be like that. Notice the three l's in spelling.

That's what I thought, too.  Not just one, but two errors put in on purpose for irony.  :)

Oh, sorry.  Didn't realize it might be intentional.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Shoo on September 16, 2013, 08:24:43 PM
Person 1:  Hi.  How are you?

Person 2:  Fine.  Yourself?

GAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 16, 2013, 08:33:07 PM
I think that's meant to be like that. Notice the three l's in spelling.

That's what I thought, too.  Not just one, but two errors put in on purpose for irony.  :)

Oh, sorry.  Didn't realize it might be intentional.

Intentional to draw in the people who twitch at the word "grammer"  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amylouky on September 16, 2013, 09:32:23 PM
We got a political questionnaire in the mail several years ago. This presumably went out to every household in the state. Across the front of the envelope, in HUGE font, were the words, "YOU'RE 2005 POLITICAL QUESTIONNAIRE IS ENCLOSED!"

Now, I'm not the type to point out every mistake that I see, because I am sure that I make a few of my own, but this was a statewide thing put together by a professional survey firm.

*le sigh*
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Erich L-ster on September 16, 2013, 09:46:38 PM
1- apostrophe abuse
2- The word "lose" is lost, replaced with "loose"
3-The word "anymore" doesn't mean what it used to mean anymore. It is being used to mean "nowadays"
4-"Anyway" has acquired an S at the end. Sometimes the S attaches itself to the end of "all" in some sad cases.
5-They're there their to too two your you're
6-would've should've could've HAVE not OF

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 16, 2013, 10:08:55 PM
Alot.

http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/04/alot-is-better-than-you-at-everything.html
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Judah on September 16, 2013, 10:09:39 PM
"Myself and Bob are going fishing."

Grrrrr.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: CharlieBraun on September 16, 2013, 10:14:18 PM
"I could care less."

Chalkboard!  Fingernails!  Screeeeccchhhhh!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Erich L-ster on September 16, 2013, 10:35:09 PM
"For all intensive purposes"

What do they think that means? Why are the purposes intensive? If this is you and you want to better yourself, it's "For all intents and purposes".

There's a good website with mangled expressions like this. I'm not sure if this is the one I'm thinking of but a search turned up several similar. There's even a name for this phenomenon: eggcorns.

http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 16, 2013, 10:44:38 PM
A couple more:

Diffuse/defuse. You do not want to diffuse a bomb, trust me on that one. ;)

Definately.

Congradulations.

Carmel instead of caramel.

Text speak. (replacing words with numbers, shortening words to single letters, etc.)

Capitalizing the first letter of every word, or every other letter. Especially irritating when you're trying to roleplay and one of the participants will not stop typing like that.

All of the sudden.

Recieve.

Use to be.

Shoe-in.

Adverse/averse.

Case and point.

Baited breath. (Fishy!)

...No, I don't twitch a lot. Why would you ever think that? :)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Erich L-ster on September 16, 2013, 11:04:04 PM
I used to be guilty of "definately". I still insist on cinnemon and margerine.......it's my grocery and I'll spell how I want to, spell how I want to (http://i.imgur.com/0HybyC1.gif)

I do correct it when my browser gives me the "hey dummy you misspelled this" red underline.

You can't always trust the computer though because there have been three or more words that it tells me are wrong but I know are right. I have even checked and the compu is wrong. I can't recall what they were now,
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Nikko-chan on September 16, 2013, 11:09:04 PM
Person 1:  Hi.  How are you?

Person 2:  Fine.  Yourself?

GAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I'm sorry Shoo, and I am a bad little grammar and spelling twitcher I suppose but... what exactly is wrong with that?
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cicero on September 16, 2013, 11:20:37 PM
It's instead of its.

I had to edit a report the other day - throughout the entire report they used <its'> instead of <its> ::) I guess they knew there was some issue with the apostrophe but didn't know what to do with iut..,
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on September 16, 2013, 11:26:20 PM
Person 1:  Hi.  How are you?

Person 2:  Fine.  Yourself?

GAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I'm sorry Shoo, and I am a bad little grammar and spelling twitcher I suppose but... what exactly is wrong with that?

It should be "you" instead of "yourself," because you wouldn't say "How are yourself?"
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Nikko-chan on September 16, 2013, 11:32:14 PM
Person 1:  Hi.  How are you?

Person 2:  Fine.  Yourself?

GAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I'm sorry Shoo, and I am a bad little grammar and spelling twitcher I suppose but... what exactly is wrong with that?

It should be "you" instead of "yourself," because you wouldn't say "How are yourself?"

*facepalm* So what is the punishment for not realizing that?
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Faerydust on September 16, 2013, 11:50:00 PM
Lots of grammar and spelling issues make me twitch, but I generally don't point them out because I know I'm not perfect. I have to admit that I giggled to myself when I went to pick up my graduation invitations on campus and there was a poster at the pick up desk written in marker that read "invatation pick up".

edit: I just KNEW I'd find a way to make a typo in this post ::)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 16, 2013, 11:50:33 PM
I didn't realize either at first, Nikko. Don't feel bad. :)

Tenderhooks instead of tenterhooks. Then again, I suppose I should just be glad anyone knows that word anymore? I haven't met anyone under the age of about 35 who's even heard it!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 16, 2013, 11:53:51 PM
It's instead of its.

I feel a certain amount of sympathy for the makers of this mistake. Very largely, the possessive in English is formed by " 's" on the end of a noun (cicero's pen; the cat's whiskers); but the possessive of "it" is not "it's", but "its"; though there is a word "its" -- the contraction of "it is".  English can be a confusing, crazy and crazy-making language, full of pitfalls -- even for native English-speakers !
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Nikko-chan on September 16, 2013, 11:57:06 PM
I didn't realize either at first, Nikko. Don't feel bad. :)

Tenderhooks instead of tenterhooks. Then again, I suppose I should just be glad anyone knows that word anymore? I haven't met anyone under the age of about 35 who's even heard it!

hey I can at least claim to know about tenterhooks! There is hope for me yet!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 17, 2013, 12:09:04 AM
Tenderhooks instead of tenterhooks. Then again, I suppose I should just be glad anyone knows that word anymore? I haven't met anyone under the age of about 35 who's even heard it!

I'm perhaps too ready to excuse those who butcher the language; but I've long known, and sometimes used, the expression "on tenterhooks" (anxiously waiting to see how something is going to work out), without having the faintest idea what a "tenterhook" was -- and I'm sure I wasn't the only one.  I feel that the word's lacking a literal significance for people, makes them more likely to mangle it.

Googling took me to The Free Dictionary: which says that the expression is "based on the literal meaning of "tenterhook" (a hook that holds cloth that is stretched to dry), suggesting that someone's emotions are tightly stretched like a piece of cloth held by tenterhooks."  This whole thing seems rather far-fetched to me; nonetheless, colloquial English clearly took "on tenterhooks" to its bosom, for quite a long while.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 17, 2013, 12:11:10 AM
hey I can at least claim to know about tenterhooks! There is hope for me yet!

Woohoo! \o/

I'm perhaps too ready to excuse those who butcher the language; but I've long known, and sometimes used, the expression "on tenterhooks" (anxiously waiting to see how something is going to work out), without having the faintest idea what a "tenterhook" was -- and I'm sure I wasn't the only one.  I feel that the word's lacking a literal significance for people, makes them more likely to mangle it.

Googling took me to The Free Dictionary: which says that the expression is "based on the literal meaning of "tenterhook" (a hook that holds cloth that is stretched to dry), suggesting that someone's emotions are tightly stretched like a piece of cloth held by tenterhooks."  This whole thing seems rather far-fetched to me; nonetheless, colloquial English clearly took "on tenterhooks" to its bosom, for quite a long while.

It does seem rather farfetched, doesn't it? I don't even remember where I picked it up...possibly a book, but like you, I didn't really know the meaning until I purposely went and looked it up. I just knew how to use it.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 17, 2013, 12:32:24 AM
Yeah, apostrophe abuse gets to me big-time. Also, it annoys me when people confuse "faze" and "phase" (as in, "He noticed the cat was on fire, but it didn't phase him, he just dumped the champagne bottle on her and went on talking to the Prime Minister". It's faze).

My paper (which is a major paper, not a local rag) got the phase/faze thing wrong in a story today. Obviously, too many editors have been laid off!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Sebastienne on September 17, 2013, 12:35:33 AM
There are so many. Apostrophe abuse, there/their/they're, its/it's, and you're/your top the list. Also:

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Paper Roses on September 17, 2013, 12:39:43 AM
In Miley Cyrus' new song - she says, "Don't you know it's we who own the night . . ." well, ok, I guess she gets points for being grammatically correct, but in the same song she says, "Don't take nothing from nobody." 

I just can't.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Paper Roses on September 17, 2013, 12:40:36 AM
Oh, and when I see "The person that . . ." or "Anyone that . . ."  I cringe. 
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Pen^2 on September 17, 2013, 02:13:16 AM
Double negatives: "I'm not doing nothing wrong!"
Not understanding plurals: "John and Fred is friends," which occurs unfortunately frequently in longer sentences. Or, the worst, "The data shows..." "The oxen is..." etc.
Mixing British and American spelling. Choose one and stick with it. it doesn't matter which. Just be consistent. You can't mix-and-match.

And homophones. Especially those with apostrophes. "It's" and "its", "who's" and "whose", "they're" and "their" or "there", and so on. They're not hard. You only have to learn one very simple rule for them and that's it. I teach five year old children how to do this and they manage fine.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MariaE on September 17, 2013, 02:24:47 AM
Could/Would/Should of - it's HAVE!!! It's bad enough when spoken, but when written it's like nails on a chalkboard to me.

Text-speak online - or the new "I'm typing from a smsrtphone amd.Can't ve bothered.to go back amd fix mistakes"-speak. I can cope with it on facebook, but on message boards it grates on me.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Teenyweeny on September 17, 2013, 03:02:32 AM
Discreet/ discrete.

I see that one a lot.

"Mary's incontinent, but she's very discrete about it."

Really? She pees in quantized units?

I think you mean discreet = circumspect, unobstrusive.

Definitely not discrete = comes in individual units. For example, the number of people in your household is a discrete variable. You can't have 5.25 people in your house. If you do, then spelling is the least of your problems.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on September 17, 2013, 03:04:41 AM
I flinch at the one I see here: Diety. No. Deity. From deus.

Diety means 'like a diet' and I vote against it being a real word.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Teenyweeny on September 17, 2013, 03:07:01 AM
I flinch at the one I see here: Diety. No. Deity. From deus.

Diety means 'like a diet' and I vote against it being a real word.

Haha, me too!

"I before E, except after C, and only when the sound is 'ee'." Too many people were not taught the bolded part of that rhyme!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: poundcake on September 17, 2013, 05:14:11 AM
Using "myself" incorrectly. I see it a lot when people are trying to write more persuasively or sound formal. "My kids and myself were at a restaurant...." "The server asked my spouse and myself to...." No! "My kids and I," "my spouse and me"!

http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/myself?page=all

I also despise another formal/persuasive writing tick: "being that." "Being that it was almost dinner time, my husband and myself went to a restaurant." No! "It was almost dinner time, so my husband and I went to a restaurant." "Being that" is meaningless and grammatically incorrect filler, and actually weakens your sentence.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on September 17, 2013, 07:01:36 AM
'So fun'.

What ever happened to 'much'? 

Also, 'on tenterhooks' doesn't sound that far-fetched to me.  When I was a child we had a stretcher that we'd set up in the back yard to dry curtains or sheets.  The fabric was held  in place by tenterhooks and it was very tight indeed.  The idea was to stretch the fabric so tight that no ironing was needed. 
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: scotcat60 on September 17, 2013, 07:10:23 AM
 A charity shop near my home organises the books for sale by category. This is fine, but the shelves are labelled "Love storys" "Autobiographys".

This week, they had a "chest with draw" for sale in the window. It looked like a chest of drawers to me.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: 123sandy on September 17, 2013, 07:11:32 AM
"Walla!" Drives me up the wall... ;)

"Off of" a recipe I got off of a website.

Should of, would of, could of.

Spellcheck changing my British spelling to US spelling. Grrrrrrr!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: scotcat60 on September 17, 2013, 07:15:28 AM
"Ryvita. For ladies that lunch"

It is for ladies who lunch.

Tneterhooks is not far fetched, they are hooks on a tenter frame, used for stretching woollen cloth after it is woven.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Tini on September 17, 2013, 07:23:38 AM
'He gave it to my husband and I' instead of 'my husband and me'

That one feels like people over-correcting the old grammar maven's favourite 'you and me are going to the cinema' where the 'me' as the subject should really be 'I'. Doesn't meant that all 'and mes' have to be replaced by 'and Is'.
I mean, you would never say 'he gave it to I', would you.

No, I'm calm, I'm a leaf on the wind. *deep breath*
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Queen of Clubs on September 17, 2013, 07:56:41 AM
And when someone attempts to turn "my husband and I" into a possessive by adding "apostrophe s", so it becomes "my husband and I's".  No.  Please.

For where and there, I wonder if it'd help people if they remember that "where" and "there" both contain "here".

One that I was caught out by was "just deserts".  I thought it should have been "desserts" but it's actually a very old form of "to deserve".
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: o_gal on September 17, 2013, 08:12:17 AM
I flinch at the one I see here: Diety. No. Deity. From deus.

Diety means 'like a diet' and I vote against it being a real word.

Haha, me too!

"I before E, except after C, and only when the sound is 'ee'." Too many people were not taught the bolded part of that rhyme!

One of my favorite t-shirts that Computergear.com has had for sale is:

"I before E, except after C"
           Weird, huh?
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MrTango on September 17, 2013, 08:14:42 AM
There are two big ones that really grind my gears:

Misuse of apostrophes: If one isn't 100% certain that an apostrophe belongs there, leave it out.  It's far less jarring to have to mentally add it than to see it there when it doesn't belong.

Homophone misuse: Using "there" when one means "their" or "they're," or "you're" when they mean "your."  There are myriad other examples.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 17, 2013, 08:24:08 AM
"I could care less."

Chalkboard!  Fingernails!  Screeeeccchhhhh!

I think this makes a certain amount of sense, if you consider it a shortening of the phrase "as if I could care less".

The one that's chalkboard to me, perhaps because it's close enough to correct to be jarring, is "free reign". No, the term is "free rein," as in what you give a horse when you allow him to move at will, without restricting him by use of the reins. When you give someone free rein, you give him/her liberty; you don't pass over the power of kingly control, or reign.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on September 17, 2013, 08:47:10 AM
As used in NYC, 'I could care less' can make perfect sense if the proper body language is used. 

The shoulders are raised.  The elbows are against the body and the hands are extended palms up. 

The words are said with a rising tone at the end. 

Try it and you'll see what I mean. 

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BabyMama on September 17, 2013, 09:01:26 AM
100s. Sneak peak. Per say.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BabyMama on September 17, 2013, 09:04:11 AM
Yeah, apostrophe abuse gets to me big-time. Also, it annoys me when people confuse "faze" and "phase" (as in, "He noticed the cat was on fire, but it didn't phase him, he just dumped the champagne bottle on her and went on talking to the Prime Minister". It's faze).

My paper (which is a major paper, not a local rag) got the phase/faze thing wrong in a story today. Obviously, too many editors have been laid off!

My local paper decided replacing the "G" in "Grapefruit" with a slice of grapefruit was a good idea.

http://weknowmemes.com/2013/03/rapefruit/
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: 123sandy on September 17, 2013, 09:08:56 AM
I could care less annoys me.

Any mention of nom, noms or nomming makes my hand itch to slap.

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amylouky on September 17, 2013, 09:23:37 AM
It's instead of its.

I feel a certain amount of sympathy for the makers of this mistake. Very largely, the possessive in English is formed by " 's" on the end of a noun (cicero's pen; the cat's whiskers); but the possessive of "it" is not "it's", but "its"; though there is a word "its" -- the contraction of "it is".  English can be a confusing, crazy and crazy-making language, full of pitfalls -- even for native English-speakers !

Okay, sorry.. I haven't had my coffee yet. The contraction of "it is" is "its"?
Dear me, have I been making people twitchy all these years?
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Shoo on September 17, 2013, 09:26:00 AM
It's instead of its.

I feel a certain amount of sympathy for the makers of this mistake. Very largely, the possessive in English is formed by " 's" on the end of a noun (cicero's pen; the cat's whiskers); but the possessive of "it" is not "it's", but "its"; though there is a word "its" -- the contraction of "it is".  English can be a confusing, crazy and crazy-making language, full of pitfalls -- even for native English-speakers !

Okay, sorry.. I haven't had my coffee yet. The contraction of "it is" is "its"?
Dear me, have I been making people twitchy all these years?

No, the contraction for "it is" is it's.  I think the poster just forgot the apostrophe.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: mharbourgirl on September 17, 2013, 09:49:24 AM
All of the above, yes.  And this one that's been bugging the ever-lovin' crap out of me lately:

brakes vs. breaks

The glass breaks when you drop it on the floor.

Vehicles and other sorts of moving things have brakes - cars have brakes, bikes/trains/planes/machines have brakes.

There is no reasonable excuse for mixing the two up.  In my opinion, of course.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 17, 2013, 10:01:44 AM
ITA with every example given so far.

Some of mine: I have to say that "nom," in any form, makes me homicidal.
Sale vs. sell. You don't "sale" a house, you sell a house.
Putting $ after the number. Saying "ten dollars" does not mean you write 10$.
Payed instead of paid. You can say you payed out a rope, but you paid, not payed, a bill.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 17, 2013, 10:09:09 AM
Another one I've been seeing recently, that makes me fear for the educational system, since it should have been learned in grade school: "payed" as the past tense of "to pay".

I know it's an anomaly that we write it "paid," but English is full of anomalies. I'm not sure if the spread of "payed" is due to lack of education, or represents the brain's automatic grammar function doing an override of what the writer knows is the correct spelling. "No! We pluralize by putting an 'ed' after the verb. Blast you, hand, for trying this 'paid' nonsense!"
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cwm on September 17, 2013, 10:11:42 AM
Person 1:  Hi.  How are you?

Person 2:  Fine.  Yourself?

GAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I'm sorry Shoo, and I am a bad little grammar and spelling twitcher I suppose but... what exactly is wrong with that?

It should be "you" instead of "yourself," because you wouldn't say "How are yourself?"

See, I do this sometimes. But for me it's shortened for "I'm fine, and how are you doing yourself?"

I flinch at the one I see here: Diety. No. Deity. From deus.

Diety means 'like a diet' and I vote against it being a real word.

Haha, me too!

"I before E, except after C, and only when the sound is 'ee'." Too many people were not taught the bolded part of that rhyme!

One of my favorite t-shirts that Computergear.com has had for sale is:

"I before E, except after C"
           Weird, huh?

"I before E, except after C, or when sounding like A as in neighbor or weigh. Unless it's weird."  That's how I learned it.

I detest misuse of homophones. I also absolutely hate it when someone uses the word "whenever" at any time they mean to use the word "when" instead.

"So I was going Joe's house whenever the car accident hapened." Really? That's the only time you went to Joe's? I thought he was your boyfriend and you went over there a lot more often.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Another Sarah on September 17, 2013, 10:14:27 AM
All the above as well as the difference between 'affect' and 'effect'

You affect something and it has an effect.
Effect is only a verb when you effect a change, and that's because its a /complicated tense/ version of bringing something into effect.

Also people correcting the figurative use of 'literally'. Literally can be used figuratively, just like any other word. People objecting to that are taking the sentence too literally :P
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on September 17, 2013, 10:22:55 AM
Lightning versus lightening. Lightening is the act of making something brighter or paler. Lightning is zappy electricity from the sky. If somebody is "struck by lightening", I don't expect him to be hurt.   :P
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: dqduck on September 17, 2013, 10:30:23 AM
When 'lay' is used instead of 'lie'. Eg: 'I'm going to go lay down.'

It's supposed to be 'lie down'.

It annoys me more when I see it on TV. Leonard even used it on the Big Bang Theory. You'd think that the characters being such pedantic nerds, would know the difference!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: missanpan on September 17, 2013, 10:33:14 AM
"He/she/they did a complete 360."   :P


Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on September 17, 2013, 10:37:48 AM
When 'lay' is used instead of 'lie'. Eg: 'I'm going to go lay down.'

It's supposed to be 'lie down'.

It annoys me more when I see it on TV. Leonard even used it on the Big Bang Theory. You'd think that the characters being such pedantic nerds, would know the difference!

You lay down a new floor.  You lie down for a nap. 

I do not like the way my IPad 'corrects' my typing.  'Friends' automatically becomes  'Friend's' and
going back to fix it is a pain in the back of the lap. 
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 17, 2013, 10:53:45 AM
When 'lay' is used instead of 'lie'. Eg: 'I'm going to go lay down.'

It's supposed to be 'lie down'.

It annoys me more when I see it on TV. Leonard even used it on the Big Bang Theory. You'd think that the characters being such pedantic nerds, would know the difference!

Oh, yes. This is one that I've had to admit has passed beyond redemption. Even those who should know better, like newspapers, have gone with "lay" rather than "lie". Why, I'm not sure. It's no easier to spell or say, and the rule "lay takes an object, lie doesn't" is not a hard one to learn.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Pen^2 on September 17, 2013, 11:03:16 AM
People who confuse "i.e." and "e.g."

They are not the same thing. "E.g." means "For example," and should (obviously) precede an example. "I.e." means "That is," and is used to clarify something by being more specific.

At my first job teaching at a highschool, the head English teacher came to me one day and very kindly and patiently explained that I used "i.e." more than "e.g." He seemed to think that I should alternate so they're each used half of the time, and suggested I replace a lot of the "i.e."s with "e.g."s. I had to explain that they don't mean the same thing, so one cannot simply be used to replace another to balance their frequencies. He didn't believe me  >:(
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on September 17, 2013, 11:10:01 AM
'He gave it to my husband and I' instead of 'my husband and me'

That one feels like people over-correcting the old grammar maven's favourite 'you and me are going to the cinema' where the 'me' as the subject should really be 'I'. Doesn't meant that all 'and mes' have to be replaced by 'and Is'.
I mean, you would never say 'he gave it to I', would you.

No, I'm calm, I'm a leaf on the wind. *deep breath*

"Between you and I" is the most common occurance of this particular error that I've come across but yeah, "I" seems to get put in place of "me" when it is the object of a verb or preposition constantly.

The misuse of "myself" has become extremely rampant of late. "Myself" is reflexive. Only I can do (anything) to myself. No one else can. So....
Please email Carol or myself if you have any questions. - wrong.
Ugh - I see that in emails almost daily!

There are so many of these errors and I don't know if they have become more common or if we just see them more because of all the written communication we now do on the internet.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on September 17, 2013, 11:17:25 AM
I think part of the problem with "lay" & "lie" is the fact that "lay" is present tense for things, Please lay the pencil on the desk and past tense (of lie) for people, I lay down for a nap yesterday.

Here's a story of absolutely no importance about when I learned the correct grammar for lie/lay/lain/laid.
In eighth grade English, I needed to make 100 on the final in order to make an A in the class. Even a 99 wouldn't have done it so I had to make sure I didn't make a single mistake. And the only thing that was going to keep me from doing that was lie/lay/lain/laid which I just could not internalize. Well, I did it. I learned it and aced the final and got the A. And I haven't forgotten it since.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amylouky on September 17, 2013, 11:17:33 AM
It's instead of its.

I feel a certain amount of sympathy for the makers of this mistake. Very largely, the possessive in English is formed by " 's" on the end of a noun (cicero's pen; the cat's whiskers); but the possessive of "it" is not "it's", but "its"; though there is a word "its" -- the contraction of "it is".  English can be a confusing, crazy and crazy-making language, full of pitfalls -- even for native English-speakers !

Okay, sorry.. I haven't had my coffee yet. The contraction of "it is" is "its"?
Dear me, have I been making people twitchy all these years?

No, the contraction for "it is" is it's.  I think the poster just forgot the apostrophe.

Ah, okay. Good, I thought I'd been doing it wrong all these years.
So, then, should cabbageweevil have empathy, not sympathy?  ;)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: sunnygirl on September 17, 2013, 11:18:59 AM
Photo's. "Post your photo's here!" "Do you want to see my photo's?" Why? Why this desire to randomly shove an apostrophe before any S in sight?

Discretely instead of discreetly - they mean entirely different things. If you don't know what the difference is, you almost certainly mean discreetly. But I do get a tiny little moment of pleasure when someone used discrete/discretely correctly because it's one of my favourite words, when it's not being mistaken for discreet. I was watching a rerun of Frasier with subtitles on the other day, and the subtitles actually wrote discretely for discreetly. It's a rerun so it's not like a live show where the subtitles have to be written at speed and mistakes are fairly common (and understandable).
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Allyson on September 17, 2013, 11:19:29 AM
"Voluptuous" does not have an "m" in it! For some reason I know a lot of people who want to say/spell it "volumptuous."

Also it makes me twitch really hard when someone announces they are pregnant but doesn't know how to spell it.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: hobish on September 17, 2013, 11:21:00 AM

I wish all those people getting pregnate would stop breeding.

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Paper Roses on September 17, 2013, 11:24:13 AM
Whenever anyone starts a sentence with "Me and" or "Him and" or "Her and"  "Me and my sister went to the store . . ." 

Just UGH!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Hillia on September 17, 2013, 11:31:13 AM
Everything listed above, and add...per se.  It's per se.  Not persay.  Makes me nuts.

I worked in dog rescue for many years.  You would think people would know that it's a German (or Australian :-) ) shepherd, not shepard.  Dogs are sometimes skittish, not skiddish.  The female has a litter of puppies, not puppys.  After they're weaned, she'll need to be spayed, not spade, before she can be adopted.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 17, 2013, 11:34:30 AM
Dogs are sometimes skittish, not skiddish.

Dogs on linoleum floors can be very skiddish, actually.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: hobish on September 17, 2013, 11:37:03 AM
Everything listed above, and add...per se.  It's per se.  Not persay.  Makes me nuts.

I worked in dog rescue for many years.  You would think people would know that it's a German (or Australian :-) ) shepherd, not shepard.  Dogs are sometimes skittish, not skiddish.  The female has a litter of puppies, not puppys.  After they're weaned, she'll need to be spayed, not spade, before she can be adopted.

I have heard "spaded" as well. The dog was spaded after she had puppies. Ouchy.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amylouky on September 17, 2013, 11:38:12 AM
Oh, forgot my favorite one.. "Viola!"

No. A viola is a musical instrument. The word you are looking for is voila (and yes, the a should be accented, I just don't know how to make that on my keyboard).

Under absolutely no circumstances, ever, should it be "Walla!"
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on September 17, 2013, 11:40:46 AM
Voilà!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 17, 2013, 11:41:24 AM
I don't know, I love to imagine someone responding to "Viola!" with "Cello!"
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amylouky on September 17, 2013, 11:41:59 AM
Voilà!

Showoff.  ;)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on September 17, 2013, 11:42:29 AM
 >:D
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: sunnygirl on September 17, 2013, 11:51:24 AM
  • Oogle instead of ogle. Oogle isn't a word.
I think it should be a word, though. It has a great sound.

Not exactly a grammar/spelling error but I hate "blippable", which comes from a brand name and means a certain kind of interactive marketing. Just because I think "blippable" sounds adorable and should mean something much nicer than it does.

I hate it when people insist that only British or American spelling/grammar is correct and the other incorrect. They are both correct; they are just geographic variables!

Also when people use semicolons before conjunctions. Donna Tartt, who is otherwise one of my favourite writers, does this a lot.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 17, 2013, 12:00:37 PM
Lightning versus lightening. Lightening is the act of making something brighter or paler. Lightning is zappy electricity from the sky. If somebody is "struck by lightening", I don't expect him to be hurt.   :P

That's one of mine, too! I've seen it spelled "lightening" in professional publications. Grrr.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 17, 2013, 12:01:53 PM

I wish all those people getting pregnate would stop breeding.

Ha!  :D
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 17, 2013, 12:04:29 PM
Reading comments on news stories can be entertaining or enraging, depending on your mood. I saw a funny one this week: kilt. As in, killed.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: menley on September 17, 2013, 12:17:31 PM
Oh, forgot my favorite one.. "Viola!"

No. A viola is a musical instrument. The word you are looking for is voila (and yes, the a should be accented, I just don't know how to make that on my keyboard).

Under absolutely no circumstances, ever, should it be "Walla!"

This one KILLS me. I see it on dozens of blogs.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: kelly_jeanie on September 17, 2013, 12:24:16 PM
I often see this when people are selling clothing -

Stripped instead of striped
Piled instead of pilled

Abbreviations I've seen that don't seem like much of a time saver, and are just plain wrong -

Hossy instead of hospital
Ressie instead of reservation

I'd make commentary but I fear I'd fall in violation of Muphry's Law (if I haven't already!).
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Onyx_TKD on September 17, 2013, 12:28:39 PM
Definately.
...
Capitalizing the first letter of every word, or every other letter. Especially irritating when you're trying to roleplay and one of the participants will not stop typing like that.

"Definately" as a typo for "definitely" doesn't bother me nearly as much as when people use "defiantly" instead. My brain can skip over "definately" as an obvious typo, but "defiantly" really throws me off since it's an actual word that could be grammatically correct (although nonsensical) in many of the sentences where it's misused. Even after I've concluded that it was supposed to be "definitely," my brain still can't help trying to interpret it as written. Same problem with "discrete" for "discreet," "diffuse"/"defuse," etc.

Also, I hate it when people use non-standard forms of emphasis for no good reason. We have plenty of good tools for emphasizing words. On computers, we have italics, boldface, and underlining to emphasize or call attention to text. If only plain text is available, various substitutes have become common, such as bracketing the word in *asterisks*, surrounding it with _underscores_ to evoke underlining, or the (sparing) use of ALL CAPS. So why do people with all of these options available instead choose to emphasize their text with Random Non-Standard Capitalization, replacing spaces with periods between every.word.in.the.emphasized.phrase*, etc.?

*I have no problem with the (sparing) stylistic use of sentence fragments. That. Is. Different. One is taking artistic license with the rules, the other is simply ignoring the rules willy-nilly.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cwm on September 17, 2013, 12:53:03 PM
I have to preface this one. I love my friend, I really do. She's got horrible dyslexia, and knows this.

Her dad's been in the hospital, and she's keeping everyone up to date on facebook. Where she posts about his cretin levels. Creatinine doesn't even sound like cretin where we live, two syllables difference. And I did reply to her first post asking what his actual creatinine levels were at, which she answered. She just couldn't get it into her head that his cretin levels were not the right thing to be saying.

Another one I hate: whilst. Yes, it is a valid word. Yes, it does mean the same thing as 'while'. Yes, some people do use it regularly. But to go through and Find/Replace every instance of the word 'while' in something and put in 'whilst' is just so wrong it's not funny.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: barkingmad on September 17, 2013, 01:18:14 PM
Cretin levels, so wrong and yet so right!  That could explain this gem, from a community page on Facebook:
Quote
A while back I posted about if anyone home school's would like to do a play date I had several response's but only hooked up with one , those who had interest or are interested comment here thanks

 
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on September 17, 2013, 01:26:50 PM
I live in the P E R M I A N   Basin area in Texas, where half the businesses, walkathons, charities and what have ya are named Permian somesuch

10 times a year I see P E R M A I N   

My eyes bug out and my hair stands on end...     
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: twiggy on September 17, 2013, 01:39:22 PM
From the discussion a few pages ago, lay vs. lie. I learned this little poem:

When I lie down in my bed, the pillow's where I lay my head
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 17, 2013, 02:32:10 PM
We got a political questionnaire in the mail several years ago. This presumably went out to every household in the state. Across the front of the envelope, in HUGE font, were the words, "YOU'RE 2005 POLITICAL QUESTIONNAIRE IS ENCLOSED!"

Now, I'm not the type to point out every mistake that I see, because I am sure that I make a few of my own, but this was a statewide thing put together by a professional survey firm.

*le sigh*

This is a case of hypercorrectness.

The most common mistake is to use "your" when people mean "you're."

So whoever did this remembered only that " 'your' is wrong," and they reflexively used "you're."

People do the same thing when they stick "whom" into places it doesn't belong.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 17, 2013, 02:37:29 PM
Oh, forgot my favorite one.. "Viola!"

No. A viola is a musical instrument. The word you are looking for is voila (and yes, the a should be accented, I just don't know how to make that on my keyboard).

Under absolutely no circumstances, ever, should it be "Walla!"

At my publication, we've had a rash of backward accents; people using the "regular" accent mark (the acute accent) when it should be the other one (the grave accent--pronounced "grahv")

The grave accent is normally located on the key to the left of the 1. é is on the lowercase e.
I'm using an iPad w/ a Bluetooth keyboard, and here it's on the ] key at the far right, but it needs the Function AND the Option keys to activate properly.

I did an email to the staff, and included a screen shot of the key--I think that's the biggest reason people were sending it through wrong--they don't know how to make it.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 17, 2013, 02:38:29 PM
I flinch at the one I see here: Diety. No. Deity. From deus.

Diety means 'like a diet' and I vote against it being a real word.

Haha, me too!

"I before E, except after C, and only when the sound is 'ee'." Too many people were not taught the bolded part of that rhyme!

One of my favorite t-shirts that Computergear.com has had for sale is:

"I before E, except after C"
           Weird, huh?

I heard "I before E, except after C, or when sounded as A as in neighbor or weigh."

and of course there are lots of words that don't fit the rules.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: SamiHami on September 17, 2013, 02:43:15 PM
This thread has piqued my interest.

We used to having a peeping Tom that peeked in my window.

Jupiter Coyote is a great band, but the peaked years ago.

And, I do apologize for getting sort of off topic here, but I used to work with a man named Demain. Now, I understood when people would request Damien. It's close. But why on earth did someone come in the office looking for Diamontay? How did we get from Demain to Diamontay? People just don't pay attention.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Editeer on September 17, 2013, 03:29:30 PM

"So I was going Joe's house whenever the car accident hapened." Really? That's the only time you went to Joe's? I thought he was your boyfriend and you went over there a lot more often.


Whenever a car accident happened, there she was, on her way to Joe's again!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 17, 2013, 03:38:56 PM
It's instead of its.

I feel a certain amount of sympathy for the makers of this mistake. Very largely, the possessive in English is formed by " 's" on the end of a noun (cicero's pen; the cat's whiskers); but the possessive of "it" is not "it's", but "its"; though there is a word "its" -- the contraction of "it is".  English can be a confusing, crazy and crazy-making language, full of pitfalls -- even for native English-speakers !

Okay, sorry.. I haven't had my coffee yet. The contraction of "it is" is "its"?
Dear me, have I been making people twitchy all these years?

No, the contraction for "it is" is it's.  I think the poster just forgot the apostrophe.

Yes, I did, sorry -- posting very early in the morning ! -- wrecked what I think is basically a valid point. I have come across a number of intelligent, educated adults, who nevertheless mixed up "its" and "it's" -- I can see how people do this, and I hesitate to pour scorn on them for it.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on September 17, 2013, 03:54:32 PM
We got a political questionnaire in the mail several years ago. This presumably went out to every household in the state. Across the front of the envelope, in HUGE font, were the words, "YOU'RE 2005 POLITICAL QUESTIONNAIRE IS ENCLOSED!"

Now, I'm not the type to point out every mistake that I see, because I am sure that I make a few of my own, but this was a statewide thing put together by a professional survey firm.

*le sigh*

This is a case of hypercorrectness.

The most common mistake is to use "your" when people mean "you're."

So whoever did this remembered only that " 'your' is wrong," and they reflexively used "you're."

People do the same thing when they stick "whom" into places it doesn't belong.

Oh boy, "whom". I can understand using "who" instead of "whom" since most people just don't get the the idea that "whom" is just the version to use when it's the object instead of the subject. But it's much more annoying to see people using "whom" incorrectly. It always makes me think they are trying to look smart by using "whom".

Easiest way to remember it (for me) is to use "who" if you would use "he" and "whom" if you would use "him".
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 17, 2013, 03:56:58 PM
"Ryvita. For ladies that lunch"

It is for ladies who lunch.

Tneterhooks is not far fetched, they are hooks on a tenter frame, used for stretching woollen cloth after it is woven.
I'd assume that I, and Liliane, had just never encountered a tenterhook / tenter frame in real life, whereas scotcat60 and Thipu1 had.  I'd long felt that a literal tenterhook could mean a great variety of things (was always too lazy to look it up, till yesterday). The metaphor didn't suggest anything in particular to me, context-wise.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Hillia on September 17, 2013, 03:59:42 PM
We got a political questionnaire in the mail several years ago. This presumably went out to every household in the state. Across the front of the envelope, in HUGE font, were the words, "YOU'RE 2005 POLITICAL QUESTIONNAIRE IS ENCLOSED!"

Now, I'm not the type to point out every mistake that I see, because I am sure that I make a few of my own, but this was a statewide thing put together by a professional survey firm.

*le sigh*

This is a case of hypercorrectness.

The most common mistake is to use "your" when people mean "you're."

So whoever did this remembered only that " 'your' is wrong," and they reflexively used "you're."

People do the same thing when they stick "whom" into places it doesn't belong.

Oh boy, "whom". I can understand using "who" instead of "whom" since most people just don't get the the idea that "whom" is just the version to use when it's the object instead of the subject. But it's much more annoying to see people using "whom" incorrectly. It always makes me think they are trying to look smart by using "whom".

Easiest way to remember it (for me) is to use "who" if you would use "he" and "whom" if you would use "him".


Warning: The Oatmeal is very, very funny, but often uses naughty words/images. 
http://theoatmeal.com/comics/who_vs_whom (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/who_vs_whom)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Moonie on September 17, 2013, 04:24:35 PM
Adding "at" or "to" where it isn't needed. "Where are you at?"  No. It's "Where are you?"  "Where are you going to?"  No. It's "Where are you going?"

Apostrophes also. I have a friend who has her own business. On her business facebook page, she refers to her clients as "client's". Every single time. I gave up correcting her a while back. If she wants to look foolish, then fine.

"I seen". You SAW, not seen. Especially stabby when hearing someone saying it in a business setting. Extra stabby when the person saying it is a supervisor or department head.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: SheltieMom on September 17, 2013, 04:51:32 PM
Birthday's for Him, Birthday's for Her--above the greeting card displays at every store several years ago.

Exiting instead of exciting--I see this all the time, and it drives me nuts

Rein, reign, rain--Our church puts the words to songs on a screen. We used to sing a song about God's sovereignty, which obviously would use "reign", except they insisted on using "rain", as in "Send Your Rain", when we were not talking about the weather. When this was pointed out, the person doing the songs went back and checked, and found that the songwriter wrote the song that way. No matter which way they put it on the screen, someone complained. At one point, they had changed it so many times that it was spelled one way in some verses, and the other in other verses. We don't sing that song anymore. 
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on September 17, 2013, 04:53:44 PM
  • Oogle instead of ogle. Oogle isn't a word.
I think it should be a word, though. It has a great sound.

I've been known to use it as onomatopoeia for an "I feel queasy" noise. :P
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Lynn2000 on September 17, 2013, 05:03:38 PM
What a hilarious thread. ;D I work mostly with people whose first language isn't English, so they have a good reason for not getting things 100% right, but I find it quite interesting what people consistently get wrong.

Correct verb conjugations are tough. I see the right verb in the wrong tense a lot. Not really complex things, either, but present when they meant past or plural when they meant singular.

Prepositions are also difficult to use correctly. Some are straightforward and tangible--the cat is ON the box, the cat is IN the box--and others are kind of abstract and dependent on memorization more than definition--do you conduct research ON a subject or IN a subject or OF a subject or FOR a subject?

In Korean they don't have articles (a/an/the), so my Korean co-worker tends to simply leave them out. This drives me crazy when I proofread his stuff, because there are SO MANY of them. I told him to at least try to put them in, he ought to get some right just by chance if nothing else, and then I wouldn't have to mark them all.

I had one co-worker who kept capitalizing random words in a sentence. I don't know where that came from. Her native language was Spanish, not German, where I understand they capitalize a lot of nouns, but I don't think they do that in Spanish.

Word connotations are really interesting. A lot of people look up the word they want in a native language-to-English dictionary, but you can miss a lot of nuances that way. One co-worker wrote a protocol in which he repeatedly used the word "grab," as in "grab the ethanol" and "grab the beaker" and "grab the hot plate." He meant "get" or "obtain" or "go over to" or "use" or various other things. My boss freaked out and made him rewrite it. It does sound rather informal. But, she also had visions of people "grabbing" like parents grabbing for the last Tickle Me Elmo at the toy store on Christmas Eve--violently and without care. Because apparently we're all morons who would take the instructions literally. ::)

My Spanish-speaking co-worker once sent me an email asking me to help her "redact" her report. That immediately brought of images of the military blacking out sensitive information before they release documents, so I was like, wah? I actually looked up the word and some dictionaries list it as a synonym for "edit," which was what she was really going for, as in "proofread." Connotations...
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 17, 2013, 05:05:20 PM
Saw someone who was complaining online about all the drug attics in the alley behind her office  ::) ::) ::)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 17, 2013, 05:31:35 PM
Saw someone who was complaining online about all the drug attics in the alley behind her office  ::) ::) ::)

Maybe they just have lofty standards. ;D

Fuschia is another one I see misspelled a lot that makes me facepalm. "Fushia" - no. "Fuchia" - no, and that sounds vaguely obscene. "Fucshia" - that's even more vaguely obscene! "Foosha" - ...no. Just no. :P
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Erich L-ster on September 17, 2013, 05:45:33 PM




Fuschia is another one I see misspelled a lot that makes me facepalm. "Fushia" - no. "Fuchia" - no, and that sounds vaguely obscene. "Fucshia" - that's even more vaguely obscene! "Foosha" - ...no. Just no. :P


psst...it's "fuchsia"
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 17, 2013, 06:00:23 PM




Fuschia is another one I see misspelled a lot that makes me facepalm. "Fushia" - no. "Fuchia" - no, and that sounds vaguely obscene. "Fucshia" - that's even more vaguely obscene! "Foosha" - ...no. Just no. :P


psst...it's "fuchsia"

And that's what I get for being half-asleep and not proofreading. :-[ *slinks off to the corner of mild shame*
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: hobish on September 17, 2013, 06:18:22 PM
  • Oogle instead of ogle. Oogle isn't a word.
I think it should be a word, though. It has a great sound.

I've been known to use it as onomatopoeia for an "I feel queasy" noise. :P

I like it. How would that go in a sentence? "My stomach is oogly"?
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 17, 2013, 06:21:50 PM
Saw someone who was complaining online about all the drug attics in the alley behind her office  ::) ::) ::)

Maybe they just have lofty standards. ;D

Fuschia is another one I see misspelled a lot that makes me facepalm. "Fushia" - no. "Fuchia" - no, and that sounds vaguely obscene. "Fucshia" - that's even more vaguely obscene! "Foosha" - ...no. Just no. :P

Here's how I remember that--the plant is named after a German botanist.

Leonhard Fuchs.

So it is Fuchs-ia. 


As for random capitalization of words--I've known native English speakers who capitalize words simply because they seem important to them.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on September 17, 2013, 06:35:26 PM
  • Oogle instead of ogle. Oogle isn't a word.
I think it should be a word, though. It has a great sound.

I've been known to use it as onomatopoeia for an "I feel queasy" noise. :P

I like it. How would that go in a sentence? "My stomach is oogly"?

"How are you feeling?"
"Oogle.  :-["

Or yes, "I'm feeling pretty oogly at the moment." It has the advantage of also sounding like 'ugly'. :P
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: hobish on September 17, 2013, 06:36:31 PM
Saw someone who was complaining online about all the drug attics in the alley behind her office  ::) ::) ::)

Maybe they just have lofty standards. ;D

Fuschia is another one I see misspelled a lot that makes me facepalm. "Fushia" - no. "Fuchia" - no, and that sounds vaguely obscene. "Fucshia" - that's even more vaguely obscene! "Foosha" - ...no. Just no. :P

Here's how I remember that--the plant is named after a German botanist.

Leonhard Fuchs.

So it is Fuchs-ia. 


As for random capitalization of words--I've known native English speakers who capitalize words simply because they seem important to them.

People do that at my Job constantly. I try to pretend I am reading German, where every Noun is capitalized. Since I work in mortgage, Condo, Co-op, Lease, Proprietary Lease ... all these get capitalized. I try not to let it get to me. We did have an entry level temp who used no caps, except at the beginning of a sentence - not in street names, cities, names, etc. She said, "That's just how I type." She had to go. Every time we get a new batch I remind them that "The" is not the way to file things. The easiest way to make me twitch (LOL, I even use that phrase) is to file something as, say, The Windsor, as opposed to Windsor, The. It kills me.

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: hobish on September 17, 2013, 06:37:22 PM
  • Oogle instead of ogle. Oogle isn't a word.
I think it should be a word, though. It has a great sound.

I've been known to use it as onomatopoeia for an "I feel queasy" noise. :P

I like it. How would that go in a sentence? "My stomach is oogly"?

"How are you feeling?"
"Oogle.  :-["

Or yes, "I'm feeling pretty oogly at the moment." It has the advantage of also sounding like 'ugly'. :P

I am definitely stealing it.  ;D
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Julia Mercer on September 17, 2013, 07:09:19 PM
Discreet/ discrete.

I see that one a lot.

"Mary's incontinent, but she's very discrete about it."

Really? She pees in quantized units?

I think you mean discreet = circumspect, unobstrusive.

Definitely not discrete = comes in individual units. For example, the number of people in your household is a discrete variable. You can't have 5.25 people in your house. If you do, then spelling is the least of your problems.

OK, I must be tired, but this one gave me a bad case of the giggles, DH and the cats are looking at me like I grew another head!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Dazi on September 17, 2013, 07:43:44 PM
Add me to the list of "intensive purposes". 

My #1  ??? is ax/axed for ask/asked...so what did they do to you to deserve being axed?  :P
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 17, 2013, 07:45:58 PM
Add me to the list of "intensive purposes". 

My #1  ??? is ax/axed for ask/asked...so what did they do to you to deserve being axed?  :P

"Axed" is only appropriate if you've buried the hatchet. ;D
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 17, 2013, 08:36:05 PM
'He gave it to my husband and I' instead of 'my husband and me'

That one feels like people over-correcting the old grammar maven's favourite 'you and me are going to the cinema' where the 'me' as the subject should really be 'I'. Doesn't meant that all 'and mes' have to be replaced by 'and Is'.
I mean, you would never say 'he gave it to I', would you.

No, I'm calm, I'm a leaf on the wind. *deep breath*
DH insisted that Sister Mary Godzilla taught him that it was always "Somebody and I," in all cases.  ::)  I dropped the Chicago Manual of Style in his lap, thoughtfully bookmarked at the right place, and let him argue with THEM.

One of my own that I haven't seen covered yet: gots.  "Johnny gots a new puppy!"

Also "I seen" and "drownded."
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 17, 2013, 08:39:39 PM
And when someone attempts to turn "my husband and I" into a possessive by adding "apostrophe s", so it becomes "my husband and I's".  No.  Please.
As in "My husband and I's new car"?  I agree, especially when there's that perfectly good word "our."
Quote
For where and there, I wonder if it'd help people if they remember that "where" and "there" both contain "here".
ACK!  Probably not.  They'd switch over to "whear" and "thear".
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 17, 2013, 08:46:23 PM
The misuse of "myself" has become extremely rampant of late. "Myself" is reflexive. Only I can do (anything) to myself. No one else can. So....
Please email Carol or myself if you have any questions. - wrong.
Ugh - I see that in emails almost daily!
I think that one goes back to the I/me question.  Should I write "email Carol or I"?  Or should it be "Carol or me"?  Because neither of them look right now.  I know!  I'll write "Carol or myself" instead of either one.  ;D
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 17, 2013, 08:49:16 PM
Another one:

Expresso.

Really? ::)

(This reminds me of an amusing anecdote from sixth grade though. My teacher tried to insist that the x in supercalifragilisticexpialidocious was, in fact, an s. Even when confronted with proof, she refused to believe it was not an s...)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Paper Roses on September 17, 2013, 09:34:21 PM
I was going to ask if we were including pronunciations!  So since you brought it up . . .

"nuke-yoo-lar" . . . no.  You do not sound smarter or more important because you say it that way.  Quite the opposite, actually.

"calvary" when they mean "cavalry."  No, they are not interchangeable. 

"in lieu of" means "instead."  It is not a synonym for "in view of," even though it sounds similar.  You were not unable to get to work in lieu of the snowstorm, but you might have been unable to in view of it.

It is not chi-pol-tay. 

The s at the end of "Illinois" is silent.  And so is the one at the end of "debris." 
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: daen on September 17, 2013, 09:41:23 PM
Regarding the use of myself/yourself/himself...
I was taught a rule of thumb that you may use the *self pronoun if you've used another version of that pronoun in the same sentence. It ends up limiting the use of actions that pronoun has done to pronounself, or uses the self form as an intensifier.
"He did it himself."
"You yourself know that this is true."

The intensifier usually ends up sounding overly formal, like the writer/speaker is trying too hard to sound important.

How about the misuse of quotation marks? It's similar to apostrophe misuse.
I've seen this sign in a thrift store:
"More"
"Fixtures"
in
"The Back."
"Thank You."

I don't know whether or laugh or cry when I see it.

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Paper Roses on September 17, 2013, 09:47:18 PM
YES!!  Whenever my MIL give anyone a greeting card, she always put on the inside the name of the person it was addressed to, and then the year, both in quotes.  Then she'd sign it putting "Love" and her name in quotes.  So it was like:

"Dave"              "1989"

Happy birthday, blah blah blah, dumb typcal card language, blah.

"Love"

"Ma"
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on September 17, 2013, 09:49:07 PM
I flinch at the one I see here: Diety. No. Deity. From deus.

Diety means 'like a diet' and I vote against it being a real word.

Haha, me too!

"I before E, except after C, and only when the sound is 'ee'." Too many people were not taught the bolded part of that rhyme!

I learned it "..or when sounded as A as in neighbor and weigh".  I think because it rhymed, it was easier to remember.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on September 17, 2013, 09:59:12 PM
"Conversating" on the corner and "axing" someone a question during it - people, using the wrong word does not make you sound SMARTER and more edumucated (yeah, they used that one, too) because you are using long words on the court show on TV). 

If anything, I was wishing Judge Judy would tell them to spend the money that they got from the "dependent" on grammar lessons from Kelsey Grammer.  Or someone who has a vocabulary larger than a third grader's.  (A TV game show reference got worked in - just for fun.)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: zyrs on September 17, 2013, 11:45:34 PM
The one thing that sets my teeth on edge seems to be making a comeback.

Casted rather than cast.  I was raised that you cast a play, a fishing line, or a spell.  Recently though I have seen the word casted used in sentences pertaining to doing those things and read articles talking about how casted is becoming popular again.  It still makes me cringe.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Teenyweeny on September 18, 2013, 03:40:26 AM
I think that people use "please ask Jane or myself" instead of "please ask Jane or me" because they think that the addition of -self softens the request.

You'll often see the use of the "Jane or myself" phrasing in emails that are unnecessesarily wordy, and I think it's because people fear being perceived as terse, because tone is so easy to misjudge in an email.

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Another Sarah on September 18, 2013, 04:39:31 AM
Just thought of two more
Unless you are a transformer, it's our car not are car.

and so many people these days are replacing comic (as in funny) with comedic (as in of the nature or pertaining to humour, most commonly used as a theatrical term)
When you see a film, sometimes it may have elements pertaining to comedy, but usually it just has funny bits.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: perpetua on September 18, 2013, 04:41:37 AM
"Then" instead of "than" - they're completely different words and I really don't understand how people mix them up. As in, "my house is bigger then your house". Then your house what?
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Teenyweeny on September 18, 2013, 04:58:34 AM
Something that I've seen on Facebook:

Where I grew up, a lot of people pronounce the pronoun 'I', as 'A' (as in apple). Fine, that's an accent thing.

I CANNOT deal with people actually writing it that way! It's not any fewer letters (how could it be?), and it makes you look illiterate!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: crella on September 18, 2013, 05:29:07 AM
I love this thread! All my 'favorites' are here  :D 'definately', 'wallah', 'per say'.

One I have been seeing a lot of lately is 'bare' instead of 'bear', as in 'bare with me'. No, thank you, I'll pass!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: 123sandy on September 18, 2013, 05:44:38 AM
Let's not forget good old there, their and they're!

I like to watch Judge Judy and so many people mix up borrow and lend I actually began to wonder if I was wrong. (She/he borrowed me $500)

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 18, 2013, 05:50:20 AM
YES!!  Whenever my MIL give anyone a greeting card, she always put on the inside the name of the person it was addressed to, and then the year, both in quotes.  Then she'd sign it putting "Love" and her name in quotes.  So it was like:

"Dave"              "1989"

Happy birthday, blah blah blah, dumb typcal card language, blah.

"Love"

"Ma"

Quotation-marks-round everything, as here and in daen's example: I seem generally to be getting into a role of defending bad practices -- but I can see where the misusers are coming from, here.  Especially when they're among the less adept of writers of the language.

Lynne Truss in "Eats, Shoots & Leaves" (in which she's usually merciless toward any incorrect punctuation) seems to feel the same way, and cuts "quotes-round-everything" folk a little bit of slack, while emphasising that this habit of theirs is incorrect.   She cites the small boy who was taken to task for quotation-marking all his written composition work, regardless of whether it was reporting any speech.  When asked why, the lad rather disarmingly replied: "Because it's all me talking".
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: EmmaJ. on September 18, 2013, 08:26:57 AM
<snip>
In Korean they don't have articles (a/an/the), so my Korean co-worker tends to simply leave them out. This drives me crazy when I proofread his stuff, because there are SO MANY of them. I told him to at least try to put them in, he ought to get some right just by chance if nothing else, and then I wouldn't have to mark them all.

Thanks!  You just explained why my teammate says "what heck" instead of "what the heck".  :D
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lilfox on September 18, 2013, 08:41:10 AM
The item is composed of X, Y, and Z.
The item comprises X, Y, and Z.

It is not "comprised of" anything.  I suppose that comprise is the rarer word, so its use seems to sound more educated, but adding "of" takes all that away.

Mostly what bugs me now is that autocorrect just changed its above to it's, so I had to manually correct it.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on September 18, 2013, 08:52:47 AM
When people who should know better misinterpret an innocent remark.

I remember attending a lecture about an ancient text.  The speaker referred to a certain turn of phrase as a 'literary conceit'.  Immediately, a high school teacher in attendance jumped up and snarled, 'How dare you call (the author) conceited!?'

A teacher of high school English should know what a literary conceit is. 
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Corvid on September 18, 2013, 08:56:04 AM
I try to be tolerant of grammar and spelling errors, especially as I'm sure I unwittingly make numerous errors of my own. 

I understand that people are often writing in their own English dialect, so I cut nonstandard English like "I seen" some slack.  Spelling is more of an issue for me, but I also understand that someone can be familiar with a spoken word or phrase but not have read it anywhere, for example, "per say".

That said, there are some errors that never fail to make me wince a bit.  A few have been mentioned - phase for faze, loose for lose.  Especially loose for lose.  Oh, I hate that one so much.  Come on, people.  They don't even sound the same.  "Loos".  "Looz".  Please stop it.  You aren't trying to loose weight.  Or if you are, quit that and tighten it again.

One I haven't seen mentioned yet is "deep seeded".  It is "deep-seated".  No, I am not kidding and yes, I am correct.

Ah, what is as refreshing as pedantry with one's morning coffee?
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: daen on September 18, 2013, 09:00:33 AM
I processed a form a while ago that required disclosure of past driving record. One of the self-reported incidents was "I backed into a parked car wow clearing snow in the parking lot."

I knew the person in question, and I was aware that his pronunciation of "while" was remarkably close to "wow." I wasn't aware that his spelling reflected that pronunciation so closely. (It was handwritten, so no autocorrect or typo to blame.)

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Lynn2000 on September 18, 2013, 09:11:49 AM
<snip>
In Korean they don't have articles (a/an/the), so my Korean co-worker tends to simply leave them out. This drives me crazy when I proofread his stuff, because there are SO MANY of them. I told him to at least try to put them in, he ought to get some right just by chance if nothing else, and then I wouldn't have to mark them all.

Thanks!  You just explained why my teammate says "what heck" instead of "what the heck".  :D

LOL! I was just trying to think if my co-worker said things like that, and I realized I wasn't sure, because to me the lack of articles is MUCH more noticeable in writing than in speaking. Same with verb conjugations and other errors.

Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Xandraea on September 18, 2013, 11:00:18 AM
All of the above!
I see a lot of mixing up of they're/their/there, your/you're, where/wear/ware, bear/bare, are/our, who's/whose in written chat in WoW.  It makes me cringe, and pity those who seem to have forgotten school for video games.

Also these drive me nuts: expresso, exspecially, Ima (I'm going to), axe (ask), learned (taught), borrow (lend), and abbreviating 3-letter words to one letter, as in "U R"
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on September 18, 2013, 11:46:56 AM

Fuschia is another one I see misspelled a lot that makes me facepalm. "Fushia" - no. "Fuchia" - no, and that sounds vaguely obscene. "Fucshia" - that's even more vaguely obscene! "Foosha" - ...no. Just no. :P
psst...it's "fuchsia"



And that's what I get for being half-asleep and not proofreading. :-[ *slinks off to the corner of mild shame*
I remember that one by remembering it's named after Herr Fuchs. (true story (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuchsia).)

It also works for Mr. Poinsett's plant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poinsettia).
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 18, 2013, 12:01:45 PM
Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.

I have a friend (British, of the English variety) whose wife of thirty years is Indian, from Gujarat.  She's a very sweet lady; but, it would seem, not a natural linguist; after decades of living in the UK and speaking English most of the time, her English can still be a bit "wobbly"; including, having problems with he / she. (One takes it that Gujarati, like Korean, does not have gendered pronouns.)

One is prompted to wonder: do Asian languages, which seem as regards word-use (pronunciation, a different thing) usually to go the "simple" route, maybe have the best idea?  Why tie oneself in linguistic knots about gender stuff, when such things can be worked out from the context?  That applies to relatively-simple English; let alone to such tongues as the Romance languages, and German and Russian, which -- it would seem -- gratuitously choose to make life difficult by assigning different genders to inanimate objects.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Miss Misery on September 18, 2013, 12:30:49 PM
Whenever I see "Your Welcome", a little part of me shrivels up and dies.

*or*

seaing writting lyk this that iz on long sentance with no puncuati0n at all everthing is sm@shed togeter and spelchk dosent exst how do u read this i dont now wear it beginz or endz i meen dont they teech this st#ff in skool anymor iz speling reelly that hard geez

*or*

Writing like this.No spaces between periods or commas.At all. Nothing,zero,zip,nada.It drives me bonkers.Like,really bonkers.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on September 18, 2013, 12:32:29 PM
Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.

I have a friend (British, of the English variety) whose wife of thirty years is Indian, from Gujarat.  She's a very sweet lady; but, it would seem, not a natural linguist; after decades of living in the UK and speaking English most of the time, her English can still be a bit "wobbly"; including, having problems with he / she. (One takes it that Gujarati, like Korean, does not have gendered pronouns.)

One is prompted to wonder: do Asian languages, which seem as regards word-use (pronunciation, a different thing) usually to go the "simple" route, maybe have the best idea?  Why tie oneself in linguistic knots about gender stuff, when such things can be worked out from the context?  That applies to relatively-simple English; let alone to such tongues as the Romance languages, and German and Russian, which -- it would seem -- gratuitously choose to make life difficult by assigning different genders to inanimate objects.

ASL is sort of the same way. I love watching Stephen Torrence (aka CaptainValor) do ASL versions of songs (mostly geek songs, but he also does some pop music). If you use the captions, it provides the gloss - the literal transcription of the ASL.

So in Jonathan Coulton's "Re: Your Brains" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQYjZc7gKXc) you can see that "We're not unreasonable/ I mean, no one's gonna eat your eyes" comes out as "We not crazy/ Not eyes eat."

a) It's funny.
b) It's like the most distilled form of language there is. No verb conjugations, no noun declensions.

Edited because "pop" music is not always "popo" music.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: NestHolder on September 18, 2013, 12:33:53 PM
I would like to state, firmly, that nobody EVER HOLDS TH—excuse me.  Nobody 'holds the reigns'.  I exclaim in joy whenever I see someone has actually typed 'reins'.  It is so rare these days.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Lynn2000 on September 18, 2013, 12:56:40 PM
Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.

I have a friend (British, of the English variety) whose wife of thirty years is Indian, from Gujarat.  She's a very sweet lady; but, it would seem, not a natural linguist; after decades of living in the UK and speaking English most of the time, her English can still be a bit "wobbly"; including, having problems with he / she. (One takes it that Gujarati, like Korean, does not have gendered pronouns.)

One is prompted to wonder: do Asian languages, which seem as regards word-use (pronunciation, a different thing) usually to go the "simple" route, maybe have the best idea?  Why tie oneself in linguistic knots about gender stuff, when such things can be worked out from the context?  That applies to relatively-simple English; let alone to such tongues as the Romance languages, and German and Russian, which -- it would seem -- gratuitously choose to make life difficult by assigning different genders to inanimate objects.

Well, not to get too far off on the linguistic tangent, but IMO most languages that develop organically over centuries/millennia reach about the same level of complexity overall, if not in one area then another. So maybe Korean doesn't have gendered pronouns, but I believe they do have a rather complicated (to me) system of address based on hierarchy and relationship, with different words and constructions used depending on if they're talking to someone older or younger, supervisory or supervised, etc.. Personally I think that would be very difficult to get correct as a non-native speaker--a mistake could be seen as rude, not just poor communication.

When I studied French in high school I had such trouble with the gendered objects. You really just have to memorize them as they often make no logical sense. I find that when a language lacks an entire concept, it's a lot more difficult to teach it to someone than if it's just a matter of different vocabulary words, or simple rules about whether the adjective goes before or after the noun. Personally I find languages and language change fascinating, and understanding how mistakes come about helps me to explain the correct way to someone. I think "should of" instead of "should have" is really interesting, for example--it appears to be related to people hearing the contraction (should've) far more often than they see or write it. Because really, it does sound like "should of," at least in my part of the world.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: menley on September 18, 2013, 01:19:24 PM
Hungarian doesn't have a separate word for he and she, so many of my Hungarian friends seem to have trouble remembering which is which when speaking English. I can't tell you how many times someone has said "she" about my husband :) I remind myself that I butcher their language in far more severe ways on a daily basis though, so I can't get too annoyed by it!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: pandabear on September 18, 2013, 01:23:20 PM

 I haven't read the entire thread yet, but one of my biggest pet peeves is using cause or cos instead of because.  It's not that difficult a word to spell!

 mixing up advice and advise is another.  And the last... misspelling ridiculous.  There is no e.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 18, 2013, 01:40:54 PM
Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.

I have a friend (British, of the English variety) whose wife of thirty years is Indian, from Gujarat.  She's a very sweet lady; but, it would seem, not a natural linguist; after decades of living in the UK and speaking English most of the time, her English can still be a bit "wobbly"; including, having problems with he / she. (One takes it that Gujarati, like Korean, does not have gendered pronouns.)

One is prompted to wonder: do Asian languages, which seem as regards word-use (pronunciation, a different thing) usually to go the "simple" route, maybe have the best idea?  Why tie oneself in linguistic knots about gender stuff, when such things can be worked out from the context?  That applies to relatively-simple English; let alone to such tongues as the Romance languages, and German and Russian, which -- it would seem -- gratuitously choose to make life difficult by assigning different genders to inanimate objects.

ASL is sort of the same way. I love watching Stephen Torrence (aka CaptainValor) do ASL versions of songs (mostly geek songs, but he also does some pop music). If you use the captions, it provides the gloss - the literal transcription of the ASL.

So in Jonathan Coulton's "Re: Your Brains" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQYjZc7gKXc) you can see that "We're not unreasonable/ I mean, no one's gonna eat your eyes" comes out as "We not crazy/ Not eyes eat."

a) It's funny.
b) It's like the most distilled form of language there is. No verb conjugations, no noun declensions.

Edited because "pop" music is not always "popo" music.

Sign language seems to have a lot going for it. Thoughts prompted, of  an "apocalyptic" novel series which I enjoyed for a while, which features a "tough and fierce" survivor group, one of whose founders was a resilient and competent bod who was deaf and dumb, and needed to converse in ASL; and another founder was a besotted Tolkien-nut. To belong to the group, one had to be fluent in both ASL, and Elvish.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 18, 2013, 01:51:00 PM
Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.

I have a friend (British, of the English variety) whose wife of thirty years is Indian, from Gujarat.  She's a very sweet lady; but, it would seem, not a natural linguist; after decades of living in the UK and speaking English most of the time, her English can still be a bit "wobbly"; including, having problems with he / she. (One takes it that Gujarati, like Korean, does not have gendered pronouns.)

One is prompted to wonder: do Asian languages, which seem as regards word-use (pronunciation, a different thing) usually to go the "simple" route, maybe have the best idea?  Why tie oneself in linguistic knots about gender stuff, when such things can be worked out from the context?  That applies to relatively-simple English; let alone to such tongues as the Romance languages, and German and Russian, which -- it would seem -- gratuitously choose to make life difficult by assigning different genders to inanimate objects.

Well, not to get too far off on the linguistic tangent, but IMO most languages that develop organically over centuries/millennia reach about the same level of complexity overall, if not in one area then another. So maybe Korean doesn't have gendered pronouns, but I believe they do have a rather complicated (to me) system of address based on hierarchy and relationship, with different words and constructions used depending on if they're talking to someone older or younger, supervisory or supervised, etc.. Personally I think that would be very difficult to get correct as a non-native speaker--a mistake could be seen as rude, not just poor communication.

Sure -- "upsides and downsides", "you win some, you lose some".  Feel basically, that forbearance toward non-native-speakers, is the proper way to go -- for anyone, anywhere.  So long as they're trying; and not yelling "To heck with your baboon-jargon, you ought to perfectly speak and understand my language, which is the only language worth calling a language !"
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cwm on September 18, 2013, 01:53:47 PM

 I haven't read the entire thread yet, but one of my biggest pet peeves is using cause or cos instead of because.  It's not that difficult a word to spell!

 mixing up advice and advise is another.  And the last... misspelling ridiculous.  There is no e.

If I do the first, it's definitely shortened with an apostrophe. Why? No reason, just 'cause. That also distinguishes it from the actual word cause. Cos (or usually coz) is how I occasionally refer to a cousin.

Posted 'cause I'd hate to cause someone's cos any distress.

(Sorry, I couldn't help it.)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 18, 2013, 01:57:23 PM
Hungarian doesn't have a separate word for he and she, so many of my Hungarian friends seem to have trouble remembering which is which when speaking English. I can't tell you how many times someone has said "she" about my husband :) I remind myself that I butcher their language in far more severe ways on a daily basis though, so I can't get too annoyed by it!

If it's any consolation -- in the far west of England, people tend to be fairly sloppy about "he" and "she" -- they know the difference in principle, they just can't be bothered.  Thus: "Where be Ted ?"  Answer: " 'er be down at the 'arbour."
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: DollyPond on September 18, 2013, 07:30:39 PM
On the Web site Failbook (http://failblog.cheezburger.com/failbook (http://failblog.cheezburger.com/failbook)) about a month ago there was a tweet supposedly from John Cleese (but I looked at his Twitter site and did not see it) that said essentially:

College entrance exam should be: use your, you're, there, their, there, (+ a few others) in sentences.  if you cannot do this, you need to go back to 4th grade.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 18, 2013, 07:38:08 PM
On the Web site Failbook (http://failblog.cheezburger.com/failbook (http://failblog.cheezburger.com/failbook)) about a month ago there was a tweet supposedly from John Cleese (but I looked at his Twitter site and did not see it) that said essentially:

College entrance exam should be: use your, you're, there, their, there, (+ a few others) in sentences.  if you cannot do this, you need to go back to 4th grade.

There was a fake "captcha" image going around Tumblr or Facebook a while back - it had the choices "there", "their", "they're", and an example sentence that asked the hypothetical user to pick the proper word to go into the sentence. At the bottom, it said something akin to "No one would ever be able to use the internet again."

Honestly, I kind of agree.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ereine on September 18, 2013, 10:44:12 PM
Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.

I have a friend (British, of the English variety) whose wife of thirty years is Indian, from Gujarat.  She's a very sweet lady; but, it would seem, not a natural linguist; after decades of living in the UK and speaking English most of the time, her English can still be a bit "wobbly"; including, having problems with he / she. (One takes it that Gujarati, like Korean, does not have gendered pronouns.)

One is prompted to wonder: do Asian languages, which seem as regards word-use (pronunciation, a different thing) usually to go the "simple" route, maybe have the best idea?  Why tie oneself in linguistic knots about gender stuff, when such things can be worked out from the context?  That applies to relatively-simple English; let alone to such tongues as the Romance languages, and German and Russian, which -- it would seem -- gratuitously choose to make life difficult by assigning different genders to inanimate objects.

Well, not to get too far off on the linguistic tangent, but IMO most languages that develop organically over centuries/millennia reach about the same level of complexity overall, if not in one area then another. So maybe Korean doesn't have gendered pronouns, but I believe they do have a rather complicated (to me) system of address based on hierarchy and relationship, with different words and constructions used depending on if they're talking to someone older or younger, supervisory or supervised, etc.. Personally I think that would be very difficult to get correct as a non-native speaker--a mistake could be seen as rude, not just poor communication.

Finnish doesn't have gendered pronouns (or nouns) or articles or but we do have 15 cases for nouns, and pronouns and adjectives are inflected as well. Verbs are conjugated for all persons and we can do confusing things with suffixes.

My English is far from perfect so I try not to judge others but copywrite for copyright really annoys me.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 18, 2013, 10:47:46 PM

Fuschia is another one I see misspelled a lot that makes me facepalm. "Fushia" - no. "Fuchia" - no, and that sounds vaguely obscene. "Fucshia" - that's even more vaguely obscene! "Foosha" - ...no. Just no. :P
psst...it's "fuchsia"



And that's what I get for being half-asleep and not proofreading. :-[ *slinks off to the corner of mild shame*
I remember that one by remembering it's named after Herr Fuchs. (true story (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuchsia).)

It also works for Mr. Poinsett's plant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poinsettia).

Unfortunately, it won't help us w/ plumeria!
Quote
Charles Plumier (20 April 1646 – 20 November 1704) was a French botanist, after whom the Frangipani genus Plumeria is named.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on September 18, 2013, 11:40:16 PM
I remember the spelling of "fuchsia" by remembering that the three consonants in the middle are in alphabetical order.

I dislike the use of "feel" to mean think, believe, or consider. My personal rule is that if you need more than one word to describe it, it's not a feeling.

Wrong: I feel the movie will be a hit.
Right: I think the movie will be a hit. Or: I feel confident (there's your one word) that the movie will be a hit.

I am a professional copy editor. I edit the work of professional writers. It is amazing how often they use the above. Not to mention "free reign." And "like" instead of "as," "as if" or "such as."

"The museum has works by famous artists like Rembrandt and Cezanne." If you mean the actual artists, and not some posers whose work is similar to Rembrandt's and Cezanne's, you need to say "such as," not "like."

I'll give them a pass if they're quoting Prince, though. I won't change "Party like it's 1999" to "Party as if it were 1999."  ;)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: perpetua on September 19, 2013, 01:23:58 AM
If it's any consolation -- in the far west of England, people tend to be fairly sloppy about "he" and "she" -- they know the difference in principle, they just can't be bothered.  Thus: "Where be Ted ?"  Answer: " 'er be down at the 'arbour."

Oh yes. Also, "Where's it to?" *is* proper English in that part of the world and shall be respected as such  ;D. My south east friends look at me askance for using it but it's so much a part of my vernacular that I can't shake it. And neither do I want to :)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on September 19, 2013, 02:46:50 AM
On the Web site Failbook (http://failblog.cheezburger.com/failbook (http://failblog.cheezburger.com/failbook)) about a month ago there was a tweet supposedly from John Cleese (but I looked at his Twitter site and did not see it) that said essentially:

College entrance exam should be: use your, you're, there, their, there, (+ a few others) in sentences.  if you cannot do this, you need to go back to 4th grade.

Given that John Cleese is English and we don't call our school years "first, second etc grade", I'd doubt it was him.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 19, 2013, 03:22:25 AM
If it's any consolation -- in the far west of England, people tend to be fairly sloppy about "he" and "she" -- they know the difference in principle, they just can't be bothered.  Thus: "Where be Ted ?"  Answer: " 'er be down at the 'arbour."

Oh yes. Also, "Where's it to?" *is* proper English in that part of the world and shall be respected as such  ;D. My south east friends look at me askance for using it but it's so much a part of my vernacular that I can't shake it. And neither do I want to :)

The beloved West Country song:

Where be that blackybird to?
Us knows where 'e be:
'E be up that wurzel-tree,
Us be after 'e !
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 19, 2013, 10:14:39 AM
If it's any consolation -- in the far west of England, people tend to be fairly sloppy about "he" and "she" -- they know the difference in principle, they just can't be bothered.  Thus: "Where be Ted ?"  Answer: " 'er be down at the 'arbour."

Oh yes. Also, "Where's it to?" *is* proper English in that part of the world and shall be respected as such  ;D . My south east friends look at me askance for using it but it's so much a part of my vernacular that I can't shake it. And neither do I want to :)

The beloved West Country song:

Where be that blackybird to?
Us knows where 'e be:
'E be up that wurzel-tree,
Us be after 'e !
Careful, you don't want our copy-editors to expire in convulsions! :D

The one I got when my first manuscript was published must have been stuck in Extremely Formal mode.  S/He tried to change all the character dialog to proper English. If a character says, "Me and him did thus-and-such," it's because the character didn't know any better, not because *I* don't!   It really stuck out with the few bits that were in dialect. (I don't do a lot of dialect, since I feel that too much makes it hard to read.)

Me: "Well, it's still jes' her word, bein' that he's dead an' cain't speak for hisself."
Copy-editor: "Well, it's only her word, since he's dead and cannot speak for himself."

(http://www3.telus.net/smile/images/bangdesk.gif)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on September 19, 2013, 10:46:39 AM
Oh, there are so many that make me twitchy!  Right now, it's "go/goes" used in place of "say/says".

"He goes "I want to see a movie" and then I go "Well, I don't".  AAAAARRRRRGGGGGHHHHH!!!!!!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 19, 2013, 10:49:49 AM
Oh, there are so many that make me twitchy!  Right now, it's "go/goes" used in place of "say/says".

"He goes "I want to see a movie" and then I go "Well, I don't".  AAAAARRRRRGGGGGHHHHH!!!!!!

In a recent interview we published, the person kept saying things like "and so he's like, 'blahdeblah.' "  I realized that "is like" has become a substitute for "say/said"
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Another Sarah on September 19, 2013, 10:52:47 AM
past/passed
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: mharbourgirl on September 19, 2013, 11:03:03 AM
Oh yes. Also, "Where's it to?" *is* proper English in that part of the world and shall be respected as such  ;D. My south east friends look at me askance for using it but it's so much a part of my vernacular that I can't shake it. And neither do I want to :)

It's also proper 'English' if you're from the Lunenburg region of Nova Scotia, or from Newfoundland -  'Hey dude, where ya to?'.  Meaning 'Where are you/where did you get yourself to?'.  I just about swallowed my gum the first time a friend hollered that at her kid who had gotten himself out of her line of sight.  Moving to the Maritimes exposed me to a wide variety of dialects and vernacular I'd never imagined existed.  It's been fun, though. :)
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amylouky on September 19, 2013, 11:23:37 AM
Careful, you don't want our copy-editors to expire in convulsions! :D

The one I got when my first manuscript was published must have been stuck in Extremely Formal mode.  S/He tried to change all the character dialog to proper English. If a character says, "Me and him did thus-and-such," it's because the character didn't know any better, not because *I* don't!   It really stuck out with the few bits that were in dialect. (I don't do a lot of dialect, since I feel that too much makes it hard to read.)

Me: "Well, it's still jes' her word, bein' that he's dead an' cain't speak for hisself."
Copy-editor: "Well, it's only her word, since he's dead and cannot speak for himself."

(http://www3.telus.net/smile/images/bangdesk.gif)

Wow.. that's just, awful. Hopefully that was a new copy editor.

I can't help but think how different some books would have been had they been edited that way. Gone with the Wind?   "Young ladies that overindulge at mealtime are not generally considered good marriage prospects" just doesn't have the same ring as "Young misses whut eats heavy mos’ gener’ly doan never ketch husbands".   ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on September 19, 2013, 03:54:13 PM
Careful, you don't want our copy-editors to expire in convulsions! :D

The one I got when my first manuscript was published must have been stuck in Extremely Formal mode.  S/He tried to change all the character dialog to proper English. If a character says, "Me and him did thus-and-such," it's because the character didn't know any better, not because *I* don't!   It really stuck out with the few bits that were in dialect. (I don't do a lot of dialect, since I feel that too much makes it hard to read.)

Me: "Well, it's still jes' her word, bein' that he's dead an' cain't speak for hisself."
Copy-editor: "Well, it's only her word, since he's dead and cannot speak for himself."

(http://www3.telus.net/smile/images/bangdesk.gif)

Wow.. that's just, awful. Hopefully that was a new copy editor.

I can't help but think how different some books would have been had they been edited that way. Gone with the Wind?   "Young ladies that overindulge at mealtime are not generally considered good marriage prospects" just doesn't have the same ring as "Young misses whut eats heavy mos’ gener’ly doan never ketch husbands".   ;D

Or think of whole stretches of passages where Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn, and "Jim" (or the King & the Duke) are talking in Mark Twain's books....he started the whole thing of writing in dialect - literature would have developed in a whole different way if he hadn't insisted in keeping the spelling & word choice consistent with his character's "voices".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Layla Miller on September 19, 2013, 04:28:34 PM
There's a haircut business in town called "Just Cuts and More."

Well, which is it?  Do you just do haircuts, or is there more?  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 19, 2013, 05:22:21 PM
There's a haircut business in town called "Just Cuts and More."

Well, which is it?  Do you just do haircuts, or is there more?  :P
No, no, no!  JUST cuts.  As opposed to unjust cuts, of course. 

"The rain it falls upon the just
And on the unjust fellow
But more upon the just, because
The unjust stole the just's umbrella."
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: hobish on September 19, 2013, 05:52:27 PM
I remember the spelling of "fuchsia" by remembering that the three consonants in the middle are in alphabetical order.

I dislike the use of "feel" to mean think, believe, or consider. My personal rule is that if you need more than one word to describe it, it's not a feeling.

Wrong: I feel the movie will be a hit.
Right: I think the movie will be a hit. Or: I feel confident (there's your one word) that the movie will be a hit.

I am a professional copy editor. I edit the work of professional writers. It is amazing how often they use the above. Not to mention "free reign." And "like" instead of "as," "as if" or "such as."

"The museum has works by famous artists like Rembrandt and Cezanne." If you mean the actual artists, and not some posers whose work is similar to Rembrandt's and Cezanne's, you need to say "such as," not "like."

I'll give them a pass if they're quoting Prince, though. I won't change "Party like it's 1999" to "Party as if it were 1999."  ;)

I've been noticing this at work a lot lately, and it makes me cringe. What's worse is we mainly deal with numbers. Don't tell me, "I feel like it should be..." It's math! It doesn't care how you feel! Grrrrr!

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on September 19, 2013, 06:46:28 PM
Careful, you don't want our copy-editors to expire in convulsions! :D

The one I got when my first manuscript was published must have been stuck in Extremely Formal mode.  S/He tried to change all the character dialog to proper English. If a character says, "Me and him did thus-and-such," it's because the character didn't know any better, not because *I* don't!   It really stuck out with the few bits that were in dialect. (I don't do a lot of dialect, since I feel that too much makes it hard to read.)

Me: "Well, it's still jes' her word, bein' that he's dead an' cain't speak for hisself."
Copy-editor: "Well, it's only her word, since he's dead and cannot speak for himself

(http://www3.telus.net/smile/images/bangdesk.gif)

Wow.. that's just, awful. Hopefully that was a new copy editor.

I can't help but think how different some books would have been had they been edited that way. Gone with the Wind?   "Young ladies that overindulge at mealtime are not generally considered good marriage prospects" just doesn't have the same ring as "Young misses whut eats heavy mos’ gener’ly doan never ketch husbands".   ;D

I would hate (or love) to see what would happen if that editor had to deal with Artemus Ward. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: EmmaJ. on September 19, 2013, 08:23:18 PM
My top three twitch-inducing errors:

1. Per say (should be per se)
2. Put through the ringer (should be put through the wringer)
3. Free reign (should be free rein)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 19, 2013, 08:40:04 PM
I don't get too bent out of shape about "per say."

The original phrase is Latin, and few people read it anywhere. They hear it.

And "per"  meaning "according to" fits with "say" in the meaning of "per se."


The true meaning of "per se" is "by, of, or in itself."

But let's look at a sentence:
Quote
This candidate is not a pacifist per se, but he is in favor of peaceful solutions when practicable.

Substitute "according to how that is normally said" in there:

"this candidate is not a pacifist according to how that term is normally said, but he is..."

Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: pandabear on September 19, 2013, 10:07:27 PM

 Heh. Meanie. :)

 I think the reason it irks me is that I don't understand why someone would type six characters for 'cause when adding the seventh makes the full word because.   <shrug>  To each his own.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: diesel_darlin on September 19, 2013, 11:22:16 PM
A friend of mine just sent a screen cap of a message where someone used thoughs for those. *twitch twitch *
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 19, 2013, 11:30:57 PM
Throws for throes.

If you're in the throws of ecstacy, I don't think that's quite healthy. :o
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: ti_ax on September 20, 2013, 06:29:23 AM
Strikes a cord with me ... you mean a chord.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on September 20, 2013, 07:51:07 AM
Yes! And people have vocal cords, not chords.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on September 20, 2013, 08:42:54 AM
yesterday my auto correct

I am about out of patients

No, no I know how to spell patience (stop helping me)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 20, 2013, 09:59:57 AM
ti_ax wrote: "Strikes a cord with me... you mean a chord."

Yes! And people have vocal cords, not chords.
Both / all can be seen as generally to do with "making a joyous noise" -- I cannot help feeling that we have a confusing language; and that some of the muddling-up of it which people do, is understandable.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 20, 2013, 10:08:09 AM
ti_ax wrote: "Strikes a cord with me... you mean a chord."

Yes! And people have vocal cords, not chords.
Both / all can be seen as generally to do with "making a joyous noise" -- I cannot help feeling that we have a confusing language; and that some of the muddling-up of it which people do, is understandable.

I agree!

And a lot of these homonyms (throws / throes) involve one incredibly uncommon word (use "throe" in a sentence that doesn't involve the cliché "in the throes of [strong emotion]." In a way, "throw" makes sense, because that's a vigorous action.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 20, 2013, 10:26:18 AM
Yes! And people have vocal cords, not chords.

This makes sense, if you've ever looked at throat anatomy (vocal cords are little stringy bits of tissue). But if you don't have that picture in your head, "chords" has a much more definite association with sound, so I can see why it's a common error.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 20, 2013, 11:22:55 AM
ti_ax wrote: "Strikes a cord with me... you mean a chord."

Yes! And people have vocal cords, not chords.
Both / all can be seen as generally to do with "making a joyous noise" -- I cannot help feeling that we have a confusing language; and that some of the muddling-up of it which people do, is understandable.

I agree!

And a lot of these homonyms (throws / throes) involve one incredibly uncommon word (use "throe" in a sentence that doesn't involve the cliché "in the throes of [strong emotion]." In a way, "throw" makes sense, because that's a vigorous action.

Thanks !  I remember receiving a letter, long ago, from an uncle of mine who had modest aspirations as a writer, and a rather expansive writing style -- wherein he put, "I am right now in the throes of literary composition -- and by the way, what on earth is a throe?"

Enthusiasts for the English language, often glory and triumph in English's huge vocabulary -- just occasionally I think, "hold on a minute -- there can sometimes be too much of a good thing."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 20, 2013, 11:26:29 AM
I have a membership to Merriam-Webster's Unabridged, and according to them, "throes" is always used in a plural sense.

It comes (through the Middle English, Old English, Old High German, and Old Norse), from the words for "threat," "pang," "longing," "trauma wound" and "distress"

First Known Use: 13th century (sense 1c)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 20, 2013, 11:37:51 AM
Best-and-commonest-known use to me: death-throes.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on September 20, 2013, 11:42:39 AM
Queue. And cue. And NOT, please not, que, which as far as I know isn't even a WORD in English.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 20, 2013, 12:00:13 PM
Whenever I see "Your Welcome", a little part of me shrivels up and dies.

*or*

seaing writting lyk this that iz on long sentance with no puncuati0n at all everthing is sm@shed togeter and spelchk dosent exst how do u read this i dont now wear it beginz or endz i meen dont they teech this st#ff in skool anymor iz speling reelly that hard geez

*or*

Writing like this.No spaces between periods or commas.At all. Nothing,zero,zip,nada.It drives me bonkers.Like,really bonkers.

Those drive me batty, too!
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 20, 2013, 12:04:28 PM
If it's any consolation -- in the far west of England, people tend to be fairly sloppy about "he" and "she" -- they know the difference in principle, they just can't be bothered.  Thus: "Where be Ted ?"  Answer: " 'er be down at the 'arbour."

Oh yes. Also, "Where's it to?" *is* proper English in that part of the world and shall be respected as such  ;D. My south east friends look at me askance for using it but it's so much a part of my vernacular that I can't shake it. And neither do I want to :)

The beloved West Country song:

Where be that blackybird to?
Us knows where 'e be:
'E be up that wurzel-tree,
Us be after 'e !

I may be a grammarian at heart, but I like ditties like that. Is there a source somewhere, online, that shows dialects for different parts of England? I have tons of English ancestors and have traced them to many parts of the country (Whitechapel in London, Yorkshire, etc.). It would be fascinating research.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 20, 2013, 12:08:19 PM
I admit, I cringe when people try to use sayings and mangle them horribly.

Recently I saw: doggy dog world and hire ups (higher ups).  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: ti_ax on September 20, 2013, 12:13:44 PM
I admit, I cringe when people try to use sayings and mangle them horribly.

Recently I saw: doggy dog world and hire ups (higher ups).  :P
I saw one just the other day in a forum discussion: someone said they might be willing to place an order with a company the crowd hadn't yet heard of ... they were "willing to be the Ginny-pig."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: daen on September 20, 2013, 12:26:21 PM

ti_ax wrote: "Strikes a cord with me... you mean a chord."

Yes! And people have vocal cords, not chords.
Both / all can be seen as generally to do with "making a joyous noise" -- I cannot help feeling that we have a confusing language; and that some of the muddling-up of it which people do, is understandable.

In the moments when I can't remember which form to use for "vocal cords" I default to "vocal folds" - it's a more precise description of the part, usually understood almost as easily, and has no pesky homophones to trip me up.

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Sirius on September 20, 2013, 12:30:13 PM
I once corrected a contract transcriptionist's use of "St. John's wart" instead of "St. John's wort", and she sent me a long, rambling message about how I was "too picky."  No, I just insisted that all medical terms, including drug/herb names, be spelled correctly. 

Listening to the way dictating doctors punctuate...oh, my.  I usually ignore what they say and punctuate correctly. 

These are sentences dictated recently:

"Medical renal disease of the right kidney which is a new finding from prior examination.  This may represent medical renal disease." 

"There are very subtle changes which may represent subtle changes of centrilobular emphysema.  These are extremely subtle, however."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: daen on September 20, 2013, 12:36:36 PM
I once corrected a contract transcriptionist's use of "St. John's wart" instead of "St. John's wort", and she sent me a long, rambling message about how I was "too picky."  No, I just insisted that all medical terms, including drug/herb names, be spelled correctly. 

Listening to the way dictating doctors punctuate...oh, my.  I usually ignore what they say and punctuate correctly. 

These are sentences dictated recently:

"Medical renal disease of the right kidney which is a new finding from prior examination.  This may represent medical renal disease." 

"There are very subtle changes which may represent subtle changes of centrilobular emphysema.  These are extremely subtle, however."

Paging Dr. Doctor of the Department of Redundancy Department.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cwm on September 20, 2013, 12:39:53 PM
Queue. And cue. And NOT, please not, que, which as far as I know isn't even a WORD in English.

I deal with this one at work. I've simply changed the word to Queue on the master roster (which I've somehow inherited as being in charge of), and any time someone asks me, I'll make sure to use the proper word in my response. It hurts me so much.
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 20, 2013, 01:06:43 PM
I may be a grammarian at heart, but I like ditties like that. Is there a source somewhere, online, that shows dialects for different parts of England? I have tons of English ancestors and have traced them to many parts of the country (Whitechapel in London, Yorkshire, etc.). It would be fascinating research.

Wish I knew of such -- unfortunately, I don't  -- only know random such stuff, heard of by chance in pre-Internet days. Hopefully more learned scholars than I, may be able to point you in the right direction.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on September 20, 2013, 03:00:33 PM
Although I don't correct my dad, some of the things he says drive me batty.  Example:

fillum - film
furnitures - he thinks it's the plural of furniture; can't convince him that furniture is both singular and plural like pants
deers - see above only with deer (he says he's right because he orders "three beers" so deers must be plural)

Sigh.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 20, 2013, 03:34:05 PM
Although I don't correct my dad, some of the things he says drive me batty.  Example:

fillum - film
furnitures - he thinks it's the plural of furniture; can't convince him that furniture is both singular and plural like pants
deers - see above only with deer (he says he's right because he orders "three beers" so deers must be plural)

Sigh.

I'm apparently assuming a role in this thread, of defending bad English-usage; but, our language is a crazily irrational and complicated and inconsistent one, as regards word-use.  You order "a beer", but  if ordering more than one, it's "x beers".  You kill one deer, but if you kill more than one, it's still "x deer".  The right locution has to be basically learnt, instance-by-instance -- is it any wonder that those who are not natural genius-wordsmiths -- even with English as their birth-speech -- sometimes muck it up?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 20, 2013, 03:38:49 PM
I feel the need to trot out this little piece of amusement from somewhere deep in the bowels of my email archive...

Eye halve a spelling chequer
It came with my pea sea
It plainly marques four my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

Eye strike a key and type a word
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh.

As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee fore two long
And eye can put the error rite
Its rare lea ever wrong.

Eye have run this poem threw it
I am shore your pleased two no
Its letter perfect awl the weigh
My chequer tolled me sew.


English really is a pain! ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: joraemi on September 20, 2013, 04:46:05 PM
The sticker on the gas pump at the corner - for *years* said, "please pre-pay in advance"

CRUD MONKEYS!

Thankfully, in the last 6 months or so, they have been replaced with new, grammatically correct stickers.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Corvid on September 20, 2013, 06:16:19 PM
Queue. And cue. And NOT, please not, que, which as far as I know isn't even a WORD in English.

Que?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amandaelizabeth on September 20, 2013, 06:49:48 PM
Not now Manuel.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on September 20, 2013, 07:24:52 PM
And Basil is in the ratatouille~! *sob*
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 21, 2013, 07:51:17 PM
Here's one I'm not entirely sure about, but I look at it and it just seems...off.

"The method in which you do (x)" - shouldn't it be "the method WITH which"? How can you be in a method? It's certainly not a place.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on September 21, 2013, 08:00:57 PM
Here's one I'm not entirely sure about, but I look at it and it just seems...off.

"The method in which you do (x)" - shouldn't it be "the method WITH which"? How can you be in a method? It's certainly not a place.

I think I'd use "the method BY which you do (x)", but definitely not 'in'!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 21, 2013, 08:02:14 PM
Here's one I'm not entirely sure about, but I look at it and it just seems...off.

"The method in which you do (x)" - shouldn't it be "the method WITH which"? How can you be in a method? It's certainly not a place.

I think I'd use "the method BY which you do (x)", but definitely not 'in'!

Yes, "by" definitely works too! So glad it's not just me who thinks "in" is wrong...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on September 21, 2013, 08:10:44 PM
Here's one I'm not entirely sure about, but I look at it and it just seems...off.

"The method in which you do (x)" - shouldn't it be "the method WITH which"? How can you be in a method? It's certainly not a place.

I think I'd use "the method BY which you do (x)", but definitely not 'in'!

Yes, "by" definitely works too! So glad it's not just me who thinks "in" is wrong...

In that vein, I'd like to submit "faced with." As in, "I was faced with a problem." NO! Walls are faced WITH things; people are faced BY them.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: missanpan on September 22, 2013, 09:15:32 AM
I feel the need to trot out this little piece of amusement from somewhere deep in the bowels of my email archive...

Eye halve a spelling chequer
It came with my pea sea
It plainly marques four my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

Eye strike a key and type a word
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh.

As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee fore two long
And eye can put the error rite
Its rare lea ever wrong.

Eye have run this poem threw it
I am shore your pleased two no
Its letter perfect awl the weigh
My chequer tolled me sew.


English really is a pain! ;)

This is brilliant!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: DaisyG on September 23, 2013, 10:01:52 AM
I feel the need to trot out this little piece of amusement from somewhere deep in the bowels of my email archive...

Eye halve a spelling chequer
It came with my pea sea
It plainly marques four my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

Eye strike a key and type a word
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh.

As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee fore two long
And eye can put the error rite
Its rare lea ever wrong.

Eye have run this poem threw it
I am shore your pleased two no
Its letter perfect awl the weigh
My chequer tolled me sew.


English really is a pain! ;)

Can I please submit these further poems:
http://www.spellingsociety.org/news/media/poems.php (http://www.spellingsociety.org/news/media/poems.php)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 23, 2013, 10:16:10 AM
Here's one I'm not entirely sure about, but I look at it and it just seems...off.

"The method in which you do (x)" - shouldn't it be "the method WITH which"? How can you be in a method? It's certainly not a place.

I think I'd use "the method BY which you do (x)", but definitely not 'in'!

Yes, "by" definitely works too! So glad it's not just me who thinks "in" is wrong...

In that vein, I'd like to submit "faced with." As in, "I was faced with a problem." NO! Walls are faced WITH things; people are faced BY them.

Actually, neither of those bother me. I think in the first case, though, I'd interpret "the method in which you do X" would mean "the method during which you do X," not "the method for doing X".

The other one? The metaphor is so stretched, that I would allow language to take its own route. I'm pretty sure that more people now say "faced with" rather than "faced by" problems.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on September 23, 2013, 10:57:48 AM
Here's one I'm not entirely sure about, but I look at it and it just seems...off.

"The method in which you do (x)" - shouldn't it be "the method WITH which"? How can you be in a method? It's certainly not a place.

I think I'd use "the method BY which you do (x)", but definitely not 'in'!

Yes, "by" definitely works too! So glad it's not just me who thinks "in" is wrong...

In that vein, I'd like to submit "faced with." As in, "I was faced with a problem." NO! Walls are faced WITH things; people are faced BY them.

Actually, neither of those bother me. I think in the first case, though, I'd interpret "the method in which you do X" would mean "the method during which you do X," not "the method for doing X".

The other one? The metaphor is so stretched, that I would allow language to take its own route. I'm pretty sure that more people now say "faced with" rather than "faced by" problems.

Be that as it may, "faced with" involving a person will always make my recall The Cask of Amontillado.  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Lynn2000 on September 23, 2013, 12:29:50 PM
Here's one I'm not entirely sure about, but I look at it and it just seems...off.

"The method in which you do (x)" - shouldn't it be "the method WITH which"? How can you be in a method? It's certainly not a place.

I think I'd use "the method BY which you do (x)", but definitely not 'in'!

Yes, "by" definitely works too! So glad it's not just me who thinks "in" is wrong...

Ah, this is exactly what I mean with abstract prepositions! Sometimes even native/fluent English speakers have problems with them, it's no wonder they're hard to learn when you're trying to pick up English as an adult.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: daen on September 23, 2013, 02:40:44 PM
Here's one I'm not entirely sure about, but I look at it and it just seems...off.

"The method in which you do (x)" - shouldn't it be "the method WITH which"? How can you be in a method? It's certainly not a place.

I think I'd use "the method BY which you do (x)", but definitely not 'in'!

Yes, "by" definitely works too! So glad it's not just me who thinks "in" is wrong...

Ah, this is exactly what I mean with abstract prepositions! Sometimes even native/fluent English speakers have problems with them, it's no wonder they're hard to learn when you're trying to pick up English as an adult.

The only way I can see "the method in which you do" is if the speaker is using a detail to identify the method.  If s/he is talking about two methods  for baking (muffin method vs creaming method, let's say) but can't remember the phrase "muffin method," s/he could say "Well, the way to make muffins is the method in which you mix wet and dry until just combined."

On the other hand, if s/he is talking about  how to make muffins, then it would be more along the lines of "Mixing wet and dry until just combined is the method by which you will get the best muffins." 

(That sounded much clearer in my head. Sorry.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 23, 2013, 03:04:07 PM
Here's one I'm not entirely sure about, but I look at it and it just seems...off.

"The method in which you do (x)" - shouldn't it be "the method WITH which"? How can you be in a method? It's certainly not a place.

I think I'd use "the method BY which you do (x)", but definitely not 'in'!

Yes, "by" definitely works too! So glad it's not just me who thinks "in" is wrong...

Ah, this is exactly what I mean with abstract prepositions! Sometimes even native/fluent English speakers have problems with them, it's no wonder they're hard to learn when you're trying to pick up English as an adult.

The only way I can see "the method in which you do" is if the speaker is using a detail to identify the method.  If s/he is talking about two methods  for baking (muffin method vs creaming method, let's say) but can't remember the phrase "muffin method," s/he could say "Well, the way to make muffins is the method in which you mix wet and dry until just combined."

On the other hand, if s/he is talking about  how to make muffins, then it would be more along the lines of "Mixing wet and dry until just combined is the method by which you will get the best muffins." 

(That sounded much clearer in my head. Sorry.)

The context (what little there is, anyway) is definitely the 'other hand' part. No method was being described, it was just a simple statement. What's kind of ironic is that it was said by the type of person that jumps down other people's throats for having even a single letter out of place...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Clarissa on September 23, 2013, 03:47:42 PM
I live in England and hear this all the time. "I lent a pen from Paul". No you borrowed a pen, Paul lent you a pen. Arrgghh! Or people seem to think its proper to say "I". As in,"I and Nick were there."If you would say me singular, then it is still me plural. And the misuse of then/than. I'd rather eat peas than sleep in a ditch, verses I'd rather eat peas then sleep in a ditch!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Onyx_TKD on September 23, 2013, 03:56:31 PM
I live in England and hear this all the time. "I lent a pen from Paul". No you borrowed a pen, Paul lent you a pen. Arrgghh! Or people seem to think its proper to say "I". As in,"I and Nick were there."If you would say me singular, then it is still me plural. And the misuse of then/than. I'd rather eat peas than sleep in a ditch, verses I'd rather eat peas then sleep in a ditch!

Did you perhaps mix up your examples? You wouldn't say "Me was there." You'd say "I was there," so "Nick and I were there" would be entirely correct. OTOH, the order "I and Nick" rather than "Nick and I" is atypical, although I don't know whether there is an explicit rule against it or just convention.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Clarissa on September 23, 2013, 03:58:40 PM
Oh yes. How bad was that? And I'm doing a degree in English. You knew what I meant though! Thank you.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Clarissa on September 23, 2013, 04:05:31 PM
I meant when people say "Jamie and I really enjoyed that today". It should be Jamie and me. But people are trying to talk "posh". The old joke, a primary school teacher asked a pupil to say a sentence using the word "I". The pupil answered "I is..." The teacher interrupted saying "always use 'I am', not 'I is' ". The pupil replied "I am the letter after H in the alphabet".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on September 23, 2013, 04:58:32 PM
I meant when people say "Jamie and I really enjoyed that today". It should be Jamie and me. But people are trying to talk "posh". The old joke, a primary school teacher asked a pupil to say a sentence using the word "I". The pupil answered "I is..." The teacher interrupted saying "always use 'I am', not 'I is' ". The pupil replied "I am the letter after H in the alphabet".

You need object, not subject for this example. :) "I really enjoyed that today" works, so "Jamie and I" is correct for that sentence - however, "Bob talked to I" is wrong, therefore you need to use "Bob talked to Jamie and me" instead of "Bob talked to Jamie and I". Or you can just dodge the whole mess and say "Bob talked to us". ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on September 23, 2013, 05:04:33 PM
I meant when people say "Jamie and I really enjoyed that today". It should be Jamie and me. But people are trying to talk "posh". The old joke, a primary school teacher asked a pupil to say a sentence using the word "I". The pupil answered "I is..." The teacher interrupted saying "always use 'I am', not 'I is' ". The pupil replied "I am the letter after H in the alphabet".

 But if you took Jamie out of the picture,  you wouldn't say  "Me really enjoyed that today."  Unless, perhaps you were Tarzan.  'Jamie and I' is correct in your example.

It will be 'me' when I am the object of the sentence and 'I' when I am the subject. So:

Jamie and I were invited to Fred's party
.    That's correct, as 'Jamie and I' is the  subject of the sentence.

Fred invited Jamie and me to his party.  Here 'Jamie  and me' is the object, and Fred s the subject.


The trick for working it out is to remove Jamie from the sentence, and whatever would be right for you alone, will be the right one to use when you're being grouped  with others.

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on September 23, 2013, 05:30:35 PM
Today's sign sighted:

Saturday & Sunday
All you can eat buffet
with Saled bar

Oh my, hasn't anyone working there seen this yet?  And CHANGED it!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 23, 2013, 06:08:49 PM
Today's sign sighted:

Saturday & Sunday
All you can eat buffet
with Saled bar

Oh my, hasn't anyone working there seen this yet?  And CHANGED it!
One of the fast food places near me had this sign for MONTHS:

Now hiring
Chicken nuggets
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 23, 2013, 08:21:21 PM
Today's sign sighted:

Saturday & Sunday
All you can eat buffet
with Saled bar

Oh my, hasn't anyone working there seen this yet?  And CHANGED it!
One of the fast food places near me had this sign for MONTHS:

Now hiring
Chicken nuggets

A Burger King nearby has an electronic sign reading "Now Hiring - Sweet Potato Fries" in sequence. I keep joking that they can't find any fries to hire!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 23, 2013, 09:13:58 PM
I meant when people say "Jamie and I really enjoyed that today". It should be Jamie and me. But people are trying to talk "posh". The old joke, a primary school teacher asked a pupil to say a sentence using the word "I". The pupil answered "I is..." The teacher interrupted saying "always use 'I am', not 'I is' ". The pupil replied "I am the letter after H in the alphabet".

 But if you took Jamie out of the picture,  you wouldn't say  "Me really enjoyed that today."  Unless, perhaps you were Tarzan.  'Jamie and I' is correct in your example.

It will be 'me' when I am the object of the sentence and 'I' when I am the subject. So:

Jamie and I were invited to Fred's party
.    That's correct, as 'Jamie and I' is the  subject of the sentence.

Fred invited Jamie and me to his party.  Here 'Jamie  and me' is the object, and Fred s the subject.


The trick for working it out is to remove Jamie from the sentence, and whatever would be right for you alone, will be the right one to use when you're being grouped  with others.

Basically if we all stopped being so damned modest, we'd get it right every time.

I and Jamie went to the party.

Fred invited me and Jamie.

See? We should all be more conceited.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: o_gal on September 24, 2013, 07:06:23 AM
I haven't seen this one mentioned yet. E-hellions, do you own a bedroom suite or a bedroom suit? Likewise, do you have a suite of furniture in your living room, or just a plain ol' suit of furniture.

Drove me nuts when I moved to this area (west-central Ohio) and kept hearing all of the commercials from furniture stores advertising bedroom "suits". And living room suits. Not the correct pronunciation, which is like "sweet". I keep wanting to go to the stores and ask them why I need to have a special set of clothes (a suit) made for my bedroom.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cwm on September 24, 2013, 11:27:04 AM
I haven't seen this one mentioned yet. E-hellions, do you own a bedroom suite or a bedroom suit? Likewise, do you have a suite of furniture in your living room, or just a plain ol' suit of furniture.

Drove me nuts when I moved to this area (west-central Ohio) and kept hearing all of the commercials from furniture stores advertising bedroom "suits". And living room suits. Not the correct pronunciation, which is like "sweet". I keep wanting to go to the stores and ask them why I need to have a special set of clothes (a suit) made for my bedroom.

Well, I am quite a fan of haberdashery and millinery, so perhaps a custom suit for each room of the house wouldn't be a bad idea after all.

Then again, changing clothes so often would just be annoying.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Xandraea on September 24, 2013, 12:01:59 PM
I haven't seen this one mentioned yet. E-hellions, do you own a bedroom suite or a bedroom suit? Likewise, do you have a suite of furniture in your living room, or just a plain ol' suit of furniture.

Drove me nuts when I moved to this area (west-central Ohio) and kept hearing all of the commercials from furniture stores advertising bedroom "suits". And living room suits. Not the correct pronunciation, which is like "sweet". I keep wanting to go to the stores and ask them why I need to have a special set of clothes (a suit) made for my bedroom.

One wears a suit, and lives in/with a suite.

From Dictionary.com:

suit [soot]
noun
1.
a set of clothing, armor, or the like, intended for wear together.
2.
a set of men's garments of the same color and fabric, consisting of trousers, a jacket, and sometimes a vest.
3.
a similarly matched set consisting of a skirt and jacket, and sometimes a topcoat or blouse, worn by women.
4.
any costume worn for some special activity: a running suit.
5.
Slang. a business executive.



suite  [sweet or for 3 often , soot]
noun
1.
a number of things forming a series or set.
2.
a connected series of rooms to be used together: a hotel suite.
3.
a set of furniture, especially a set comprising the basic furniture necessary for one room: a bedroom suite.
4.
a company of followers or attendants; a train or retinue.
5.
Music.
a.
an ordered series of instrumental dances, in the same or related keys, commonly preceded by a prelude.
b.
an ordered series of instrumental movements of any character.



I learned something new today.  I knew the spelling part, and always figured people were mispronouncing "suite" as "suit", which I only really heard when I lived near south OH/KY/WV.  Apparently it is a recognized pronunciation of "suite" when referring to a set of furniture. I'd still pronounce it "sweet".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: artk2002 on September 24, 2013, 12:18:28 PM
This is a tad off-topic, but I figured the people who enjoy English here would get a groan out of this.

School director introducing one of the deans last night: "Bob has his thumb on the heartbeat of this campus." As I texted to my ex (who works for this school) "The English language wept."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amylouky on September 24, 2013, 12:39:05 PM
Oh yes. How bad was that? And I'm doing a degree in English. You knew what I meant though! Thank you.

You may want to google "versus", also..    ;)

Sorry, in any other thread I wouldn't point that out, just felt like I had to here.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: KB on September 24, 2013, 05:45:53 PM
Basically if we all stopped being so damned modest, we'd get it right every time.

I and Jamie went to the party.

Fred invited me and Jamie.

See? We should all be more conceited.

And people would call you out on your grammar since you should NEVER put yourself first!  :o

See, you can't win!  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Dazi on September 26, 2013, 10:12:35 AM
Threw or thru for through...I begrudgingly give a pass  for drive thru.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cwm on September 26, 2013, 10:21:56 AM
Threw or thru for through...I begrudgingly give a pass  for drive thru.

Yes. I will also give a pass to EZ Bake Oven or the EZ Pass lanes for the turnpike, this is what they decided to name those things.

I mean, it's not that hard to write it out. It's literally easy!

I did see a funny last night I had to share, though. And I figured this was a decent board to do it, seeing as how we're discussing language and pronunciation.

How can you tell the difference between a plumber and a chemist? Ask him to pronounce "unionized".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Outdoor Girl on September 26, 2013, 10:37:21 AM
How can you tell the difference between a plumber and a chemist? Ask him to pronounce "unionized".

LOL.  I'm both a (bio)chemist and in a union so I'm really confused.   ;D

A poster here has the tag line 'Bad spellers of the world, untie!'  Makes me laugh but also highlights one of my twitches.  Words with transposed letters, especially when the transposed letters also form a word.  Quite for quiet is one I see a lot.

I've been reading a lot of free books on my Kindle and one of the things that is more noticeable is mistakes in they're, their, there; to, too, two; maid, made; that kind of thing.  Drives me crazy, even though I find my menopause brain is making me do the same thing.  Although, I usually realize right away that I've typed the wrong word and I correct it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on September 26, 2013, 10:43:43 AM
I've made a spelling mistake in something I've posted to Facebook - and I can't edit it. It hurts every time I see it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: z_squared82 on September 26, 2013, 10:52:55 AM
I haven’t seen my pet peeves yet. Other than using an apostrophe to make something plural, which is just wrong.

I can handle using prepositions at the end of sentences, especially when spoken, except for “at”. “Where is he at?” No, no, no, no! “Where is he?” and “Where is he at?” mean the exact same thing! (Unlike “Who is this?” and “Who is this for?”) Just drop the “at” and sound more educated!

Also, over/more than. Over is spatial. More than is quantitative. I jumped over the tire more than 50 times. “Over 100 items on sale!” is never right.

Oh, and funny mistake I saw on my first day as a newspaper intern? Meringue vs. Merengue. They meant the dance, they said the pie.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cwm on September 26, 2013, 11:26:22 AM
I haven’t seen my pet peeves yet. Other than using an apostrophe to make something plural, which is just wrong.

I can handle using prepositions at the end of sentences, especially when spoken, except for “at”. “Where is he at?” No, no, no, no! “Where is he?” and “Where is he at?” mean the exact same thing! (Unlike “Who is this?” and “Who is this for?”) Just drop the “at” and sound more educated!

Also, over/more than. Over is spatial. More than is quantitative. I jumped over the tire more than 50 times. “Over 100 items on sale!” is never right.

Oh, and funny mistake I saw on my first day as a newspaper intern? Meringue vs. Merengue. They meant the dance, they said the pie.

Unless the sale is in the basement, maybe?

"Where he be?" is one thing that I just can't stand. I could almost understand the "Where he at?" thing, but "Where he be?" No. You're conjugating the verb wrong. He doesn't be anything. He is somewhere. I mean, even "Where he is?" sounds a bit better. Subject/verb agreement. We're moving forward here.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on September 26, 2013, 11:54:54 AM


"Where he be?" is one thing that I just can't stand. I could almost understand the "Where he at?" thing, but "Where he be?" No. You're conjugating the verb wrong. He doesn't be anything. He is somewhere. I mean, even "Where he is?" sounds a bit better. Subject/verb agreement. We're moving forward here.

I have no problem with "be" as colloquial/dialect. In Laura Ingalls Wilder's Farmer Boy, the story of her husband's childhood, I remember a scene where Almanzo is watching his father cut roof shingles. His father notices him and asks "Be ye havin' a good time, son?"
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on September 26, 2013, 12:41:42 PM
I've made a spelling mistake in something I've posted to Facebook - and I can't edit it. It hurts every time I see it.

I delete those and repost. Unless someone has commented.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amylouky on September 26, 2013, 12:46:12 PM
So, apparently there was a meteor or something that buzzed over our city this morning. The local news station posted on Facebook, asking who had noticed it.
It's a sad commentary on my city that a good 40 percent of the comments included the words, "I seen.."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 26, 2013, 02:56:59 PM
I live in England and hear this all the time. "I lent a pen from Paul". No you borrowed a pen, Paul lent you a pen. Arrgghh! Or people seem to think its proper to say "I". As in,"I and Nick were there."If you would say me singular, then it is still me plural. And the misuse of then/than. I'd rather eat peas than sleep in a ditch, verses I'd rather eat peas then sleep in a ditch!

Per the bolded: I heard something similar when I lived in the south (USA). It was common to hear people say, "Can you borrow me....." Drove me batty!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 26, 2013, 02:58:58 PM
I haven't seen this one mentioned yet. E-hellions, do you own a bedroom suite or a bedroom suit? Likewise, do you have a suite of furniture in your living room, or just a plain ol' suit of furniture.

Drove me nuts when I moved to this area (west-central Ohio) and kept hearing all of the commercials from furniture stores advertising bedroom "suits". And living room suits. Not the correct pronunciation, which is like "sweet". I keep wanting to go to the stores and ask them why I need to have a special set of clothes (a suit) made for my bedroom.

I grew up in MI, and that was pretty common. Maybe it's a midwestern thing? (FTR, I don't use that)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 26, 2013, 03:00:50 PM
So, apparently there was a meteor or something that buzzed over our city this morning. The local news station posted on Facebook, asking who had noticed it.
It's a sad commentary on my city that a good 40 percent of the comments included the words, "I seen.."

That's hilarious! Not surprising, though.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Dazi on September 26, 2013, 04:27:05 PM
I live in England and hear this all the time. "I lent a pen from Paul". No you borrowed a pen, Paul lent you a pen. Arrgghh! Or people seem to think its proper to say "I". As in,"I and Nick were there."If you would say me singular, then it is still me plural. And the misuse of then/than. I'd rather eat peas than sleep in a ditch, verses I'd rather eat peas then sleep in a ditch!

Per the bolded: I heard something similar when I lived in the south (USA). It was common to hear people say, "Can you borrow me....." Drove me batty!

I've heard "Can you learn me?" for "can you teach me?" in some parts of the South.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on September 26, 2013, 07:08:35 PM
Threw or thru for through...I begrudgingly give a pass  for drive thru.

Yes. I will also give a pass to EZ Bake Oven or the EZ Pass lanes for the turnpike, this is what they decided to name those things.

I mean, it's not that hard to write it out. It's literally easy!

I did see a funny last night I had to share, though. And I figured this was a decent board to do it, seeing as how we're discussing language and pronunciation.

How can you tell the difference between a plumber and a chemist? Ask him to pronounce "unionized".

Here's one that is sort of related.

How do you pronounce the following word.




POLISH





(Is it "polish" or "polish"?  No way to tell - according to Isaac Asimov.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 26, 2013, 10:48:52 PM
I live in England and hear this all the time. "I lent a pen from Paul". No you borrowed a pen, Paul lent you a pen. Arrgghh! Or people seem to think its proper to say "I". As in,"I and Nick were there."If you would say me singular, then it is still me plural. And the misuse of then/than. I'd rather eat peas than sleep in a ditch, verses I'd rather eat peas then sleep in a ditch!

Per the bolded: I heard something similar when I lived in the south (USA). It was common to hear people say, "Can you borrow me....." Drove me batty!

I've heard "Can you learn me?" for "can you teach me?" in some parts of the South.

I heard those, too. I had been an English major, so you can imagine what that did to me!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on September 26, 2013, 11:11:39 PM
Someone telling me to "itch" my bug bites drives me crazy. I'm scratching, not itching them.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on September 27, 2013, 01:10:35 AM

How do you pronounce the following word.




POLISH


(Is it "polish" or "polish"?  No way to tell - according to Isaac Asimov.)

If it's Polish and therefore related to the country, it should be capitalised and pronounced Poe-lish  (Rhyming with Edgar Allen's surname).  "Kabanos is a Polish sausage."

If it's polish and means putting a shine on something, then uncapitalised and pronounced poll-ish, with the 'o' sound the very short one you get in the name Polly. "Polish your shoes! They're dirty."

I don't really see Azimov's problem.  Scratches head...

(ETA :  We British seldom shine our shoes, btw. We polish, not Polish, them.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on September 27, 2013, 02:26:33 AM

How do you pronounce the following word.




POLISH


(Is it "polish" or "polish"?  No way to tell - according to Isaac Asimov.)

If it's Polish and therefore related to the country, it should be capitalised and pronounced Poe-lish  (Rhyming with Edgar Allen's surname).  "Kabanos is a Polish sausage."

If it's polish and means putting a shine on something, then uncapitalised and pronounced poll-ish, with the 'o' sound the very short one you get in the name Polly. "Polish your shoes! They're dirty."

I don't really see Azimov's problem.  Scratches head...

(ETA :  We British seldom shine our shoes, btw. We polish, not Polish, them.)

I b'lieve Asimov's point was that when it's in all-caps like that, with no context or capitalisation clues, you can't tell whether it's shoeshine or Slavic people. :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Teenyweeny on September 27, 2013, 03:04:11 AM

How do you pronounce the following word.




POLISH


(Is it "polish" or "polish"?  No way to tell - according to Isaac Asimov.)

If it's Polish and therefore related to the country, it should be capitalised and pronounced Poe-lish  (Rhyming with Edgar Allen's surname).  "Kabanos is a Polish sausage."

If it's polish and means putting a shine on something, then uncapitalised and pronounced poll-ish, with the 'o' sound the very short one you get in the name Polly. "Polish your shoes! They're dirty."

I don't really see Azimov's problem.  Scratches head...

(ETA :  We British seldom shine our shoes, btw. We polish, not Polish, them.)

I b'lieve Asimov's point was that when it's in all-caps like that, with no context or capitalisation clues, you can't tell whether it's shoeshine or Slavic people. :)

Yeah, like this word:

READ

Is that pronounced 'reed' or 'red'? The pronounciation depends entirely upon the tense. Out of context, there's no way to know how you should pronounce it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 27, 2013, 06:30:54 AM
My father had a joke: that he knew a word which could be spoken, but was impossible to write.  "The farmer sows the corn; his wife sews his shirt.  They both [pronounced, 'so']".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Pen^2 on September 27, 2013, 06:46:16 AM
I love heterographs :)

The bandage was wound around the wound.
The farm was used to produce produce.
A bass fish was painted on a bass drum.
I did not object to the object.
The farmer taught his talented sow to sow.
After a number of injections my jaw got number.
They were too close to close the door.
Does he see the does?
The dove dove into the tree.

etc.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 27, 2013, 08:25:23 AM
I love heterographs :)

The bandage was wound around the wound.
The farm was used to produce produce.
A bass fish was painted on a bass drum.
I did not object to the object.
The farmer taught his talented sow to sow.
After a number of injections my jaw got number.
They were too close to close the door.
Does he see the does?
The dove dove into the tree.

etc.

I feel that you'd enjoy cryptic crosswords -- which if I have things rightly, are basically a British thing -- crosswords in North America revolve around essentially "factual" q & a.  Cryptic crosswords rely heavily on heterographs, for their clues.

(In the UK, your last example wouldn't work -- over here, it would have "dived" into the tree.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 27, 2013, 08:46:11 AM
Yeah, like this word:

READ

Is that pronounced 'reed' or 'red'? The pronounciation depends entirely upon the tense. Out of context, there's no way to know how you should pronounce it.

Another one:

TEAR

Is it a drop of water from the eye, or an action pulling things apart?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: squeakers on September 27, 2013, 09:43:45 AM
I've made a spelling mistake in something I've posted to Facebook - and I can't edit it. It hurts every time I see it.

Facebook is going to be rolling out the ability to edit statuses.  In order to keep people from posting "I love kitties!" and then, after garnering tons of "likes", editing it to say "I kick puppies" the status will show "has been edited" and people can click to see the previous tpyos.

Which is great because there's nothing like posting, enjoying the "likes" and chatting with friends only to notice hours later a glaring typo, missing capitalization or even missing words.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on September 27, 2013, 03:16:54 PM

How do you pronounce the following word.




POLISH


(Is it "polish" or "polish"?  No way to tell - according to Isaac Asimov.)

If it's Polish and therefore related to the country, it should be capitalised and pronounced Poe-lish  (Rhyming with Edgar Allen's surname).  "Kabanos is a Polish sausage."

If it's polish and means putting a shine on something, then uncapitalised and pronounced poll-ish, with the 'o' sound the very short one you get in the name Polly. "Polish your shoes! They're dirty."

I don't really see Azimov's problem.  Scratches head...

(ETA :  We British seldom shine our shoes, btw. We polish, not Polish, them.)

It is written in all caps, with no context to determine how it was used.  How do you pronounce it?

If the context offers a clue - such as a sign on a shoe shine stand would be polish - a sign on a sausage stand would be Polish.

But all caps with NO context - no way to tell.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on September 27, 2013, 03:44:45 PM
I've made a spelling mistake in something I've posted to Facebook - and I can't edit it. It hurts every time I see it.

Facebook is going to be rolling out the ability to edit statuses.  In order to keep people from posting "I love kitties!" and then, after garnering tons of "likes", editing it to say "I kick puppies" the status will show "has been edited" and people can click to see the previous tpyos.

Which is great because there's nothing like posting, enjoying the "likes" and chatting with friends only to notice hours later a glaring typo, missing capitalization or even missing words.

Good. I don't know why they didn't just do that when they gave that capability to comments on statuses/posts.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: pwv on September 27, 2013, 04:53:00 PM
Another one:

LEAD


Is it pronounced leed or led.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 28, 2013, 02:35:39 PM
Another one:

LEAD


Is it pronounced leed or led.

Both, depending on usage. Led = lead pencil. Lead = playing a lead in a play.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on September 28, 2013, 02:52:17 PM
Another one:

LEAD


Is it pronounced leed or led.

Both, depending on usage. Led = lead pencil. Lead = playing a lead in a play.

The "riddle" part of the question is that you can't tell WHICH way to pronounce certain words without "context" - whether it is the rest of a sentence, whether or not the first letter is capitalized, or even what the one word sign is posted on.

There have been several previous examples in this thread - this is just one more.

Did I read the joke below HERE or elsewhere?

How do you tell the difference between a PLUMBER and a chemist?

Ask them to pronounce "unionized".

Plumber will probably see it as related to union, so union-ized, while a chemist will most likely see it as un-ionized.

Mom was a science teacher....I need to send that one to her...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Tini on September 28, 2013, 03:15:24 PM
And of course, there's READING - either my former home town (pronounced redding) or the obvious one.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 28, 2013, 06:00:13 PM
Except any good chemist would know it's DE-ionized, not un-ionized, which unfortunately ruins the joke  :-\
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on September 28, 2013, 06:01:17 PM
Except any good chemist would know it's DE-ionized, not un-ionized, which unfortunately ruins the joke  :-\

Dang nab it - but now I'm glad I DIDN'T send it to Mom!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: mrs_deb on September 28, 2013, 08:01:39 PM
Although I don't correct my dad, some of the things he says drive me batty.  Example:

fillum - film


...does he like The Three Stooges?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on September 29, 2013, 09:52:22 AM
I had an aunt who drove everybody nuts.

She would say 'fillum', 'chimbly' and 'liberry'.  She also never had a 'snack' she had a 'smack'. 

It was a bit of a family mystery because her sisters received the same education in the same school and none of them spoke that way. 

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on September 29, 2013, 10:59:13 AM
I had an aunt who drove everybody nuts.

She would say 'fillum', 'chimbly' and 'liberry'.  She also never had a 'snack' she had a 'smack'. 

It was a bit of a family mystery because her sisters received the same education in the same school and none of them spoke that way. 



Slight hearing loss so that she really HEARD things that way?  Or a "lazy tongue"?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: 123sandy on September 29, 2013, 11:18:06 AM
Fillum is quite natural for the North of Scotland.

Please add "spaded" as in had our dog spade or spaded.  :(
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 29, 2013, 11:37:08 AM
And of course, there's READING - either my former home town (pronounced redding) or the obvious one.

Utterly dreadful and feeble English joke / riddle.  Reading, England, is the county town ("capital") of the English county of Berkshire -- pronounced as your home town, Tini -- don't know whether you're in America or UK.  Said idiotic riddle basically doesn't work "spoken"; only "written / read".

Q: Which is the most studious county in England?

A: Berkshire; because there is a town in it which is always Reading.

Said riddle came in a book which I owned as a kid -- " A Thousand Conundrums / Riddles".  Believe me, even among a thousand of them, that one was scraping the barrel.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 29, 2013, 12:19:56 PM
My X was intelligent and well educated, but he did manage to mangle some words (his parents were the king and queen of mangling the language!)
Some examples: birfday for birthday, wood-ent for wouldn't.

And some of the comments reminded me of how many people say and spell sherbet "sherbert."  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Outdoor Girl on September 29, 2013, 01:49:25 PM
Except any good chemist would know it's DE-ionized, not un-ionized, which unfortunately ruins the joke  :-\

Dang nab it - but now I'm glad I DIDN'T send it to Mom!

I would use un-ionized occasionally when referring to particular valances of elements.  I would use de-ionized when referring to water treated to remove ionized chemical components.  In aqueous solution, most things are ionized.

(Biochemist here)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Pen^2 on September 29, 2013, 02:52:43 PM
Except any good chemist would know it's DE-ionized, not un-ionized, which unfortunately ruins the joke  :-\

Dang nab it - but now I'm glad I DIDN'T send it to Mom!

I would use un-ionized occasionally when referring to particular valances of elements.  I would use de-ionized when referring to water treated to remove ionized chemical components.  In aqueous solution, most things are ionized.

(Biochemist here)

Exactly. Both are correct, technical terms, but have different meanings and uses. Although I guess to a layman they seem pretty much the same. On a rather similar note...

People mixing up "uninterested" and "disinterested." Despite having similar prefixes, the words do not mean the same thing and are not interchangeable. I've seen this twice today for some reason. >:(
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on September 29, 2013, 03:25:29 PM
My X was intelligent and well educated, but he did manage to mangle some words (his parents were the king and queen of mangling the language!)
Some examples: birfday for birthday, wood-ent for wouldn't.

And some of the comments reminded me of how many people say and spell sherbet "sherbert."  :P

"Sherbert" makes me climb walls.  See also pronouncing tastes as taste-uzz.  *flinch*

I'm always tempted to correct grocery store signage here as it's almost always incorrect.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on September 29, 2013, 05:44:27 PM
I used to work at a convenience store that also sold ice cream by the dip. When sherbet coolers were the special, the signs from corporate we used always spelled it "sherbet," but everyone, employees and customers, pronounced it "sherbert." I was prepared to offer to buy a cooler for any customer who actually said "sherbet."

I'm in upstate New York and know some lifelong residents who use "borrow" for "lend." It's almost numbed me to the use of "loan" for "lend." The former is a noun; the latter is a verb. "I need a loan. Can you lend me $100?"
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on September 29, 2013, 07:39:53 PM
I found this article interesting and sobering.

http://paintingthegreyarea.wordpress.com/2012/11/26/literacy-privilege/
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on September 30, 2013, 07:57:01 AM
I used to work at a convenience store that also sold ice cream by the dip. When sherbet coolers were the special, the signs from corporate we used always spelled it "sherbet," but everyone, employees and customers, pronounced it "sherbert." I was prepared to offer to buy a cooler for any customer who actually said "sherbet."

I'm in upstate New York and know some lifelong residents who use "borrow" for "lend." It's almost numbed me to the use of "loan" for "lend." The former is a noun; the latter is a verb. "I need a loan. Can you lend me $100?"

Loan and lend used to bother me too. (It still does to some extent.)
However, it turns out that loan can be used as a verb. I don't know if it's always been that way or not but language does evolve and incorrect usage, if it becomes common enough, can become correct.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/loan?s=t&path=/ (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/loan?s=t&path=/)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 30, 2013, 08:40:29 AM
I found this article interesting and sobering.

http://paintingthegreyarea.wordpress.com/2012/11/26/literacy-privilege/

I'm afraid I disagree with some of the writer's conclusions.

Yes, people have differing reading/writing abilities, and will not always conform to the "right" way of doing things. However, throwing up your hands and announcing "anything goes" doesn't really help the people who need it the most. If you have trouble reading standard English, trying to follow a poorly written, badly spelled and incoherent paragraph is going to be even harder. The best readers (particularly those with a good grasp of phonics) can follow "ewneek" spellings with relative ease; those who don't recognize the phonetic units of words are not likely to recognize alternate spellings so easily. Punctuation and even capitalization of certain words are not signs of snobbishness, they're the equivalent of having a standardized road sign system for readers.

Of course, it's rude, and pointless, to hold someone's internet postings to the standards of a proof-read professional document. However, those who choose to write need to write clearly above all else, and the rules of grammar and spelling are part of this. I would, of course, rather read a page of poorly-spelled text with split infinitives and improper punctuation rather than a properly-spelled one consisting of rambling sentences that never quite seem to coalesce into actual communication.

I have come across posters on this and other sites who didn't spell so well, and whose grammar was not perfect, but were able to put together a sentence that meant something. This is the most important thing.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 30, 2013, 09:06:16 AM
I found this article interesting and sobering.

http://paintingthegreyarea.wordpress.com/2012/11/26/literacy-privilege/

I'm afraid I disagree with some of the writer's conclusions.

Yes, people have differing reading/writing abilities, and will not always conform to the "right" way of doing things. However, throwing up your hands and announcing "anything goes" doesn't really help the people who need it the most. If you have trouble reading standard English, trying to follow a poorly written, badly spelled and incoherent paragraph is going to be even harder. The best readers (particularly those with a good grasp of phonics) can follow "ewneek" spellings with relative ease; those who don't recognize the phonetic units of words are not likely to recognize alternate spellings so easily. Punctuation and even capitalization of certain words are not signs of snobbishness, they're the equivalent of having a standardized road sign system for readers.

Of course, it's rude, and pointless, to hold someone's internet postings to the standards of a proof-read professional document. However, those who choose to write need to write clearly above all else, and the rules of grammar and spelling are part of this. I would, of course, rather read a page of poorly-spelled text with split infinitives and improper punctuation rather than a properly-spelled one consisting of rambling sentences that never quite seem to coalesce into actual communication.

I have come across posters on this and other sites who didn't spell so well, and whose grammar was not perfect, but were able to put together a sentence that meant something. This is the most important thing.

MsCellany: I see where you, and the linked article’s author, are coming from. Am "telling my beads rather differently", I feel, from you and the author; and from Twik.  In this thread (mostly, it seems to me, about individual small use-of-English annoyances and pet peeves), I’ve inclined toward the “tolerance” end of the spectrum; in part, because language-wise, faulty grammar and spelling tend not to bother me – I’m more disposed to be annoyed by vocabulary (words used, which just happen to grate on me) and pronunciation (re the latter, am usually more irked by “precious and superior” in that realm, than “ignorant and low-class”).

Still; I have the feeling that – especially with this being the “relaxed and for fun” section of the forum – folk are often basically engaging in a light-hearted form of “venting”: with it being understood that they realise that less-than-optimal use of English does not make the misusers, bad or despicable people – and that in the great scheme of things, this is (largely) petty and unimportant stuff. It’s just that certain usages acutely grate on the hearer / reader (we all have our pet hates in this department); and it can be a relief to have a place in which one can express and let out one’s minor bigotries, where one is unlikely to hurt or offend anyone in the course of doing so.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 30, 2013, 10:06:53 AM
One should, if necessary to attack at all, attack the argument, not the form; but the argument has to be comprehensible. An understandable posting in Lolspeak may be cute, or tedious, but if it's understandable, I don't really care. Someone who writes "u no I iz not gon 2 rite lik dat," so that I have to spend five minutes sounding it out and playing rebus games, is not going to make for easy conversation.

And if you are trying to win an argument on your technical expertise, you lose 101% right off the top if you cannot spell technical terms relevant to that supposed expertise. If you say, "I should know, because I am a kernel in the armed forces," I will find myself doubting you.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: *new*mommyagain36 on September 30, 2013, 02:36:23 PM
A very sweet person I work with calls it "alphabeticalized"   :-\
She is such a doll that I just keep going but inward I do flinch a little.  Just a little.   :D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 04, 2013, 11:37:57 AM
I used to work at a convenience store that also sold ice cream by the dip. When sherbet coolers were the special, the signs from corporate we used always spelled it "sherbet," but everyone, employees and customers, pronounced it "sherbert." I was prepared to offer to buy a cooler for any customer who actually said "sherbet."

"Bumping" this thread after a few days, after reading a discussion elsewhere, which shed new light for me on the "sherbet / sherbert" question.  I had been wondering why so many people here on eHell seemed to get a bit bent out of shape about the "sherbert" version -- it had struck me just as a question of correct or incorrect spelling (about which, for sure, nearly all of us have at least a couple of pet hates or hot buttons). I'd hitherto been thinking "obviously, people conflate the spelling of the eaten / drunk substance, with the name (both 'given', and surname) Herbert -- surely, no very big deal?"  Today, at last, I think I get it (your post above, baglady, should have given me a clue).

I see as taking a hand here, the well-known US / British "rhotic / non-rhotic" thing.  It would seem that mostly in the US, people always pronounce the r's in words; whereas the UK pronunciation tends to slide over / suppress the r's. Here in the UK, in the main we'll say "sher-buht" and "Her-buht" -- sounding the same, except for the initial consonant.  In the US, you vocalise the "r" -- hence potential annoying pronunciation, as well as spelling, difference. Understanding gained, I hope...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on October 04, 2013, 11:41:50 AM
I see as taking a hand here, the well-known US / British "rhotic / non-rhotic" thing.  It would seem that mostly in the US, people always pronounce the r's in words; whereas the UK pronunciation tends to slide over / suppress the r's. Here in the UK, in the main we'll say "sher-buht" and "Her-buht" -- sounding the same, except for the initial consonant.  In the US, you vocalise the "r" -- hence potential annoying pronunciation, as well as spelling, difference. Understanding gained, I hope...

Ooh, this explanation makes my linguistic heart happy.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 04, 2013, 12:38:52 PM
I see as taking a hand here, the well-known US / British "rhotic / non-rhotic" thing.  It would seem that mostly in the US, people always pronounce the r's in words; whereas the UK pronunciation tends to slide over / suppress the r's. Here in the UK, in the main we'll say "sher-buht" and "Her-buht" -- sounding the same, except for the initial consonant.  In the US, you vocalise the "r" -- hence potential annoying pronunciation, as well as spelling, difference. Understanding gained, I hope...

Ooh, this explanation makes my linguistic heart happy.

There was in our family, when I was a kid, a silly "rhyming alphabet", of which I now only remember fragments -- do wish that I still had it in full.  It involved a five-line verse for each letter -- on the "limerick" principle, though not with that metre -- mostly, maybe throughout, featuring animal characters.

"T" therein, was as follows.

"T was a turbot
 Addicted to sherbet;
 (I forget lines 3 and 4, but they definitely told of unpleasant consequences of said addiction)
 Terrible turbot !"

In the UK, that rhymes and "works" just fine -- on the other side of the Atlantic, it would seem, not so much !

ETA -- On reflection -- I'm an idiot !  So long as "sherbert" is avoided, it's totally "cool" both sides of the pond -- isn't it?  For me -- to quote the British satirical magazine -- "That's enough sherbe[r]t -- Ed."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 04, 2013, 01:08:42 PM
I'll admit I spell it "sherbet" and say "sherbert" - just one of those words whose pronunciation bears little resemblance to the spelling, like worcestershire sauce.  (I say "wuss-ter-shir" and DH says "wore-chester," for the record . . .)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 04, 2013, 02:28:16 PM
I'll admit I spell it "sherbet" and say "sherbert" - just one of those words whose pronunciation bears little resemblance to the spelling, like worcestershire sauce.  (I say "wuss-ter-shir" and DH says "wore-chester," for the record . . .)

English place-names, pronunciation versus spelling -- I'd give anyone who is not English, a total pass re all of that: inconsistent lunacy, rules. Slarti, in fact you've got the pronunciation of "Worcestershire" right, as near as makes no difference.  And with place-names in our Celtic neighbour countries, the nightmare becomes worse: their, different, ancestral languages get in on the act too...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on October 04, 2013, 02:33:45 PM
As far as I'm concerned, the county of Worcestershire is Wooste'shur, but the sauce is Wooster. #shrugs#

I hate, loathe and despise 'crispy'. What's wrong with 'crisp'? I mean we don't say a building is biggy, or a sound is loudy.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 04, 2013, 03:41:37 PM
I hate, loathe and despise 'crispy'. What's wrong with 'crisp'? I mean we don't say a building is biggy, or a sound is loudy.

"Crisp" versus "crispy" -- blood has been spilt over that question...

I basically agree with you -- think "crispy" silly and unnecessary -- but apparently it's been around for a surprisingly long time, and has some passionate defenders.

From another message board which I frequent, on which there was a recent outbreak of the "crisp v. crispy" war:

" 'Crispy' is a fake word invented by some company that wanted to make the crispness of one of its products sound somehow more emphatic or fun than that of a competitor's similarly crisp items. [A certain company] has more recently begun trying to do the same thing again by extending the extension to get 'crispitty' and 'crunchitty'. Once people have got used to that, some other company will later give us another round, like 'crispetackitty'..."

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on October 10, 2013, 01:39:13 PM
One of our work study students was just tasked with making an inventory of our supply closet.  On the list she wrote that we had:

Vanilla folders (150)

My head hurts.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on October 10, 2013, 01:45:28 PM
One of our work study students was just tasked with making an inventory of our supply closet.  On the list she wrote that we had:

Vanilla folders (150)

My head hurts.

Do scents give you headaches?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on October 10, 2013, 01:46:01 PM
Lol, I thought at first it was a kitchen cupboard, and wondered how the vanilla got into folders.

I guess those manila folders were - nice and sweet and tasty, right?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: NestHolder on October 12, 2013, 03:41:40 PM
I'm confused by the enraging qualities of 'sherbert'.  It's a legitimate alternate spelling for 'sherbet', and certainly the one I was taught (quite a long time ago).

I mourn the demise of "disinterested", which these days seems to mean "uninterested", leaving us bereft of a word that actually means "disinterested".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Dazi on October 12, 2013, 03:44:18 PM
mute for moot  <sigh>
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: White Dragon on October 12, 2013, 10:19:57 PM
A large part of my job involves the care and feeding of Purchase Orders.

These documents go by the short form PO.

The correct use of the term would be me composing an email which says "I am forwarding you the POs we discussed earlier."

However, my computer auto corrects POs to Pos.
I do not handle 'pos', I handle POs.

So unless I want to go back and correct every use of the term, the only way to type it without backtracking is to insert a completely incorrect and aggravating possessive apostrophe. The fact that my computer will not let me write the word properly is like nails on an chalkboard - and it happens several dozen times a day.

My colleagues wonder why I growl at my computer? It's because I've forced to write 'PO's' for the 30th time that day. >:(
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Sebastienne on October 12, 2013, 10:22:28 PM
A large part of my job involves the care and feeding of Purchase Orders.

These documents go by the short form PO.

The correct use of the term would be me composing an email which says "I am forwarding you the POs we discussed earlier."

However, my computer auto corrects POs to Pos.
I do not handle 'pos', I handle POs.

So unless I want to go back and correct every use of the term, the only way to type it without backtracking is to insert a completely incorrect and aggravating possessive apostrophe. The fact that my computer will not let me write the word properly is like nails on an chalkboard - and it happens several dozen times a day.

My colleagues wonder why I growl at my computer? It's because I've forced to write 'PO's' for the 30th time that day. >:(

Can you hit undo after it autocorrects? That works for me.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: White Dragon on October 12, 2013, 10:34:40 PM
A large part of my job involves the care and feeding of Purchase Orders.

These documents go by the short form PO.

The correct use of the term would be me composing an email which says "I am forwarding you the POs we discussed earlier."

However, my computer auto corrects POs to Pos.
I do not handle 'pos', I handle POs.

So unless I want to go back and correct every use of the term, the only way to type it without backtracking is to insert a completely incorrect and aggravating possessive apostrophe. The fact that my computer will not let me write the word properly is like nails on an chalkboard - and it happens several dozen times a day.

My colleagues wonder why I growl at my computer? It's because I've forced to write 'PO's' for the 30th time that day. >:(

Can you hit undo after it autocorrects? That works for me.

It does, then it reverts again. I have to move onto the next word and then backtrack.
It won't let me add it to the dictionary.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Psychopoesie on October 13, 2013, 02:08:09 AM
I hate, loathe and despise 'crispy'. What's wrong with 'crisp'? I mean we don't say a building is biggy, or a sound is loudy.

"Crisp" versus "crispy" -- blood has been spilt over that question...

I basically agree with you -- think "crispy" silly and unnecessary -- but apparently it's been around for a surprisingly long time, and has some passionate defenders.

From another message board which I frequent, on which there was a recent outbreak of the "crisp v. crispy" war:

" 'Crispy' is a fake word invented by some company that wanted to make the crispness of one of its products sound somehow more emphatic or fun than that of a competitor's similarly crisp items. [A certain company] has more recently begun trying to do the same thing again by extending the extension to get 'crispitty' and 'crunchitty'. Once people have got used to that, some other company will later give us another round, like 'crispetackitty'..."

I'm happy with crispy - tend to prefer more word choices rather than fewer. Sometimes crispy sounds better.

Looked up crispy in the OED (Oxford English Dictionary) out of curiosity - I love their quotes.

The earliest one for crispy was:

1398   J. Trevisa tr. Bartholomew de Glanville De Proprietatibus Rerum (1495) v. xv. 121   By grete heete the heer of the berd and of the heed ben cryspy and curlyd.

I also liked a 1721 quote for another meaning of crispy:

1721   W. Gibson Farriers Dispensatory iii. xv. 279   Boil..till..the Worms are grown crispy.

Eeeuw.

 :)



Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 13, 2013, 04:42:10 AM
I wonder whether Dr. Samuel Johnson included "crispy" in his famous dictionary (published 1755).  Knowing him, if he did not favour the word, he'd have condemned it most scathingly; or if in the "pro" camp, he'd have been equally scathing about those who disliked it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TinyVulgarUnicorn on October 13, 2013, 05:36:42 AM
I just got back some graded material from my professor and this is what I received back word for word on one of my summaries:

Comments: (Dirty Weasel),

I think you dd a nice job of addressing the questions, but your posts would have been stronger if you engaged the readings a bit more, and cited your sources. Also, there were a few grammatical errors in your posts. Overall, however, great job!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Louie_LI on October 13, 2013, 06:02:27 AM
A large part of my job involves the care and feeding of Purchase Orders.

These documents go by the short form PO.

The correct use of the term would be me composing an email which says "I am forwarding you the POs we discussed earlier."

However, my computer auto corrects POs to Pos.
I do not handle 'pos', I handle POs.

So unless I want to go back and correct every use of the term, the only way to type it without backtracking is to insert a completely incorrect and aggravating possessive apostrophe. The fact that my computer will not let me write the word properly is like nails on an chalkboard - and it happens several dozen times a day.

My colleagues wonder why I growl at my computer? It's because I've forced to write 'PO's' for the 30th time that day. >:(

Are you using Word? If so, go to autocorrect options and unclick the box that says something like "Correct two INitial CAps". Isn't there also a way to add exceptions? (Sorry to be imprecise; I'm not on a machine with Word right now.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: scotcat60 on October 13, 2013, 06:33:10 AM
One of the best places to see mis-spellings is watching TV programmes subtitles. 

A case of using the wrong word occured when a character in "Agents of Shield"claimed another character had "Wrangled" and invitation to a party.  The word should be "Wangled"(to manipulate, manage in a skilful way), that "Wrangled" was for mathemeticians and people who work with horses, though there is a definition "to argue noisily""
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Lady Snowdon on October 13, 2013, 07:25:13 AM
One of the best places to see mis-spellings is watching TV programmes subtitles. 

A case of using the wrong word occured when a character in "Agents of Shield"claimed another character had "Wrangled" and invitation to a party.  The word should be "Wangled"(to manipulate, manage in a skilful way), that "Wrangled" was for mathemeticians and people who work with horses, though there is a definition "to argue noisily""

I saw a very funny closed captioning typo last night while watching a TV show.  Apparently the Indianapolis Colts and the San Diego Chargers will be playing this weekend.  Except that the closed captioning announced that the Colts and the Charge Earns would be playing.  I wonder who the Charge Earns are, and what their mascot is?  >:D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Hillia on October 13, 2013, 09:58:47 AM
I'll admit I spell it "sherbet" and say "sherbert" - just one of those words whose pronunciation bears little resemblance to the spelling, like worcestershire sauce.  (I say "wuss-ter-shir" and DH says "wore-chester," for the record . . .)

English place-names, pronunciation versus spelling -- I'd give anyone who is not English, a total pass re all of that: inconsistent lunacy, rules. Slarti, in fact you've got the pronunciation of "Worcestershire" right, as near as makes no difference.  And with place-names in our Celtic neighbour countries, the nightmare becomes worse: their, different, ancestral languages get in on the act too...

Martha Grimes writes murder mysteries that feature a recurring cast of eccentrics.  One is a social climbing American woman, who thinks her behavior is that of (her concept of) the British aristocracy.  However, she cannot grasp British names.  One character is named Ruthven, which should be pronounced 'Rivven'.  Another is St. John, pronounced 'Sinjin'.  She argues furiously for phonetic pronunciation.

Another  mixup that gets me: Carmel for caramel.  Carmel is a place name, caramel is a delicious candy, sometimes melted and poured of popcorn.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: White Dragon on October 13, 2013, 12:52:42 PM
A large part of my job involves the care and feeding of Purchase Orders.

These documents go by the short form PO.

The correct use of the term would be me composing an email which says "I am forwarding you the POs we discussed earlier."

However, my computer auto corrects POs to Pos.
I do not handle 'pos', I handle POs.

So unless I want to go back and correct every use of the term, the only way to type it without backtracking is to insert a completely incorrect and aggravating possessive apostrophe. The fact that my computer will not let me write the word properly is like nails on an chalkboard - and it happens several dozen times a day.

My colleagues wonder why I growl at my computer? It's because I've forced to write 'PO's' for the 30th time that day. >:(

Are you using Word? If so, go to autocorrect options and unclick the box that says something like "Correct two INitial CAps". Isn't there also a way to add exceptions? (Sorry to be imprecise; I'm not on a machine with Word right now.)

You're quite right and your solution is perfect.
Sadly, my system locks me out of making changes.
It's enough to make me weep!

I will be soooooo happy when they send back this bug ridden system and get me a new one!
Oh to be able to open files on the first try!!!!

They tell me the new machines are in but just have to be configured. I am on tenter-hooks!!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Sebastienne on October 13, 2013, 02:58:07 PM
The other thing you can do in Word is to set up your own autocorrect/autocomplete so that "pos" automatically changes to "POs." How to do that depends on which version of Word you're using, but it's usually under Tools somewhere.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TylerBelle on October 13, 2013, 05:33:29 PM
"Prolly." ::twitch:: I think it's used to shorten "probably." Why? To me it sounds more what a little girl would name her doll.


One of our work study students was just tasked with making an inventory of our supply closet.  On the list she wrote that we had:

Vanilla folders (150)

My head hurts.

Hee! This rings a bell. I remember in elementary school we would use manila paper for various projects and things, and for the longest time I thought the teachers were saying vanilla (it was similar in color to the ice cream) ::).
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: White Dragon on October 15, 2013, 10:47:42 PM
DD is in first year of university and taking a first year English course.

Recently, she got back an essay where she was discussing the character's compulsion to do something.

She used the word "geas" and the essay came back with the word underlined.
Her English teacher did not know that it was a word.

DD was in shock.
I was in shock. Neither of us considered it really obscure word, especially since this is a literature class and the professor is presumably well read.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on October 15, 2013, 11:11:49 PM
DD is in first year of university and taking a first year English course.

Recently, she got back an essay where she was discussing the character's compulsion to do something.

She used the word "geas" and the essay came back with the word underlined.
Her English teacher did not know that it was a word.

DD was in shock.
I was in shock. Neither of us considered it really obscure word, especially since this is a literature class and the professor is presumably well read.

I...didn't know it was a word, and I consider myself fairly literate as well. Someone can just not know a word. However, if I were a teacher and grading a paper, I'd check a dictionary to make sure I was grading fairly.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MariaE on October 16, 2013, 05:33:15 AM
DD is in first year of university and taking a first year English course.

Recently, she got back an essay where she was discussing the character's compulsion to do something.

She used the word "geas" and the essay came back with the word underlined.
Her English teacher did not know that it was a word.

DD was in shock.
I was in shock. Neither of us considered it really obscure word, especially since this is a literature class and the professor is presumably well read.

I...didn't know it was a word, and I consider myself fairly literate as well. Someone can just not know a word. However, if I were a teacher and grading a paper, I'd check a dictionary to make sure I was grading fairly.

I'd never heard the word before either.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: iridaceae on October 16, 2013, 05:39:04 AM
Geas is common in fantasy; I know I've run across it in some of the Witch World novels.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Psychopoesie on October 16, 2013, 05:43:46 AM
Geas is common in fantasy; I know I've run across it in some of the Witch World novels.

Agree, it depends on what you've read.  It's familiar to me as a reader of fantasty novels, also cropping up in some folk or fairy tales if I recall correctly.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 16, 2013, 05:45:51 AM
Before seeing these recent posts, I'd only known "geas" as a word from Celtic culture, which I'd understood as equivalent to a taboo (came across it, with that sense implied, in S.M. Stirling's "Emberverse" novel series, before I got fed up with said series -- the novels take place, partially in a strongly Celtic milieu).  Was unaware that it could also be a compulsion to do something.  Looking up the online Oxford Dictionary, I found: "geas -- in Irish folklore -- an obligation or prohibition magically imposed on a person".

Highly educational, this eHell !
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MariaE on October 16, 2013, 05:49:35 AM
Geas is common in fantasy; I know I've run across it in some of the Witch World novels.

Agree, it depends on what you've read.  It's familiar to me as a reader of fantasty novels, also cropping up in some folk or fairy tales if I recall correctly.

Fantasy is probably the genre I read the most, still haven't ever come across it before. Have never read any of the Witch World novels though.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Psychopoesie on October 16, 2013, 06:31:34 AM
Geas is common in fantasy; I know I've run across it in some of the Witch World novels.

Agree, it depends on what you've read.  It's familiar to me as a reader of fantasty novels, also cropping up in some folk or fairy tales if I recall correctly.

Fantasy is probably the genre I read the most, still haven't ever come across it before. Have never read any of the Witch World novels though.

There's so much wonderful fantasy to read, impossible to get to it all.  :)

Hard to work out where I first ran across the word - it has the feeling of a word I learned in my teens. That's about when I did read the Witch World novels - so maybe that's the source for me.

There was also a series by Tom Deitz (Windmaster's Bane is the first) which is where I do recall it being used - it draws on Irish folklore which may be why.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: iridaceae on October 16, 2013, 06:49:44 AM
Patricia Kennealy-Morrison used it in her Keltiad books as well.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: squeakers on October 16, 2013, 07:30:43 AM
Piers Anthony uses geas a lot.  In both his Xanth series and his Phaze/Apprentice Adept series.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Psychopoesie on October 16, 2013, 07:42:56 AM
Patricia Kennealy-Morrison used it in her Keltiad books as well.
Piers Anthony uses geas a lot.  In both his Xanth series and his Phaze/Apprentice Adept series.

Read these too. Still think I read it first in the Witch World ones.

Also pretty sure I came across geas in a version of the Hound of Cuchulainn when I was still in late primary school. Was used in the sense of being a taboo - there was something he couldn't eat (dog, maybe, because that's what he was named after).

I love that this thread is reminding me of many good reads from the past.

Thanks.  :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on October 16, 2013, 08:18:40 AM
Fair and faire and fayre and fare. Fair for blond(e) is O.K.  (although I might also have a small mutter at the people who write 'John is the blonde' because he isn't) and fair for a gathering, like a trade fair or a funfair is fine. I'll swallow both faire and fayre as the archaic versions of that fair. Fare for food - not any of the other spellings and absolutely not fayre. It just isn't. Different word. Unfortunately it's become very common in the U.K. in things like pub menus, and it makes me shudder. Yes, I'm a snob but if you write 'Country Fayre' at the top of your menu, I just know that all the food was made in central Birmingham, brought in frozen and microwaved.

I'm disinclined to enter Ye Olde Shoppe too. The word is 'the'. We have the letters T and H nowadays rather than thorn or thurisaz. Don't mix and match. If you want to use thorn instead of TH,  why isn't the rest of your name written in Anglo-Saxon?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 16, 2013, 10:09:40 AM
Fare for food - not any of the other spellings and absolutely not fayre. It just isn't. Different word. Unfortunately it's become very common in the U.K. in things like pub menus, and it makes me shudder. Yes, I'm a snob but if you write 'Country Fayre' at the top of your menu, I just know that all the food was made in central Birmingham, brought in frozen and microwaved.

I'm disinclined to enter Ye Olde Shoppe too. The word is 'the'. We have the letters T and H nowadays rather than thorn or thurisaz. Don't mix and match. If you want to use thorn instead of TH,  why isn't the rest of your name written in Anglo-Saxon?

FRHC -- you're probably aware of the following: but the "thorn" letter came, in medieval times, to be written pretty well indistinguishably from "y" proper, which it had already looked quite like. "Th" was already coming in, to represent that vocalisation; but the alternative for it, as "y", had its life artificially prolonged by the introduction of printing. For a good while, it was useful for printers to have the option of using "y" as an alternative to "th" -- particularly if they had run short of space. In such circumstances, pronunciation was always read-off as "th", not as "y proper" like in "yes" or "young". "Ye" as substitute for "the", showed up especially often in this context.

Concerning the "Ye Olde" thing, and the misuse of "fayre": I'd reckon that marketers -- and some at any rate of their public -- find appealing, bonkers-seeming supposedly archaic / rustic spellings of words, no matter how unauthentic.  A memory prompted by "fare" for food: an IMO ill-advised initiative a couple of decades or more ago, by our national railway undertaking -- British Rail as it was then -- which had an unfortunate way of coming up with annoying, would-be very "switched-on" advertising, tending to be on the pretentious side. For a (mercifully, quite brief) while, they rebranded all their refreshments outlets under the name of "Travellers-Fare" -- I think deliberately not putting an apostrophe after the s, in order for it to look still more "edgy".  I hated that title -- cringed at the utter precious-ness of it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Layla Miller on October 16, 2013, 10:42:40 AM
DD is in first year of university and taking a first year English course.

Recently, she got back an essay where she was discussing the character's compulsion to do something.

She used the word "geas" and the essay came back with the word underlined.
Her English teacher did not know that it was a word.

DD was in shock.
I was in shock. Neither of us considered it really obscure word, especially since this is a literature class and the professor is presumably well read.

I...didn't know it was a word, and I consider myself fairly literate as well. Someone can just not know a word. However, if I were a teacher and grading a paper, I'd check a dictionary to make sure I was grading fairly.

I've heard the word before, but very rarely.  I also do a lot of proofreading for friends, and any time I come across an unfamiliar word or phrase I go straight to Google or the dictionary before I mark it!  Like you said, if someone's grade is in the balance you darn well better be sure.  :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on October 16, 2013, 01:59:30 PM
DD is in first year of university and taking a first year English course.

Recently, she got back an essay where she was discussing the character's compulsion to do something.

She used the word "geas" and the essay came back with the word underlined.
Her English teacher did not know that it was a word.

DD was in shock.
I was in shock. Neither of us considered it really obscure word, especially since this is a literature class and the professor is presumably well read.

I...didn't know it was a word, and I consider myself fairly literate as well. Someone can just not know a word. However, if I were a teacher and grading a paper, I'd check a dictionary to make sure I was grading fairly.
I see that mostly in fantasy novels.  (Come to think of it, I don't think I've ever seen it outside of fantasy.) If the teacher doesn't read that genre ("*I* only read Literature.") then s/he might never have run across it.  Did the teacher mark her down for it, or just query its meaning?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on October 16, 2013, 02:38:54 PM
I've read fantasy and folklore where geas was used - starting back in junior high (I ran out of juvenile books in elementary school and was reading at a higher level because that was what was on the book cases at home, when I couldn't get to a school library). 

I did reread a few things when I got older & picked up whole new layers of meaning after menarche & marriage!

Menarche is another real word that you don't see used much in real life - unless you're in a medical field...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 16, 2013, 05:57:31 PM
I've read fantasy and folklore where geas was used - starting back in junior high (I ran out of juvenile books in elementary school and was reading at a higher level because that was what was on the book cases at home, when I couldn't get to a school library). 

I did reread a few things when I got older & picked up whole new layers of meaning after menarche & marriage!

Menarche is another real word that you don't see used much in real life - unless you're in a medical field...

I first came across the word in a novel by Robert A. Heinlein; whom many find to have had things in the -- broadly -- sex-related sphere, rather on the brain...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on October 16, 2013, 09:27:01 PM
I've read fantasy and folklore where geas was used - starting back in junior high (I ran out of juvenile books in elementary school and was reading at a higher level because that was what was on the book cases at home, when I couldn't get to a school library). 

I did reread a few things when I got older & picked up whole new layers of meaning after menarche & marriage!

Menarche is another real word that you don't see used much in real life - unless you're in a medical field...

I first came across the word in a novel by Robert A. Heinlein; whom many find to have had things in the -- broadly -- sex-related sphere, rather on the brain...

I think it was in his Glory Road that I read the word.....since it would not have been used in Have Spacesuit, Will Travel or Podkayne of Mars.  Pure science fiction, no use of the term since it would not be the correct term for the milieu.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: SheltieMom on October 16, 2013, 09:36:14 PM
Heinlein used it frequently in Time Enough for Love.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: White Dragon on October 16, 2013, 09:55:31 PM
DD is in first year of university and taking a first year English course.

Recently, she got back an essay where she was discussing the character's compulsion to do something.

She used the word "geas" and the essay came back with the word underlined.
Her English teacher did not know that it was a word.

DD was in shock.
I was in shock. Neither of us considered it really obscure word, especially since this is a literature class and the professor is presumably well read.

I...didn't know it was a word, and I consider myself fairly literate as well. Someone can just not know a word. However, if I were a teacher and grading a paper, I'd check a dictionary to make sure I was grading fairly.
I see that mostly in fantasy novels.  (Come to think of it, I don't think I've ever seen it outside of fantasy.) If the teacher doesn't read that genre ("*I* only read Literature.") then s/he might never have run across it.  Did the teacher mark her down for it, or just query its meaning?

The teacher marked as being incorrect.
DD returned with extracts from two dictionaries.
Teacher corrected the mark.

It all worked out, but I was surprised the teacher assumed it was wrong.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 17, 2013, 12:32:32 AM
Heinlein used it frequently in Time Enough for Love.

Think that's where I came across it -- was very keen on Heinlein for a while, sufficiently to read his later "mega-sagas"; which I'd find wearisome now. (Still like his more terse stand-alone ones -- pure sci-fi, as VorFemme notes.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: dawnfire on October 17, 2013, 06:11:05 PM
Patricia Kennealy-Morrison used it in her Keltiad books as well.
Piers Anthony uses geas a lot.  In both his Xanth series and his Phaze/Apprentice Adept series.

Read these too. Still think I read it first in the Witch World ones.

Also pretty sure I came across geas in a version of the Hound of Cuchulainn when I was still in late primary school. Was used in the sense of being a taboo - there was something he couldn't eat (dog, maybe, because that's what he was named after).


It was dog he couldn't eat or refuse food from a woman, so when he was offered dog meat by a hag, it leads to his downfall.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on October 22, 2013, 03:11:02 PM
Today, Annoying Coworker has pronounced "mine" as "my-yin" at least four times.  I want to swat her in the mouth every time she says it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Editeer on October 22, 2013, 03:12:54 PM
What's mine is my-yin, what's yours is . . . ur-ine?  >:D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on October 22, 2013, 03:26:26 PM
What's mine is my-yin, what's yours is . . . ur-ine?  >:D

Thanks, I needed that!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 22, 2013, 05:01:49 PM
Really mad about this one because it cost me actual money  >:(

I entered a writing contest recently - many local chapters of my writing association hold contests like this, and it's a good way to both get feedback on the first few chapters of your work and also to get your manuscript in front of agents and editors (if you final in the contest).

Only one of my three "judges" (other writers) had useful advice.  One other liked my book but said nothing substantial.  But the third . . . wow.

She marked my "grammar and craft" down substantially because, I quote, "You have alot of passive voice."  And she helpfully did a find-and-replace to highlight every instance of the word "was" in my entry, to prove it.

(For the record, sentences in the form "John was running as fast as he could, but the bear was still faster!" are NOT in passive voice!)

I'm debating whether to email the contest coordinators and let them know that this particular judge needs a refresher.  On the one hand, whoever-it-is clearly hasn't really understood fully what passive voice is.  On the other hand, I don't want to sound like a whiner just because I didn't win . . . and I'm not going to be entering this contest again anyway  :-\
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on October 23, 2013, 01:58:57 AM

(For the record, sentences in the form "John was running as fast as he could, but the bear was still faster!" are NOT in passive voice!)


I suspect the judge took to heart the advice to look critically at auxiliary and linking verbs - and 'to be' in all its forms is the commonest - and replace them with stronger ones where possible. Strong, direct verbs grab the reader's attention. 

Of course, not all use of auxiliary and linking verbs is passive, and maybe she should have said instead: 'Look hard at your text for the distribution of weak and strong verbs and think about tipping the balance to get maximum impact.'

(I do understand that 'John was running' is in active voice, but 'John ran' is stronger.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 23, 2013, 08:32:58 AM

(For the record, sentences in the form "John was running as fast as he could, but the bear was still faster!" are NOT in passive voice!)


I suspect the judge took to heart the advice to look critically at auxiliary and linking verbs - and 'to be' in all its forms is the commonest - and replace them with stronger ones where possible. Strong, direct verbs grab the reader's attention. 

Of course, not all use of auxiliary and linking verbs is passive, and maybe she should have said instead: 'Look hard at your text for the distribution of weak and strong verbs and think about tipping the balance to get maximum impact.'

(I do understand that 'John was running' is in active voice, but 'John ran' is stronger.)

But not in the same tense.  "John was running along the meadow when the bear jumped out at him" and "John ran along the meadow..." are two different things, and neither has to do with passive or active voice.  Too much passive voice is something a lot of beginning writers have a hard time with, though, so it's one of the more common pieces of writing advice out there - and there are quite a few not-really-new-anymore writers who know not to do it, but are a bit fuzzy on what exactly it is.  I'm guessing this judge was one of that number.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on October 23, 2013, 09:02:35 AM

(For the record, sentences in the form "John was running as fast as he could, but the bear was still faster!" are NOT in passive voice!)


I suspect the judge took to heart the advice to look critically at auxiliary and linking verbs - and 'to be' in all its forms is the commonest - and replace them with stronger ones where possible. Strong, direct verbs grab the reader's attention. 

Of course, not all use of auxiliary and linking verbs is passive, and maybe she should have said instead: 'Look hard at your text for the distribution of weak and strong verbs and think about tipping the balance to get maximum impact.'

(I do understand that 'John was running' is in active voice, but 'John ran' is stronger.)

But not in the same tense.  "John was running along the meadow when the bear jumped out at him" and "John ran along the meadow..." are two different things, and neither has to do with passive or active voice.  Too much passive voice is something a lot of beginning writers have a hard time with, though, so it's one of the more common pieces of writing advice out there - and there are quite a few not-really-new-anymore writers who know not to do it, but are a bit fuzzy on what exactly it is.  I'm guessing this judge was one of that number.

In your new sentence it's quite clear that 'was running' is in the past continuous tense and yes, in the new sentence that form is perfectly correct and the two verb forms are quite different.  I don't think you had quite the same context, though, in the first example you gave, where the simple past would be stronger. 

I've been writing for years and this is still something I approach critically in my own work at the first and second edits!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elisabunny on October 26, 2013, 03:58:11 PM
We are at Children's Hospital for LittleBunny's bone marrow transplant.  Down in the lobby, there is a box of knit hats with a sign on it.  The sign reads, "Children love new warm hats!  Please help yourself's.".  :o


Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on October 26, 2013, 07:40:22 PM
We are at Children's Hospital for LittleBunny's bone marrow transplant.  Down in the lobby, there is a box of knit hats with a sign on it.  The sign reads, "Children love new warm hats!  Please help yourself's.".  :o
Best of luck and hugs for you and LittleBunny.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amylouky on November 22, 2013, 11:39:46 AM
Baited breath, instead of bated. I know, it's really common, but it just brings up an image of someone whose breath smells like worms.

Love this poem though, by Geoffrey Taylor. I think it's the only place where "baited" would be the correct spelling.

Sally, having swallowed cheese,
Directs down holes the scented breeze,
Enticing thus with baited breath
Nice mice to an untimely death.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Pen^2 on November 22, 2013, 05:49:05 PM
I'm holding an introductory English grammar class over the holiday period on top of my regular classes. The guy who made the sign typed, "Learn to use English Grammer Correct! Enrole now!"

 :o

What's worse is that when I brought up the glaringly obvious, he didn't think it was that important. Talk about bad advertising! Yeesh...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: AvidReader on November 22, 2013, 07:31:00 PM
I go nuts when I hear comparatives, mostly in TV ads, that are incorrectly expressed.  For example, "You will use over/more than 4 times less of our brand X than the other brand Y."  In other words, don't waste your money on brand Y.  4 times something is a larger quantity, not a lesser quantity.  Won't I be using less than 1/4 of brand X than brand Y?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on November 22, 2013, 07:38:23 PM
I go nuts when I hear comparatives, mostly in TV ads, that are incorrectly expressed.  For example, "You will use over/more than 4 times less of our brand X than the other brand Y."  In other words, don't waste your money on brand Y.  4 times something is a larger quantity, not a lesser quantity.  Won't I be using less than 1/4 of brand X than brand Y?

"More than four times less than Y" would literally be X > .25Y - so all it says is "you will need at least 1/4 Y."  Which could mean "0.25000001 times Y" or it could be "X takes fifty times the amount that Y does!"

Yeah, bad wording  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Peppergirl on November 22, 2013, 10:45:21 PM
I'm holding an introductory English grammar class over the holiday period on top of my regular classes. The guy who made the sign typed, "Learn to use English Grammer Correct! Enrole now!"

 :o

What's worse is that when I brought up the glaringly obvious, he didn't think it was that important. Talk about bad advertising! Yeesh...

Nooooo!  PLEASE tell me you're joking.  :o ::)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: NestHolder on November 23, 2013, 06:32:50 AM
I am enraged by furniture advertising.  It seems impossible for the voice-overs to say: Four hundred and ninety-nine pounds.  Instead, they say, "Yours for just four nine nine", which makes no sense, is wrong, and—GAH!

There should be a law.   *mutters*  If I were Queen of the World, there would be.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MariaE on November 23, 2013, 07:02:43 AM
Baited breath, instead of bated. I know, it's really common, but it just brings up an image of someone whose breath smells like worms.

Similarly "Intensive purposes" instead of "Intents and purposes". I have to sit on SnarkyMaria's hands whenever I see that written down somewhere.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Pen^2 on November 23, 2013, 08:23:08 AM
I go nuts when I hear comparatives, mostly in TV ads, that are incorrectly expressed.  For example, "You will use over/more than 4 times less of our brand X than the other brand Y."  In other words, don't waste your money on brand Y.  4 times something is a larger quantity, not a lesser quantity.  Won't I be using less than 1/4 of brand X than brand Y?

You remind me of the first panel in this: http://xkcd.com/870/ (http://xkcd.com/870/) which, whenever I see it in shops, irritates me to an unreasonable extent.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on November 23, 2013, 11:05:25 AM
I'm holding an introductory English grammar class over the holiday period on top of my regular classes. The guy who made the sign typed, "Learn to use English Grammer Correct! Enrole now!"

 :o

What's worse is that when I brought up the glaringly obvious, he didn't think it was that important. Talk about bad advertising! Yeesh...

Ugh. I hear a lot of that (people thinking it is unimportant). "You know what they're saying, and that's all that matters," is a common excuse. Er....it does matter, at least in "professional" settings.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on November 23, 2013, 11:06:13 AM
I am enraged by furniture advertising.  It seems impossible for the voice-overs to say: Four hundred and ninety-nine pounds.  Instead, they say, "Yours for just four nine nine", which makes no sense, is wrong, and—GAH!

There should be a law.   *mutters*  If I were Queen of the World, there would be.

I would totally support your reign!  :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: amylouky on November 23, 2013, 01:25:06 PM
I'm holding an introductory English grammar class over the holiday period on top of my regular classes. The guy who made the sign typed, "Learn to use English Grammer Correct! Enrole now!"

 :o

What's worse is that when I brought up the glaringly obvious, he didn't think it was that important. Talk about bad advertising! Yeesh...

Nooooo!  PLEASE tell me you're joking.  :o ::)

Actually, please tell me HE was joking?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Pen^2 on November 23, 2013, 01:52:49 PM
I'm holding an introductory English grammar class over the holiday period on top of my regular classes. The guy who made the sign typed, "Learn to use English Grammer Correct! Enrole now!"

 :o

What's worse is that when I brought up the glaringly obvious, he didn't think it was that important. Talk about bad advertising! Yeesh...

Nooooo!  PLEASE tell me you're joking.  :o ::)

Actually, please tell me HE was joking?

Unfortunately, he wasn't. English-based creole is the standard tongue here (I'm not exaggerating), and as such, the importance of things like tenses, pronouncing the final consonants in words (I'm not talking 'comb' but rather words like 'cat' here), word order, plurals, etc. is very low indeed. "Can I turn off the light?" is said as, "Off light can?" and pronounced as, "Off ligh cah?" and "He went to the park yesterday," becomes, "Yestuhdeh go puh one."

The advertising guy's point of view was that everyone else would understand it more easily if it was what they were used to rather than technically correct, so why make it harder for them?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Rosgrana on November 24, 2013, 12:00:44 PM
Wracked with pain/guilt etc.

I know the writer really means racked, as in tortured, but it always gives me a vision of someone being beaten with large clumps of seaweed, which tends to make me snicker instead of sympathise.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elisabunny on November 24, 2013, 12:44:42 PM
Wracked with pain/guilt etc.

I know the writer really means racked, as in tortured, but it always gives me a vision of someone being beaten with large clumps of seaweed, which tends to make me snicker instead of sympathise.

I just checked my Oxford Dictionary of English, and it says that both are correct in that context.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on November 24, 2013, 01:11:44 PM
Wracked with pain/guilt etc.

I know the writer really means racked, as in tortured, but it always gives me a vision of someone being beaten with large clumps of seaweed, which tends to make me snicker instead of sympathise.

You rack your brain, but you're nerve-wracked.  I tend to default to "wracked" instead of "racked" for most of the ambiguous usages, but it's one of those things that really can go either way.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on November 25, 2013, 02:10:37 PM
"Ave." is an abbreviation for the word "avenue".  People, it is not an actual word.  You do not pronounce the abbreviations for street (St.), lane (Ln.), boulevard (Blvd.) or Court (Ct.).  Why, on earth, would you pronounce this as "ah-v"?!

Yes, I understand that Mr. and Dr. are abbreviations as well, but you still don't pronounce them as they are spelled.

Just stop it!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: mrs_deb on November 25, 2013, 08:10:04 PM
"Ave." is an abbreviation for the word "avenue".  People, it is not an actual word.  You do not pronounce the abbreviations for street (St.), lane (Ln.), boulevard (Blvd.) or Court (Ct.).  Why, on earth, would you pronounce this as "ah-v"?!


Are you in Boston?  I don't think I've ever heard anyone say the entire word here!  It's Comm Ave, Dot Ave, Harvard Ave...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on November 26, 2013, 12:09:34 PM
"Ave." is an abbreviation for the word "avenue".  People, it is not an actual word.  You do not pronounce the abbreviations for street (St.), lane (Ln.), boulevard (Blvd.) or Court (Ct.).  Why, on earth, would you pronounce this as "ah-v"?!


Are you in Boston?  I don't think I've ever heard anyone say the entire word here!  It's Comm Ave, Dot Ave, Harvard Ave...

Nope, Northeastern Pennsylvania.  It's pretty prevalent here as well.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on November 26, 2013, 12:25:27 PM
"Ave." is an abbreviation for the word "avenue".  People, it is not an actual word.  You do not pronounce the abbreviations for street (St.), lane (Ln.), boulevard (Blvd.) or Court (Ct.).  Why, on earth, would you pronounce this as "ah-v"?!


Are you in Boston?  I don't think I've ever heard anyone say the entire word here!  It's Comm Ave, Dot Ave, Harvard Ave...

Nope, Northeastern Pennsylvania.  It's pretty prevalent here as well.

Common here in NJ, too.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on April 05, 2014, 09:05:48 PM
I had to resurrect this zombie thread because I saw this in the entrance of a restaurant the other night!

I can't stand bad grammar, but I think it's considerably worse when it wasn't double-checked and a lot of money was spent to have a sign made and displayed.

(http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff475/FAW329/0326042044a_zps53a9c702.jpg)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: squeakers on April 05, 2014, 10:47:00 PM
I'm not seeing the bad grammar? (Nothing new about that, though.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on April 05, 2014, 10:52:21 PM
I'm not sure I see it either. Is "sat before me" bad grammar in this case, or am I missing it entirely?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on April 05, 2014, 10:52:58 PM
I'm not seeing the bad grammar? (Nothing new about that, though.)

It should be "seated", not "sat".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Onyx_TKD on April 05, 2014, 11:48:35 PM
I'm not seeing the bad grammar? (Nothing new about that, though.)

It should be "seated", not "sat".

IME, "being seated" is more common terminology for being shown to a seat in a restaurant, but "being sat" is also a commonly used variation. I had thought "being sat" was a regional or colloquial usage (which I would consider perfectly reasonable to use on a sign). However, Merriam-Webster online (m-w.com) lists this meaning without any reference to it being non-standard.

Definition of "sat (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sat)":
Quote
past and past participle of sit

From the definition of "sit (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sit)":
Quote
transitive verb
1
:  to cause to be seated :  place on or in a seat —often used with down
...
4
:  to provide seats or seating room for

That seems to fit what they do in a restaurant to me.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on April 06, 2014, 02:05:28 AM
All of the above. Really, all 24 pages.  ;D

"Being sat" makes my skin crawl.

My latest pet peeve is the incorrect use of apostrophes in ages. Over and over again I see sentences like, "Hannah was three-years-old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska" and "Mike Connor, who is thirty-years-old, was arrested on Monday."

Correct: Hannah was three years old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska.
Correct: In 2001, three-year-old Hannah moved to Alaska with her family.

Correct: Mike Connor, who is thirty years old, was arrested on Monday.
Correct: Thirty-year-old Mike Connor was arrested on Monday.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on April 06, 2014, 02:08:59 AM
Rather than paraphrase the good explanation that I read on another site (http://www.englishforums.com/English/SeatedOrSat/zhddj/post.htm). I'll just copy and paste the explanation here:

...Sat is the past simple and past participle of the verb "to sit", which implies an action that only the subject can do on itself, nobody else but the subject of the sentence. So, you sat a customer on table 40, for example, is totally wrong, as one only sits oneself! However, I seated the customer, as you said, is right, because you are using the verb "to seat" as a transtive verb to indicate that you are the one who actually seated somebody else (took somebody to their seat). Sit can only be used against yourself, you sit on a chair, for instance. You simply cannot "sit somebody on a chair"! Therefore, in past form, they cannot be "sat" by you.

Basically seated and sat are from different verbs: the first one is "to sit" and the other one is "to seat"; just think of them like this: to sit oneself; to be seated.

I hate it when I hear people say "I was sat there"... it's ridiculous! You either say "I sat there", or you say "I was seated there". It's actually very simple when you think about it, people tend to hear these errors and they get stuck in their brains and become normal discourse.. let's protect the English language!!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Onyx_TKD on April 06, 2014, 02:34:43 AM
Rather than paraphrase the good explanation that I read on another site (http://www.englishforums.com/English/SeatedOrSat/zhddj/post.htm). I'll just copy and paste the explanation here:

...Sat is the past simple and past participle of the verb "to sit", which implies an action that only the subject can do on itself, nobody else but the subject of the sentence. So, you sat a customer on table 40, for example, is totally wrong, as one only sits oneself! However, I seated the customer, as you said, is right, because you are using the verb "to seat" as a transtive verb to indicate that you are the one who actually seated somebody else (took somebody to their seat). Sit can only be used against yourself, you sit on a chair, for instance. You simply cannot "sit somebody on a chair"! Therefore, in past form, they cannot be "sat" by you.

Basically seated and sat are from different verbs: the first one is "to sit" and the other one is "to seat"; just think of them like this: to sit oneself; to be seated.

I hate it when I hear people say "I was sat there"... it's ridiculous! You either say "I sat there", or you say "I was seated there". It's actually very simple when you think about it, people tend to hear these errors and they get stuck in their brains and become normal discourse.. let's protect the English language!!


This explanation is founded on the "fact" that "sit" is always an intransitive verb, i.e., that one can sit, but cannot sit someone/something else. A lot of dictionaries disagree. For example, Merriam-Webster online (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sit) (defs. 1 and 4 under transitive verb, as I quoted before), Oxford English Dictionary (http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/180462?rskey=UMwMKN&result=4&isAdvanced=false#eid) (def. 23 with examples as far back as the 15th century, as well as from notable authors like Dickens), dictionary.com (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/sit?s=t) (def. 16), Cambridge Dictionaries Online (http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/american-english/sit_1?q=sit) (transitive definition marked by [T]). All of these list transitive usages of the verb "sit," and all include definitions that would apply to seating a customer in a restaurant. You can dislike the usage all you like, but that doesn't make it wrong.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Hillia on April 13, 2014, 08:44:45 PM
The acronym for the set of federal regulations regarding patient confidentiality and other issues is HIPAA.  Not HIPPA.  If you work in health care, you need to know this and use it properly.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Gogi on April 13, 2014, 10:30:20 PM

My latest pet peeve is the incorrect use of apostrophes in ages. Over and over again I see sentences like, "Hannah was three-years-old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska" and "Mike Connor, who is thirty-years-old, was arrested on Monday."

Correct: Hannah was three years old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska.
Correct: In 2001, three-year-old Hannah moved to Alaska with her family.

Correct: Mike Connor, who is thirty years old, was arrested on Monday.
Correct: Thirty-year-old Mike Connor was arrested on Monday.



Hyphens, too.  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on April 14, 2014, 01:04:28 AM

My latest pet peeve is the incorrect use of apostrophes in ages. Over and over again I see sentences like, "Hannah was three-years-old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska" and "Mike Connor, who is thirty-years-old, was arrested on Monday."

Correct: Hannah was three years old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska.
Correct: In 2001, three-year-old Hannah moved to Alaska with her family.

Correct: Mike Connor, who is thirty years old, was arrested on Monday.
Correct: Thirty-year-old Mike Connor was arrested on Monday.



Hyphens, too.  ;)

LOLOL! In my fury, I didn't even notice.  :D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on April 15, 2014, 12:32:52 PM
To quote Judge Judy, "There is no such word as 'tooken'."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Xandraea on April 15, 2014, 12:40:04 PM
To quote Judge Judy, "There is no such word as 'tooken'."

or "broughten"!   -- as defined by urban dictionary: "Another piece of ... backwards, street slang that is slowly helping to erode proper English usage, grammar and meaningful and intelligent communication."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on April 16, 2014, 05:25:20 PM
Or "conversated"

Nobody can "borrow" you anything they own, either.  You can borrow it, they can loan it.  But they can't "borrow" their own possessions.

And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: pwv on April 16, 2014, 09:08:19 PM
people who use  costumer  when they mean  customer.

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Nikko-chan on April 17, 2014, 01:00:02 AM
Or "conversated"

Nobody can "borrow" you anything they own, either.  You can borrow it, they can loan it.  But they can't "borrow" their own possessions.

And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.

Oh yes. I think that is my biggest one ever. It makes me cringe.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: squeakers on April 17, 2014, 01:20:47 AM


Nobody can "borrow" you anything they own, either.  You can borrow it, they can loan it.  But they can't "borrow" their own possessions.


I think that one has been covered before... it's a colloquialism. http://www.folklib.net/history/scansin.shtml
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: mrs_deb on April 17, 2014, 10:46:17 AM
And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.

I cranked about that very thing on Facebook when I was in Florida this winter. 

"So there's a commercial down here for a company called "1-800-ASK-GARY" - a lawyer/doctor referral service. When you have an accident, they want you to dial 1-800-ASK-GARY before speaking to your insurance company, bla bla bla. So why in the name of all that's holy do they have a spokesman who pronounces it as "1-800-AKS-GARY"? Nobody was available for the commercial that actually speaks freakin English?"
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on April 17, 2014, 11:27:58 AM
And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.

I cranked about that very thing on Facebook when I was in Florida this winter. 

"So there's a commercial down here for a company called "1-800-ASK-GARY" - a lawyer/doctor referral service. When you have an accident, they want you to dial 1-800-ASK-GARY before speaking to your insurance company, bla bla bla. So why in the name of all that's holy do they have a spokesman who pronounces it as "1-800-AKS-GARY"? Nobody was available for the commercial that actually speaks freakin English?"

I remember those ads! Drove me crazy.  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on April 17, 2014, 03:47:47 PM
And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.

I cranked about that very thing on Facebook when I was in Florida this winter. 

"So there's a commercial down here for a company called "1-800-ASK-GARY" - a lawyer/doctor referral service. When you have an accident, they want you to dial 1-800-ASK-GARY before speaking to your insurance company, bla bla bla. So why in the name of all that's holy do they have a spokesman who pronounces it as "1-800-AKS-GARY"? Nobody was available for the commercial that actually speaks freakin English?"
Might be Gary himself doing the ad.  I've seen several in the Baltimore market where the spokesperson is the advertiser's mother or daughter or granddaughter.  ::)

And then there was one for the National Aquarium where the spokesman had a pseudo-French accent.  The aquarium's website is aqua.org, but the spokesman sounded like he was saying acquire.org.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on April 18, 2014, 04:38:04 PM

My latest pet peeve is the incorrect use of apostrophes in ages. Over and over again I see sentences like, "Hannah was three-years-old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska" and "Mike Connor, who is thirty-years-old, was arrested on Monday."

Correct: Hannah was three years old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska.
Correct: In 2001, three-year-old Hannah moved to Alaska with her family.

Correct: Mike Connor, who is thirty years old, was arrested on Monday.
Correct: Thirty-year-old Mike Connor was arrested on Monday.



Hyphens, too.  ;)

LOLOL! In my fury, I didn't even notice.  :D

On a related note, it bugs me when people describe a baby as being "one years old" or as a "one-years-old".  I realize, it's probably just habit, because all the higher numbers for years of age do require the plural, but it's just a little twitchy thing for me. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on April 18, 2014, 07:18:57 PM
And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.

I cranked about that very thing on Facebook when I was in Florida this winter. 

"So there's a commercial down here for a company called "1-800-ASK-GARY" - a lawyer/doctor referral service. When you have an accident, they want you to dial 1-800-ASK-GARY before speaking to your insurance company, bla bla bla. So why in the name of all that's holy do they have a spokesman who pronounces it as "1-800-AKS-GARY"? Nobody was available for the commercial that actually speaks freakin English?"
Might be Gary himself doing the ad.  I've seen several in the Baltimore market where the spokesperson is the advertiser's mother or daughter or granddaughter.  ::)

And then there was one for the National Aquarium where the spokesman had a pseudo-French accent.  The aquarium's website is aqua.org, but the spokesman sounded like he was saying acquire.org.

IIRC, the ads use different people who are, supposedly, satisfied clients.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on April 18, 2014, 09:35:19 PM
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

It will never be acceptable to me, and I will continue to shoot it on sight.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on April 18, 2014, 10:09:31 PM
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

It will never be acceptable to me, and I will continue to shoot it on sight.
I think it should also be open season on "liberry" and "chimbley" and "tempchur." 

Also pitcher. A pitcher is a container for holding and pouring liquids.   It is NOT that representational art that hangs on the wall.  That is a picture.

 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on April 18, 2014, 10:11:25 PM
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

It will never be acceptable to me, and I will continue to shoot it on sight.
I think it should also be open season on "liberry" and "chimbley" and "tempchur.

Also pitcher. A pitcher is a container for holding and pouring liquids.   It is NOT that representational art that hangs on the wall.  That is a picture.

 

What about "temp - a - chur"? 'Cause that's how I've always said it with my twang.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on April 20, 2014, 06:27:07 AM
I have recently seen "inbox me." This trend of making non-verbs into verbs is getting old. Yes, I realize that language evolves, but in some cases I think it devolves!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on April 20, 2014, 06:59:27 AM
I won't deny that "making non-verbs into verbs" can be annoying, and feel highly unnecessary; but I gather this is something of an instance of "nothing new under the sun".  I've read that writings from the Elizabethan-and-shortly-thereafter period, show a tendency in that direction, then -- such things as one's being said to "happy" one's friend, or "malice" one's enemy.  Maybe there are times and general milieux when linguistic innovations are apt to run riot; and intervening periods when things settle down, and the crazier neologisms tend to die out.

It's generally accepted that -- as above -- in England in the late 16th / early 17th century, Shakespeare and co. were having wonderful fun trying and seeing what clever and innovative things could be done with the language; and that some of such failed to catch on with said language's users, and died a natural death.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: knitwicca on April 20, 2014, 09:17:26 AM
My ex husband used "irregardless" on a regular basis. He enjoyed seeing me twitch.

It seems few people understand "flammable" and "inflammable" share the same meaning.

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: DanaJ on April 20, 2014, 09:30:22 AM
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

I've never seen this, do you have an example?

Proofreading is an integral part of my job function. The most common mistakes I see are abuses of the apostrophe and capitalization issues. One thing that makes me utterly crazy however is the use of "addicting" where "addictive" should be.

"Heroin is an addictive drug."

"These potato chips are so addicting!" unless the chips are currently injecting a drug like heroin into their little potato veins and are in the process of becoming addicts, then no.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: #borecore on April 20, 2014, 10:09:57 AM
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

I've never seen this, do you have an example?

Proofreading is an integral part of my job function. The most common mistakes I see are abuses of the apostrophe and capitalization issues. One thing that makes me utterly crazy however is the use of "addicting" where "addictive" should be.

"Heroin is an addictive drug."

"These potato chips are so addicting!" unless the chips are currently injecting a drug like heroin into their little potato veins and are in the process of becoming addicts, then no.

"More than" is for things greater in number; "over" is for things on top of or surpassing/after other things.
Some friends (editors, all) and I were coming up with song lyrics and titles that would not work with the alternative inserted:

"Over Words"
"Over a Feeling"
"Head More Than Heels"
"Bridge More Than Troubled Water"
"Somewhere More Than the Rainbow"
"It Ain't More Than Till it's More Than."
"Happy Christmas (War is More Than)"
"Over This"

The confusing or overlapping (and still incorrect, in my books--and by that I mean the books I edit) usage comes with things like "over 50 years old," which should always be "more than 50 years old."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on April 20, 2014, 10:17:00 AM
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

I've never seen this, do you have an example?

Proofreading is an integral part of my job function. The most common mistakes I see are abuses of the apostrophe and capitalization issues. One thing that makes me utterly crazy however is the use of "addicting" where "addictive" should be.

"Heroin is an addictive drug."

"These potato chips are so addicting!" unless the chips are currently injecting a drug like heroin into their little potato veins and are in the process of becoming addicts, then no.

"More than" is for things greater in number; "over" is for things on top of or surpassing/after other things.
Some friends (editors, all) and I were coming up with song lyrics and titles that would not work with the alternative inserted:

"Over Words"
"Over a Feeling"
"Head More Than Heels"
"Bridge More Than Troubled Water"
"Somewhere More Than the Rainbow"
"It Ain't More Than Till it's More Than."
"Happy Christmas (War is More Than)"
"Over This"

The confusing or overlapping (and still incorrect, in my books--and by that I mean the books I edit) usage comes with things like "over 50 years old," which should always be "more than 50 years old."

That drives me up the wall too, and even more so because sometimes I'm not sure which one to use!

(Those all remind me of newspaper headlines, too... ;D)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on April 20, 2014, 10:33:41 AM
I won't deny that "making non-verbs into verbs" can be annoying, and feel highly unnecessary; but I gather this is something of an instance of "nothing new under the sun".  I've read that writings from the Elizabethan-and-shortly-thereafter period, show a tendency in that direction, then -- such things as one's being said to "happy" one's friend, or "malice" one's enemy.  Maybe there are times and general milieux when linguistic innovations are apt to run riot; and intervening periods when things settle down, and the crazier neologisms tend to die out.

It's generally accepted that -- as above -- in England in the late 16th / early 17th century, Shakespeare and co. were having wonderful fun trying and seeing what clever and innovative things could be done with the language; and that some of such failed to catch on with said language's users, and died a natural death.

You're absolutely correct. Sometimes I just feel grumpy about things I read online.  8)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on April 20, 2014, 12:36:30 PM
I won't deny that "making non-verbs into verbs" can be annoying, and feel highly unnecessary; but I gather this is something of an instance of "nothing new under the sun".  I've read that writings from the Elizabethan-and-shortly-thereafter period, show a tendency in that direction, then -- such things as one's being said to "happy" one's friend, or "malice" one's enemy.  Maybe there are times and general milieux when linguistic innovations are apt to run riot; and intervening periods when things settle down, and the crazier neologisms tend to die out.

It's generally accepted that -- as above -- in England in the late 16th / early 17th century, Shakespeare and co. were having wonderful fun trying and seeing what clever and innovative things could be done with the language; and that some of such failed to catch on with said language's users, and died a natural death.

You're absolutely correct. Sometimes I just feel grumpy about things I read online.  8)

For sure -- plenty of things that I read on line, make me feel grumpy or worse...!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on April 20, 2014, 01:07:34 PM
I won't deny that "making non-verbs into verbs" can be annoying, and feel highly unnecessary; but I gather this is something of an instance of "nothing new under the sun".  I've read that writings from the Elizabethan-and-shortly-thereafter period, show a tendency in that direction, then -- such things as one's being said to "happy" one's friend, or "malice" one's enemy.  Maybe there are times and general milieux when linguistic innovations are apt to run riot; and intervening periods when things settle down, and the crazier neologisms tend to die out.

It's generally accepted that -- as above -- in England in the late 16th / early 17th century, Shakespeare and co. were having wonderful fun trying and seeing what clever and innovative things could be done with the language; and that some of such failed to catch on with said language's users, and died a natural death.

You're absolutely correct. Sometimes I just feel grumpy about things I read online.  8)

For sure -- plenty of things that I read on line, make me feel grumpy or worse...!

It's part of being human, I guess.  :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Bijou on April 20, 2014, 04:48:47 PM
Most of the time it doesn't bother me, but if someone is holding forth as knowledgeable about something and they make mistakes like using their instead of there I have to wonder about how much I can trust their information. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mary Lennox on April 20, 2014, 05:01:44 PM
I'm having an ongoing debate with the lady who sends out the birthday announcements at work. She asks me to check the emails to make sure they are correct. I told her the wording was fine, but having every second or third word start with a capital looked weird. She said because it was an announcement, capitalising random words was okay.

No it's not okay. Capital letters belong to proper nouns, the start of a sentence and shouting on the internet.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on April 20, 2014, 05:28:36 PM
I have handwritten recipe books belonging to my grandmother and great-aunt - and I'm the wrong side of 50 - that have not only the Random capital Letter but also random "Quotation" marks. I have recipes for "Sultana" tea Cake and almond "Boats". They didn't even have the excuse of predictive text...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on April 20, 2014, 09:09:19 PM
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

I've never seen this, do you have an example?

Proofreading is an integral part of my job function. The most common mistakes I see are abuses of the apostrophe and capitalization issues. One thing that makes me utterly crazy however is the use of "addicting" where "addictive" should be.

"Heroin is an addictive drug."

"These potato chips are so addicting!" unless the chips are currently injecting a drug like heroin into their little potato veins and are in the process of becoming addicts, then no.

"More than" is for things greater in number; "over" is for things on top of or surpassing/after other things.
Some friends (editors, all) and I were coming up with song lyrics and titles that would not work with the alternative inserted:

"Over Words"
"Over a Feeling"
"Head More Than Heels"
"Bridge More Than Troubled Water"
"Somewhere More Than the Rainbow"
"It Ain't More Than Till it's More Than."
"Happy Christmas (War is More Than)"
"Over This"

The confusing or overlapping (and still incorrect, in my books--and by that I mean the books I edit) usage comes with things like "over 50 years old," which should always be "more than 50 years old."

Actually, "over 50 years old" is an accepted usage per the AP. It's "over" in usages such as "over 100 people attended" that used to be unacceptable.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MrTango on April 20, 2014, 09:55:02 PM
My ex husband used "irregardless" on a regular basis. He enjoyed seeing me twitch.

It seems few people understand "flammable" and "inflammable" share the same meaning.

That's true, but I think that's an example of a failure of the English language in general.  If "inedible" is the opposite of "edible" and "inopportune" is the opposite of "opportune," (not to mention many other examples of adding the prefix "in" to create the antonym of the root word), then "inflammable" should be the opposite of "flammable."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Hillia on April 23, 2014, 04:22:32 PM
I just read an article on a website that talked about the 'repore' two characters on a sitcom had with each other.  Ow.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on April 23, 2014, 11:31:29 PM
My ex husband used "irregardless" on a regular basis. He enjoyed seeing me twitch.

It seems few people understand "flammable" and "inflammable" share the same meaning.

That's true, but I think that's an example of a failure of the English language in general.  If "inedible" is the opposite of "edible" and "inopportune" is the opposite of "opportune," (not to mention many other examples of adding the prefix "in" to create the antonym of the root word), then "inflammable" should be the opposite of "flammable."

The root of "inflammable" is the word "inflame," which means to set afire, or to catch fire. The word "flammable" was coined because the "in" part of "inflammable" can be mistaken for the prefix "in-" meaning "not." It's idiot-proofing ... just like having all phone numbers in movies and TV shows start with "555" (because some people will call numbers they hear on TV) and labeling dog chew toys "eatable" (because some people don't understand the word "edible" because it doesn't have "eat" in it). "Flammable" isn't the language's fault; it's the idiots' fault.

One that *is* the language's fault is the word "sanction." It means both punishment and authorization/approval. A country can impose economic sanctions (the bad kind) against another country, but an organization can "sanction" (the good kind) events -- as in, "the New York State Tiddlywinks Tournament is a World Tiddlywinks Association-sanctioned competition."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on April 24, 2014, 01:35:12 AM
<quote tree snipped>
One that *is* the language's fault is the word "sanction." It means both punishment and authorization/approval. A country can impose economic sanctions (the bad kind) against another country, but an organization can "sanction" (the good kind) events -- as in, "the New York State Tiddlywinks Tournament is a World Tiddlywinks Association-sanctioned competition."

I love words that can hold contradictory meaning.  I think they're one of the delights of English as a language.  They're 'contranyms' or 'antagonyms' or 'autoantonyms'  - I also love a language that has so many odd words to describe its own quirks!  There are probably loads of them, but a few I can think of offhand:

cleave : to separate - or to cling to something.

weather : to get through or withstand something ('weather the storm') - or be worn away

bolt : make secure - or flee (possibly screaming...)

refrain : to hold back from doing something, not to do it - or repeat (as in the refrain to a song, the chorus)

fast : quick, rapid  - or stuck, stable ('held fast')

trim : cut away excess  - or decorate


A probable explanation is that although on the surface we've ended up with one word that apparently has contradictory meanings, what we have here are two words from different roots which have ended up being spelt in the same way.  Etymology dictionaries are wondrous things when you get into word usage!

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Nikko-chan on April 24, 2014, 05:55:43 AM
I just read an article on a website that talked about the 'repore' two characters on a sitcom had with each other.  Ow.

That's supposed to be 'rapport' isn't it? Yeah Hillia, I'm with you. Ow.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on April 24, 2014, 02:14:55 PM
My DH subscribes to a variety of four wheeling and off-roading Jeep magazines. I rarely read them, but I was looking through one the other day and I read the following sentence. It was an article advising drivers on how to beef up their vehicles.

"A powerful vehicle can be had by..."

I suppose that it's grammatically correct, but it still made me wince.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on April 24, 2014, 02:30:41 PM
I just read an article on a website that talked about the 'repore' two characters on a sitcom had with each other.  Ow.

That's supposed to be 'rapport' isn't it? Yeah Hillia, I'm with you. Ow.

The person who wrote that ought to have a copy of the OED thrown at them.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on April 24, 2014, 04:23:51 PM
Someone was telling me about going hiking in a state or national where the water source for the sinks in the toilet facilities was clearly labeled as "not potable".  And watching people wash their hands, splash water on their faces, and then DRINK gulps of it from their hands...

Apparently "Not Potable" is not clear labeling to some people.  But "Don't drink the water from the sink faucets" is going to take a much bigger sign and you'll still have people who don't read it because "it's too many words"...yeah, heard that one - someone asked what the sign said & excused themselves for not reading it because it had "too many words".  It was a historical marker explaining the significance of something that happened in that area...and I heard it at more than one historical marker on that trip - not from the same people.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Onyx_TKD on April 24, 2014, 04:53:13 PM
Someone was telling me about going hiking in a state or national where the water source for the sinks in the toilet facilities was clearly labeled as "not potable".  And watching people wash their hands, splash water on their faces, and then DRINK gulps of it from their hands...

Apparently "Not Potable" is not clear labeling to some people.  But "Don't drink the water from the sink faucets" is going to take a much bigger sign and you'll still have people who don't read it because "it's too many words"...yeah, heard that one - someone asked what the sign said & excused themselves for not reading it because it had "too many words".  It was a historical marker explaining the significance of something that happened in that area...and I heard it at more than one historical marker on that trip - not from the same people.

OTOH, there is also the possibility that they understood "not potable" perfectly well and were willing to take the risk anyway. For example, I know of some natural springs that are labeled as not potable, but that people frequently drink from. IME, "not potable" does not necessarily mean dangerous or contaminated, but rather that it is not known (or tested) to be safe for drinking. So it may mean "drink at your own risk" rather than "don't drink".

Also, you mention "watching people wash their hands" in the list of actions demonstrating that they didn't understand the sign. I would take "not potable" on a bathroom sink to mean that I shouldn't avoid ingesting the water, i.e., don't drink it, don't wet my toothbrush with it, and perhaps avoid getting it in other orifaces like the eyes. I wouldn't interpret that as saying it's not safe for hand-washing, unless I had open wounds on my hands. If the water wasn't safe for hand-washing, then why on earth would they pipe it to a restroom sink in the first place? That's the main purpose of a restroom sink!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on April 24, 2014, 06:22:12 PM
Add replace to that list; it can mean either "keep it and put it back in place" or "get rid of it and buy a new one." 

I ran afoul of that a couple of years ago.  We bought a new front door and the installers asked what they should do with the screen door; I meant the first when I said "replace it," but they obviously interpreted it the second way, because it was ripped off and too bent to use. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Outdoor Girl on April 25, 2014, 08:48:16 AM
Just got this email today from someone in the organization who is leaving.  This went to our division as a whole.  I've never met the individual in person.  What is with all the quotation marks?!?!?  Made me laugh and wonder what she was really saying.

As some of you may know, I have decided to leave [employer] to continue my career [with employer].

My journey with [employer] these past 8 years has been the ‘most amazing’, the ‘most fulfilling’, the ‘most educating’ and above all the ‘most cherished’ one. I feel extremely privileged having got the opportunity to know and work with so many talented individuals from diverse backgrounds who are so welcoming and friendly. It has truly been an ‘enriching life experience’ for me.

As I take this next step in my career, I take with me all the knowledge and experience I have gained working with all of you.
Thank you all for your support, patience, and friendship over the years. You are a special group of people and I will definitely miss you.

Please keep in touch by adding me to LinkedIn or other social media outlets. Remember, life is a journey, not a destination.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on April 25, 2014, 09:35:30 AM
"Reign" for "rein" is making me crazy.

I suppose the problem is that most people no longer ride or drive horses, so metaphors like "taking the reins" or "giving free rein" no longer resonate. Instead, they realize those terms have something to do with control, and "reign" is control, right? So, they give people free reign to take the reigns.

It's bad enough in daily writings, but when I saw it show up in "Ironman" I wanted to cry. Do they not use proofreaders?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MrTango on April 25, 2014, 01:25:29 PM
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

I've never seen this, do you have an example?

Proofreading is an integral part of my job function. The most common mistakes I see are abuses of the apostrophe and capitalization issues. One thing that makes me utterly crazy however is the use of "addicting" where "addictive" should be.

"Heroin is an addictive drug."

"These potato chips are so addicting!" unless the chips are currently injecting a drug like heroin into their little potato veins and are in the process of becoming addicts, then no.

"More than" is for things greater in number; "over" is for things on top of or surpassing/after other things.
Some friends (editors, all) and I were coming up with song lyrics and titles that would not work with the alternative inserted:

"Over Words"
"Over a Feeling"
"Head More Than Heels"
"Bridge More Than Troubled Water"
"Somewhere More Than the Rainbow"
"It Ain't More Than Till it's More Than."
"Happy Christmas (War is More Than)"
"Over This"

The confusing or overlapping (and still incorrect, in my books--and by that I mean the books I edit) usage comes with things like "over 50 years old," which should always be "more than 50 years old."

Actually, "over 50 years old" is an accepted usage per the AP. It's "over" in usages such as "over 100 people attended" that used to be unacceptable.

I always thought of it as whether it's a discrete count or a value along a scale.  For values along a scale (i.e. temperature, depth, pressure, height) where we just happen to have set units, but where we can have values between those units, one can use "over." For things that are counted (as opposed to a scale where you can have portions of a unit), such as apples, people, grains of sand, etc, one should use "more than."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Giraffe, Esq on April 25, 2014, 02:54:54 PM
"Reign" for "rein" is making me crazy.

I suppose the problem is that most people no longer ride or drive horses, so metaphors like "taking the reins" or "giving free rein" no longer resonate. Instead, they realize those terms have something to do with control, and "reign" is control, right? So, they give people free reign to take the reigns.

It's bad enough in daily writings, but when I saw it show up in "Ironman" I wanted to cry. Do they not use proofreaders?

Yes!  There's an ad in the train and bus stations around here, for Crown Royal, that has a slogan about knowing "when to reign in and when to reign on".  No no no no no!!!  It's rein in!  Makes me twitch every time I see it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on April 25, 2014, 03:29:56 PM
Cuff, cuff, cuff!  This is what I wanted to yell at the two women discussing one's "rotator cup" tear.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on April 25, 2014, 04:18:16 PM
I saw this on a Facebook feed this week: fist of cuffs.  :o
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on April 25, 2014, 05:59:58 PM
Aaak. Rotator cup tear and fist of cuffs.

I had a friend from high school who graduated a few years before me and he joined the US Army. When he came back to visit, he wore a hat that said "U.S. Cavalry" but he kept insisting that he was a member of the Calvary. When I pronounced it "Cavalry" he would tell me I was wrong, so I gave up.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mikayla on April 26, 2014, 06:47:02 PM
"I'm going too the store"

"I'm to tired too care".

Honestly, if they could fix this one thing, my Twitch Quotient would get cut in half on the spot.

(I may have mentioned this earlier, but at that point I think it was "your" vs "you're.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on April 26, 2014, 06:58:21 PM
"I'm going too the store"

"I'm to tired too care".

Honestly, if they could fix this one thing, my Twitch Quotient would get cut in half on the spot.

(I may have mentioned this earlier, but at that point I think it was "your" vs "you're.)

This reminds me of a picture I saw once...

(http://blog.imprezzio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/TheyTheirTheyre.jpg)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mikayla on April 26, 2014, 07:08:33 PM
Ok, I seriously cracked up at "thank you for your interest in the Internet". 

Can I snag that?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on April 26, 2014, 07:11:09 PM
It's not my image, so I don't see why not. :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on April 27, 2014, 03:02:44 AM
I follow a lot of cats on Facebook - as in an embarrassingly large number. Over and over again I see sentences like the following crop up on these pages:

"My cat loves to have his tummy pet."
"Check out what this kitten does when he gets pet."
"She loves to be pet right when I'm trying to leave for work."

Petted.

PETTED.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on April 27, 2014, 08:44:02 AM
Cuff, cuff, cuff!  This is what I wanted to yell at the two women discussing one's "rotator cup" tear.

All I'm thinking is OW OW OW.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on April 27, 2014, 09:01:08 AM
'Inner-esting'.  I'm hearing it more and more and it's getting on my nerves. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on April 27, 2014, 03:47:54 PM
'Inner-esting'.  I'm hearing it more and more and it's getting on my nerves.

Um...that's how most people I know (myself included) pronounce interesting. It would sound forced to emphasize the "t." Perhaps it's a Southernism making its way northward?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Teenyweeny on April 27, 2014, 04:52:02 PM
'Inner-esting'.  I'm hearing it more and more and it's getting on my nerves.

Um...that's how most people I know (myself included) pronounce interesting. It would sound forced to emphasize the "t." Perhaps it's a Southernism making its way northward?

UK here: I only ever hear 'int-REST-ing', stress on second syllable, or possibly 'in-trest-in', even stress.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on April 27, 2014, 10:59:01 PM
To go with "axed", their partners "excape" and "expresso."  ::)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on April 28, 2014, 01:04:14 PM
Someone was telling me about going hiking in a state or national where the water source for the sinks in the toilet facilities was clearly labeled as "not potable".  And watching people wash their hands, splash water on their faces, and then DRINK gulps of it from their hands...

Apparently "Not Potable" is not clear labeling to some people.  But "Don't drink the water from the sink faucets" is going to take a much bigger sign and you'll still have people who don't read it because "it's too many words"...yeah, heard that one - someone asked what the sign said & excused themselves for not reading it because it had "too many words".  It was a historical marker explaining the significance of something that happened in that area...and I heard it at more than one historical marker on that trip - not from the same people.

OTOH, there is also the possibility that they understood "not potable" perfectly well and were willing to take the risk anyway. For example, I know of some natural springs that are labeled as not potable, but that people frequently drink from. IME, "not potable" does not necessarily mean dangerous or contaminated, but rather that it is not known (or tested) to be safe for drinking. So it may mean "drink at your own risk" rather than "don't drink".

Also, you mention "watching people wash their hands" in the list of actions demonstrating that they didn't understand the sign. I would take "not potable" on a bathroom sink to mean that I shouldn't avoid ingesting the water, i.e., don't drink it, don't wet my toothbrush with it, and perhaps avoid getting it in other orifaces like the eyes. I wouldn't interpret that as saying it's not safe for hand-washing, unless I had open wounds on my hands. If the water wasn't safe for hand-washing, then why on earth would they pipe it to a restroom sink in the first place? That's the main purpose of a restroom sink!

Handwashing would be normal - splashing my face & risking getting it in my eyes and drinking it would be uses I'd think twice about.  I may not have been clear...

The person who told me about it asked the lady if she knew that the water wasn't "potable" and got a snarky comment back that indicated that she didn't care what the word meant, she was thirsty & hadn't brought any bottled water with her so she was drinking this tap water...I gather that the first woman was a seasoned hiker with her own source of drinking water while the other woman was used to city water that was heavily treated and had no idea what she MIGHT be risking (sulfur in the water, bacteria in the water, or something else that the park service didn't want to be blamed for if people reacted to it once a year when the water in the small lake or pond "turned over" and tasted bad).

Like the woman who didn't want vegetables grown in dirt but the nice clean ones packaged in plastic at the store...the experience of the woman drinking the non-potable water might not have led her to know that not all water goes through a water treatment plant with various filters & sanitizing methods....
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on April 28, 2014, 01:07:49 PM
I follow a lot of cats on Facebook - as in an embarrassingly large number. Over and over again I see sentences like the following crop up on these pages:

"My cat loves to have his tummy pet."
"Check out what this kitten does when he gets pet."
"She loves to be pet right when I'm trying to leave for work."

Petted.

PETTED.

My theory is "bad computer translation" and ignore the misuse because the difference won't translate back into the poster's original language.  Then I go have a cup of hot tea to soothe my nerves.  Snarky & Evil may add a little something besides lemon & honey to the tea....
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mikayla on April 28, 2014, 01:19:00 PM
'Inner-esting'.  I'm hearing it more and more and it's getting on my nerves.

Um...that's how most people I know (myself included) pronounce interesting. It would sound forced to emphasize the "t." Perhaps it's a Southernism making its way northward?

Wasn't there a TV character from long ago who used "verrrry interesting" and pronounced it with that emphasis on the t?  I remember my parents laughing about it and talking to each other that way.   Maybe it landed in someone's DNA!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on April 28, 2014, 01:44:29 PM
'Inner-esting'.  I'm hearing it more and more and it's getting on my nerves.

Um...that's how most people I know (myself included) pronounce interesting. It would sound forced to emphasize the "t." Perhaps it's a Southernism making its way northward?

Wasn't there a TV character from long ago who used "verrrry interesting" and pronounced it with that emphasis on the t?  I remember my parents laughing about it and talking to each other that way.   Maybe it landed in someone's DNA!

Arte Johnson on Laugh-In.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkFx3TaOunA (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkFx3TaOunA)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on April 28, 2014, 03:26:16 PM
I suppose asking people to observe the difference between "lie" and "lay" is a lost cause. But why is there an outbreak of the spelling "payed" popping up around me everywhere? Surely most people have seen the word in print enough to notice it's an irregular past tense.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Onyx_TKD on April 28, 2014, 03:29:29 PM
Someone was telling me about going hiking in a state or national where the water source for the sinks in the toilet facilities was clearly labeled as "not potable".  And watching people wash their hands, splash water on their faces, and then DRINK gulps of it from their hands...

Apparently "Not Potable" is not clear labeling to some people.  But "Don't drink the water from the sink faucets" is going to take a much bigger sign and you'll still have people who don't read it because "it's too many words"...yeah, heard that one - someone asked what the sign said & excused themselves for not reading it because it had "too many words".  It was a historical marker explaining the significance of something that happened in that area...and I heard it at more than one historical marker on that trip - not from the same people.

OTOH, there is also the possibility that they understood "not potable" perfectly well and were willing to take the risk anyway. For example, I know of some natural springs that are labeled as not potable, but that people frequently drink from. IME, "not potable" does not necessarily mean dangerous or contaminated, but rather that it is not known (or tested) to be safe for drinking. So it may mean "drink at your own risk" rather than "don't drink".

Also, you mention "watching people wash their hands" in the list of actions demonstrating that they didn't understand the sign. I would take "not potable" on a bathroom sink to mean that I shouldn't avoid ingesting the water, i.e., don't drink it, don't wet my toothbrush with it, and perhaps avoid getting it in other orifaces like the eyes. I wouldn't interpret that as saying it's not safe for hand-washing, unless I had open wounds on my hands. If the water wasn't safe for hand-washing, then why on earth would they pipe it to a restroom sink in the first place? That's the main purpose of a restroom sink!

Handwashing would be normal - splashing my face & risking getting it in my eyes and drinking it would be uses I'd think twice about.  I may not have been clear...

The person who told me about it asked the lady if she knew that the water wasn't "potable" and got a snarky comment back that indicated that she didn't care what the word meant, she was thirsty & hadn't brought any bottled water with her so she was drinking this tap water...I gather that the first woman was a seasoned hiker with her own source of drinking water while the other woman was used to city water that was heavily treated and had no idea what she MIGHT be risking (sulfur in the water, bacteria in the water, or something else that the park service didn't want to be blamed for if people reacted to it once a year when the water in the small lake or pond "turned over" and tasted bad).

Like the woman who didn't want vegetables grown in dirt but the nice clean ones packaged in plastic at the store...the experience of the woman drinking the non-potable water might not have led her to know that not all water goes through a water treatment plant with various filters & sanitizing methods....

To me, that sounds like the woman consciously chose to take the risk of drinking the water even after she definitely understood that the sign advised against it. So a sign that said "Don't drink the water from the sink faucets" instead of "not potable" probably wouldn't have made any difference--it was a risk she was willing to take. (Actually, if she didn't act surprised at your friend's warning, then I'd suspect she already had an idea of what the sign was getting at, even if she wasn't familiar with the word "potable" specifically) The snark in response to someone politely (I assume) making sure she understood the risk was rude, but choosing to risk drinking "non-potable" water doesn't necessarily indicate that she didn't understand the sign. She may have been foolish and ill-prepared not to have carried her own water, but choosing to risk ingesting the restroom water rather than becoming dehydrated was not necessarily an unreasonable choice (unless the water was known to currently have a dangerous contaminant, which I doubt).
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on April 28, 2014, 04:06:19 PM
Years ago my local DIY store had a large warning near the door that basically informed us that nothing they had on site should go in your mouth. Apart from my regular grumble of 'who needs to be told that?' (I know, it's horrifying how many people actually do) what bugged me was the statement that paint, or whatever, 'could be harmful if digested'.

Could be harmful a long way before digestion, I always thought. Ingestion. Ingestion.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on April 28, 2014, 09:31:44 PM
i used to volunteer at an animal shelter, and it was a three-way tie as to what made me twitch the most: people using "spay" as the adjective/past participle ("Is the cat spay?"), or "spayded," or those who knew it was "spayed" but spelled it "spade."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: JustEstelle on April 28, 2014, 11:46:22 PM
I have a facebook friend who constantly misuses "whom."  For example, she would say something like this:  "My best friend whom is coming to visit is planning to stay a week."  I just want to scream, "WHO!!!  My best friend who is coming to visit!!!!!" 

Gah!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on April 28, 2014, 11:47:13 PM
I saw this on a Facebook feed this week: fist of cuffs.  :o

That's kind of fun!

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on April 29, 2014, 02:50:11 PM
I suppose asking people to observe the difference between "lie" and "lay" is a lost cause. But why is there an outbreak of the spelling "payed" popping up around me everywhere? Surely most people have seen the word in print enough to notice it's an irregular past tense.

You've noticed that, too? I don't get it.  :-[
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on April 29, 2014, 02:52:34 PM
I saw this on a Facebook feed this week: fist of cuffs.  :o

That's kind of fun!

It would be fun if they were using that intentionally. I'm trying to imagine how they envision that phrase.  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on May 04, 2014, 01:22:05 AM
Saw this today and loved it:

(https://scontent-b-dfw.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1.0-9/10338718_586452811468997_3239960765516852163_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: kckgirl on May 04, 2014, 04:55:25 AM
I love it, too, Danika!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: oz diva on May 04, 2014, 06:15:12 AM
Star-craving - love it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on May 04, 2014, 06:22:30 AM
Perfect!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MorgnsGrl on May 04, 2014, 06:24:09 AM
I haven't read all the comments so I don't know if anyone has mentioned "Your Grammar Sucks" on YouTube. It's quite funny. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA6687CF25DE17420
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on May 04, 2014, 10:51:02 AM
Saw this today and loved it:

(https://scontent-b-dfw.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1.0-9/10338718_586452811468997_3239960765516852163_n.jpg)

Persactly!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 09, 2014, 03:06:58 AM
Brought to mind by a thing which recently showed up elsewhere on eHell: this doesn’t precisely make me twitch, but I do find it mildly annoying – the confusion which people often display in writing, with “martial / marshal / marshall”.

martial (adjective): “of or pertaining to war or the armed forces” – most common correct uses are in “martial law” or “court-martial”.

marshal: (noun) – one who keeps things systematic / maintains order; and, a designated high military rank. (Verb) – to order / arrange / control things.

Marshall: a fairly common surname; also, if someone marshals things, he / she is marshalling them (two l’s).

Many people mix these up in an assortment of ways – the commonest probably being, to spell the noun marshal, with two l’s.  As said, this business irritates me only mildly.  It’s usually clear enough what people mean; and just because the distinctions are clear and seem obvious to me, doesn’t mean that will be so for everyone – and no doubt nearly all of us have a grammar / orthography / word-use blind spot or two somewhere. This one is  a bit of a niggle for me, though.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: #borecore on May 09, 2014, 07:11:42 AM
Relatives by marriage had a common surname with a less common spelling (see Cabbageweevil's post). They were forever correcting people on its spelling. The family patriarch's vanity license plate?

"ONE L"

(Didn't hurt that his first name was Al!)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 09, 2014, 09:54:42 AM
Double-versus-single l's -- among other single / double situations -- can be tricky on the nomenclature scene.  There are "thorny thickets" involving the surname Eliot (as with the poet, T.S.), and its "l" and "t" variations -- the name originating from the Anglo-Scottish border area. There's a little verse about it, citing names from that part of the world:

The double L and single T
Descend from Minto and Wolflee.
The double T and single L
Mark the old race in Stobs that dwell.
The single L and single T
The Eliots of St. Germains be;
But double T and double L --
Who they are, nobody can tell.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on May 09, 2014, 10:15:41 AM
I saw this on a Facebook feed this week: fist of cuffs.  :o

That's kind of fun!

It would be fun if they were using that intentionally. I'm trying to imagine how they envision that phrase.  :P

Oh, but that's the fun part!

If you think of "cuff" as a verb--you cuff someone by hitting them lightly with the palm of the hand. So turn that into a noun, and you have a fist that seems to be only made up of hitting people.

A bunch of linguists have called these eggcorns, and started a database of them.

http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/

 My mother used to love finding these; she'd call me at work (interrupting both her and me) every time she found one.

Her fave was "next store to the post office"; mine is "whoa is me."

Wonderful imagery about what it is that they are thinking when they translate a term they've really only *heard* into words on paper. The Internet is wonderful for that!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on May 09, 2014, 02:03:30 PM
I saw this on a Facebook feed this week: fist of cuffs.  :o

That's kind of fun!

It would be fun if they were using that intentionally. I'm trying to imagine how they envision that phrase.  :P

Oh, but that's the fun part!

If you think of "cuff" as a verb--you cuff someone by hitting them lightly with the palm of the hand. So turn that into a noun, and you have a fist that seems to be only made up of hitting people.

A bunch of linguists have called these eggcorns, and started a database of them.

http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/

 My mother used to love finding these; she'd call me at work (interrupting both her and me) every time she found one.

Her fave was "next store to the post office"; mine is "whoa is me."

Wonderful imagery about what it is that they are thinking when they translate a term they've really only *heard* into words on paper. The Internet is wonderful for that!

Reminds me of the people who called the radio station requesting "Hooked on the Ceiling" by B.J. Thomas.  ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on May 09, 2014, 02:36:05 PM
My poor kids had to hear me shriek to never play a song in our home again

"Hall of Fat Girl"   

okay so I'm stupid and partially deaf, Hollerback Girl - don't want to hear it again, E V E R !
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on May 09, 2014, 03:07:17 PM
My poor kids had to hear me shriek to never play a song in our home again

"Hall of Fat Girl"   

okay so I'm stupid and partially deaf, Hollerback Girl - don't want to hear it again, E V E R !

Redneck Gravy you owe me a new keyboard.  Also, Diet Dr. Pepper through one's nose really hurts!  ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Specky on May 09, 2014, 05:01:44 PM
Opps instead of oops
Alot, alittle
apostrophe abuse
Him and me.  Her and him...
We had went
We was
text speak
"You ain't drank nothing"
"I don't got no"
If you had gave me...
Myself and...
I seen her
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on May 09, 2014, 05:08:26 PM
Not really grammar or spelling, but while we're on the song sidetrack:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQ4c54rCJ_k

(Caller to a radio station in the Dominican Republic wants them to play the song asking "Are those Reebok or Nike?"  It's absolutely worth listening through to hear the whole clip - you'll never be able to "un-hear" those lyrics . . .)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 09, 2014, 11:23:58 PM
A bunch of linguists have called these eggcorns...

 My mother used to love finding these; she'd call me at work (interrupting both her and me) every time she found one.

Her fave was "next store to the post office"; mine is "whoa is me."

The following is not a mishearing / mistranscribing kind of botch, but something deliberate -- anyway, brought back a memory from adolescence. The headmaster of my school (in England) was a rather pompous individual -- Mr. Rowe. He invited ridicule speech-wise, in that he spoke with a very plummy-voiced upper-class English accent, with a curious "mooing" intonation that was all his own: plus, he couldn't pronounce his r's -- they came out as "w".  His pupils delighted in mocking his way of speaking -- were particularly fond of the invented phrase "Wowe [woe] is me".  Unkind, I suppose -- but IMO one's schooldays are not an outstandingly happy time, and kids need some sort of a safety-valve.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on May 10, 2014, 06:31:52 AM
A bunch of linguists have called these eggcorns...

 My mother used to love finding these; she'd call me at work (interrupting both her and me) every time she found one.

Her fave was "next store to the post office"; mine is "whoa is me."

The following is not a mishearing / mistranscribing kind of botch, but something deliberate -- anyway, brought back a memory from adolescence. The headmaster of my school (in England) was a rather pompous individual -- Mr. Rowe. He invited ridicule speech-wise, in that he spoke with a very plummy-voiced upper-class English accent, with a curious "mooing" intonation that was all his own: plus, he couldn't pronounce his r's -- they came out as "w".  His pupils delighted in mocking his way of speaking -- were particularly fond of the invented phrase "Wowe [woe] is me".  Unkind, I suppose -- but IMO one's schooldays are not an outstandingly happy time, and kids need some sort of a safety-valve.
Did anyone else flash to "Mawwiage. Mawwiage is what bwings us togethew today. Mawwiage, that bwessed awwangement, that dweam within a dweam. And wove, twue wove, wiww fowwow you fowevah and evah…"?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: iridaceae on May 10, 2014, 06:53:54 AM
Nope. I went to "Welease Wodewick!"
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on May 10, 2014, 07:44:49 AM
A bunch of linguists have called these eggcorns...

 My mother used to love finding these; she'd call me at work (interrupting both her and me) every time she found one.

Her fave was "next store to the post office"; mine is "whoa is me."

The following is not a mishearing / mistranscribing kind of botch, but something deliberate -- anyway, brought back a memory from adolescence. The headmaster of my school (in England) was a rather pompous individual -- Mr. Rowe. He invited ridicule speech-wise, in that he spoke with a very plummy-voiced upper-class English accent, with a curious "mooing" intonation that was all his own: plus, he couldn't pronounce his r's -- they came out as "w".  His pupils delighted in mocking his way of speaking -- were particularly fond of the invented phrase "Wowe [woe] is me".  Unkind, I suppose -- but IMO one's schooldays are not an outstandingly happy time, and kids need some sort of a safety-valve.
Did anyone else flash to "Mawwiage. Mawwiage is what bwings us togethew today. Mawwiage, that bwessed awwangement, that dweam within a dweam. And wove, twue wove, wiww fowwow you fowevah and evah…"?

I did!  :D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on May 10, 2014, 09:46:11 AM
My poor kids had to hear me shriek to never play a song in our home again

"Hall of Fat Girl"   

okay so I'm stupid and partially deaf, Hollerback Girl - don't want to hear it again, E V E R !


Redneck Gravy you owe me a new keyboard.  Also, Diet Dr. Pepper through one's nose really hurts!  ;D

Oh my, so sorry !

Also, more corrections, it's: Hollaback Girl   (there did I finally get it right?)  aggghhh
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 10, 2014, 02:08:36 PM
Did anyone else flash to "Mawwiage. Mawwiage is what bwings us togethew today. Mawwiage, that bwessed awwangement, that dweam within a dweam. And wove, twue wove, wiww fowwow you fowevah and evah…"?

This, and iridaceae's "Welease Wodewick" -- perhaps because I'm not North American, perhaps because I'm culturally deprived, or both -- these references mean nothing to me. Would be very grateful for elucidation !
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: athersgeo on May 10, 2014, 02:11:51 PM
Did anyone else flash to "Mawwiage. Mawwiage is what bwings us togethew today. Mawwiage, that bwessed awwangement, that dweam within a dweam. And wove, twue wove, wiww fowwow you fowevah and evah…"?

This, and iridaceae's "Welease Wodewick" -- perhaps because I'm not North American, perhaps because I'm culturally deprived, or both -- these references mean nothing to me. Would be very grateful for elucidation !

I think they're either Monty Python or Four Weddings and a Funeral quotes
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on May 10, 2014, 02:27:58 PM
Did anyone else flash to "Mawwiage. Mawwiage is what bwings us togethew today. Mawwiage, that bwessed awwangement, that dweam within a dweam. And wove, twue wove, wiww fowwow you fowevah and evah…"?

This, and iridaceae's "Welease Wodewick" -- perhaps because I'm not North American, perhaps because I'm culturally deprived, or both -- these references mean nothing to me. Would be very grateful for elucidation !

I think they're either Monty Python or Four Weddings and a Funeral quotes

The "Mawwage" one is from The Princess Bride.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Marga on May 10, 2014, 11:21:20 PM
Did anyone else flash to "Mawwiage. Mawwiage is what bwings us togethew today. Mawwiage, that bwessed awwangement, that dweam within a dweam. And wove, twue wove, wiww fowwow you fowevah and evah…"?

This, and iridaceae's "Welease Wodewick" -- perhaps because I'm not North American, perhaps because I'm culturally deprived, or both -- these references mean nothing to me. Would be very grateful for elucidation !

I think they're either Monty Python or Four Weddings and a Funeral quotes

The "Mawwage" one is from The Princess Bride.

And "Welease Wodewick" is from Monty Python's "Life of Brian".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 11, 2014, 12:23:36 AM
Thanks for replies.  I have just got to see The Princess Bride some time -- the whole Internet seems replete with quotes from it !
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on May 11, 2014, 03:49:12 AM
My poor kids had to hear me shriek to never play a song in our home again

"Hall of Fat Girl"   

okay so I'm stupid and partially deaf, Hollerback Girl - don't want to hear it again, E V E R !

That reminds me of this story. I don't listen to popular music, but my husband occasionally does. Some years ago, he kept singing bits of a popular song out loud, the most often repeated line being "Take my picture." He'd sing it over and over and, never having heard the song, I didn't think much about it.

Then one day I heard the song and realized that they were most definitely not saying "Take my picture." They were saying "Slap my b-word up."  :o
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: athersgeo on May 11, 2014, 06:23:56 AM
Did anyone else flash to "Mawwiage. Mawwiage is what bwings us togethew today. Mawwiage, that bwessed awwangement, that dweam within a dweam. And wove, twue wove, wiww fowwow you fowevah and evah…"?

This, and iridaceae's "Welease Wodewick" -- perhaps because I'm not North American, perhaps because I'm culturally deprived, or both -- these references mean nothing to me. Would be very grateful for elucidation !

I think they're either Monty Python or Four Weddings and a Funeral quotes

The "Mawwage" one is from The Princess Bride.

*smacks forehead* Doh! (Still, I was half right - got the Monty Python one at least!)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on May 11, 2014, 02:18:32 PM
My poor kids had to hear me shriek to never play a song in our home again

"Hall of Fat Girl"   

okay so I'm stupid and partially deaf, Hollerback Girl - don't want to hear it again, E V E R !

That reminds me of this story. I don't listen to popular music, but my husband occasionally does. Some years ago, he kept singing bits of a popular song out loud, the most often repeated line being "Take my picture." He'd sing it over and over and, never having heard the song, I didn't think much about it.

Then one day I heard the song and realized that they were most definitely not saying "Take my picture." They were saying "Slap my b-word up."  :o

I love that song and have the album, but that line is unsettling and I can't play it when the kiddos are around.

A few years after that song came out, DH and I heard a song that we thought sounded like "tube socks." We wondered why someone would write a song about tube sox. I don't think the filters here will change the words. The song lyrics are actually "rude box" which doesn't mean anything to American ears, but apparently is offensive or risqué somewhere overseas.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: PlainJane on May 11, 2014, 08:31:56 PM
I have to sit on my hands and grit my teeth when I see someone use 'apart' when they mean 'a part'.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on May 12, 2014, 11:20:18 AM
I proofread a paper for a classmate last week...

The point was mute (apparently it couldn't speak for itself)

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on May 12, 2014, 01:13:58 PM
People who use 'simplistic' when 'simple' is intended.

I once had to catalog an article reviewing children's books about the ancient world.  The author of the article consistently used phrases like, 'the author ofthisbook presents rather complex aspects of Egyptian religion in a simplistic way that children can understand'. 

I don't know about you but I've never heard 'simplistic' used in a positive sense. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on May 12, 2014, 01:19:34 PM
People who use 'simplistic' when 'simple' is intended.

I once had to catalog an article reviewing children's books about the ancient world.  The author of the article consistently used phrases like, 'the author ofthisbook presents rather complex aspects of Egyptian religion in a simplistic way that children can understand'. 

I don't know about you but I've never heard 'simplistic' used in a positive sense.

Ironically, it means that writer finds "simple" too simplistic for his/her tastes.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: wx4caster on May 12, 2014, 01:30:29 PM
Thanks for replies.  I have just got to see The Princess Bride some time -- the whole Internet seems replete with quotes from it !

Not seen The Princess Bride. Inconceivable!

I know I saw it mentioned earlier, but the use of good instead of well.  It's like nails on the chalkboard to me.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on May 12, 2014, 01:39:13 PM
I know I saw it mentioned earlier, but the use of good instead of well.  It's like nails on the chalkboard to me.

I'm always afraid to get it wrong. Please, tell me if I'm correct in the following:

Q: How are you doing?
A: Well  <- that's the right answer because it is an adverb that describes "doing"

Q: How are you?
A: Good <- that's the right answer because it's an adjective that describes "I/you"

And the only time you would answer "How are you?" with "well" is if you had been sick for a long time and now you're no longer sick, so you're well again.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: wx4caster on May 12, 2014, 01:51:12 PM
I know I saw it mentioned earlier, but the use of good instead of well.  It's like nails on the chalkboard to me.

I'm always afraid to get it wrong. Please, tell me if I'm correct in the following:

Q: How are you doing?
A: Well  <- that's the right answer because it is an adverb that describes "doing"

Q: How are you?
A: Good <- that's the right answer because it's an adjective that describes "I/you"

And the only time you would answer "How are you?" with "well" is if you had been sick for a long time and now you're no longer sick, so you're well again.

Single word answers like that are fine. It's the phrase "He did good" that make me want to stick my fingers in my ears.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on May 12, 2014, 02:24:09 PM
I proofread a paper for a classmate last week...

The point was mute (apparently it couldn't speak for itself)

I know a few people who use "mute point," too. it bugs me!  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on May 12, 2014, 02:27:55 PM
Corporate-speak annoys me no end and I could go on for pages about it, but for now I'll just mention the two most recent obnoxious trends where I work.

Using "ask" instead of "question"
"How can we increase our profits this quarter? That's the big ask."
"That sounds like a great plan but I have a few asks about it."

Using "spend" instead of "payment" or similar
"Unless we make a better widget we can't expect our clients to increase their spend with us."

I want to scream whenever I hear either one - and both are spreading like wildfire.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on May 12, 2014, 02:31:45 PM
Corporate-speak annoys me no end and I could go on for pages about it, but for now I'll just mention the two most recent obnoxious trends where I work.

Using "ask" instead of "question"
"How can we increase our profits this quarter? That's the big ask."
"That sounds like a great plan but I have a few asks about it."

Using "spend" instead of "payment" or similar
"Unless we make a better widget we can't expect our clients to increase their spend with us."

I want to scream whenever I hear either one - and both are spreading like wildfire.

I have never heard those before. How can anyone speak that way and expect to sound professional?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on May 12, 2014, 02:45:29 PM
Corporate-speak annoys me no end and I could go on for pages about it, but for now I'll just mention the two most recent obnoxious trends where I work.

Using "ask" instead of "question"
"How can we increase our profits this quarter? That's the big ask."
"That sounds like a great plan but I have a few asks about it."

Using "spend" instead of "payment" or similar
"Unless we make a better widget we can't expect our clients to increase their spend with us."

I want to scream whenever I hear either one - and both are spreading like wildfire.

I have never heard those before. How can anyone speak that way and expect to sound professional?

Wha...?  I'm...?  Huh?  My brain hurts.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 12, 2014, 02:49:11 PM
Thanks for replies.  I have just got to see The Princess Bride some time -- the whole Internet seems replete with quotes from it !

Not seen The Princess Bride. Inconceivable!

I know -- I live under a rock / on a remote island in the Outer Hebrides...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on May 12, 2014, 03:32:13 PM
Corporate-speak annoys me no end and I could go on for pages about it, but for now I'll just mention the two most recent obnoxious trends where I work.

Using "ask" instead of "question"
"How can we increase our profits this quarter? That's the big ask."
"That sounds like a great plan but I have a few asks about it."

Using "spend" instead of "payment" or similar
"Unless we make a better widget we can't expect our clients to increase their spend with us."

I want to scream whenever I hear either one - and both are spreading like wildfire.

I have never heard those before. How can anyone speak that way and expect to sound professional?

Both atrocities are coming from one person high up in the organization. Where he got them I have no idea, but people are copying him so they can sound "important." <rolls eyes>

And cabbageweevil, I've never seen The Princess Bride either.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on May 12, 2014, 07:36:27 PM
Corporate-speak annoys me no end and I could go on for pages about it, but for now I'll just mention the two most recent obnoxious trends where I work.

Using "ask" instead of "question"
"How can we increase our profits this quarter? That's the big ask."
"That sounds like a great plan but I have a few asks about it."

Using "spend" instead of "payment" or similar
"Unless we make a better widget we can't expect our clients to increase their spend with us."

I want to scream whenever I hear either one - and both are spreading like wildfire.

I've made my peace with "ask" as a noun in the fundraising context, where "the ask" is shorthand for "that point in our relationship with a potential donor where we actually ask him/her for a contribution."

But "ask" as a substitute for "question" -- as in "I have some asks about this"? That's just wrong.

"Spend" should never be a noun. What's wrong with "increase their spending" or "spend more"? Both are just one little extra syllable.

My former boss used to verb the noun "incentive": "I need to find ways to incent my staff." Sounded as if she was going to spray us with cologne or something.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: RooRoo on May 13, 2014, 12:12:23 AM
Many of my "favorites" have already been mentioned. Here are two I haven't seen yet:

"On a daily basis." It just grates on my ear. What's wrong with "Daily?"

This one makes me laugh more than anything. My mother brought it to my attention about 50 years ago, when she said: 

"If you're 'nauseous,' it means looking at you makes me nauseated!"

I guess that we baby boomers misused it often enough to get it into the dictionaries though; in fact, it is now listed as the first meaning!

...By the way, our Bull Terrier gets called "R.O.U.S." frequently. (Another Princess Bride reference.) And, of course, my DH and I frequently respond to each others' requests with "As you wish!"
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MariaE on May 13, 2014, 02:30:58 AM
Thanks for replies.  I have just got to see The Princess Bride some time -- the whole Internet seems replete with quotes from it !

Not seen The Princess Bride. Inconceivable!

I know -- I live under a rock / on a remote island in the Outer Hebrides...

I saw it at age 16 and was sorely disappointed because it had been hyped so much and just couldn't live up to my expectations. Saw it again at age 33 with MUCH lower expectations and thought it reasonably cute. It'll never be a favourite though.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 13, 2014, 05:42:52 AM
Thanks for replies.  I have just got to see The Princess Bride some time -- the whole Internet seems replete with quotes from it !

Not seen The Princess Bride. Inconceivable!

I know -- I live under a rock / on a remote island in the Outer Hebrides...

I saw it at age 16 and was sorely disappointed because it had been hyped so much and just couldn't live up to my expectations. Saw it again at age 33 with MUCH lower expectations and thought it reasonably cute. It'll never be a favourite though.

Thanks MariaE, and bansidhe.  I feel less freakish !  Have just somehow never got round to seeing TPB-- I'm not a big filmgoer, in general.  In part, the title has always struck me as rather lame;  which, illogically, has been a bit of a disincentive for me, to seeing the film.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: iridaceae on May 13, 2014, 06:07:28 AM
I've never seen The Princess Bride,  either,  cabbageweevil. I read the book before the movie came out- a few years before - because friends recommended it. I thought the book was overrated so never bothered with the movie.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MariaE on May 13, 2014, 06:34:34 AM
I've never seen The Princess Bride,  either,  cabbageweevil. I read the book before the movie came out- a few years before - because friends recommended it. I thought the book was overrated so never bothered with the movie.

FWIW, I thought the movie HEAPS better than the book... I read it after being unimpressed by the movie as I figured I was missing out on something ("Never judge a book by its movie"...), but ended up thinking that as overrated as the movie was, the book was even worse.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 13, 2014, 11:50:57 AM
Further digging my hole of amazing ignorance -- I didn't know till just now, that there was a book The Princess Bride, pre-existing the film.  I promise you all, that I am dimly aware that the earth goes round the sun, and that the Pope is Catholic, and that Europe is on one side of the Atlantic Ocean and North America on the other...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on May 13, 2014, 12:28:22 PM
Further digging my hole of amazing ignorance -- I didn't know till just now, that there was a book The Princess Bride, pre-existing the film.  I promise you all, that I am dimly aware that the earth goes round the sun, and that the Pope is Catholic, and that Europe is on one side of the Atlantic Ocean and North America on the other...

IIRC, the book has 23 chapters just on details of the wedding preparation, right?

I've seen the movie a couple of times. My husband loves it. I thought it was mildly ok at best, but some of the parts that are often quoted are the funniest. I think it's worth watching once just to catch the references to:
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: artk2002 on May 13, 2014, 12:53:33 PM
Further digging my hole of amazing ignorance -- I didn't know till just now, that there was a book The Princess Bride, pre-existing the film.  I promise you all, that I am dimly aware that the earth goes round the sun, and that the Pope is Catholic, and that Europe is on one side of the Atlantic Ocean and North America on the other...

Do you mean The Princess Bride by William Goldman (screenwriter for the movie) or the book by S. Morgenstern (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S._Morgenstern#Autobiographical_fiction)?   >:D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 13, 2014, 01:27:44 PM
To quote Charlie Brown / "Peanuts" --  AAAAAUUUUUGGGHHHH !!!!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: #borecore on May 13, 2014, 01:35:45 PM
Because this is apparently (yet another!) "Princess Bride" thread, I'll add that I read the book well before I saw the movie. I giggled a lot (circa age 11). I do not find the movie humorous or even all that entertaining.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on May 13, 2014, 02:32:39 PM
But "ask" as a substitute for "question" -- as in "I have some asks about this"? That's just wrong.

I typed "ask as a noun" into Google and got a number of results. I had no idea it was so widespread! There is apparently a Stop Using Ask as a Noun Facebook page, but I can't access FB from work so can't check it out at the moment.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on May 13, 2014, 06:32:24 PM
Further digging my hole of amazing ignorance -- I didn't know till just now, that there was a book The Princess Bride, pre-existing the film.  I promise you all, that I am dimly aware that the earth goes round the sun, and that the Pope is Catholic, and that Europe is on one side of the Atlantic Ocean and North America on the other...

IIRC, the book has 23 chapters just on details of the wedding preparation, right?


Not exactly :-)  Both the book and the movie allude to another, "real" book, which has chapters and chapters of boring stuff in between the action.  In the movie this is presented as a grandfather reading (and clearly editing on the fly) the book to a sick young boy; in the written version it's the author tracking down this book his grandfather used to read him as a kid and then finding out how tremendously boring half of it is.  The "real" book doesn't exist, though, other as a frame for the adventure story  :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Marga on May 13, 2014, 09:59:12 PM
Further digging my hole of amazing ignorance -- I didn't know till just now, that there was a book The Princess Bride, pre-existing the film.  I promise you all, that I am dimly aware that the earth goes round the sun, and that the Pope is Catholic, and that Europe is on one side of the Atlantic Ocean and North America on the other...

IIRC, the book has 23 chapters just on details of the wedding preparation, right?

I've seen the movie a couple of times. My husband loves it. I thought it was mildly ok at best, but some of the parts that are often quoted are the funniest. I think it's worth watching once just to catch the references to:
  • My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.
  • Inconceivable
  • You keep using that word, I do not think it means what you think it means.
  • Wuuv. Twoo wuuv.
  • Mawage

Those 23 chapters are only in the original book, and not in the adaptation/abridment by Morgenstern. Of course some people will tell you there never was an original and that Morgenstern wrote it all himself. Lies, I tell you! ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 14, 2014, 02:23:11 AM
I swear, I think I'll go on being unacquainted with TPB in all its shapes and forms !  It all sounds just too complicated :-\ ...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: oz diva on May 14, 2014, 03:38:55 AM
Just watch the film, it's a light hearted romp with an amazing cast. The bride and Westley are the least interesting, though he's a great sword fighter.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MariaE on May 14, 2014, 04:31:55 AM
I swear, I think I'll go on being unacquainted with TPB in all its shapes and forms !  It all sounds just too complicated :-\ ...

It's not, honestly :) The book pretends to be a rewrite of a much older and much longer book, but the author decided to "condense" it, in order to make it more approachable.

The book was later adapted for the screen.

Some people actually think the "much older and much longer" book actually exists and is the "real" book (resulting in some hilarious reviews on GoodReads) which is where it gets confusing, but that's about it :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BabyMama on May 14, 2014, 08:08:36 AM
My friend who teaches at a local college just received this e-mail from a student:

"i dont undstand m grade on essy? Why u grade so lo?"

 ::)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on May 14, 2014, 08:12:01 AM
Compare and contrast with Inkheart. I took my children to see the film when it came out. For those who don't know it, it was based on a book of the same name, and the plot revolves around a man who can make a story come true by reading it aloud. He comes across a book called Inkheart...

The Elder Chick enjoyed the film, so we bought the Cornelia Funke book Inkheart - which is about another book also called Inkheart by a writer called Fenoglio. The EC's view was that he had liked the film, and the Funke book was OK, but the book he really wanted to read was the Fenoglio book that the Funke book was about, if you follow what I mean...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on May 14, 2014, 08:15:26 AM
I swear, I think I'll go on being unacquainted with TPB in all its shapes and forms !  It all sounds just too complicated :-\ ...

Don't let all that discussion throw you off. I know nothing of any of that but love the movie, which I watched for the first time, years ago, knowing nothing of what it was about in advance.

Turned out to be an entertaining (what I call) enhanced fairy tale with lots of over-the-top characters and situations. Enhanced meaning entertaining for both kids and adults.

So, forget everything you've read and just watch the movie for the fun of it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on May 14, 2014, 11:47:35 AM
Thanks, all.  Agreed -- I really should, at all events, give the film an honest try.

On reflection, the "book-within-a-book" conceit is not unique or unheard-of.  FRHC cites Inkheart ; and really, none of what we've seen mentioned, is any more barmy than the realms of Tolkien.  In there, Lord Of The Rings is supposedly a translation by JRRT, of a book handed down from very ancient days of Earth; translated by him from the language which the hobbits used, with amplifyings-and-clarifyings from writings by other races of those times, originally in their languages...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on May 14, 2014, 12:44:35 PM
Just watch the film, it's a light hearted romp with an amazing cast. The bride and Westley are the least interesting, though he's a great sword fighter.

I saw The Princess Bride only because it was the movie on a long distance bus trip.  It was amusing and some of the cameo appearances (especially Billy Crystal) were hilarious. 

the 'Mawwage' sermon reminded me of the old 'Beyond the Fringe' sketch in which the text of the sermon is 'My brother Esau is an hairy man but I am a smooth man'. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Xandraea on May 20, 2014, 08:28:27 AM
About The Princess Bride: If you go into it knowing it's a parody, with a damsel in distress, a hero, a motley group of people to add interest, and a whole lot of improbable situations, you'll likely find it hilarious. If thought of as a dramatic love story, it loses the appeal.

My favourite scenes/lines involve the extra characters.  The Billy Crystal character and his wife, the King (very small part, but he's great!), the Mawwage scene, the "battle of wits" with iocane ... I saw the DVD at a cashwrap for $5 and purchased it for my teenager to watch. She watched it repeatedly and always laughs out loud at Inigo running thru the castle halls screaming in desperation, "HELP ME, FEZZIK! HE'S GETTING AWAY!"

I recommend seeing it, enjoying it for what it is. :)

Oh, and grammar that makes me twitch: "should of" "could of" "would of" .. sure, saying it sounds similar to this, but in writing, use the contractions properly!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: artk2002 on May 20, 2014, 08:50:18 AM
Just watch the film, it's a light hearted romp with an amazing cast. The bride and Westley are the least interesting, though he's a great sword fighter.

I saw The Princess Bride only because it was the movie on a long distance bus trip.  It was amusing and some of the cameo appearances (especially Billy Crystal) were hilarious. 

the 'Mawwage' sermon reminded me of the old 'Beyond the Fringe' sketch in which the text of the sermon is 'My brother Esau is an hairy man but I am a smooth man'.

You do know, I hope, that the man playing the prelate in Princess Bride was also in Beyond the Fringe? That's Peter Cook. I haven't seen the BYF sketch but it wouldn't surprise me at all if it was Cook in both instances.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on May 20, 2014, 09:52:29 AM
Yes. Thank you for the reminder.

Peter Cook was in 'Beyond the Fringe' but, if I recall properly,  the 'My Brother Esau...' sketch in the original was performed by Alan Bennett.  Both performances are hilarious.  I remember going to the show when it was on Broadway.   

You can find the sketch if you type in 'My Brother Esau is an Hairy  Man'.  If you type in 'My Brother Esau' you'll get a song by 'The Grateful Dead'.  That's good but it isn't the same thing.   
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: GreenHall on May 20, 2014, 12:35:48 PM
I proofread a paper for a classmate last week...

The point was mute (apparently it couldn't speak for itself)

I work on a college campus.  At the end of spring term, there were flyers for various apartment complexes around.  One read "Be Apart of Something Great" - it hurt me.

I was gratified on my walk the next day to see that a red pen had been taken to all of the ones on my path :)

Edit: OUCH- I meant to quote about the misuse of 'apart' and 'a part'.  My follow up post was going to be on moot, which I have read actually means a point to be talked about, rather the common (to me at least) usage of 'not worth talking about because something has already been decided, or is too trivial', so I don't want to use moot either - but I need to know a word that replaces what I thought moot meant...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Giraffe, Esq on May 20, 2014, 06:00:26 PM
I proofread a paper for a classmate last week...

The point was mute (apparently it couldn't speak for itself)

{snip}
Edit: OUCH- I meant to quote about the misuse of 'apart' and 'a part'.  My follow up post was going to be on moot, which I have read actually means a point to be talked about, rather the common (to me at least) usage of 'not worth talking about because something has already been decided, or is too trivial', so I don't want to use moot either - but I need to know a word that replaces what I thought moot meant...

Yeah, in law, we "moot" our arguments before going to appellate court.  In law school, we have "Mock Trial" (competitive teams that do pretend trials) and "Moot Court" (competitive teams that do pretend appeals, with brief and oral arguments). 

Now that I'm practicing, we'll get together to moot our colleagues before an important appellate argument. 

It definitely threw me for a loop at first, but I'm used to using it that way now!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on May 20, 2014, 07:04:22 PM
I know I saw it mentioned earlier, but the use of good instead of well.  It's like nails on the chalkboard to me.

I'm always afraid to get it wrong. Please, tell me if I'm correct in the following:

Q: How are you doing?
A: Well  <- that's the right answer because it is an adverb that describes "doing"

Q: How are you?
A: Good <- that's the right answer because it's an adjective that describes "I/you"

And the only time you would answer "How are you?" with "well" is if you had been sick for a long time and now you're no longer sick, so you're well again.

Or: "How are you doing?"
         "Well."
         "I'm doing well." (note the verb)
         "I'm good." (note, no verb)
         "I'm well." (note--"well" is also an adjective)

"How are you?"
       "Good."
       "I'm good."
       "I'm doing well."
       "I'm well."


However, note: good is listed in Merriam-Webster's as an adverb. A big usage note, though.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: songbird on May 21, 2014, 06:16:43 AM
Commuter railroad station has turned into a major construction site, the area is getting a complete makeover.

There is a sign hanging on one of the fences asking the public for its understanding during renovation.

The public is requested to "please bare with us . . . ."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on May 21, 2014, 07:40:37 AM
Given the tendency of construction workers to remove their shirts at the first blink of sunshine, they're just asking you to join in  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Margo on May 21, 2014, 08:41:42 AM
I proofread a paper for a classmate last week...

The point was mute (apparently it couldn't speak for itself)

{snip}
Edit: OUCH- I meant to quote about the misuse of 'apart' and 'a part'.  My follow up post was going to be on moot, which I have read actually means a point to be talked about, rather the common (to me at least) usage of 'not worth talking about because something has already been decided, or is too trivial', so I don't want to use moot either - but I need to know a word that replaces what I thought moot meant...

Yeah, in law, we "moot" our arguments before going to appellate court.  In law school, we have "Mock Trial" (competitive teams that do pretend trials) and "Moot Court" (competitive teams that do pretend appeals, with brief and oral arguments). 

Now that I'm practicing, we'll get together to moot our colleagues before an important appellate argument. 

It definitely threw me for a loop at first, but I'm used to using it that way now!

Moot has two meanings - subject to debate or uncertainty and having no/little practical relevance.
I think the word original came from a term for a parliament / council.

When I was at University, there were moots which involved mock trials, but they were sometimes on very technical points so arguably fitted both descriptions (I recall one was about whether a person who was locked up, without there being any lawful excuse for his being impriosoned, but  who was asleep/unconscious the entire time so did not know he was imprisoned could be considered to have been falsely imprisoned)

I have seen it written as 'mute point' by a lawyer. In professional correspondence.  That really made me twitch. . .

Terry Wogan, on his breakfast radio show used to poke fun at those who use 'sat' rather than 'sitting' (or worse, sat sitting')
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: songbird on May 21, 2014, 09:43:51 AM
Given the tendency of construction workers to remove their shirts at the first blink of sunshine, they're just asking you to join in  ;)

 ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on May 21, 2014, 11:22:19 AM
Given the tendency of construction workers to remove their shirts at the first blink of sunshine, they're just asking you to join in  ;)

entirely different subject...   where is this job site ?  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on May 21, 2014, 11:35:13 AM
Given the tendency of construction workers to remove their shirts at the first blink of sunshine, they're just asking you to join in  ;)

entirely different subject...   where is this job site ?  ;)

Somewhere close to the Diet Coke factory, I think.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: songbird on May 21, 2014, 12:22:07 PM
I proofread a paper for a classmate last week...

The point was mute (apparently it couldn't speak for itself)

LOL

{snip}
Edit: OUCH- I meant to quote about the misuse of 'apart' and 'a part'.  My follow up post was going to be on moot, which I have read actually means a point to be talked about, rather the common (to me at least) usage of 'not worth talking about because something has already been decided, or is too trivial', so I don't want to use moot either - but I need to know a word that replaces what I thought moot meant...

Yeah, in law, we "moot" our arguments before going to appellate court.  In law school, we have "Mock Trial" (competitive teams that do pretend trials) and "Moot Court" (competitive teams that do pretend appeals, with brief and oral arguments). 

Now that I'm practicing, we'll get together to moot our colleagues before an important appellate argument. 

It definitely threw me for a loop at first, but I'm used to using it that way now!

Moot has two meanings - subject to debate or uncertainty and having no/little practical relevance.
I think the word original came from a term for a parliament / council.

When I was at University, there were moots which involved mock trials, but they were sometimes on very technical points so arguably fitted both descriptions (I recall one was about whether a person who was locked up, without there being any lawful excuse for his being impriosoned, but  who was asleep/unconscious the entire time so did not know he was imprisoned could be considered to have been falsely imprisoned)

I have seen it written as 'mute point' by a lawyer. In professional correspondence.  That really made me twitch. . .

Terry Wogan, on his breakfast radio show used to poke fun at those who use 'sat' rather than 'sitting' (or worse, sat sitting')
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on May 21, 2014, 04:25:10 PM
I refuse to accept responsibility if anyone starts bleeding from the eyeballs when they see this:
http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1 (http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1)

 >:D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lilfox on May 21, 2014, 06:25:00 PM
There was a discussion a few pages back on the use of "more than" or "over" to indicate an amount in excess of a given figure.  This isn't my peeve.

I'll preface this by saying that I don't think this is technically incorrect.  But my peeve is when I read something like "She has more than 14 publications." (FWIW I've also seen it as "over X publications.")  Why not just write 15 pubs?  It only bugs me when it's a nonstandard number to use as a benchmark.  "More than 20 publications" is fine (if they want to be vague), because it could be 21, 22, 23, and so on.  Especially as you get into larger numbers it almost looks pedantic to list a specific number, for example 142 publications.  So, "more than 14" really just means 15, because if it were more than 15 (but less than 20), the usual choice would be to use 15 as the benchmark.  I would happily accept "14 publications and 3 currently in press" if that's what is really meant.

And if I never get another email that uses 's to indicate plurals, I will be so happy.  The note from my DD's school, thanking all the Mother's and Grandmother's who visited and received their gift's from the children, was sweet but painful to read.  (and yes, Mother and Grandmother were capitalized).
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on May 21, 2014, 10:37:27 PM
And if I never get another email that uses 's to indicate plurals, I will be so happy.  The note from my DD's school, thanking all the Mother's and Grandmother's who visited and received their gift's from the children, was sweet but painful to read.  (and yes, Mother and Grandmother were capitalized).

Yes, that drives me nuts! Especially when it's from an elementary school teacher. I cringe and think "this is the person teaching my kids!"
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MamaMootz on May 22, 2014, 08:35:33 AM
I work for a digital marketing agency - we create, manage, and send e-mails out to clients who opt in to the brand mailing lists. I am currently supporting a huge pharmaceutical client and am in the process of reviewing e-mails we sent for past campaigns. Part of the marketing provides links in the e-mails to videos of diabetes patients that are adjusting their favorite recipes to make them healthier.

One particular video is focused on a woman who grew up in the southern US. The title of the video in the e-mail:

Meet "Southern Bell" Cheryl

This had to go through I can't even tell you how many levels of proofreading, and no one caught this. And my agency sent this out to hundreds of thousands of people. I know these mistakes are bad when the general public does it, but I think it's 1,000 times worse when this is done in a professional capacity. A little part of me just died.  :D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on May 22, 2014, 12:13:07 PM
My boss, a writer/copy editor, has two kids in elementary school. The music teacher sent home a flyer that said "There will be no lip-sinking in the talent show."


Her head exploded again as she told us about it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Editeer on May 22, 2014, 12:17:26 PM
My boss, a writer/copy editor, has two kids in elementary school. The music teacher sent home a flyer that said "There will be no lip-sinking in the talent show."



Thank goodness, because loose ships sink lips, don't they?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on May 22, 2014, 01:08:03 PM
My boss, a writer/copy editor, has two kids in elementary school. The music teacher sent home a flyer that said "There will be no lip-sinking in the talent show."



Thank goodness, because loose ships sink lips, don't they?

It makes me sad when educators massacre the language!  :(
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: TootsNYC on May 22, 2014, 01:11:35 PM
There was a discussion a few pages back on the use of "more than" or "over" to indicate an amount in excess of a given figure.  This isn't my peeve.

I'll preface this by saying that I don't think this is technically incorrect.  But my peeve is when I read something like "She has more than 14 publications." (FWIW I've also seen it as "over X publications.")  Why not just write 15 pubs?  It only bugs me when it's a nonstandard number to use as a benchmark.  "More than 20 publications" is fine (if they want to be vague), because it could be 21, 22, 23, and so on.  Especially as you get into larger numbers it almost looks pedantic to list a specific number, for example 142 publications.  So, "more than 14" really just means 15, because if it were more than 15 (but less than 20), the usual choice would be to use 15 as the benchmark.  I would happily accept "14 publications and 3 currently in press" if that's what is really meant.


It doesn't actually mean "15"; it means "we could definitely find 14, but there is a big possibility that there are a couple more, but we couldn't confirm those. And we didn't want to say 'more than 10,' bcs that would mean 11 or 12 or 13."

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MamaMootz on May 22, 2014, 02:50:48 PM
My boss, a writer/copy editor, has two kids in elementary school. The music teacher sent home a flyer that said "There will be no lip-sinking in the talent show."



Thank goodness, because loose ships sink lips, don't they?

Get out of my brain  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Onyx_TKD on May 22, 2014, 02:54:44 PM
There was a discussion a few pages back on the use of "more than" or "over" to indicate an amount in excess of a given figure.  This isn't my peeve.

I'll preface this by saying that I don't think this is technically incorrect.  But my peeve is when I read something like "She has more than 14 publications." (FWIW I've also seen it as "over X publications.")  Why not just write 15 pubs?  It only bugs me when it's a nonstandard number to use as a benchmark.  "More than 20 publications" is fine (if they want to be vague), because it could be 21, 22, 23, and so on.  Especially as you get into larger numbers it almost looks pedantic to list a specific number, for example 142 publications.  So, "more than 14" really just means 15, because if it were more than 15 (but less than 20), the usual choice would be to use 15 as the benchmark.  I would happily accept "14 publications and 3 currently in press" if that's what is really meant.


It doesn't actually mean "15"; it means "we could definitely find 14, but there is a big possibility that there are a couple more, but we couldn't confirm those. And we didn't want to say 'more than 10,' bcs that would mean 11 or 12 or 13."

I think lilfox has a point. The bolded statement might be what they intended to say, but that would be correctly stated as "She has at least 14 publications" (i.e., number of publications >= 14). The statement that "She has more than 14 publications" indicates that she definitely has at least 15 publications, since publications are discrete items (i.e., number of publications >14, and you can't have 14.2 or 14.5 publications, so number of publications >= 15).
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Hijinks on May 22, 2014, 03:20:55 PM
My boss, a writer/copy editor, has two kids in elementary school. The music teacher sent home a flyer that said "There will be no lip-sinking in the talent show."



Thank goodness, because loose ships sink lips, don't they?

It makes me sad when educators massacre the language!  :(

My kids' teachers are terrible spellers and have a poor understanding of grammar.  It's frustrating.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: GreenHall on May 22, 2014, 03:37:07 PM
My boss, a writer/copy editor, has two kids in elementary school. The music teacher sent home a flyer that said "There will be no lip-sinking in the talent show."



Thank goodness, because loose ships sink lips, don't they?

It makes me sad when educators massacre the language!  :(

My kids' teachers are terrible spellers and have a poor understanding of grammar.  It's frustrating.
My sister's third grade teacher misspelling the SPELLING words, unapologetically, is when my mom gave up on the local school system, and put in an application to the charter school.  That charter school had just moved and about doubled in size that year.  I understand they were surprised at the level that the students from our county were on, during that first influx year...

(I don't post in this thread often, because I am not always sure of my grammar and spelling...)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: o_gal on May 23, 2014, 06:26:34 AM
One particular video is focused on a woman who grew up in the southern US. The title of the video in the e-mail:

Meet "Southern Bell" Cheryl

Maybe she spent her entire career working for the phone company  >:D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on May 23, 2014, 10:10:08 AM
One particular video is focused on a woman who grew up in the southern US. The title of the video in the e-mail:

Meet "Southern Bell" Cheryl

Maybe she spent her entire career working for the phone company  >:D


Nope. That would be Bell South.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on May 23, 2014, 10:50:44 AM
I refuse to accept responsibility if anyone starts bleeding from the eyeballs when they see this:
http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1 (http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1)

 >:D

The best is the fire alarm identified only by a set of quotation marks.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on May 23, 2014, 01:05:33 PM
My boss, a writer/copy editor, has two kids in elementary school. The music teacher sent home a flyer that said "There will be no lip-sinking in the talent show."



Thank goodness, because loose ships sink lips, don't they?

It makes me sad when educators massacre the language!  :(

My kids' teachers are terrible spellers and have a poor understanding of grammar.  It's frustrating.

I thought that one of the requirements of being a teacher was being good at reading/writing.  :-[
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on May 23, 2014, 01:16:38 PM
We have a custom plaque on the front of our house, with our address and last name (let's say it's Scattercherry.)

The sign says "The Scattercherry's, (address)".

This is a professionally done plaque. How did that manage to slip by? :-\
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on May 24, 2014, 10:10:02 AM
I refuse to accept responsibility if anyone starts bleeding from the eyeballs when they see this:
http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1 (http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1)

 >:D

The best is the fire alarm identified only by a set of quotation marks.

These are hilarious!  Thank you for sharing.  I also enjoyed the selections from Engrish.com.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Harriet Jones on May 24, 2014, 10:50:02 AM
One particular video is focused on a woman who grew up in the southern US. The title of the video in the e-mail:

Meet "Southern Bell" Cheryl

Maybe she spent her entire career working for the phone company  >:D


Nope. That would be Bell South.

Wasn't it Southern Bell *before* it was Bell South, though?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: artk2002 on May 24, 2014, 02:08:27 PM
I refuse to accept responsibility if anyone starts bleeding from the eyeballs when they see this:
http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1 (http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1)

 >:D

The best is the fire alarm identified only by a set of quotation marks.

These are hilarious!  Thank you for sharing.  I also enjoyed the selections from Engrish.com.

Back when the Yellow Pages were popular, the abuse of quotes was rampant there. I don't know if that's ever been fixed since I now decline them.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on May 24, 2014, 05:47:42 PM
One particular video is focused on a woman who grew up in the southern US. The title of the video in the e-mail:

Meet "Southern Bell" Cheryl

Maybe she spent her entire career working for the phone company  >:D


Nope. That would be Bell South.

Wasn't it Southern Bell *before* it was Bell South, though?

I thought so. I know the other two (only 2 others?) were Pacific Bell and Mountain Bell, so it makes sense but I don't remember for sure myself.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Nikko-chan on May 25, 2014, 06:54:10 AM
I refuse to accept responsibility if anyone starts bleeding from the eyeballs when they see this:
http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1 (http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1)

 >:D

The best is the fire alarm identified only by a set of quotation marks.

These are hilarious!  Thank you for sharing.  I also enjoyed the selections from Engrish.com.

Back when the Yellow Pages were popular, the abuse of quotes was rampant there. I don't know if that's ever been fixed since I now decline them.

The worst part about 43 is not the use of quotations.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on May 25, 2014, 11:22:55 AM
To my pastor today...something does not "beg the question." Begging the question is a logical fallacy construct. I think you meant "pose the question." Also, I felt kinda bad when you slipped and said that this world is trying to making truth "relevant" when you clearly meant "relative" by the context.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: turtleIScream on May 25, 2014, 01:21:07 PM
To my pastor today...something does not "beg the question." Begging the question is a logical fallacy construct. I think you meant "pose the question." Also, I felt kinda bad when you slipped and said that this world is trying to making truth "relevant" when you clearly meant "relative" by the context.

My former pastor moved to your church??
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on May 26, 2014, 08:59:57 AM
To my pastor today...something does not "beg the question." Begging the question is a logical fallacy construct. I think you meant "pose the question." Also, I felt kinda bad when you slipped and said that this world is trying to making truth "relevant" when you clearly meant "relative" by the context.

My former pastor moved to your church??

I hope not.  :P Though, two pastors being that embarrassing...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whiterose on May 26, 2014, 09:02:58 AM
A friend of mine stated that she would be singing a "contatta". I knew she meant "cantata". It got on my nerves- but the first time I let it slide assuming it was one of those typos everyone else makes.

The second time she misspelled it like that, I let her know that it is spelled "cantata". And that "contatta" means "to contact" in Italian- while "cantata" means "a sung piece".

She never made that error again.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Specky on May 26, 2014, 10:27:12 AM
A roadside sign I used to pass on the way to and from college proclaimed:  "Egg's"  "From happy hen's"
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on May 30, 2014, 12:59:57 AM
I'm seeing an awful lot of "would have" instead of "had".  Of course it's because if some confusion over the past conditional tense, but it grates.

 For example,
"If I would have known X, then... (something different would have happened)" - should be "If I had known..."

"If you would have listened to me, then (we wouldn't have got lost)" - should be "If you had listened..."


It's made even more cringe-worthy when the misuse is doubled by "If I would of known..."

Shudder.



Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on May 30, 2014, 09:14:18 AM
A FB friend's daughter is graduating from high school tommorrow, on her FB page she posted:

"I am being conceded and posting photos of myself for graduation..."

Dear Heavens, all that schooling and she still can't spell conceited ! 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on May 30, 2014, 10:47:04 AM
To my pastor today...something does not "beg the question." Begging the question is a logical fallacy construct. I think you meant "pose the question." Also, I felt kinda bad when you slipped and said that this world is trying to making truth "relevant" when you clearly meant "relative" by the context.

Speaking of religion, I used to find the funniest typos in the church bulletin. One time it was a note that "lightening" had struck the steeple.  :o
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on May 30, 2014, 10:48:11 AM
A FB friend's daughter is graduating from high school tommorrow, on her FB page she posted:

"I am being conceded and posting photos of myself for graduation..."

Dear Heavens, all that schooling and she still can't spell conceited !

I am not surprised at all. Not saying this is true of this young lady, but more and more college freshmen are having to take remedial classes because they're not prepared for college-level courses.  :-[
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on May 30, 2014, 10:56:05 AM
It's not only first-year students who have the problem. 

A few years ago, a colleague was giving a summer workshop for teachers on the Amarna Period.  He referred to a certain turn of phrase in a document of the period  as a 'literary conceit'.

  One teacher immediately jumped up and confronted him.  How dare he call Akhenaten conceited!
 :P
 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on May 30, 2014, 10:59:11 AM
It's not only first-year students who have the problem. 

A few years ago, a colleague was giving a summer workshop for teachers on the Amarna Period.  He referred to a certain turn of phrase in a document of the period  as a 'literary conceit'.

  One teacher immediately jumped up and confronted him.  How dare he call Akhenaten conceited!
 :P
 

Ow. I think my brain broke.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on May 30, 2014, 11:27:54 AM
It's not only first-year students who have the problem. 

A few years ago, a colleague was giving a summer workshop for teachers on the Amarna Period.  He referred to a certain turn of phrase in a document of the period  as a 'literary conceit'.

  One teacher immediately jumped up and confronted him.  How dare he call Akhenaten conceited!
 :P
 

So it's worse than I thought!  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: o_gal on May 30, 2014, 02:36:49 PM
To my pastor today...something does not "beg the question." Begging the question is a logical fallacy construct. I think you meant "pose the question." Also, I felt kinda bad when you slipped and said that this world is trying to making truth "relevant" when you clearly meant "relative" by the context.

Speaking of religion, I used to find the funniest typos in the church bulletin. One time it was a note that "lightening" had struck the steeple.  :o

When I used to work on base, we would get emails from the weather ops group warning about dangerous weather conditions in the area. A coworker and I would get the biggest kick out of emails that warned us about:

dangerous lightening
dangerous lighting

 :D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: songbird on May 30, 2014, 02:45:32 PM
OK, here's a question.

When you're comparing two items, are they "different from" or "different to" each other?

There's a commercial on TV where the dentist says "Dentures are different to natural teeth."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on May 30, 2014, 02:48:19 PM
OK, here's a question.

When you're comparing two items, are they "different from" or "different to" each other?

There's a commercial on TV where the dentist says "Dentures are different to natural teeth."

Either is correct, although I think "different from" sounds better.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on May 30, 2014, 02:50:52 PM
OK, here's a question.

When you're comparing two items, are they "different from" or "different to" each other?

There's a commercial on TV where the dentist says "Dentures are different to natural teeth."

"Different from" is USAian.
"Different to" is British.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: #borecore on May 30, 2014, 02:57:11 PM
OK, here's a question.

When you're comparing two items, are they "different from" or "different to" each other?

There's a commercial on TV where the dentist says "Dentures are different to natural teeth."

"Different from" is USAian.
"Different to" is British.

Indeed.

And "different than" is only correct in very, very limited circumstances (speaking for the US only).
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on May 30, 2014, 02:58:32 PM
I just remembered this.  When I was in high school, my mother's supervisor at the coffee shop where she worked paid me $5 per week to type the coffee shop menu (on a manual typewriter, no less).  I had to do so much proofreading and correcting that I was tempted to charge $10.  Some of her favorites:

Tomtoe soup (this is really how she believed "tomato" was spelled)
Marsh mellows (yes, she thought it was two words)
Special today: Count of Monte Crisco sandwich (I shudder to think what THAT would taste like regardless of blatant misspelling and misnaming)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on May 30, 2014, 04:43:54 PM
DD came home from elementary school today with this bracelet:

(http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff475/FAW329/CaughtDoingGood_zpseae87099.jpg)

It says "Caught Doing Good" and I'm not sure if that's supposed to mean that she was doing good in the community or if she was doing well in class.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on May 31, 2014, 02:07:49 PM
DD came home from elementary school today with this bracelet:

(http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff475/FAW329/CaughtDoingGood_zpseae87099.jpg)

It says "Caught Doing Good" and I'm not sure if that's supposed to mean that she was doing good in the community or if she was doing well in class.

It's probably indicating she was caught doing good things/behavior in class.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: turtleIScream on May 31, 2014, 03:56:33 PM
I posted on FB that I was recently diagnosed with allergy-induced asthma, triggered primarily by dust and pets. One of my friends commented that her allergies became much less bothersome after she cleaned her ducks. I was a little confused, because my allergy test included cats and dogs, not farm animals, and I was unaware they could test for duck allergies. Then I remembered that many people don't know the proper word is "ducts".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: athersgeo on May 31, 2014, 04:33:05 PM
I posted on FB that I was recently diagnosed with allergy-induced asthma, triggered primarily by dust and pets. One of my friends commented that her allergies became much less bothersome after she cleaned her ducks. I was a little confused, because my allergy test included cats and dogs, not farm animals, and I was unaware they could test for duck allergies. Then I remembered that many people don't know the proper word is "ducts".

I have to admit, as a spelling error goes, that one is rather good - I'm now picturing someone with a bathroom full of soapy aquatic avians and it's...amusing :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: dawnfire on May 31, 2014, 08:36:10 PM
I posted on FB that I was recently diagnosed with allergy-induced asthma, triggered primarily by dust and pets. One of my friends commented that her allergies became much less bothersome after she cleaned her ducks. I was a little confused, because my allergy test included cats and dogs, not farm animals, and I was unaware they could test for duck allergies. Then I remembered that many people don't know the proper word is "ducts".

I have to admit, as a spelling error goes, that one is rather good - I'm now picturing someone with a bathroom full of soapy aquatic avians and it's...amusing :)

or them sitting in the roof blowing hot air like on this ad

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0nabkpki7w
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on May 31, 2014, 10:28:21 PM
Just got back from a girl scout camp (and if I never hear "Let It Go" again, it will be too soon . . .)

Anyway, I got a real kick out of all the signs saying

SLOW
GIRL SCOUTS
PLAYING

because it was obvious someone came along with a magic marker and snuck in a tiny comma after the "slow."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MariaE on June 01, 2014, 01:19:13 AM
I posted on FB that I was recently diagnosed with allergy-induced asthma, triggered primarily by dust and pets. One of my friends commented that her allergies became much less bothersome after she cleaned her ducks. I was a little confused, because my allergy test included cats and dogs, not farm animals, and I was unaware they could test for duck allergies. Then I remembered that many people don't know the proper word is "ducts".
... Which is why so many people seem to think it's called "duck tape".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on June 01, 2014, 02:24:17 AM
I posted on FB that I was recently diagnosed with allergy-induced asthma, triggered primarily by dust and pets. One of my friends commented that her allergies became much less bothersome after she cleaned her ducks. I was a little confused, because my allergy test included cats and dogs, not farm animals, and I was unaware they could test for duck allergies. Then I remembered that many people don't know the proper word is "ducts".
... Which is why so many people seem to think it's called "duck tape".

And now to really confuse folks, a company capitalized on the ignorance and named their brand "Duck Tape" and so there is a duck tape.

Here's the original by Scotch
(http://www.3m.com/product/images/Duct-Tape-All-Weather-300.jpg)

And here's the second brand, Duck Tape
(https://tw-projects.s3.amazonaws.com/twduckbrand/prod/images/products/00-03023-01-resized_resized.jpg)

In the second one, in huge bold letters it says "Duck Tape", and then on the next line in tiny tiny font "Brand Duct Tape".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: iridaceae on June 01, 2014, 04:36:49 AM
I have Flamingo Pink Duck Tape. My life is immeasurably better for having it. And I don't even like pink.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on June 01, 2014, 06:02:14 AM
The CBS Sunday Show had a feature on duck tape.  According to them, the original name was 'duck tape'.  It was used in the army during WW II as a water-resistant repair.  At that time, it was green.

After the war, civilians started using it to repair ductwork in their homes.  That's when the color was changed to silver and the name 'duct tape' came into being.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Outdoor Girl on June 01, 2014, 12:16:00 PM
And to further confuse matters, duct tape shouldn't actually be used on ducts.  You need a metal tape for that.  (As told to me by more than one contractor.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on June 01, 2014, 12:19:07 PM
Duct tape can, however, be used on a broken water main. (The main under our street back in Colorado broke - we got to watch the repairmen fix it, and yes, they used duct tape!)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: flamingo on June 01, 2014, 12:51:52 PM
noone  :o
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on June 01, 2014, 02:00:53 PM
noone  :o

Agreed.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: kckgirl on June 01, 2014, 02:05:07 PM
A funny story about noone: We were keeping an attendance list for an event, and my co-worker called to ask me if I knew who Noone is. I checked our employee roster and found nobody by that name, and then it dawned on me. I asked her to read the email she got to see if "no one" fit. She started giggling, and I told her I see it on the Internet all the time.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on June 02, 2014, 08:27:15 AM
OK, here's a question.

When you're comparing two items, are they "different from" or "different to" each other?

There's a commercial on TV where the dentist says "Dentures are different to natural teeth."

"Different from" is USAian.
"Different to" is British.

Indeed.

And "different than" is only correct in very, very limited circumstances (speaking for the US only).

Brit here (English variety). I can't claim to speak for everyone in Britain -- but I've always considered "different from" to be the correct form of the expression; and so far as I recall, was taught thus. And I have the impression that most of my compatriots use "from", not "to".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: scotcat60 on June 02, 2014, 10:38:38 AM
Just got back from a girl scout camp (and if I never hear "Let It Go" again, it will be too soon . . .)

Anyway, I got a real kick out of all the signs saying

SLOW
GIRL SCOUTS
PLAYING

because it was obvious someone came along with a magic marker and snuck in a tiny comma after the "slow."


This reminds me of the story of an army base where one of the officers was a bad driver, and the men altered the sign saying HALT. MAJOR ROAD AHEAD, by adding a comma after the word major
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: scotcat60 on June 02, 2014, 10:44:30 AM
I'm seeing an awful lot of "would have" instead of "had".  Of course it's because if some confusion over the past conditional tense, but it grates.

 For example,
"If I would have known X, then... (something different would have happened)" - should be "If I had known..."

"If you would have listened to me, then (we wouldn't have got lost)" - should be "If you had listened..."


It's made even more cringe-worthy when the misuse is doubled by "If I would of known..."

Shudder.


I am with you on this one. I once read a coment by someone "If I would have told you about what went on you would not have believed me" when all she needed to say was "If I had told you...."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on June 02, 2014, 11:03:06 AM
Just got back from a girl scout camp (and if I never hear "Let It Go" again, it will be too soon . . .)

Anyway, I got a real kick out of all the signs saying

SLOW
GIRL SCOUTS
PLAYING

because it was obvious someone came along with a magic marker and snuck in a tiny comma after the "slow."


It should've been a colon or semicolon.  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: fountainof on June 02, 2014, 11:49:23 AM
There have been new commercials in my area for Lysol products that are saying instead of cleaning, people should be healthing (i.e. cleaning to improve health).  So, now they have a big campaign on "healthing".  Have other people here seen these commercials?  I wonder who had thought this up, probably someone who was a fan of Google as a verb and wanted to create their own branding with a new verb.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: missanpan on June 02, 2014, 01:01:58 PM
There have been new commercials in my area for Lysol products that are saying instead of cleaning, people should be healthing (i.e. cleaning to improve health).  So, now they have a big campaign on "healthing".  Have other people here seen these commercials?  I wonder who had thought this up, probably someone who was a fan of Google as a verb and wanted to create their own branding with a new verb.

This reminds me of the Calvin and Hobbes comic strip and "verbing:"

http://www.unmemorabletitle.co.uk/verbing-weirds-language/
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: mrs_deb on June 02, 2014, 04:15:27 PM
Apostrophe abuse at a barbershop in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

(http://i288.photobucket.com/albums/ll168/mrs_deb/1149250_10201044184443603_510268227_o.jpg)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Nikko-chan on June 02, 2014, 04:29:33 PM
and also for line ups... if those letters can't be in a straight line, I don't want to come to you for whatever a line up might be.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: artk2002 on June 02, 2014, 04:31:55 PM
Apostrophe abuse at a barbershop in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Not to mention the odd typography, with the dot over each upper case "I".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on June 09, 2014, 11:49:25 AM
DH and I took The Beagle for a long walk in a local park.  Right there, on the walking trail, was this sign:

No trespassing after dark without permission.   :o
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: ddawn23 on June 09, 2014, 12:09:32 PM
DD came home from elementary school today with this bracelet:

(http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff475/FAW329/CaughtDoingGood_zpseae87099.jpg)

It says "Caught Doing Good" and I'm not sure if that's supposed to mean that she was doing good in the community or if she was doing well in class.
Definitely the former, and not bad grammar.  After all, one isn't caught doing well in class.  Incidentally, my elementary school had something similar called a "caught being good."  A (male) classmate and I received one for freely pairing up in gym class.  Evidently most kids would whine when forced to pair with an opposite-gendered student during gym.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Arila on June 09, 2014, 03:04:22 PM
A consequence of the abundance of bad grammar on the internet:
I saw a correctly used "they're" and caught myself mid-eye-roll...Oh, wait...it's the correct spelling!

This is really bad - I've always been able to rely on my "sounds right" sense and now it's being slowly pushed askew.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: poundcake on June 12, 2014, 03:55:54 PM
"Myself" instead of "me" or "I" makes me want to scream. "Myself, my spouse, and our children went" or "He told Grandpa, Dad and myself that-"

No. Stop it. It does not sound more elegant that way!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on June 12, 2014, 04:29:56 PM
To some, any added syllables increase the prestige and emphasize the intelligence of the writer. Think ofthose who prefer 'utilize' over 'use'.   

A few years ago I posted about an article reviewing books for children.  The very well-regarded reviewer wanted to say that certain difficult concepts were presented in a way that children could begin to understand.  Instead of 'simple' she consistently used 'simplistic'. 

She believed that the extra syllable made her writing sound more authoritative. It just made people who know the difference between 'simple' and 'simplistic' want to strangle her.     
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on June 13, 2014, 01:55:46 AM
"Myself" instead of "me" or "I" makes me want to scream. "Myself, my spouse, and our children went" or "He told Grandpa, Dad and myself that-"

No. Stop it. It does not sound more elegant that way!

POD POD POD! This drives me nuts.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on June 13, 2014, 08:03:01 AM
"Myself" instead of "me" or "I" makes me want to scream. "Myself, my spouse, and our children went" or "He told Grandpa, Dad and myself that-"

No. Stop it. It does not sound more elegant that way!

Total POD. I attribute this misuse of "myself" to the fact that there is so much confusion as to whether to use "me" or "I" in a sentence. I believe people use "myself" instead so they don't have to decide.

It has become ubiquitous in emails:
Please contact Joe or myself if you have any questions.

Ugh.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on June 13, 2014, 08:30:37 AM
"Myself" instead of "me" or "I" makes me want to scream. "Myself, my spouse, and our children went" or "He told Grandpa, Dad and myself that-"

No. Stop it. It does not sound more elegant that way!

Total POD. I attribute this misuse of "myself" to the fact that there is so much confusion as to whether to use "me" or "I" in a sentence. I believe people use "myself" instead so they don't have to decide.

It has become ubiquitous in emails:
Please contact Joe or myself if you have any questions.

Ugh.
DH does it for just that reason.  And I know that he knows the trick of using I or me, because I've heard him tell the grandsons.  What is so hard about using Joe and I when you would use a singular I, and Joe and me when you would use me? I went to the store.  Joe and I went to the store.  Please contact me.  Please contact Joe or me.  ::) >:( :o
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Specky on June 13, 2014, 09:03:26 AM
Under a picture in an article:  "To embiggen, please click here."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on June 13, 2014, 09:11:56 AM
Under a picture in an article:  "To embiggen, please click here."
Isn't English a wonderful language?  ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on June 13, 2014, 09:21:59 AM
Under a picture in an article:  "To embiggen, please click here."
Isn't English a wonderful language?  ;D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_the_Iconoclast (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_the_Iconoclast)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on June 13, 2014, 11:10:40 AM
Under a picture in an article:  "To embiggen, please click here."

It's a perfectly cromulent word.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on June 13, 2014, 05:15:00 PM
Under a picture in an article:  "To embiggen, please click here."
Isn't English a wonderful language?  ;D


English is indeed wonderful. I'm just not sure 'embiggen' is English...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on June 13, 2014, 05:33:25 PM
Under a picture in an article:  "To embiggen, please click here."
Isn't English a wonderful language?  ;D


English is indeed wonderful. I'm just not sure 'embiggen' is English...

Oh, come on. It's awesomesauce! <- and that is the new trendy term that makes me go (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-sick001.gif)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 13, 2014, 05:53:16 PM
To go with "axed", their partners "excape" and "expresso."  ::)

I regret to inform you.  Expresso is now in the dictionary listed as a variant.  My condolences

:P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: PastryGoddess on June 13, 2014, 05:55:03 PM
Under a picture in an article:  "To embiggen, please click here."

It's urban slang and can be used to great effect as seen here  http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/urban-scientist/2013/10/11/give-trouble-to-others-but-not-me/
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on June 13, 2014, 08:12:56 PM
Not "twitch" as much as "laugh uproariously," but I'll just link this here (https://twitter.com/FelicityMorse/status/477459019393929216/photo/1).  (Not spectacularly dirty, but contains a word I suspect eHell would filter.)  Granted, it was written by a kid so strange spellings are standard, but still  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: mlmama on June 14, 2014, 01:21:34 AM
I have a few that have been making me go twicthy lately. First, my daughter texting me and saying "doe" instead of though. I tell her, "I am not a female deer, dear."  :P Second, my friend from high school that posts on FB uses "hafta" instead of have to. Another FB friend has used "are" instead of "our" when talking about things she and her husband are doing together.  I hope I haven't made too many errors in writing this. I know my grammar is far from perfect!  ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on June 14, 2014, 01:26:17 AM
A chef I watch talked about the flavors "meddling together". Sir, the word is "melding".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on June 14, 2014, 02:33:02 AM
A chef I watch talked about the flavors "meddling together". Sir, the word is "melding".


Not if he's talking about the sort of pies mentioned in the link that Slartibartfast gave a couple of posts up. In that case, 'meddling' may be just the word we need!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on June 14, 2014, 02:59:49 PM
My friend who teaches at a local college just received this e-mail from a student:

"i dont undstand m grade on essy? Why u grade so lo?"

 ::)

Did the teacher write back something along the lines of  "I don't understand your spelling or grammar.  Please repeat the question in proper format."?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on July 03, 2014, 03:33:07 PM
I am resurrecting this thread to complain about a writing trend I'm seeing more and more frequently. For lack of a better term, I call it Unnecessary Possession. Here are a couple of examples:

"Yesterday, I had a man cut in line in front of me at the grocery store."
"At work this morning, we had a client come in and immediately start yelling at the receptionist."

It bugs me every time I see it. What's the matter with:

"Yesterday at the grocery store, a man cut in line in front of me."
"At work this morning, a client came in and immediately started yelling at the receptionist."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on July 03, 2014, 04:09:15 PM
I am resurrecting this thread to complain about a writing trend I'm seeing more and more frequently. For lack of a better term, I call it Unnecessary Possession. Here are a couple of examples:

"Yesterday, I had a man cut in line in front of me at the grocery store."
"At work this morning, we had a client come in and immediately start yelling at the receptionist."


I am *so* stealing this.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on July 03, 2014, 04:11:19 PM
My dad used to complain about what he called the "First Person Conditional" tense:

"We'd like to welcome you to the Atlanta airport."

(He said he always half-expected them to go on: "Unfortunately, we seem to have landed in Chicago.")
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: PastryGoddess on July 03, 2014, 04:49:09 PM
I am resurrecting this thread to complain about a writing trend I'm seeing more and more frequently. For lack of a better term, I call it Unnecessary Possession. Here are a couple of examples:

"Yesterday, I had a man cut in line in front of me at the grocery store."
"At work this morning, we had a client come in and immediately start yelling at the receptionist."

It bugs me every time I see it. What's the matter with:

"Yesterday at the grocery store, a man cut in line in front of me."
"At work this morning, a client came in and immediately started yelling at the receptionist."

My dad used to complain about what he called the "First Person Conditional" tense:

"We'd like to welcome you to the Atlanta airport."

(He said he always half-expected them to go on: "Unfortunately, we seem to have landed in Chicago.")

There are phrases for these things I hate!  I love you both
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on July 04, 2014, 03:46:01 AM
I am resurrecting this thread to complain about a writing trend I'm seeing more and more frequently. For lack of a better term, I call it Unnecessary Possession. Here are a couple of examples:

"Yesterday, I had a man cut in line in front of me at the grocery store."
"At work this morning, we had a client come in and immediately start yelling at the receptionist."

It bugs me every time I see it. What's the matter with:

"Yesterday at the grocery store, a man cut in line in front of me."
"At work this morning, a client came in and immediately started yelling at the receptionist."

Interesting observation! I think I'm guilty of that! I'm going to start paying attention to what I say in order to avoid it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Anniissa on July 04, 2014, 05:09:05 AM
I don't understand how apparently people have completely forgotten how to spell drawer - just in the last couple of days I've seen a work email asking about something missing from a "desk draw", an otherwise very professional looking sign advertising a "chest of draws" and twice in national newspapers the word used was draw when they obviously meant drawer. Surely, at least in the newspaper there ought to be an editor or copy checker who should spot this  ???
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MariaE on July 04, 2014, 05:06:52 PM
I am resurrecting this thread to complain about a writing trend I'm seeing more and more frequently. For lack of a better term, I call it Unnecessary Possession. Here are a couple of examples:

"Yesterday, I had a man cut in line in front of me at the grocery store."
"At work this morning, we had a client come in and immediately start yelling at the receptionist."

It bugs me every time I see it. What's the matter with:

"Yesterday at the grocery store, a man cut in line in front of me."
"At work this morning, a client came in and immediately started yelling at the receptionist."

Interesting observation! I think I'm guilty of that! I'm going to start paying attention to what I say in order to avoid it.

I'm definitely guilty of this! Mostly because I really dislike interposed sentences when they can be avoided, and would rather use unnecessary possession (love it!) instead.

Of course "Yesterday a man cut in front of me at the grocery store" would be even better than both those examples :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on July 05, 2014, 12:23:06 AM
I don't understand how apparently people have completely forgotten how to spell drawer - just in the last couple of days I've seen a work email asking about something missing from a "desk draw", an otherwise very professional looking sign advertising a "chest of draws" and twice in national newspapers the word used was draw when they obviously meant drawer. Surely, at least in the newspaper there ought to be an editor or copy checker who should spot this  ???

Part of the problem is that, in some accents, drawer sounds like "draw" or "draw'r," so if someone's not paying attention to what's being said, they may think that's how it's said/spelled.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: holly firestorm on July 05, 2014, 03:44:57 PM
I am resurrecting this thread to complain about a writing trend I'm seeing more and more frequently. For lack of a better term, I call it Unnecessary Possession. Here are a couple of examples:

"Yesterday, I had a man cut in line in front of me at the grocery store."
"At work this morning, we had a client come in and immediately start yelling at the receptionist."

It bugs me every time I see it. What's the matter with:

"Yesterday at the grocery store, a man cut in line in front of me."
"At work this morning, a client came in and immediately started yelling at the receptionist."

Interesting observation! I think I'm guilty of that! I'm going to start paying attention to what I say in order to avoid it.

I'm definitely guilty of this! Mostly because I really dislike interposed sentences when they can be avoided, and would rather use unnecessary possession (love it!) instead.

Of course "Yesterday a man cut in front of me at the grocery store" would be even better than both those examples :)
I know I do stuff like that when I'm speaking, but try to avoid it when writing.

My all time 'favorite' is still, "I had went."

There's also a new one, which I've seen used repeatedly on TV by educated intelligent people. Say a PhD is on a talk show to promote a new book about a theory she has. The host asks, "What is the book about?" and the author always starts the sentence with,"...so." To me the word "so" is the way to continue a topic, not begin one.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BabyMama on July 07, 2014, 11:26:13 AM
One of my coworkers contributes to our company's newsletter that is seen by both employees and buyers. Last week his article was titled, "Tuting My Own Horn."

Now, the entry was on tutoring--so maybe he thought it was some kind of pun? (Then why wouldn't you make it "Tutoring My Own Horn" to make it clearer?) It looks like a terrible spelling mistake to me.

Did I mention we work for a major publisher.  :-[ I'm embarrassed that other people are seeing this, and I had nothing to do with it.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on July 08, 2014, 10:44:50 AM
I had a magazine hand delivered to my office yesterday, it's basically a magazine filled with pretty full color ads.  A couple of short, fluffy articles and some wedding announcements.

Filled with typos!  One sentence just didn't sound right...taking care of customer's base needs (well that just sounds naughty). One of the old, local family names is misspelled in a headline, a couple fell in live while working together, Mr Warren joint the military, they wedding took place, another misspelled name in the body of the article about said person, spectacular ball event for local charity has charity name butchered (Sky High instead of High Sky), etc.  It's horrible.

I'm not even halfway through the magazine, obviously they only relied on spell check and did not actually proof this.   

It also opens with a letter about SHOPPING LOCAL, then in the next column you find out the mag is published in another city by a couple of ladies that actually live in other town (over 200 miles away). 

I sent an email asking them to please proofread future issues.  These are not minor infractions IMO, this is just laziness.

If they call me about placing an ad I will decline and state why.   

 
 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Outdoor Girl on July 08, 2014, 12:39:11 PM
When writing about male anatomy, it's prostate, people.  There is no 'r' in there.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on July 08, 2014, 01:07:58 PM
When writing about male anatomy, it's prostate, people.  There is no 'r' in there.

This!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on July 08, 2014, 01:31:05 PM
When writing about male anatomy, it's prostate, people.  There is no 'r' in there.

This!

Yes if you have prostrate trouble I picture you having problems laying flat, lying flat, lying down, being prone - you know one of those
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Outdoor Girl on July 08, 2014, 01:51:06 PM
Well, he might end up prostrate, depending on what's been done to his prostate.   ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on July 08, 2014, 04:23:58 PM
Ugh, that one drives me nuts too! (Although I admit to being amused the one time someone accidentally typed prostate as phosphate...)

"Crukid" for crooked. I used to know someone who did that regularly and would not be corrected, throwing tantrums that they were absolutely correct and anyone who corrected them needed to go back to school.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on July 08, 2014, 08:57:32 PM
My dad used to complain about what he called the "First Person Conditional" tense:

"We'd like to welcome you to the Atlanta airport."

(He said he always half-expected them to go on: "Unfortunately, we seem to have landed in Chicago.")

More of a misplaced modifier issue than a conditional, but when a server says, "If you need anything, my name is Judy," I'm tempted to finish the thought with "And if you don't, my name is Kathy."

Same thing with broadcast news reporters: "In Albany, I'm Mary Jones." ("And in Schenectady, I go by Lucy Smith.")

I'm an unemployed copy editor, and all these posts about egregious errors showing up in print are making me crazy. I need a job, people! I can clean up that mess!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Nikko-chan on July 09, 2014, 12:17:59 AM
Ugh, that one drives me nuts too! (Although I admit to being amused the one time someone accidentally typed prostate as phosphate...)

"Crukid" for crooked. I used to know someone who did that regularly and would not be corrected, throwing tantrums that they were absolutely correct and anyone who corrected them needed to go back to school.

what? Just what? Is that a thing now? Ugh I feel old.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Xandraea on July 09, 2014, 09:15:57 AM
One of my DD's friends has taken to using "16" to replace "is" wherever it appears in texts. I asked DD why friend does this, and she doesn't know, but friend claims she won't do it in important writing.

"How 16 Engl16h class? 16 your teacher nice? Th16 song is the best. It 16 fun to dance to."


16 = is      << (this appeared at the bottom of the first several such texts. If your texts need a translation code, maybe you're doing it wrong?)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: scotcat60 on July 09, 2014, 09:30:14 AM
Slightly OT.

I was buying apples from a fruit stall and the young man was serving me with one hand and texting with the other. He said to me "How do you spell Chew?" and mimed chewing on an orange from the stall. I spelled C_H_E_W and he tapped it into his phone and took the £1  he was charging for the scoop of apples.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on July 09, 2014, 03:44:01 PM
Ugh, that one drives me nuts too! (Although I admit to being amused the one time someone accidentally typed prostate as phosphate...)

"Crukid" for crooked. I used to know someone who did that regularly and would not be corrected, throwing tantrums that they were absolutely correct and anyone who corrected them needed to go back to school.

what? Just what? Is that a thing now? Ugh I feel old.

I've seen it more than once, unfortunately. :(
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Frog24 on July 15, 2014, 01:40:13 PM
My wordy friends..... Weird Al has finally written a song for us:

http://www.vevo.com/watch/weird-al-yankovic/word-crimes/USRV81400343 (http://www.vevo.com/watch/weird-al-yankovic/word-crimes/USRV81400343)  "Word Crimes".

We even watched it at work and had a laugh.... until he said it was okay if we got rid of the Oxford comma.  ;)

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on July 15, 2014, 01:45:00 PM
I'm buying that album as soon as I get home.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MrTango on July 15, 2014, 02:07:02 PM
One of my DD's friends has taken to using "16" to replace "is" wherever it appears in texts. I asked DD why friend does this, and she doesn't know, but friend claims she won't do it in important writing.

"How 16 Engl16h class? 16 your teacher nice? Th16 song is the best. It 16 fun to dance to."


16 = is      << (this appeared at the bottom of the first several such texts. If your texts need a translation code, maybe you're doing it wrong?)

I'd bet when she turns seventeen, she'll start replacing all occurrances of "it" with "17"...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: pandabear on July 16, 2014, 05:16:53 PM
I've stated this before, yet I'm going to do so again.

The word is because.  Not cuz, not cos, not cause.  It is because.  Because people!!

I was just reading a different forum and a frequent poster uses cuz.  It drives me batty.  I have to stop reading his/her posts else I'll lose my sanity.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: ladyknight1 on July 16, 2014, 05:17:42 PM
My wordy friends..... Weird Al has finally written a song for us:

http://www.vevo.com/watch/weird-al-yankovic/word-crimes/USRV81400343 (http://www.vevo.com/watch/weird-al-yankovic/word-crimes/USRV81400343)  "Word Crimes".

We even watched it at work and had a laugh.... until he said it was okay if we got rid of the Oxford comma.  ;)

Amazing video and song!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: PastryGoddess on July 16, 2014, 09:19:34 PM
My wordy friends..... Weird Al has finally written a song for us:

http://www.vevo.com/watch/weird-al-yankovic/word-crimes/USRV81400343 (http://www.vevo.com/watch/weird-al-yankovic/word-crimes/USRV81400343)  "Word Crimes".

We even watched it at work and had a laugh.... until he said it was okay if we got rid of the Oxford comma.  ;)

Amazing video and song!

FYI There is another thread on this already
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: o_gal on July 17, 2014, 06:34:54 AM
My wordy friends..... Weird Al has finally written a song for us:

http://www.vevo.com/watch/weird-al-yankovic/word-crimes/USRV81400343 (http://www.vevo.com/watch/weird-al-yankovic/word-crimes/USRV81400343)  "Word Crimes".

We even watched it at work and had a laugh.... until he said it was okay if we got rid of the Oxford comma.  ;)

Amazing video and song!

FYI There is another thread on this already

But that thread is ostensibly about one of his other videos, "Tacky". Discussing "Word Crimes" here makes more sense. But the mods can combine the two if needed.

If I was a middle school or high school language arts/English teacher, that video would be the first thing I show when school in the US resumes this fall. I for one, will defend my love of the Oxford comma for as long as necessary  :)

Weird Al Yankovich
has a big
dic
tionary  ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on July 17, 2014, 03:08:40 PM
I've stated this before, yet I'm going to do so again.

The word is because.  Not cuz, not cos, not cause.  It is because.  Because people!!

I was just reading a different forum and a frequent poster uses cuz.  It drives me batty.  I have to stop reading his/her posts else I'll lose my sanity.

multi Pod !

My cousin is cuz.  Because is the word. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on July 18, 2014, 12:31:36 AM
"Chalk full" instead of "chock full". ARGH!

(there's an absolutely awesome animated gif of "the seven deadly sins of Disney" that I want to show people... but the person who created it used "chalk" instead of "chock" and I just can't do it. :-X
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on July 18, 2014, 08:47:21 AM
vaca for vacation

I got an automated reply from an email that said, "I am on vaca this week if you have an emergency please contact XYZ"

Okay, so I'm not the sharpest pencil in the box, I thought vaca was an island...

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Tini on July 18, 2014, 12:22:26 PM
Ha, vaca is Spanish for cow... conjures up an interesting image.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on July 18, 2014, 01:02:04 PM
I've stated this before, yet I'm going to do so again.

The word is because.  Not cuz, not cos, not cause.  It is because.  Because people!!

I was just reading a different forum and a frequent poster uses cuz.  It drives me batty.  I have to stop reading his/her posts else I'll lose my sanity.

multi Pod !

My cousin is cuz.  Because is the word.

Pod times 10,000.  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Team HoundMom on July 22, 2014, 03:43:42 PM
I just realized that the title of this thread about spelling has "spelling" spelled with 3 L's.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on July 22, 2014, 03:45:54 PM
I just realized that the title of this thread about spelling has "spelling" spelled with 3 L's.

It used to have grammar spelled "grammer" too. It's deliberate. :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on July 25, 2014, 06:41:30 PM
I am running into this style of writing more and more frequently:

"I know what you mean the other day the same thing happened to me hahaha so funny still can't believe it."

It's like they just vomit the words onto the screen.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Nikko-chan on July 26, 2014, 05:54:31 AM
I am running into this style of writing more and more frequently:

"I know what you mean the other day the same thing happened to me hahaha so funny still can't believe it."

It's like they just vomit the words onto the screen.

Two things: One, I now have a headache from reading that.

Two: Is it bad that I want to go through and correct that sentence?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on July 26, 2014, 06:43:35 AM
For some reason today I'm coming across the 'silent e' thing. Can people not hear the difference with words that aren't even pronounced the same way? This morning I've encountered 'I am loathe to do...' No, you aren't. You're loath to. Loathe is a verb. I loathe eating offal, I am loath to eat it. One is a verb and the other is an adjective. I've also seen 'I'm just going to change my cloths' for 'clothes', and 'she couldn't breath properly'. I'm a bit hiss and spit this morning and it's annoying me even more than usual.

Silent E! (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91BQqdNOUxs)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on July 26, 2014, 09:32:07 AM
Flout and flaunt. 

Flout means to openly disregard. 
Flaunt means to parade some perceived superiority. 

The only things you can flout are rules and convention.  You can flaunt  wealth, education or anything else that makes you feel you're better than someone else. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on July 26, 2014, 11:49:23 AM
For some reason today I'm coming across the 'silent e' thing. Can people not hear the difference with words that aren't even pronounced the same way? This morning I've encountered 'I am loathe to do...' No, you aren't. You're loath to. Loathe is a verb. I loathe eating offal, I am loath to eat it. One is a verb and the other is an adjective. I've also seen 'I'm just going to change my cloths' for 'clothes', and 'she couldn't breath properly'. I'm a bit hiss and spit this morning and it's annoying me even more than usual.

Silent E! (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91BQqdNOUxs)

You're not alone; that bothers me, too.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MERUNCC13 on July 26, 2014, 12:00:47 PM
Mine is comma abuse.  Hubby always puts a comma in a sentence as he put it: " when you are pausing in a sentence, you add a comma".  I don't look at it that way as it looks like comma splicing, and so I do not let him proof my school papers (although he can do anything else!)  Working in the local school system, I see a lot of beginning spelling mistakes from my kids, what I do is ask them to speak out the word and then try to spell it.  If that doesn't work, then I introduce them to Mr. Webster (we keep children's dictionaries in the classroom) and try to introduce them to the joys of a well written sentence even in second grade! 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on July 26, 2014, 12:03:26 PM
For some reason today I'm coming across the 'silent e' thing. Can people not hear the difference with words that aren't even pronounced the same way? This morning I've encountered 'I am loathe to do...' No, you aren't. You're loath to. Loathe is a verb. I loathe eating offal, I am loath to eat it. One is a verb and the other is an adjective. I've also seen 'I'm just going to change my cloths' for 'clothes', and 'she couldn't breath properly'. I'm a bit hiss and spit this morning and it's annoying me even more than usual.

Silent E! (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91BQqdNOUxs)

Uh, I've always heard "loath" and "loathe" pronounced the same way. I still spell them differently, though.

The others, though, make no sense.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on July 26, 2014, 12:11:42 PM
This is syntax more than anything else, but

(http://s1.ibtimes.com/sites/www.ibtimes.com/files/styles/v2_article_large/public/2014/07/23/ap_tweet.png)

They later had to clarify as "Dutch military plane carrying Malaysia Airlines bodies lands in Eindhoven" - the plane was carrying bodies from the crash and it landed safely; it didn't "crash land."

 ::)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: GreenEyedHawk on July 26, 2014, 12:27:10 PM
I'm glad I read your explanation...I was horrified there for a minute. I thought, 'The plane carrying the bodies from that crash *crash landed*?? Those people are CURSED!"
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Marga on July 26, 2014, 05:29:25 PM
For some reason today I'm coming across the 'silent e' thing. Can people not hear the difference with words that aren't even pronounced the same way? This morning I've encountered 'I am loathe to do...' No, you aren't. You're loath to. Loathe is a verb. I loathe eating offal, I am loath to eat it. One is a verb and the other is an adjective. I've also seen 'I'm just going to change my cloths' for 'clothes', and 'she couldn't breath properly'. I'm a bit hiss and spit this morning and it's annoying me even more than usual.

Silent E! (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91BQqdNOUxs)

I never knew that, thank you. This will help me whenever I'm not certain about that last E, without the need to check the dictionary.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Smulkin on July 28, 2014, 07:09:09 AM
 Another syntax-y issue. I'll call it the dangling 'which', since I'm not sure of the terminology.

 e.g. Stan and Fauntleroy are making cakes. Stan makes a superb, exemplary cake, whereas Fauntleroy becomes distracted, leaves something to overheat, goes off somewhere and returns to find half his ingredients aflame. No one is pleased.
 You want to convey this displeasure to Fauntleroy, thusly: "You were meant to be baking... something which Stan accomplished, but you not only failed *spectacularly* at, but topped off by setting the cheese on fire."
 
 I see a lot of this instead: "You were meant to be baking... Stan accomplished this, which you not only failed *spectacularly* at baking but set the cheese on fire too."

 It works if you substitute 'whereas' for 'which', but it's like the writer/speaker lost track of what their 'which' referred to (i.e. baking), spiralled off into a new thought, and restated a whole unnecessary clump of sentence. It reads as if it's switched tracks suddenly in the middle, and if it's a very long sentence, I lose the thread.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on July 28, 2014, 12:02:34 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: #borecore on July 28, 2014, 12:09:43 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."

"Drive-Thru" -- I might have brought this one up before, but the "thru" spelling really bothers me in this context, and it's worse when it's used for any other "through." It's so commonplace that I don't think people realize they're doing it.

"Donuts" instead of "doughnuts": Add this to the list of do-nots. :D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on July 28, 2014, 01:57:52 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."


After getting ice cream yesterday, The Sweetie and I were musing about why "ice cream" instead of "iced cream" is okay but "can goods" instead of "canned goods" isn't.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on July 28, 2014, 02:09:42 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."


After getting ice cream yesterday, The Sweetie and I were musing about why "ice cream" instead of "iced cream" is okay but "can goods" instead of "canned goods" isn't.

Also, "ice tea" - not ok. It's "iced tea".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on July 28, 2014, 02:12:28 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."

"Drive-Thru" -- I might have brought this one up before, but the "thru" spelling really bothers me in this context, and it's worse when it's used for any other "through." It's so commonplace that I don't think people realize they're doing it.

"Donuts" instead of "doughnuts": Add this to the list of do-nots. :D

Re: the "D," if you leave the letter off it means that you are the first to serve, not to be served (the first people to come through are the first served). Yes, people write it, "first serve," but it's incorrect.

I don't like "thru," either. Even when I'm texting I spell it "through."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on July 28, 2014, 02:13:13 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."


After getting ice cream yesterday, The Sweetie and I were musing about why "ice cream" instead of "iced cream" is okay but "can goods" instead of "canned goods" isn't.

Also, "ice tea" - not ok. It's "iced tea".

Yes, that one, too!  :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on July 28, 2014, 03:05:01 PM
A local ice cream store had "salt carmel" as their special flavor of the week.  When I saw it I turned to DH and did this  :o ::) >:(.

He looked at me and said "You want to take your red pen out of your purse, don't you?".

Yes, yes I do.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on July 28, 2014, 03:06:26 PM
A local ice cream store had "salt carmel" as their special flavor of the week.  When I saw it I turned to DH and did this  :o ::) >:(.

He looked at me and said "You want to take your red pen out of your purse, don't you?".

Yes, yes I do.

Oh, right. I forgot about the ice-cream place's poster for banana splits, which listed one ingredient as "pealed bananas."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on July 28, 2014, 03:12:20 PM
A local ice cream store had "salt carmel" as their special flavor of the week.  When I saw it I turned to DH and did this  :o ::) >:(.

He looked at me and said "You want to take your red pen out of your purse, don't you?".

Yes, yes I do.

Oh, right. I forgot about the ice-cream place's poster for banana splits, which listed one ingredient as "pealed bananas."

Okay, I'm now picturing bananas pealing with laughter because being peeled tickles!  Thanks for that!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on July 28, 2014, 03:14:36 PM
A local ice cream store had "salt carmel" as their special flavor of the week.  When I saw it I turned to DH and did this  :o ::) >:(.

He looked at me and said "You want to take your red pen out of your purse, don't you?".

Yes, yes I do.

Oh, right. I forgot about the ice-cream place's poster for banana splits, which listed one ingredient as "pealed bananas."

Okay, I'm now picturing bananas pealing with laughter because being peeled tickles!  Thanks for that!

I was thinking of maybe bells shaped like bananas, being rung for all they're worth.  Maybe a windchime that looks like a bunch of bananas, all making a joyful noise.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on July 28, 2014, 03:22:55 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."

"Drive-Thru" -- I might have brought this one up before, but the "thru" spelling really bothers me in this context, and it's worse when it's used for any other "through." It's so commonplace that I don't think people realize they're doing it.

"Donuts" instead of "doughnuts": Add this to the list of do-nots. :D

Some of these I think are acceptable, though. "Donuts" is just an alternate spelling for "doughnuts". And "thru" seems to be the standard spelling in the special case of "drive-thru". It's a commercial construction, not simply a misspelling.

I would gladly accept donuts if we could get rid of "lay" for "lie". "Lie" is a perfectly good word - why don't we use it? It's not as if "lay" is shorter, or easier to spell.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Eeep! on July 28, 2014, 03:32:59 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."



After getting ice cream yesterday, The Sweetie and I were musing about why "ice cream" instead of "iced cream" is okay but "can goods" instead of "canned goods" isn't.

Also, "ice tea" - not ok. It's "iced tea".

My 5 year old son had this exact question.  We had previously discussed the use of "whipped cream" and that a lot of people just say "whip cream". And then I had used iced tea as another example of this mistake. So then a couple days later I said something about  ice cream and he said "Mom, I think maybe it should really be iced cream." I had to tell him he had a really good point. ;)

Edited to fix quoting error.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on July 28, 2014, 03:37:26 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."



After getting ice cream yesterday, The Sweetie and I were musing about why "ice cream" instead of "iced cream" is okay but "can goods" instead of "canned goods" isn't.

Also, "ice tea" - not ok. It's "iced tea".

My 5 year old son had this exact question.  We had previously discussed the use of "whipped cream" and that a lot of people just say "whip cream". And then I had used iced tea as another example of this mistake. So then a couple days later I said something about  ice cream and he said "Mom, I think maybe it should really be iced cream.". I had to tell him he had a really good point. ;)

I'm kind of torn here.  I tend to think of "iced tea" as being correct because there is tea and it has been iced.  And "whipped cream" is correct because there is cream and it has been whipped.  But "ice cream" isn't cream that has been iced, so leaving off the "d" seems more okay to me.  I think of it more as ice that has been creamed (with milk, etc, added to it).  "Cream of ice", if you will.  But you could see it the other way around, I suppose.  :D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Eeep! on July 28, 2014, 03:37:32 PM
My pet peeve - and sadly something I see all the time online - is the use of rediculous, instead of ridiculous.  Otherwise educated, intelligent people use that spelling.  Drives me bonkers!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Eeep! on July 28, 2014, 03:38:14 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."



After getting ice cream yesterday, The Sweetie and I were musing about why "ice cream" instead of "iced cream" is okay but "can goods" instead of "canned goods" isn't.

Also, "ice tea" - not ok. It's "iced tea".

My 5 year old son had this exact question.  We had previously discussed the use of "whipped cream" and that a lot of people just say "whip cream". And then I had used iced tea as another example of this mistake. So then a couple days later I said something about  ice cream and he said "Mom, I think maybe it should really be iced cream.". I had to tell him he had a really good point. ;)

I'm kind of torn here.  I tend to think of "iced tea" as being correct because there is tea and it has been iced.  And "whipped cream" is correct because there is cream and it has been whipped.  But "ice cream" isn't cream that has been iced, so leaving off the "d" seems more okay to me.  I think of it more as ice that has been creamed (with milk, etc, added to it).  "Cream of ice", if you will.  But you could see it the other way around, I suppose.  :D

That was actually the explanation I ended up giving him! :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on July 28, 2014, 03:38:48 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."



After getting ice cream yesterday, The Sweetie and I were musing about why "ice cream" instead of "iced cream" is okay but "can goods" instead of "canned goods" isn't.

Also, "ice tea" - not ok. It's "iced tea".

My 5 year old son had this exact question.  We had previously discussed the use of "whipped cream" and that a lot of people just say "whip cream". And then I had used iced tea as another example of this mistake. So then a couple days later I said something about  ice cream and he said "Mom, I think maybe it should really be iced cream.". I had to tell him he had a really good point. ;)

I'm kind of torn here.  I tend to think of "iced tea" as being correct because there is tea and it has been iced.  And "whipped cream" is correct because there is cream and it has been whipped.  But "ice cream" isn't cream that has been iced, so leaving off the "d" seems more okay to me.  I think of it more as ice that has been creamed (with milk, etc, added to it).  "Cream of ice", if you will.  But you could see it the other way around, I suppose.  :D

That was actually the explanation I ended up giving him! :)

Cool! Great minds think alike, I guess.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on July 28, 2014, 03:41:59 PM
This is one that really bothers me, because if you read it it makes no sense: "First come, first serve." It makes my brain hurt!

I've seen it with or without a D on the end, but either way is extraordinarily lazy shorthand for, "The first people who come through the door are the first people we serve/first people who are served."

"Drive-Thru" -- I might have brought this one up before, but the "thru" spelling really bothers me in this context, and it's worse when it's used for any other "through." It's so commonplace that I don't think people realize they're doing it.

"Donuts" instead of "doughnuts": Add this to the list of do-nots. :D

Some of these I think are acceptable, though. "Donuts" is just an alternate spelling for "doughnuts". And "thru" seems to be the standard spelling in the special case of "drive-thru". It's a commercial construction, not simply a misspelling.

I would gladly accept donuts if we could get rid of "lay" for "lie". "Lie" is a perfectly good word - why don't we use it? It's not as if "lay" is shorter, or easier to spell.

I am reminded of the old bit by Gallagher (the comedian who smashed watermelons) where he was making fun of weird words and he said "Drive through hamburgers? Ewwwww" while turning an imaginary steering wheel and looking around with disgust.

Maybe the "thru" spelling of the word in that context is because driving "through" hamburgers really isn't all that appealing.   ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on July 28, 2014, 03:42:44 PM
It's interesting. With regards to the "ice tea," would you not say "lemon tea," rather than "lemoned tea"?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on July 28, 2014, 03:45:57 PM
I thought it was ice tea also.

I just order tea, if I want it hot I say "hot tea"  I don't even bother with the ice/iced, obviously it comes with ice if it's not hot tea.

But once again, proving my redneck ignorance, I thought it was ice tea.

 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on July 28, 2014, 03:48:10 PM
It's interesting. With regards to the "ice tea," would you not say "lemon tea," rather than "lemoned tea"?

Personally, I would say "tea with lemon", but that's a really good question.  Maybe in that case you could say that lemon is an adjective.  "Lemon tea" in the same way as you would say "hot tea".  And you could say "sweetened tea" if you really wanted to but "sweet tea" is okay because the tea is now sweet.  The adjective "sweet" modifies the noun "tea".

I really could do without the phrase "unsweet tea", though.  That's just annoying.  It kind of implies that sweet (or sweetened) tea is the default, when really, when you make tea it isn't sweetened and if you want it to be, you have to add something to it.

And McDonald's new "diet sweet tea" really has me confused.  How is that different from taking regular tea and adding fake sugar to it? 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on July 28, 2014, 03:51:16 PM
I thought it was ice tea also.

I just order tea, if I want it hot I say "hot tea"  I don't even bother with the ice/iced, obviously it comes with ice if it's not hot tea.

But once again, proving my redneck ignorance, I thought it was ice tea.

 

Well, in all fairness, if you want to say "iced tea" you really have to go out of your way to hit that d on the end and then pause a little bit before you say "tea".  When you speak quickly, the words kind of blur together, so I can see how it would be easy to think that it's "ice tea".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Eeep! on July 28, 2014, 03:51:43 PM
It's interesting. With regards to the "ice tea," would you not say "lemon tea," rather than "lemoned tea"?

I would. But that is because I would be thinking that the tea itself has lemon in it.  Whereas the iced tea is over ice.  (So really, we should just all say "tea, on the rocks".)

But then, I actually use "ice tea" about half the time. I also use "whip cream".   >:D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Eeep! on July 28, 2014, 03:52:52 PM
It's interesting. With regards to the "ice tea," would you not say "lemon tea," rather than "lemoned tea"?

Personally, I would say "tea with lemon", but that's a really good question.  Maybe in that case you could say that lemon is an adjective.  "Lemon tea" in the same way as you would say "hot tea".  And you could say "sweetened tea" if you really wanted to but "sweet tea" is okay because the tea is now sweet.  The adjective "sweet" modifies the noun "tea".

I really could do without the phrase "unsweet tea", though.  That's just annoying.  It kind of implies that sweet (or sweetened) tea is the default, when really, when you make tea it isn't sweetened and if you want it to be, you have to add something to it.

And McDonald's new "diet sweet tea" really has me confused.  How is that different from taking regular tea and adding fake sugar to it?

The bolded part is how I feel about the use of the phrase "gin martini". 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on July 28, 2014, 03:53:24 PM
It's interesting. With regards to the "ice tea," would you not say "lemon tea," rather than "lemoned tea"?

I would. But that is because I would be thinking that the tea itself has lemon in it.  Whereas the iced tea is over ice.  (So really, we should just all say "tea, on the rocks".)

But then, I actually use "ice tea" about half the time. I also use "whip cream".   >:D

See my above post, LOL.  "Whip cream" has a similar problem, I think.  The "whipped" blurs with the "cream" if you aren't careful-so sometimes it's impossible to tell which one somebody is saying anyway.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Onyx_TKD on July 28, 2014, 04:00:51 PM
It's interesting. With regards to the "ice tea," would you not say "lemon tea," rather than "lemoned tea"?

I'm not sure that I'd use either. If you're talking about a cup of tea with the juice of a lemon added just before serving, I would say "tea with lemon" (similarly "tea with honey," etc.). OTOH, I would definitely use the "X tea" construction for X-flavored tea, e.g., "peach tea" is a peach-flavored tea, so I guess I would use "lemon tea" for a tea that came already flavored with lemon. However, peach tea hasn't been "peached"--it has been flavored with peach. By contrast, iced tea is not ice-flavored tea nor does it necessarily contain chunks of ice; instead, it's tea that has been cooled or "iced". The temperature is the defining factor, not the ingredients.

I would. But that is because I would be thinking that the tea itself has lemon in it.  Whereas the iced tea is over ice.  (So really, we should just all say "tea, on the rocks".)

Where I'm from, iced tea is just "tea" (you have to specify "hot tea" to get anything else), but I could totally get behind "tea, on the rocks."  ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: PastryGoddess on July 28, 2014, 04:43:07 PM
It's interesting. With regards to the "ice tea," would you not say "lemon tea," rather than "lemoned tea"?

Personally, I would say "tea with lemon", but that's a really good question.  Maybe in that case you could say that lemon is an adjective.  "Lemon tea" in the same way as you would say "hot tea".  And you could say "sweetened tea" if you really wanted to but "sweet tea" is okay because the tea is now sweet.  The adjective "sweet" modifies the noun "tea".

I really could do without the phrase "unsweet tea", though.  That's just annoying.  It kind of implies that sweet (or sweetened) tea is the default, when really, when you make tea it isn't sweetened and if you want it to be, you have to add something to it.

And McDonald's new "diet sweet tea" really has me confused.  How is that different from taking regular tea and adding fake sugar to it?

The bolded part is how I feel about the use of the phrase "gin martini". 

I agree, but unfortunately vodka has become the default at many places.  I've taken to ordering a call drink rather than take the chance that my drink will come out with the wrong spirit.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: kckgirl on July 28, 2014, 04:50:13 PM
I just thought of one, and this thread is so long I can't find if I already mentioned it.

Next store is not the house next to you. That's the house next door.

It's another one where pronunciation sounds different than the real words if you say it quickly. It's really similar to could of, would of, should of, which are really the contractions could've, would've, and should've for could have, would have, and should have.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on July 28, 2014, 04:54:36 PM
A local ice cream store had "salt carmel" as their special flavor of the week.  When I saw it I turned to DH and did this  :o ::) >:(.

He looked at me and said "You want to take your red pen out of your purse, don't you?".

Yes, yes I do.

We are soul mates.  :) My local ice cream place has "sherbert."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on July 28, 2014, 05:00:45 PM
Nouns being turned into verbs tends to drive me nuts. I've recently been watching Food Factory and enjoying it - but I twitch every time the narrators refer to the act of wrapping a stacked pallet of boxes as the boxes being "palletized". That is not a word! Stop verbing the noun!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on July 28, 2014, 06:15:23 PM
It's interesting. With regards to the "ice tea," would you not say "lemon tea," rather than "lemoned tea"?

Personally, I would say "tea with lemon", but that's a really good question.  Maybe in that case you could say that lemon is an adjective.  "Lemon tea" in the same way as you would say "hot tea".  And you could say "sweetened tea" if you really wanted to but "sweet tea" is okay because the tea is now sweet.  The adjective "sweet" modifies the noun "tea".

I really could do without the phrase "unsweet tea", though.  That's just annoying.  It kind of implies that sweet (or sweetened) tea is the default, when really, when you make tea it isn't sweetened and if you want it to be, you have to add something to it.

And McDonald's new "diet sweet tea" really has me confused.  How is that different from taking regular tea and adding fake sugar to it?

This is wholly regional - in the southern US, "iced tea" generally tastes like kool-aid with a tea leaf in it.  In the northern US, it tastes like cold tea and you have to add sweetener yourself.  It is different, though - sweet tea is super-saturated, so it literally has more sugar than you'd be able to add by yourself and not have a big pile of sludge at the bottom.  (A lot of commercial sweet teas are corn-syrup-based.)  I'm assuming the McDonald's "diet sweet tea" is of the super-saturated-flavor variety, but with artificial sweetener instead.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: perpetua on July 28, 2014, 06:26:37 PM
Nouns being turned into verbs tends to drive me nuts. I've recently been watching Food Factory and enjoying it - but I twitch every time the narrators refer to the act of wrapping a stacked pallet of boxes as the boxes being "palletized". That is not a word! Stop verbing the noun!

I feel your pain. There's an advert on TV in the UK at the moment that urges its watchers to "weekend like nobody's watching" and just... no.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Smulkin on July 29, 2014, 04:36:58 AM
 Re. whipped/whip, iced/ice etc., some similar annoyances: "you're suppose to," "I'm just old-fashion", "you're bias/prejudice", and 'that's so cliché".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on July 29, 2014, 07:27:34 AM
I thought it was ice tea also.

I just order tea, if I want it hot I say "hot tea"  I don't even bother with the ice/iced, obviously it comes with ice if it's not hot tea.

But once again, proving my redneck ignorance, I thought it was ice tea.

 

Well, in all fairness, if you want to say "iced tea" you really have to go out of your way to hit that d on the end and then pause a little bit before you say "tea".  When you speak quickly, the words kind of blur together, so I can see how it would be easy to think that it's "ice tea".

Oh sure, when you say it, the words meld together. But that's true of many word combinations.
However, the correct way to write it is "iced" not "ice" tea.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on July 29, 2014, 09:12:49 AM
I looked at a carton yesterday - Whipping Cream

So after you whip it, it is whipped cream, when would it ever be whip cream?

And what does it say on Cool Whip (I forgot to look yesterday)  Whipped topping?

On the tea issue, my brother orders Sweet Tea, if they bring him raspberry or peach tea he sends it back.  We look at each other and say where did THAT come from? 

We are in Texas, sweet is the default around here.


Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on July 29, 2014, 09:25:52 AM
I looked at a carton yesterday - Whipping Cream

So after you whip it, it is whipped cream, when would it ever be whip cream?

And what does it say on Cool Whip (I forgot to look yesterday)  Whipped topping?

On the tea issue, my brother orders Sweet Tea, if they bring him raspberry or peach tea he sends it back.  We look at each other and say where did THAT come from? 

We are in Texas, sweet is the default around here.

LOL! What part of Texas? I'm in Houston, and regular ol' brewed tea on ice with no additional flavorings or sweeteners is the default here. Some restaurants do offer "sweet tea" but it certainly is not the default. Probably Texas is too big and diverse to have one default.  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on July 29, 2014, 09:39:55 AM
I am in west Texas, Midland-Odessa, when I order tea the waitperson says SWEET and I have to say no almost every darn time. 

(I love, love, love sweet tea but my body doesn't love the sugar)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on July 29, 2014, 09:47:48 AM
Yeah, I can't do "sweet" either. I went to a BBQ place here once and the only kind of tea they offered was "sweet". So, ok, I thought I'd try it. My teeth about fell out, it was so sweet. After about three sips I couldn't drink anymore.

I do put sweet n low in my tea, but you know, just a little bit.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Xandraea on July 29, 2014, 12:03:47 PM
Yeah, I can't do "sweet" either. I went to a BBQ place here once and the only kind of tea they offered was "sweet". So, ok, I thought I'd try it. My teeth about fell out, it was so sweet. After about three sips I couldn't drink anymore.

I do put sweet n low in my tea, but you know, just a little bit.

Yep, I lived in the south for a couple years and I'd always have to specify "un-sweetened tea" to avoid the tea-flavoured corn syrup variety. Then I'd add my own sugar (real stuff only; my body doesn't recognize substitutes)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: ladyknight1 on July 29, 2014, 06:32:06 PM
I always order unsweetened tea, with no lemon (since that is the default at most restaurants). I had to explain to someone at the wedding we attended this weekend that my son, who likes sweet tea, and tried the unlabeled tea in the carafe on the table then determined it was too sweet for him, than any sugar that looked at the tea will make it too sweet for my taste.

I hate 'whip cream' with a passion. We have several local restaurants with misspellings on their menus or menu boards. I always want to point it out.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Specky on July 29, 2014, 07:00:45 PM
Used to work with a nurse who would use abbreviations.  One of her favorites was when she would try to describe something as watery.  She tried to use the formula for water, H2O and add a "y" on the end, so she thought she was writing "H2Oy".   Instead, what she was writing was "H2O2y".  I would see this notation and think, hmm...  Hydrogen peroxide, so foamy?

Thru, nite, sox, slax, nocs, tix, and pix are among my twitch triggers.  Also worked with a nurse who argued with me that "thru" was the correct spelling and "through" was incorrect.  She was also the one who would say, "I saul it"  "We had went" or "I had went".  She also called babies "it" when speaking to the baby's parents.  Guess she was a twitch trigger, too.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on July 30, 2014, 08:07:44 AM
This morning I was watching the Today show and they had a reporter covering the massive water main break in Los Angeles.  The reporter was talking about the flooding on the campus of UCLA; specifically, the sports venues.

He described how the UCLA officials now faced the task of "unwatering" the campus.  :o  How does one "unwater" something?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on July 30, 2014, 08:18:29 AM
I've always been a stickler for spelling things correctly but I have come to realize that spelling and pronunciation do evolve (much to my horror!). I also know, again, even though it horrifies me, that many of the spellings we use today weren't correct in the past and thus, won't necessarily be correct in the future.

I think of this when I see words like "thru". At some point way in the future, it's conceivable that "thru" will evolve to be correct and even preferred.

Here's an interesting article about how some words evolved into their current spelling.
http://mentalfloss.com/article/13076/11-weirdly-spelled-words%E2%80%94and-how-they-got-way (http://mentalfloss.com/article/13076/11-weirdly-spelled-words%E2%80%94and-how-they-got-way)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on July 30, 2014, 08:47:14 AM
Some things are true changes, some are just fads. Back in the 1920s, Time Magazine was a chief proponent of "telegraphese," a style of writing where everything was clipped down to the bone. The text of articles was written in the same way that the headlines were. The magazine was quite proud of it. It was the wave of the future! Sleek, with nothing extra weighing it down, like articles or pronouns. Why write a full sentence saying the latest movie had made a lot of money, when you could say "New pic does boff biz!"

It went the way of the Dodo. With it went Time's strange liking for unusual word order. (As someone once commented, "Backward ran sentences until reeled the mind.")
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on July 30, 2014, 12:37:20 PM
Some things are true changes, some are just fads. Back in the 1920s, Time Magazine was a chief proponent of "telegraphese," a style of writing where everything was clipped down to the bone. The text of articles was written in the same way that the headlines were. The magazine was quite proud of it. It was the wave of the future! Sleek, with nothing extra weighing it down, like articles or pronouns. Why write a full sentence saying the latest movie had made a lot of money, when you could say "New pic does boff biz!"

It went the way of the Dodo. With it went Time's strange liking for unusual word order. (As someone once commented, "Backward ran sentences until reeled the mind.")

During Yoda's tenure as editor-in-chief, obviously.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on July 30, 2014, 09:04:20 PM
Some things are true changes, some are just fads. Back in the 1920s, Time Magazine was a chief proponent of "telegraphese," a style of writing where everything was clipped down to the bone. The text of articles was written in the same way that the headlines were. The magazine was quite proud of it. It was the wave of the future! Sleek, with nothing extra weighing it down, like articles or pronouns. Why write a full sentence saying the latest movie had made a lot of money, when you could say "New pic does boff biz!"

It went the way of the Dodo. With it went Time's strange liking for unusual word order. (As someone once commented, "Backward ran sentences until reeled the mind.")

During Yoda's tenure as editor-in-chief, obviously.

LOL. Funny that is.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on July 31, 2014, 02:49:58 AM
Some things are true changes, some are just fads. Back in the 1920s, Time Magazine was a chief proponent of "telegraphese," a style of writing where everything was clipped down to the bone. The text of articles was written in the same way that the headlines were. The magazine was quite proud of it. It was the wave of the future! Sleek, with nothing extra weighing it down, like articles or pronouns. Why write a full sentence saying the latest movie had made a lot of money, when you could say "New pic does boff biz!"

It went the way of the Dodo.

Fetched up from recesses of brain, an "American journalese" tale which I heard long ago.  Apparently, film-makers and -distributors had observed that films whose characters were unsophisticated back-country dwellers, tended not to be popular with audiences in remote rural parts of the US -- the inhabitants perhaps feeling that the films were mocking them, or...?  This phenomenon was magnificently "telegraphesed" (likely, by Time) as follows:  "Stix nix hix pix."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on July 31, 2014, 07:31:25 AM
Some things are true changes, some are just fads. Back in the 1920s, Time Magazine was a chief proponent of "telegraphese," a style of writing where everything was clipped down to the bone. The text of articles was written in the same way that the headlines were. The magazine was quite proud of it. It was the wave of the future! Sleek, with nothing extra weighing it down, like articles or pronouns. Why write a full sentence saying the latest movie had made a lot of money, when you could say "New pic does boff biz!"

It went the way of the Dodo.

Fetched up from recesses of brain, an "American journalese" tale which I heard long ago.  Apparently, film-makers and -distributors had observed that films whose characters were unsophisticated back-country dwellers, tended not to be popular with audiences in remote rural parts of the US -- the inhabitants perhaps feeling that the films were mocking them, or...?  This phenomenon was magnificently "telegraphesed" (likely, by Time) as follows:  "Stix nix hix pix."

I don't know if that was a real headline or not, but it's quoted by Jimmy Cagney in his role as George M. Cohan in "Yankee Doodle Dandy". Toward the end of the film, he runs into some teenagers speaking the lingo of their time, presumably early 40s, and wants to give them a taste of his own familiar jargon. He reads them the headline of Variety which happens to be, "Stix nix hix pix" and then proceeds to explain to them what it means.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: fountainof on July 31, 2014, 10:38:25 AM
Quote
I'm kind of torn here.  I tend to think of "iced tea" as being correct because there is tea and it has been iced.  And "whipped cream" is correct because there is cream and it has been whipped.  But "ice cream" isn't cream that has been iced, so leaving off the "d" seems more okay to me.  I think of it more as ice that has been creamed (with milk, etc, added to it).  "Cream of ice", if you will.  But you could see it the other way around, I suppose.  :D
It is interesting as I would think ice that was creamed was more like a smoothie as ice cream doesn't have ice in it like the iced tea but is cooled over ice (at least traditionally) so maybe it should be iced cream.  In my area ice tea doesn't really mean tea with ice it refers to a drink flavour (that doesn't really even taste like tea like the US stuff does).  For some of these things I think they just become product names and aren't mean to be grammatically correct.  Like the drive-thru example that is only used commercially, almost like a brand name.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: #borecore on July 31, 2014, 10:52:53 AM
My point was that I see people using "thru" in lots and lots of situations that have nothing to do with a "drive-thru" (though I would argue that it shouldn't be used there, either). Some people seem to use it anytime "through" would be the correct word.

I'm not sure why other oversimplified spelling is considered peeve-worthy but that one keeps getting excused as "commercial."

(Then again, I'm regularly annoyed by misspellings for the sake of some commercial purpose I can't divine, e.g., the proliferation of "Kwik" or "Rite.")
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on July 31, 2014, 12:35:50 PM
My point was that I see people using "thru" in lots and lots of situations that have nothing to do with a "drive-thru" (though I would argue that it shouldn't be used there, either). Some people seem to use it anytime "through" would be the correct word.

I'm not sure why other oversimplified spelling is considered peeve-worthy but that one keeps getting excused as "commercial."

(Then again, I'm regularly annoyed by misspellings for the sake of some commercial purpose I can't divine, e.g., the proliferation of "Kwik" or "Rite.")
I believe it has to do with the legalities of trademarking.  You can't trademark "Ready Quick" because they're common English words, but you can trademark the coined spelling "ReddiKwik". 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on July 31, 2014, 12:36:47 PM
My point was that I see people using "thru" in lots and lots of situations that have nothing to do with a "drive-thru" (though I would argue that it shouldn't be used there, either). Some people seem to use it anytime "through" would be the correct word.

I'm not sure why other oversimplified spelling is considered peeve-worthy but that one keeps getting excused as "commercial."

(Then again, I'm regularly annoyed by misspellings for the sake of some commercial purpose I can't divine, e.g., the proliferation of "Kwik" or "Rite.")

Companies spell "thru" that way for a reason - our brains process words in specific ways, and one of the side effects is it's incredibly hard for even non-dyslexic people to differentiate things like "though" versus "through" versus "thorough" on the first pass, especially if we're reading quickly.  "Thru" is much easier to read and understand at a momentary glance.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: z_squared82 on July 31, 2014, 12:40:56 PM
My point was that I see people using "thru" in lots and lots of situations that have nothing to do with a "drive-thru" (though I would argue that it shouldn't be used there, either). Some people seem to use it anytime "through" would be the correct word.

I'm not sure why other oversimplified spelling is considered peeve-worthy but that one keeps getting excused as "commercial."

(Then again, I'm regularly annoyed by misspellings for the sake of some commercial purpose I can't divine, e.g., the proliferation of "Kwik" or "Rite.")

Companies spell "thru" that way for a reason - our brains process words in specific ways, and one of the side effects is it's incredibly hard for even non-dyslexic people to differentiate things like "though" versus "through" versus "thorough" on the first pass, especially if we're reading quickly.  "Thru" is much easier to read and understand at a momentary glance.

Additionally, it fits better on signs.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: #borecore on July 31, 2014, 02:25:27 PM
None of that means that they look intelligent or accurate, or that they drive me less batty because there's a reason for them.

It looks lazy and "cute," perhaps, but that doesn't mean I have to like it.

I have faith that people could process "Drive-Through" (or "Drive-Up" if we want to be brief).
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on August 01, 2014, 01:45:50 AM
Fetched up from recesses of brain, an "American journalese" tale which I heard long ago.  Apparently, film-makers and -distributors had observed that films whose characters were unsophisticated back-country dwellers, tended not to be popular with audiences in remote rural parts of the US -- the inhabitants perhaps feeling that the films were mocking them, or...?  This phenomenon was magnificently "telegraphesed" (likely, by Time) as follows:  "Stix nix hix pix."

I don't know if that was a real headline or not, but it's quoted by Jimmy Cagney in his role as George M. Cohan in "Yankee Doodle Dandy". Toward the end of the film, he runs into some teenagers speaking the lingo of their time, presumably early 40s, and wants to give them a taste of his own familiar jargon. He reads them the headline of Variety which happens to be, "Stix nix hix pix" and then proceeds to explain to them what it means.

Thanks.  Heard the tale long ago from a relative; don't remember whether he gave correct, or any, attribution -- recalled only the wondrous four monosyllables, and that it was in some US periodical long ago !
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on August 01, 2014, 01:49:30 AM
My point was that I see people using "thru" in lots and lots of situations that have nothing to do with a "drive-thru" (though I would argue that it shouldn't be used there, either). Some people seem to use it anytime "through" would be the correct word.

I'm not sure why other oversimplified spelling is considered peeve-worthy but that one keeps getting excused as "commercial."

(Then again, I'm regularly annoyed by misspellings for the sake of some commercial purpose I can't divine, e.g., the proliferation of "Kwik" or "Rite.")

Companies spell "thru" that way for a reason - our brains process words in specific ways, and one of the side effects is it's incredibly hard for even non-dyslexic people to differentiate things like "though" versus "through" versus "thorough" on the first pass, especially if we're reading quickly.  "Thru" is much easier to read and understand at a momentary glance.

English and its fiendish "ough" words -- I can empathise with anyone who has any sort of trouble with those.  Getting a little O/T: I can't touch-type, and when I want to type "through", my fingers always seem to want to make it "thorough".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Specky on August 01, 2014, 11:55:49 AM
This poor guy:  http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/politics/58236366-90/says-english-homophones-language.html.csp

At first, I thought it was satire.  Nope.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on August 01, 2014, 12:48:14 PM
Nope, that's true. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ms_Cellany on August 01, 2014, 01:19:23 PM
This poor guy:  http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/politics/58236366-90/says-english-homophones-language.html.csp

At first, I thought it was satire.  Nope.

Good news/bad news: 

He got hired immediately as a PR person for the dairy council.

Then fired for talking about homogenized milk.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 01, 2014, 02:17:43 PM
This poor guy:  http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/politics/58236366-90/says-english-homophones-language.html.csp

At first, I thought it was satire.  Nope.

Good news/bad news: 

He got hired immediately as a PR person for the dairy council.

Then fired for talking about homogenized milk.

best thing ever
Title: Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BrownEyedGirl on August 06, 2014, 04:09:51 PM


Abbreviations I've seen that don't seem like much of a time saver, and are just plain wrong -

Hossy instead of hospital
Ressie instead of reservation

I've never seen 'hossy' but I have seen 'ressie'. Makes me cringe. I also really dislike 'totes' and 'adorbs'. They're too cutesy for my taste, and is it really that hard to use the entire word?

Oh, and I just saw 'payed' on some work papers. Argh.

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Bandu on August 06, 2014, 06:59:45 PM
I guess this is punctuation that makes me twitch.

A new antiques/vintage place opened in a nearby town. Its name is: (Woman's name)'s  Stor"e"

I'm not sure what they're aiming at with the random quote marks.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: daen on August 06, 2014, 09:54:13 PM
I guess this is punctuation that makes me twitch.

A new antiques/vintage place opened in a nearby town. Its name is: (Woman's name)'s  Stor"e"

I'm not sure what they're aiming at with the random quote marks.

If they were aiming to make me cringe, they succeeded handily.
That's horrid.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on August 06, 2014, 11:50:52 PM
If I see one more person state that orange female cats are "incredibly rare" I'm going to scream. Roughly 1/4 of orange cats are female. That's not incredibly rare - or ever regular old rare.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on August 07, 2014, 08:31:28 AM
If I see one more person state that orange female cats are "incredibly rare" I'm going to scream. Roughly 1/4 of orange cats are female. That's not incredibly rare - or ever regular old rare.

Thank you! 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BabyMama on August 07, 2014, 09:34:20 AM
Today Adobe inDesign is telling me "don't" isn't a word (and is suggesting I replace it with "dont") and is marking all speech tags as incorrectly uncapitalized. It's not April Fool's Day, is it...??
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: mime on August 07, 2014, 10:34:32 AM
This is a phrase rather than grammar, but there are people around here who overuse the phrase "like a banshee".

If someone said "she was screaming like a banshee" that would make some sense. I've heard people say "he was driving like a banshee", "she was running like a banshee", "I was working like a banshee".... putting any verb they find into that phrase.

As for spelling: I don't like probably shortened into "prolly". I worry people will start pronouncing it that way.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: athersgeo on August 07, 2014, 10:56:52 AM
As for spelling: I don't like probably shortened into "prolly". I worry people will start pronouncing it that way.

Where I live, that is how people pronounce it - if they're not pronouncing it prob'ly.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Allyson on August 07, 2014, 12:44:44 PM
"Prolly" has long been one of those spellings that literally make me twitch! I don't know why it bugs me so much, but I have stopped reading things that use this.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Sirius on August 07, 2014, 01:13:21 PM
Came across this statement in an ad in Astronomy Magazine for the Morehead State astronomy program: 

"With an 17:1 student/faculty ratio..." 

There was also no indication anywhere in the ad as to the location of this college.  I had to look it up on-line to discover it was in Kentucky.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BabyMama on August 07, 2014, 01:46:54 PM
"Prolly" has long been one of those spellings that literally make me twitch! I don't know why it bugs me so much, but I have stopped reading things that use this.

Same for "imma" instead of "I'm going to."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on August 07, 2014, 02:38:39 PM
"Prolly" has long been one of those spellings that literally make me twitch! I don't know why it bugs me so much, but I have stopped reading things that use this.

Same for "imma" instead of "I'm going to."

Gah!  Both of these make my teeth ache.  Although, a friend of mine had a coworker who would say "prob not" instead of "probably not".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Bethczar on August 07, 2014, 05:19:35 PM
This is a phrase rather than grammar, but there are people around here who overuse the phrase "like a banshee".

If someone said "she was screaming like a banshee" that would make some sense. I've heard people say "he was driving like a banshee", "she was running like a banshee", "I was working like a banshee".... putting any verb they find into that phrase.
I see you've met my old college roommate. Everything was "_____ like a banshee". I was teasing her about it one time and as it turned out, she had no idea what a banshee was. She thought it was a nonsense word.

I wish I could say that she stopped using it then, but that would be too much to ask. I still think "She's drinking like a banshee!" when I see someone knocking beer down like ex-roomie used to.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 07, 2014, 05:46:40 PM
Got instead of have.  There is a vendor that I use who has a rep that uses "got" instead of have.  So she'll say I got 15 of those left. Or I got a price of xxx.

It drives me crazy.  It's "got" to the point now where I hang up and go back into the queue if I hear her answer the phone. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on August 07, 2014, 05:58:01 PM
Got instead of have.  There is a vendor that I use who has a rep that uses "got" instead of have.  So she'll say I got 15 of those left. Or I got a price of xxx.

It drives me crazy.  It's "got" to the point now where I hang up and go back into the queue if I hear her answer the phone.
Or the even worse "gots."  "I gots 25 of those."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on August 07, 2014, 07:09:54 PM
If I see one more person state that orange female cats are "incredibly rare" I'm going to scream. Roughly 1/4 of orange cats are female. That's not incredibly rare - or ever regular old rare.

Thank you!

You're welcome - although I now realize I posted that in the wrong thread.  :D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Eeep! on August 08, 2014, 12:02:56 AM
This is a phrase rather than grammar, but there are people around here who overuse the phrase "like a banshee".

If someone said "she was screaming like a banshee" that would make some sense. I've heard people say "he was driving like a banshee", "she was running like a banshee", "I was working like a banshee".... putting any verb they find into that phrase.
I see you've met my old college roommate. Everything was "_____ like a banshee". I was teasing her about it one time and as it turned out, she had no idea what a banshee was. She thought it was a nonsense word.

I wish I could say that she stopped using it then, but that would be too much to ask. I still think "She's drinking like a banshee!" when I see someone knocking beer down like ex-roomie used to.

One Christmas when I was a teenager my dad, commenting on how many presents my sister and I had received, accidentally said "Wow! You guys made out like banshees!"  We still use that phrase in our family now. :D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on August 08, 2014, 02:24:14 AM
This is a phrase rather than grammar, but there are people around here who overuse the phrase "like a banshee".

If someone said "she was screaming like a banshee" that would make some sense. I've heard people say "he was driving like a banshee", "she was running like a banshee", "I was working like a banshee".... putting any verb they find into that phrase.
I see you've met my old college roommate. Everything was "_____ like a banshee". I was teasing her about it one time and as it turned out, she had no idea what a banshee was. She thought it was a nonsense word.

I wish I could say that she stopped using it then, but that would be too much to ask. I still think "She's drinking like a banshee!" when I see someone knocking beer down like ex-roomie used to.

One Christmas when I was a teenager my dad, commenting on how many presents my sister and I had received, accidentally said "Wow! You guys made out like banshees!"  We still use that phrase in our family now. :D

I feel that "banshee" really makes a rather good all-purpose nonsense word for similes !  From the above posts, it would appear that that may indeed be the way language is going, with this word.  In time, perhaps only Celtic-folklore specialists will know and use the word with its original meaning.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: guihong on August 12, 2014, 12:58:02 AM
Misplaced dependent clauses:

"A waiter was handing Uncle the wine list, who was talking to the wine steward".  Wine lists don't speak  ;D.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Hollanda on August 12, 2014, 03:42:33 AM
Sammich instead of sandwich.
 
"Imma make a sammich."
 
No.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on August 13, 2014, 11:10:53 PM
Today was the first day of school in our city. There is now a huge printed sign in a kiosk at the entrance to our neighborhood that says "Drive Easy" and then something about the safety of children. But I was so distracted wondering what people have against adverbs and using "ly" that I couldn't read the rest.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on August 15, 2014, 11:57:21 AM
I have never seen this before, but now I've already seen it twice today on a forum Someone writing "ridic" instead of the full word "ridiculous." Oh boy, I hope this doesn't become a very popular new trend.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: gollymolly2 on August 15, 2014, 05:52:04 PM
I have never seen this before, but now I've already seen it twice today on a forum Someone writing "ridic" instead of the full word "ridiculous." Oh boy, I hope this doesn't become a very popular new trend.

I hate to be the bearer if bad news but that's been fairly common for at least ten years now (I remember hearing it a lot in college). I guess consider yourself lucky you didn't have to hear it befor now if it bothers you?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 15, 2014, 06:43:34 PM
I guess this is punctuation that makes me twitch.

A new antiques/vintage place opened in a nearby town. Its name is: (Woman's name)'s  Stor"e"

I'm not sure what they're aiming at with the random quote marks.

I think they're trying to go with "store - e" as in "story".  I'm not sure why, but that's with what I came up.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: ishka on August 16, 2014, 06:30:26 AM
I know this isn't really spelling or grammar but - the use of nonplussed to mean unconcerned grinds my reading to a complete halt. Unconcerned is exactly not what nonplussed means. 

It has the same effect on me as the use of enervate to mean energise (J.K Rowling I'm glaring at you)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mikayla on August 16, 2014, 06:31:12 PM
The term "conscious" seems to have a meaning among college students that someone is....actually, I have no idea.  It's not a shortened version of conscientious, though.  It's like aware and caring or something.

Anyway, in randomly looking through our local craigslist at house-shares, I ran into an add for a young, chill person who "must be conscious".

As opposed to those annoying folks who are unconscious,  but still poring through craigslist ads .
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 16, 2014, 11:48:51 PM
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on August 17, 2014, 06:48:39 PM
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on August 17, 2014, 09:18:12 PM
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.

Your spouses aren't Irish, I suppose?  I gather that one of the characteristic oddities of "Irish English" is a tendency to use "myself / himself / herself" for the personal pronouns -- both subject, and object: "Myself was walking along the road," etc.  Apparently a carrying-over of grammar / ways of expressing, from the Irish language, into English.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on August 17, 2014, 11:36:11 PM
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.

Your spouses aren't Irish, I suppose?  I gather that one of the characteristic oddities of "Irish English" is a tendency to use "myself / himself / herself" for the personal pronouns -- both subject, and object: "Myself was walking along the road," etc.  Apparently a carrying-over of grammar / ways of expressing, from the Irish language, into English.

My DH's last name is an Irish name, but his family has been in the US for centuries. I blame his use of "myself" instead of "me" to watching too much Star Trek Next Generation because Captain Picard's lines were written that way all the time.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 18, 2014, 12:37:52 AM
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.

Your spouses aren't Irish, I suppose?  I gather that one of the characteristic oddities of "Irish English" is a tendency to use "myself / himself / herself" for the personal pronouns -- both subject, and object: "Myself was walking along the road," etc.  Apparently a carrying-over of grammar / ways of expressing, from the Irish language, into English.

My DH's last name is an Irish name, but his family has been in the US for centuries. I blame his use of "myself" instead of "me" to watching too much Star Trek Next Generation because Captain Picard's lines were written that way all the time.

My DH is German. I blame his on cop talk and a little of thinking it sounds better (like utilize instead of use).
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on August 18, 2014, 12:41:17 AM
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.

Your spouses aren't Irish, I suppose?  I gather that one of the characteristic oddities of "Irish English" is a tendency to use "myself / himself / herself" for the personal pronouns -- both subject, and object: "Myself was walking along the road," etc.  Apparently a carrying-over of grammar / ways of expressing, from the Irish language, into English.

My DH's last name is an Irish name, but his family has been in the US for centuries. I blame his use of "myself" instead of "me" to watching too much Star Trek Next Generation because Captain Picard's lines were written that way all the time.

My DH is German. I blame his on cop talk and a little of thinking it sounds better (like utilize instead of use).

I, too, think my DH thinks he sounds more educated when he says that. He doesn't say it at home, but when he's in a business setting or if we're at a formal dinner party, he says it a lot more.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Another Sarah on August 18, 2014, 11:10:42 AM
I have never seen this before, but now I've already seen it twice today on a forum Someone writing "ridic" instead of the full word "ridiculous." Oh boy, I hope this doesn't become a very popular new trend.

I hate to be the bearer if bad news but that's been fairly common for at least ten years now (I remember hearing it a lot in college). I guess consider yourself lucky you didn't have to hear it befor now if it bothers you?

"Ridic" is a quote from that classic piece of modern cinema, "Bring it on 2". (it came out around 2002 when I was at uni)

It's what the idiotic head cheerleader says, I think when people first started saying it, it was a bit tongue in cheek because she was the try-hard that wanted to be a trendsetter, but now I think it's lost some of the comic overtones.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: ladyknight1 on August 18, 2014, 11:20:40 AM
Awkward wording: "The University would like to inform you about a new process that we must follow beginning with the Fall 2014 semester regarding confirming academic activity. "
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Eeep! on August 18, 2014, 12:15:38 PM
The term "conscious" seems to have a meaning among college students that someone is....actually, I have no idea.  It's not a shortened version of conscientious, though.  It's like aware and caring or something.

Anyway, in randomly looking through our local craigslist at house-shares, I ran into an add for a young, chill person who "must be conscious".

As opposed to those annoying folks who are unconscious,  but still poring through craigslist ads .

I'm betting they are using it kind of like "socially conscious" or "environmentally conscious".  Although, the thought of running an ad for someone with "not passed out" as a qualification cracks me up.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Margo on August 19, 2014, 08:19:21 AM
Awkward wording: "The University would like to inform you about a new process that we must follow beginning with the Fall 2014 semester regarding confirming academic activity. "

Grrr.

When I was doing my post grad course we had a couple of classes which were about effective communication, and using plain English. We were given various pieces of writing to 'translate'.

I found it really surprising to see how many people seemed to struggle to put things into clear, understandable english.

Our tutor admitted (when bribed with beer asked nicely) that all of the examples were taken from actual letters, leaflets and notices issued by the University.

(One which bugs me is the warning which used to be displayed on local rubbish vans 0 in the old days, this used to read "Caution! - Men at Work"
Presumaby this was thought to be sexist, so instead of changing it to "Caution! People at Work" they decided to go with "Caution - Operatives working at rear of vehicle" Which bugged me for a number of reasons:
- It was displayed on the back of the vehicle. The workers would be working mainly but not entirely at the back, so if you could see the sign, you could also see the people working.
- because it is a longer statement, they had to make the lettering smaller, so it was harder to read and so less effective
- it assumes that everyone is familiar with the words 'operative' and 'vehicle'

I have recently moved house into a new area. Our local bin lorries don;t appear to have any warnings at all, perhaps relying on the fact that they are covered in flashing orange lights, and that all of the workers wear Hi-Viz jackets. The recycling lorries have big signs which just say "Caution!" and leave it up to the individual driver to work out what they need to be cautious about.. )
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 19, 2014, 09:23:57 AM
Awkward wording: "The University would like to inform you about a new process that we must follow beginning with the Fall 2014 semester regarding confirming academic activity. "

Grrr.

When I was doing my post grad course we had a couple of classes which were about effective communication, and using plain English. We were given various pieces of writing to 'translate'.

I found it really surprising to see how many people seemed to struggle to put things into clear, understandable english.

Our tutor admitted (when bribed with beer asked nicely) that all of the examples were taken from actual letters, leaflets and notices issued by the University.

(One which bugs me is the warning which used to be displayed on local rubbish vans 0 in the old days, this used to read "Caution! - Men at Work"
Presumaby this was thought to be sexist, so instead of changing it to "Caution! People at Work" they decided to go with "Caution - Operatives working at rear of vehicle" Which bugged me for a number of reasons:
- It was displayed on the back of the vehicle. The workers would be working mainly but not entirely at the back, so if you could see the sign, you could also see the people working.
- because it is a longer statement, they had to make the lettering smaller, so it was harder to read and so less effective
- it assumes that everyone is familiar with the words 'operative' and 'vehicle'

I have recently moved house into a new area. Our local bin lorries don;t appear to have any warnings at all, perhaps relying on the fact that they are covered in flashing orange lights, and that all of the workers wear Hi-Viz jackets. The recycling lorries have big signs which just say "Caution!" and leave it up to the individual driver to work out what they need to be cautious about.. )

I think you would be hard pressed to find someone of driving age who does my know the meaning of "vehicle". I get the other frustrations, though.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on August 19, 2014, 05:00:33 PM
Awkward wording: "The University would like to inform you about a new process that we must follow beginning with the Fall 2014 semester regarding confirming academic activity. "

Grrr.

When I was doing my post grad course we had a couple of classes which were about effective communication, and using plain English. We were given various pieces of writing to 'translate'.

I found it really surprising to see how many people seemed to struggle to put things into clear, understandable english.

Our tutor admitted (when bribed with beer asked nicely) that all of the examples were taken from actual letters, leaflets and notices issued by the University.

(One which bugs me is the warning which used to be displayed on local rubbish vans 0 in the old days, this used to read "Caution! - Men at Work"
Presumaby this was thought to be sexist, so instead of changing it to "Caution! People at Work" they decided to go with "Caution - Operatives working at rear of vehicle" Which bugged me for a number of reasons:
- It was displayed on the back of the vehicle. The workers would be working mainly but not entirely at the back, so if you could see the sign, you could also see the people working.
- because it is a longer statement, they had to make the lettering smaller, so it was harder to read and so less effective
- it assumes that everyone is familiar with the words 'operative' and 'vehicle'

I have recently moved house into a new area. Our local bin lorries don;t appear to have any warnings at all, perhaps relying on the fact that they are covered in flashing orange lights, and that all of the workers wear Hi-Viz jackets. The recycling lorries have big signs which just say "Caution!" and leave it up to the individual driver to work out what they need to be cautious about.. )

I think you would be hard pressed to find someone of driving age who does my know the meaning of "vehicle". I get the other frustrations, though.

People with reading disabilities? People with English as a second (third, fourth...) language? People who don't use formal/complex English very much, who haven't used the word 'vehicle' since they left school, and maybe not even then? Heck, I have trouble saying 'vehicle' without pronouncing it in a sarcastic/humorous way, because it just doesn't come up in normal life and my first association with it is Sheriff Roscoe P. Coltrane in the Dukes of Hazzard telling the main characters to exit their 'veee-hickle', for some reason. ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on August 19, 2014, 05:38:01 PM
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.

Your spouses aren't Irish, I suppose?  I gather that one of the characteristic oddities of "Irish English" is a tendency to use "myself / himself / herself" for the personal pronouns -- both subject, and object: "Myself was walking along the road," etc.  Apparently a carrying-over of grammar / ways of expressing, from the Irish language, into English.

I have had several Irish-American friends (I guess you could say I come under that description, but I wasn't brought up with any Irish traditions) whose parents came over and still speak "very Irish." One phrase I heard a lot was, "There she is, herself."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: daen on August 20, 2014, 07:45:45 AM

People with reading disabilities? People with English as a second (third, fourth...) language? People who don't use formal/complex English very much, who haven't used the word 'vehicle' since they left school, and maybe not even then? Heck, I have trouble saying 'vehicle' without pronouncing it in a sarcastic/humorous way, because it just doesn't come up in normal life and my first association with it is Sheriff Roscoe P. Coltrane in the Dukes of Hazzard telling the main characters to exit their 'veee-hickle', for some reason. ;D

<snipped quote tree>

I hear Sgt. Rizzo from M*A*S*H, most notably when Col. Potter has to take a driving course. "Veeeeeee-hick'l!"
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Giraffe, Esq on August 20, 2014, 01:19:15 PM
Awkward wording: "The University would like to inform you about a new process that we must follow beginning with the Fall 2014 semester regarding confirming academic activity. "

Grrr.

When I was doing my post grad course we had a couple of classes which were about effective communication, and using plain English. We were given various pieces of writing to 'translate'.

I found it really surprising to see how many people seemed to struggle to put things into clear, understandable english.

Our tutor admitted (when bribed with beer asked nicely) that all of the examples were taken from actual letters, leaflets and notices issued by the University.

(One which bugs me is the warning which used to be displayed on local rubbish vans 0 in the old days, this used to read "Caution! - Men at Work"
Presumaby this was thought to be sexist, so instead of changing it to "Caution! People at Work" they decided to go with "Caution - Operatives working at rear of vehicle" Which bugged me for a number of reasons:
- It was displayed on the back of the vehicle. The workers would be working mainly but not entirely at the back, so if you could see the sign, you could also see the people working.
- because it is a longer statement, they had to make the lettering smaller, so it was harder to read and so less effective
- it assumes that everyone is familiar with the words 'operative' and 'vehicle'

I have recently moved house into a new area. Our local bin lorries don;t appear to have any warnings at all, perhaps relying on the fact that they are covered in flashing orange lights, and that all of the workers wear Hi-Viz jackets. The recycling lorries have big signs which just say "Caution!" and leave it up to the individual driver to work out what they need to be cautious about.. )

I think you would be hard pressed to find someone of driving age who does my know the meaning of "vehicle". I get the other frustrations, though.

People with reading disabilities? People with English as a second (third, fourth...) language? People who don't use formal/complex English very much, who haven't used the word 'vehicle' since they left school, and maybe not even then? Heck, I have trouble saying 'vehicle' without pronouncing it in a sarcastic/humorous way, because it just doesn't come up in normal life and my first association with it is Sheriff Roscoe P. Coltrane in the Dukes of Hazzard telling the main characters to exit their 'veee-hickle', for some reason. ;D

In law school, we had some booklet with advice on...oral arguments, I think?  It had a pronunciation guide in it, for some commonly mispronounced terms.  One was "vehicle" and the pronunciation give was "cahr".   ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on August 20, 2014, 01:47:15 PM
Awkward wording: "The University would like to inform you about a new process that we must follow beginning with the Fall 2014 semester regarding confirming academic activity. "

Grrr.

When I was doing my post grad course we had a couple of classes which were about effective communication, and using plain English. We were given various pieces of writing to 'translate'.

I found it really surprising to see how many people seemed to struggle to put things into clear, understandable english.

Our tutor admitted (when bribed with beer asked nicely) that all of the examples were taken from actual letters, leaflets and notices issued by the University.

(One which bugs me is the warning which used to be displayed on local rubbish vans 0 in the old days, this used to read "Caution! - Men at Work"
Presumaby this was thought to be sexist, so instead of changing it to "Caution! People at Work" they decided to go with "Caution - Operatives working at rear of vehicle" Which bugged me for a number of reasons:
- It was displayed on the back of the vehicle. The workers would be working mainly but not entirely at the back, so if you could see the sign, you could also see the people working.
- because it is a longer statement, they had to make the lettering smaller, so it was harder to read and so less effective
- it assumes that everyone is familiar with the words 'operative' and 'vehicle'

I have recently moved house into a new area. Our local bin lorries don;t appear to have any warnings at all, perhaps relying on the fact that they are covered in flashing orange lights, and that all of the workers wear Hi-Viz jackets. The recycling lorries have big signs which just say "Caution!" and leave it up to the individual driver to work out what they need to be cautious about.. )

I think you would be hard pressed to find someone of driving age who does my know the meaning of "vehicle". I get the other frustrations, though.

People with reading disabilities? People with English as a second (third, fourth...) language? People who don't use formal/complex English very much, who haven't used the word 'vehicle' since they left school, and maybe not even then? Heck, I have trouble saying 'vehicle' without pronouncing it in a sarcastic/humorous way, because it just doesn't come up in normal life and my first association with it is Sheriff Roscoe P. Coltrane in the Dukes of Hazzard telling the main characters to exit their 'veee-hickle', for some reason. ;D

This reminds me of the time when I was in Germany and read a sign which said "Achtung. Es ist verboten zu..." which translates as "Warning. It is forbidden to..." and there was one more word. I was standing on a sidewalk reading the sign which was on the grass. My knowledge of German was good enough to translate the first part, but the very last word (where the ellipses are) was new to me. So I was trying to imagine what I was doing wrong. Was I doing something dangerous? Or illegal? Was it forbidden to loiter? Was it forbidden to walk onto the grass?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: athersgeo on August 20, 2014, 03:47:57 PM

This reminds me of the time when I was in Germany and read a sign which said "Achtung. Es ist verboten zu..." which translates as "Warning. It is forbidden to..." and there was one more word. I was standing on a sidewalk reading the sign which was on the grass. My knowledge of German was good enough to translate the first part, but the very last word (where the ellipses are) was new to me. So I was trying to imagine what I was doing wrong. Was I doing something dangerous? Or illegal? Was it forbidden to loiter? Was it forbidden to walk onto the grass?

It could always be "throw stones at this sign" (reputedly, there is a sign somewhere in rural Ireland which does simply say "do not throw stones at this sign" - so the story goes, this sign is in splendid isolation, so quite why it's there, nobody knows, but it has, naturally, become rather dented from people throwing stones at the only available target!) - but I suspect "walk on the grass" is probably more likely, with "drop litter" a pretty close second.

And (just to be on topic) my area has a lot of roadwork being done at the moment. This means lots of temporary signs. Most of them have been fine, but... "Wide load's please stop at next lay by" is trampling on my last nerve (especially because the reason the sign is there invariably means I'm driving by the dang thing verrrrrrrrrry slowly)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on August 20, 2014, 06:24:38 PM

This reminds me of the time when I was in Germany and read a sign which said "Achtung. Es ist verboten zu..." which translates as "Warning. It is forbidden to..." and there was one more word. I was standing on a sidewalk reading the sign which was on the grass. My knowledge of German was good enough to translate the first part, but the very last word (where the ellipses are) was new to me. So I was trying to imagine what I was doing wrong. Was I doing something dangerous? Or illegal? Was it forbidden to loiter? Was it forbidden to walk onto the grass?

It could always be "throw stones at this sign" (reputedly, there is a sign somewhere in rural Ireland which does simply say "do not throw stones at this sign" - so the story goes, this sign is in splendid isolation, so quite why it's there, nobody knows, but it has, naturally, become rather dented from people throwing stones at the only available target!) - but I suspect "walk on the grass" is probably more likely, with "drop litter" a pretty close second.

And (just to be on topic) my area has a lot of roadwork being done at the moment. This means lots of temporary signs. Most of them have been fine, but... "Wide load's please stop at next lay by" is trampling on my last nerve (especially because the reason the sign is there invariably means I'm driving by the dang thing verrrrrrrrrry slowly)

I'd have to drive extra slowly next time, roll down my window, and use a Sharpie to fix the sign!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Dazi on August 20, 2014, 06:42:49 PM
http://notalwaysromantic.com/dont-date-her-if-i-was-you/31499

<snerk>
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Outdoor Girl on August 20, 2014, 08:00:05 PM
http://notalwaysromantic.com/dont-date-her-if-i-was-you/31499

<snerk>

Yes!  I was hoping someone would post that one.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Specky on August 20, 2014, 08:40:57 PM
I'm encountering a phalanx of "to" instead of "too".  Ptui!

Opps for Oops.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: PastryGoddess on August 20, 2014, 08:58:00 PM

Opps for Oops.

Are those stealth mistakes?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: violinp on August 20, 2014, 10:36:23 PM

Opps for Oops.

Are those stealth mistakes?

I laughed much harder than I should've.  ;D  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: MrTango on August 21, 2014, 07:20:46 AM

Opps for Oops.

Are those stealth mistakes?

I laughed much harder than I should've.  ;D  :P

I think that would be "ops."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on August 24, 2014, 11:20:08 PM
"Carmel" for caramel. Even worse when it's someone sharing a recipe they've copied down from somewhere, the original recipe has it spelled properly, and the copied one doesn't... ???
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on August 25, 2014, 02:06:32 AM
I just saw something on that bastion of excellent writing and grammar, Facebook, where someone's Twitter post is being shared around so it can be jeered at for referring to the Holocaust as the "Hall of Cost" - an unusual (perhaps Freudian) slip, given the appalling cost to humanity.

The clincher was one of the jeerers in the comments, who wrote " Well, he may have the actually spelling wrong, and the actual name of the Halocoast...."  Presumably some saintly beach resort, somewhere.

Grins. I love irony.

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on August 26, 2014, 03:23:36 PM
I am taking a college history course online, started yesterday.  Instructor asks for us to join in a discussion with name, location, background and clues to our favorite historical person but not their name for the rest of us to guess.  Some are very interesting and difficult. 

I copied the exact text: My favorite historical figure was a president in office that was cripled from the waiste down but that never stopped him. He had one of the most important speches that led to the tearing down of the berlin well. He was an actor in California before becoming governor.

I don't want to get into political trouble here - but I cannot find ONE president that meets this criteria.  I found one that was crippled from polio and one that was an actor prior to being Governor of California and made an important speech about the Berlin Wall. 

Again, this is college and this person is a local high school graduate.  I just want to call their high school and cry.   




Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on August 26, 2014, 03:28:36 PM
I am taking a college history course online, started yesterday.  Instructor asks for us to join in a discussion with name, location, background and clues to our favorite historical person but not their name for the rest of us to guess.  Some are very interesting and difficult. 

I copied the exact text: My favorite historical figure was a president in office that was cripled from the waiste down but that never stopped him. He had one of the most important speches that led to the tearing down of the berlin well. He was an actor in California before becoming governor.

I don't want to get into political trouble here - but I cannot find ONE president that meets this criteria.  I found one that was crippled from polio and one that was an actor prior to being Governor of California and made an important speech about the Berlin Wall. 

Again, this is college and this person is a local high school graduate.  I just want to call their high school and cry.   

 :o

My assessment is the same as yours!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on August 26, 2014, 04:12:17 PM
I just saw something on that bastion of excellent writing and grammar, Facebook, where someone's Twitter post is being shared around so it can be jeered at for referring to the Holocaust as the "Hall of Cost" - an unusual (perhaps Freudian) slip, given the appalling cost to humanity.

The clincher was one of the jeerers in the comments, who wrote " Well, he may have the actually spelling wrong, and the actual name of the Halocoast...."  Presumably some saintly beach resort, somewhere.

Grins. I love irony.

I saw this on something yesterday and could not figure out what they were talking about...

dear heavens - Hall of Cost ???   I'm just stunned into near silence. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on August 27, 2014, 04:02:14 AM
I just saw something on that bastion of excellent writing and grammar, Facebook, where someone's Twitter post is being shared around so it can be jeered at for referring to the Holocaust as the "Hall of Cost" - an unusual (perhaps Freudian) slip, given the appalling cost to humanity.

The clincher was one of the jeerers in the comments, who wrote " Well, he may have the actually spelling wrong, and the actual name of the Halocoast...."  Presumably some saintly beach resort, somewhere.

Grins. I love irony.

There's another message board which I frequent, which has "coined" an Internet "Law" of its own (called Gaudere's Law, after a poster thereon, with that online name, who has seemed to be a frequent victim of the phenomenon concerned). Which is, that anyone who makes a post correcting another poster's spelling or grammar, is extremely likely -- if not outright guaranteed -- to have an error of some kind in that very post of theirs.  Admittedly, this is usually a matter of typos, rather than of being wrong / mistaken oneself.  However, it tends to make one wary of perpetrating such correcting-type posts !

With "the highly ignorant correcting the highly ignorant", though -- absolutely: you've got to laugh.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BabyMama on August 27, 2014, 08:15:41 AM
If I see one more person state that orange female cats are "incredibly rare" I'm going to scream. Roughly 1/4 of orange cats are female. That's not incredibly rare - or ever regular old rare.

Thank you!

You're welcome - although I now realize I posted that in the wrong thread.  :D

Which thread is it? I can't find it! I have a male calico, the number of people who insist I'm wrong is astounding...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 27, 2014, 09:49:57 AM
If I see one more person state that orange female cats are "incredibly rare" I'm going to scream. Roughly 1/4 of orange cats are female. That's not incredibly rare - or ever regular old rare.

Thank you!

You're welcome - although I now realize I posted that in the wrong thread.  :D

Which thread is it? I can't find it! I have a male calico, the number of people who insist I'm wrong is astounding...

I had an all white cat with green eyes who wasn't deaf.  Plenty of people insisted I was wrong even after I called to him and he came to me.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: athersgeo on August 27, 2014, 10:01:25 AM
My brother got married at the weekend.

I earned a great many Good Sister Points for biting my tongue and not pointing out the 150 (approx!) missing apostrophes on all their place cards and menus. They all said "Elphaba and Fiyeros Wedding" - it's not even correct if there'd been more than one groom. Gah. And the really sad part is I'm probably the only person who noticed...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on August 28, 2014, 02:52:15 PM
I am taking a college history course online, started yesterday.  Instructor asks for us to join in a discussion with name, location, background and clues to our favorite historical person but not their name for the rest of us to guess.  Some are very interesting and difficult. 

I copied the exact text: My favorite historical figure was a president in office that was cripled from the waiste down but that never stopped him. He had one of the most important speches that led to the tearing down of the berlin well. He was an actor in California before becoming governor.

I don't want to get into political trouble here - but I cannot find ONE president that meets this criteria.  I found one that was crippled from polio and one that was an actor prior to being Governor of California and made an important speech about the Berlin Wall. 

Again, this is college and this person is a local high school graduate.  I just want to call their high school and cry.   

 :o

My assessment is the same as yours!

One of my favorite books is "Anguished English" by Richard Lederer.  It is chock full of grammar mistakes and comical historical inaccuracies.  Example: "Beethoven wrote many symphonies.  He also fathered many children.  In between, he practiced on a old spinster in the attic."  ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on August 28, 2014, 03:30:20 PM
I am taking a college history course online, started yesterday.  Instructor asks for us to join in a discussion with name, location, background and clues to our favorite historical person but not their name for the rest of us to guess.  Some are very interesting and difficult. 

I copied the exact text: My favorite historical figure was a president in office that was cripled from the waiste down but that never stopped him. He had one of the most important speches that led to the tearing down of the berlin well. He was an actor in California before becoming governor.

I don't want to get into political trouble here - but I cannot find ONE president that meets this criteria.  I found one that was crippled from polio and one that was an actor prior to being Governor of California and made an important speech about the Berlin Wall. 

Again, this is college and this person is a local high school graduate.  I just want to call their high school and cry.   

 :o

My assessment is the same as yours!

One of my favorite books is "Anguished English" by Richard Lederer.  It is chock full of grammar mistakes and comical historical inaccuracies.  Example: "Beethoven wrote many symphonies.  He also fathered many children.  In between, he practiced on a old spinster in the attic."  ;D

Or the bank that said "Save with us - you'll never reget it!"

I love Richard Lederer's books. ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: artk2002 on August 29, 2014, 01:27:28 PM
I copied the exact text: My favorite historical figure was a president in office that was cripled from the waiste down but that never stopped him. He had one of the most important speches that led to the tearing down of the berlin well. He was an actor in California before becoming governor.

So someone made a Frankenstein-like president out of FDR and Ronald Reagan? Politically, that would have been very interesting!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: bansidhe on August 29, 2014, 02:07:35 PM
If I see one more person state that orange female cats are "incredibly rare" I'm going to scream. Roughly 1/4 of orange cats are female. That's not incredibly rare - or ever regular old rare.

Thank you!

You're welcome - although I now realize I posted that in the wrong thread.  :D

Which thread is it? I can't find it! I have a male calico, the number of people who insist I'm wrong is astounding...

The people saying that about orange cats was on Facebook rather than here. I meant to put my post in the Things That Drive You Nuts thread instead of this one.

My cats' vet has a male calico, also. They're few and far between, but they certainly exist. :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on August 29, 2014, 03:18:21 PM
I copied the exact text: My favorite historical figure was a president in office that was cripled from the waiste down but that never stopped him. He had one of the most important speches that led to the tearing down of the berlin well. He was an actor in California before becoming governor.

So someone made a Frankenstein-like president out of FDR and Ronald Reagan? Politically, that would have been very interesting!

Frankenprez!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: scotcat60 on August 30, 2014, 09:13:44 AM
Perhaps the person who couldn't spell holocaust hopes to be a TV subtitle writer. Some of the spellings I have seen on those are really peculiar.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Nikko-chan on August 30, 2014, 09:53:44 AM
If I see one more person state that orange female cats are "incredibly rare" I'm going to scream. Roughly 1/4 of orange cats are female. That's not incredibly rare - or ever regular old rare.

Thank you!

You're welcome - although I now realize I posted that in the wrong thread.  :D

Which thread is it? I can't find it! I have a male calico, the number of people who insist I'm wrong is astounding...

I had an all white cat with green eyes who wasn't deaf.  Plenty of people insisted I was wrong even after I called to him and he came to me.

I thought it was white cats with blue eyes that were more prone to deafness? Not that you know, they would automatically be deaf, just that there was a higher proportion of blue eyed white cats that were deaf.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 30, 2014, 10:39:56 AM
If I see one more person state that orange female cats are "incredibly rare" I'm going to scream. Roughly 1/4 of orange cats are female. That's not incredibly rare - or ever regular old rare.

Thank you!

You're welcome - although I now realize I posted that in the wrong thread.  :D

Which thread is it? I can't find it! I have a male calico, the number of people who insist I'm wrong is astounding...

I had an all white cat with green eyes who wasn't deaf.  Plenty of people insisted I was wrong even after I called to him and he came to me.

I thought it was white cats with blue eyes that were more prone to deafness? Not that you know, they would automatically be deaf, just that there was a higher proportion of blue eyed white cats that were deaf.

Yes, sorry; I pointed out the green eyes to show them it was even more unlikely he was deaf. I didn't explain that very well in my post.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on August 30, 2014, 10:56:04 AM
If I see one more person state that orange female cats are "incredibly rare" I'm going to scream. Roughly 1/4 of orange cats are female. That's not incredibly rare - or ever regular old rare.

Thank you!

You're welcome - although I now realize I posted that in the wrong thread.  :D

Which thread is it? I can't find it! I have a male calico, the number of people who insist I'm wrong is astounding...

I had an all white cat with green eyes who wasn't deaf.  Plenty of people insisted I was wrong even after I called to him and he came to me.

Well, you obviously taught your cat to lip read.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on August 30, 2014, 12:46:49 PM
I had an all white cat with green eyes who wasn't deaf.  Plenty of people insisted I was wrong even after I called to him and he came to me.

Well, you obviously taught your cat to lip read.
Why would a cat need to lip-read when they're telepathic?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Hollanda on September 01, 2014, 04:15:31 AM
is it ironic that the word "Spelling" in the thread title mistakenly has three l's instead of 2?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: zyrs on September 01, 2014, 05:13:10 AM
We had our first overnight guests in the new house.

Our guests sent a Thank You card, which was very thoughtful.  It is also a great example of why you don't use quotation marks for emphasis:


We just wanted to say "Thanks" for the "hospitality" and we "love, love, love" your new house.

The first time I read it I was trying to figure out how I had offended them.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mel the Redcap on September 01, 2014, 05:50:24 AM
is it ironic that the word "Spelling" in the thread title mistakenly has three l's instead of 2?

I believe it's deliberate :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Hollanda on September 01, 2014, 06:22:41 AM
We had our first overnight guests in the new house.

Our guests sent a Thank You card, which was very thoughtful.  It is also a great example of why you don't use quotation marks for emphasis:


We just wanted to say "Thanks" for the "hospitality" and we "love, love, love" your new house.

The first time I read it I was trying to figure out how I had offended them.

That just made me crack up laughing.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on September 01, 2014, 07:43:23 AM
I may have ranted on this subject mentioned it before, but transitive verbs are not the same as intransitive verbs. I passed an advertisement today for mattresses, saying something like 'lay down and try!' I know this is acceptable in US English but it's wrong here in the UK!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: starry diadem on September 01, 2014, 11:51:23 AM
I may have ranted on this subject mentioned it before, but transitive verbs are not the same as intransitive verbs. I passed an advertisement today for mattresses, saying something like 'lay down and try!' I know this is acceptable in US English but it's wrong here in the UK!

I don't think it's correct in the US, either. Common usage, though, that will probably become entrenched and acceptable.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: turtleIScream on September 01, 2014, 02:31:27 PM
I may have ranted on this subject mentioned it before, but transitive verbs are not the same as intransitive verbs. I passed an advertisement today for mattresses, saying something like 'lay down and try!' I know this is acceptable in US English but it's wrong here in the UK!

Nope, not acceptable here, or at least it shouldn't be.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on September 01, 2014, 06:17:07 PM
I may have ranted on this subject mentioned it before, but transitive verbs are not the same as intransitive verbs. I passed an advertisement today for mattresses, saying something like 'lay down and try!' I know this is acceptable in US English but it's wrong here in the UK!

Nope, not acceptable here, or at least it shouldn't be.

And "lie" is not only grammatically correct, but it makes a nice little rhyme. Have a "try lie." (Years ago I also heard a mattress store inviting customers to take a "test rest.")

I think I first saw "ridic" in an Archie comic book in the 1960s, so it's not new. It may be making a comeback because of textspeak ("txtspk"?).

I used to work for a store that sold its own house brand of bread. One style was called Old Fashion. What, it's made out of poodle skirts and flapper dresses?

Re closed-caption errors: My favorite was on some sports talk show where they were discussing figure skater Ekaterina Gordeeva's book about her late husband/skating partner, "My Sergei." On the captioning it came out "Mice Are gay."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 01, 2014, 09:51:47 PM
Diffuse instead of defuse. No...you defuse a bomb. You don't diffuse it. The latter is an extremely bad idea.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: athersgeo on September 02, 2014, 02:45:29 AM
Here's a new one:

If you are calling in back up or support you are calling in the cavalry.

If you are calling in the calvary, you're asking for a small hill in/near Jerusalem.

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 02, 2014, 03:44:57 AM
And "lie" is not only grammatically correct, but it makes a nice little rhyme. Have a "try lie." (Years ago I also heard a mattress store inviting customers to take a "test rest.")

That could also perhaps be a colloquial term for perjury -- the telling of an untruth when someone was being tried in court  :) ...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: ladyknight1 on September 02, 2014, 07:43:32 AM
My son's very young English teacher believes depose means to assassinate and doesn't know what a sturgeon is. Both words were vocabulary words discussed in class. DS has to work very hard not to be a CKIA, since his vocabulary is very broad.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lowspark on September 02, 2014, 09:10:35 AM
Perhaps the person who couldn't spell holocaust hopes to be a TV subtitle writer. Some of the spellings I have seen on those are really peculiar.

I have to say that I find those errors in closed captions to be completely forgivable. I can't imagine typing what was already said while also listening to what is currently being said. That's got to be tough!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Thipu1 on September 02, 2014, 09:21:27 AM
I may have ranted on this subject mentioned it before, but transitive verbs are not the same as intransitive verbs. I passed an advertisement today for mattresses, saying something like 'lay down and try!' I know this is acceptable in US English but it's wrong here in the UK!

I don't think it's correct in the US, either. Common usage, though, that will probably become entrenched and acceptable.

Amen,  it isn't correct in the US.  A person may choose to 'lie down' for a nap.  That same person will 'lay' an object on a shelf. 

There's a similar problem with 'hung' and 'hanged'. 

The picture was hung on the wall.

The murderer was hanged at the prison. 

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 02, 2014, 09:38:07 AM
Perhaps the person who couldn't spell holocaust hopes to be a TV subtitle writer. Some of the spellings I have seen on those are really peculiar.

I have to say that I find those errors in closed captions to be completely forgivable. I can't imagine typing what was already said while also listening to what is currently being said. That's got to be tough!
Only if the captioning is being done live.  There is no excuse for something recorded to have errors of that sort, and I still see similar howlers like "Mice are gay."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on September 02, 2014, 09:43:33 AM
Perhaps the person who couldn't spell holocaust hopes to be a TV subtitle writer. Some of the spellings I have seen on those are really peculiar.

I have to say that I find those errors in closed captions to be completely forgivable. I can't imagine typing what was already said while also listening to what is currently being said. That's got to be tough!
Only if the captioning is being done live.  There is no excuse for something recorded to have errors of that sort, and I still see similar howlers like "Mice are gay."

I fully agree-and now I really want to know what "mice are gay" was supposed to be.  :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 02, 2014, 09:53:51 AM
Perhaps the person who couldn't spell holocaust hopes to be a TV subtitle writer. Some of the spellings I have seen on those are really peculiar.

I have to say that I find those errors in closed captions to be completely forgivable. I can't imagine typing what was already said while also listening to what is currently being said. That's got to be tough!
Only if the captioning is being done live.  There is no excuse for something recorded to have errors of that sort, and I still see similar howlers like "Mice are gay."

I fully agree-and now I really want to know what "mice are gay" was supposed to be.  :)
From earlier in the thread:
Quote from: baglady
Re closed-caption errors: My favorite was on some sports talk show where they were discussing figure skater Ekaterina Gordeeva's book about her late husband/skating partner, "My Sergei." On the captioning it came out "Mice Are gay."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on September 02, 2014, 09:55:47 AM
Perhaps the person who couldn't spell holocaust hopes to be a TV subtitle writer. Some of the spellings I have seen on those are really peculiar.

I have to say that I find those errors in closed captions to be completely forgivable. I can't imagine typing what was already said while also listening to what is currently being said. That's got to be tough!
Only if the captioning is being done live.  There is no excuse for something recorded to have errors of that sort, and I still see similar howlers like "Mice are gay."

I fully agree-and now I really want to know what "mice are gay" was supposed to be.  :)
From earlier in the thread:
Quote from: baglady
Re closed-caption errors: My favorite was on some sports talk show where they were discussing figure skater Ekaterina Gordeeva's book about her late husband/skating partner, "My Sergei." On the captioning it came out "Mice Are gay."

Oh, I see. I must have missed that.  Thanks!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 02, 2014, 10:22:21 AM
Perhaps the person who couldn't spell holocaust hopes to be a TV subtitle writer. Some of the spellings I have seen on those are really peculiar.

I have to say that I find those errors in closed captions to be completely forgivable. I can't imagine typing what was already said while also listening to what is currently being said. That's got to be tough!
Only if the captioning is being done live.  There is no excuse for something recorded to have errors of that sort, and I still see similar howlers like "Mice are gay."

I don't think these are done by people. I'm pretty sure most of the "live" close-captioning is done by some sort of voice-recognition software, which is still pretty rudimentary. There's just too much gibberish for it to be done by a human, even a human with a poor ear and bad spelling.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on September 02, 2014, 07:28:51 PM
Like Twik's, my understanding is that most closed captioning is done by voice recognition software. It might be edited after the fact, but I thought the first pass was done by computer.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: JoW on September 02, 2014, 09:11:53 PM
Destroyal.  Its the term my employer uses to describe product or ingredients that are bad and have to be destroyed.  Not destruction.  Destroyal. 

Drives me crazy.  And its so ingrained it can't be changed. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on September 03, 2014, 12:43:28 PM
Destroyal.  Its the term my employer uses to describe product or ingredients that are bad and have to be destroyed.  Not destruction.  Destroyal. 

Drives me crazy.  And its so ingrained it can't be changed.

So, basically, if something is to be destroyed, it gets renamed "destroyal"? Example: "This bag of flour has worms in it-put it in the pile with the rest of the destroyal"? What's wrong with "garbage" or "trash" or some similar word?

Ordinarily I don't have a problem with verbing nouns and nouning verbs-sometimes that can be quite creative!  But this particular one makes my teeth squeak.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 03, 2014, 12:46:02 PM
I thought it was more like "this bag of Fluor must be subject to destroyal."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on September 03, 2014, 01:45:41 PM
I thought it was more like "this bag of Fluor must be subject to destroyal."

Now that you point it out, you're probably right.  That makes more sense.

And that seems so much worse for some reason, than just renaming it "destroyal"!  :D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mad Goat Woman on September 03, 2014, 10:06:30 PM
The most hilarious (and quite true, considering the subject) teletext I've ever read was "Eddie O lied"-- it was meant to read Eddie Obeid.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 03, 2014, 10:10:42 PM
is it ironic that the word "Spelling" in the thread title mistakenly has three l's instead of 2?

I originally wrote it as "grammer and spellling" but a mod went and corrected half of it  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: JoW on September 03, 2014, 10:17:27 PM
I thought it was more like "this bag of Fluor must be subject to destroyal."

Now that you point it out, you're probably right.  That makes more sense.

And that seems so much worse for some reason, than just renaming it "destroyal"!  :D
The form we fill out to keep the accountants and the USDA happy is called a "Notice of Destroyal"  People talk about having to fill out a Destroyal Form.  And yes, we say "subject to destroyal". 

(I make animal vaccines for a living.  Everything we make, even the stuff we through out, has to be reported to the US Department of Agriculture.  They regulate animal vaccines. )
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 04, 2014, 02:53:15 AM
Re the "destroyal" discussion: I feel that it's rather a good-sounding word.  I could live with it as an alternative, in-parallel with "destruction" !
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Xandraea on September 04, 2014, 07:54:44 AM
is it ironic that the word "Spelling" in the thread title mistakenly has three l's instead of 2?

I originally wrote it as "grammer and spellling" but a mod went and corrected half of it  ;)

Your'e "grammer and spellling" maked the mod twitch.  ;)

(how many more are twitching now?)  ;D ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on September 04, 2014, 08:14:22 AM
is it ironic that the word "Spelling" in the thread title mistakenly has three l's instead of 2?

I originally wrote it as "grammer and spellling" but a mod went and corrected half of it  ;)

Your'e "grammer and spellling" maked the mod twitch.  ;)

(how many more are twitching now?)  ;D ;D

I am giggling at the fact that the "grammer" made the mod twitch but not, apparently, the "spellling".   :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: zyrs on September 04, 2014, 08:02:07 PM
is it ironic that the word "Spelling" in the thread title mistakenly has three l's instead of 2?

I originally wrote it as "grammer and spellling" but a mod went and corrected half of it  ;)

Your'e "grammer and spellling" maked the mod twitch.  ;)

(how many more are twitching now?)  ;D ;D

I am giggling at the fact that the "grammer" made the mod twitch but not, apparently, the "spellling".   :)

There is a meme going around about a tutor advertisement where the tutor spells the word 'phisics'.  It has the word 'phisics' circled in red.  The person that made the meme didn't notice that the tutor also spelled it 'gauranteed'.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 04, 2014, 09:26:38 PM
Another argument in favor of the Oxford comma. (https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BwtI4TEIUAAjro1.jpg)

(Image linked instead of copied just in case someone's overly-inquisitive kid is reading over their shoulder - not actually NSFW, though.)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 04, 2014, 10:26:03 PM
Another argument in favor of the Oxford comma. (https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BwtI4TEIUAAjro1.jpg)

(Image linked instead of copied just in case someone's overly-inquisitive kid is reading over their shoulder - not actually NSFW, though.)

I cannot stop laughing at this.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: menley on September 05, 2014, 04:36:57 AM
Another argument in favor of the Oxford comma. (https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BwtI4TEIUAAjro1.jpg)

(Image linked instead of copied just in case someone's overly-inquisitive kid is reading over their shoulder - not actually NSFW, though.)

Oh my gosh. I just laughed so hard that my dogs came running in to see what was up!
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Dazi on September 05, 2014, 06:39:20 AM
There's one in a manual at work. A plural word that should end in - ies someone used - y's. No, no, no.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 05, 2014, 03:23:27 PM
There's one in a manual at work. A plural word that should end in - ies someone used - y's. No, no, no.
So it reads something like "All thingummy's should be painted green" instead of  "All thingummies..."?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Ser Lucien Liliane on September 05, 2014, 05:27:45 PM
There's one in a manual at work. A plural word that should end in - ies someone used - y's. No, no, no.

I saw the same thing at the grocery the other day. "Blueberry's" referring to a cake which contained blueberries. No, not quiiite...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Dazi on September 05, 2014, 05:39:46 PM
There's one in a manual at work. A plural word that should end in - ies someone used - y's. No, no, no.
So it reads something like "All thingummy's should be painted green" instead of  "All thingummies..."?

Precisely.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on September 08, 2014, 02:50:49 PM
I don't want to get this shut down so I won't go into specifics on the ad I saw this weekend, but it was for a prolife rally.  The ad depicted 5 newborns lined up.  One was shadowed so that the print was lighter than the rest.  The ad read:

"Every forth baby is....."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 08, 2014, 02:56:53 PM
I don't want to get this shut down so I won't go into specifics on the ad I saw this weekend, but it was for a prolife rally.  The ad depicted 5 newborns lined up.  One was shadowed so that the print was lighter than the rest.  The ad read:

"Every forth baby is....."

That's even more painful given there were five in the picture.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 08, 2014, 03:26:15 PM
There's one in a manual at work. A plural word that should end in - ies someone used - y's. No, no, no.

I saw the same thing at the grocery the other day. "Blueberry's" referring to a cake which contained blueberries. No, not quiiite...

Lynne Truss, in Eats, Shoots & Leaves -- in which she is usually pretty hard-nosed and unforgiving about any misuse of punctuation -- rather endearingly shows a little leniency toward signwriting on the part of those who sell fruit and vegetables for a living.  She cuts such folk a bit of slack, on the grounds of their being "horny-thumbed people who do not live by words"; and reckons it pretty well standard and to be expected -- and kind-of lovable -- that they will get things wrong apostrophe-wise, and pluralise their wares as "potato's", "banana's", "tomato's", "blueberry's", etc.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: lilfox on September 08, 2014, 04:17:37 PM
We had our first overnight guests in the new house.

Our guests sent a Thank You card, which was very thoughtful.  It is also a great example of why you don't use quotation marks for emphasis:


We just wanted to say "Thanks" for the "hospitality" and we "love, love, love" your new house.

The first time I read it I was trying to figure out how I had offended them.

My grandmother does a similar thing with holiday and birthday cards.  She puts quotes around either "happy birthday" or my name, but not both.  Which one is quoted varies in every card.  I assume she means it to read like she's saying those bits (out loud) to me, so it's more personal.

I think it would be funny, if a bit off-putting, if she ever signed it "Love," Nana, but so far that one hasn't appeared.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: artk2002 on September 08, 2014, 05:38:28 PM
There's one in a manual at work. A plural word that should end in - ies someone used - y's. No, no, no.

I saw the same thing at the grocery the other day. "Blueberry's" referring to a cake which contained blueberries. No, not quiiite...

Lynne Truss, in Eats, Shoots & Leaves -- in which she is usually pretty hard-nosed and unforgiving about any misuse of punctuation -- rather endearingly shows a little leniency toward signwriting on the part of those who sell fruit and vegetables for a living.  She cuts such folk a bit of slack, on the grounds of their being "horny-thumbed people who do not live by words"; and reckons it pretty well standard and to be expected -- and kind-of lovable -- that they will get things wrong apostrophe-wise, and pluralise their wares as "potato's", "banana's", "tomato's", "blueberry's", etc.

It's so common that there's even a term for it. The Greengrocer's Apostrophe (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/greengrocer%27s_apostrophe). (Here as well (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostrophe#Superfluous_apostrophes_.28.22greengrocers.27_apostrophes.22.29))

I don't know if there's a term for the misuse of quotes such as Zyrs and lilfox describe. Back when dinosaurs roamed the earth, I was perusing the Yellow Pages and saw dozens, if not hundreds, of ads that had superfluous quotes.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: gollymolly2 on September 08, 2014, 09:00:20 PM
http://www.unnecessaryquotes.com (http://www.unnecessaryquotes.com)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 09, 2014, 02:40:22 AM
There's one in a manual at work. A plural word that should end in - ies someone used - y's. No, no, no.

I saw the same thing at the grocery the other day. "Blueberry's" referring to a cake which contained blueberries. No, not quiiite...

Lynne Truss, in Eats, Shoots & Leaves -- in which she is usually pretty hard-nosed and unforgiving about any misuse of punctuation -- rather endearingly shows a little leniency toward signwriting on the part of those who sell fruit and vegetables for a living.  She cuts such folk a bit of slack, on the grounds of their being "horny-thumbed people who do not live by words"; and reckons it pretty well standard and to be expected -- and kind-of lovable -- that they will get things wrong apostrophe-wise, and pluralise their wares as "potato's", "banana's", "tomato's", "blueberry's", etc.

It's so common that there's even a term for it. The Greengrocer's Apostrophe (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/greengrocer%27s_apostrophe). (Here as well (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostrophe#Superfluous_apostrophes_.28.22greengrocers.27_apostrophes.22.29))

And there's disagreement about the placement of the apostrophe, in the term itself -- including, between / within your two links. Quoting one: "greengrocers' (grocers') apostrophes, often called (spelled) greengrocer's (grocer's) apostrophes."  Musing over what is correct apostrophe-use can quite easily drive one crazy !
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on September 09, 2014, 08:45:26 AM
And there's disagreement about the placement of the apostrophe, in the term itself -- including, between / within your two links. Quoting one: "greengrocers' (grocers') apostrophes, often called (spelled) greengrocer's (grocer's) apostrophes."  Musing over what is correct apostrophe-use can quite easily drive one crazy !

That reminds me of my own confusion regarding "the day in May devoted to mothers" and "the day in June devoted to fathers".  Is it "Mother's Day" and "Father's Day" or "Mothers' Day" and "Fathers' Day"?

My personal thought is that if I am writing to someone specific and want to wish them well, I should write "Happy Mother's/Father's Day", but if I am writing  generally, it should be the other way, as in "Remember that Mothers'/Fathers' Day is next Sunday, so don't put your shopping off until the last minute".

On the other hand, maybe no apostrophe is needed at all.  Maybe it really should be "Mothers Day" and "Fathers Day", with "mothers" and fathers" being adjectives describing the day.  That just doesn't feel right to me, though.

Any thoughts?



Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 09, 2014, 11:47:21 AM
That reminds me of my own confusion regarding "the day in May devoted to mothers" and "the day in June devoted to fathers".  Is it "Mother's Day" and "Father's Day" or "Mothers' Day" and "Fathers' Day"?

My personal thought is that if I am writing to someone specific and want to wish them well, I should write "Happy Mother's/Father's Day", but if I am writing  generally, it should be the other way, as in "Remember that Mothers'/Fathers' Day is next Sunday, so don't put your shopping off until the last minute".

On the other hand, maybe no apostrophe is needed at all.  Maybe it really should be "Mothers Day" and "Fathers Day", with "mothers" and fathers" being adjectives describing the day.  That just doesn't feel right to me, though.

Any thoughts?

A potential problem which I’d never really thought of before.  Intrigued, I did a bit of Googling, and learnt of Anna Jarvis, who I’d never previously heard of – I not being American, can thus perhaps be excused for that.  One discovers that Anna (1864 – 1948) campaigned ardently for the celebratory day concerned, to officially enter the US calendar, which it did in 1914. She was absolutely adamant that it should be rendered as “Mother’s Day”: as a commentator puts it, “It wasn’t to celebrate all mothers. It was to celebrate the best mother you’ve ever known – your mother – as a son or daughter.”

Anna Jarvis seems to have been a combative person, with a very strong “my-way-or-the-highway” streak. Post-1914, she fought vehemently against attempts to commercialise Mother’s Day, and against anyone who tried to co-opt it for any kind of political agenda. It seems that she had a rather troubled life, which she finished in miserable circumstances.

news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/05/140508-mothers-day-nation-gifts-facts-culture-moms
 


Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Mental Magpie on September 09, 2014, 09:14:34 PM
That reminds me of my own confusion regarding "the day in May devoted to mothers" and "the day in June devoted to fathers".  Is it "Mother's Day" and "Father's Day" or "Mothers' Day" and "Fathers' Day"?

My personal thought is that if I am writing to someone specific and want to wish them well, I should write "Happy Mother's/Father's Day", but if I am writing  generally, it should be the other way, as in "Remember that Mothers'/Fathers' Day is next Sunday, so don't put your shopping off until the last minute".

On the other hand, maybe no apostrophe is needed at all.  Maybe it really should be "Mothers Day" and "Fathers Day", with "mothers" and fathers" being adjectives describing the day.  That just doesn't feel right to me, though.

Any thoughts?

A potential problem which I’d never really thought of before.  Intrigued, I did a bit of Googling, and learnt of Anna Jarvis, who I’d never previously heard of – I not being American, can thus perhaps be excused for that.  One discovers that Anna (1864 – 1948) campaigned ardently for the celebratory day concerned, to officially enter the US calendar, which it did in 1914. She was absolutely adamant that it should be rendered as “Mother’s Day”: as a commentator puts it, “It wasn’t to celebrate all mothers. It was to celebrate the best mother you’ve ever known – your mother – as a son or daughter.”

Anna Jarvis seems to have been a combative person, with a very strong “my-way-or-the-highway” streak. Post-1914, she fought vehemently against attempts to commercialise Mother’s Day, and against anyone who tried to co-opt it for any kind of political agenda. It seems that she had a rather troubled life, which she finished in miserable circumstances.

news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/05/140508-mothers-day-nation-gifts-facts-culture-moms

I think, then, that it should be Mother's Day, as in "this is my mother's day, the day I celebrate her".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on September 12, 2014, 01:59:39 PM
Slightly O/T:  DS is taking creative writing this semester.  On the first day of class his professor joked that his pet peeve is misuse of "its" and "it's" and that he deducted two points for every misuse.

I think I'm in love.

I told DS "Tell your professor your Mom wants to know his opinion about the Oxford comma".  ;D
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Giraffe, Esq on September 12, 2014, 02:24:49 PM
Slightly O/T:  DS is taking creative writing this semester.  On the first day of class his professor joked that his pet peeve is misuse of "its" and "it's" and that he deducted two points for every misuse.

I think I'm in love.

I told DS "Tell your professor your Mom wants to know his opinion about the Oxford comma".  ;D

Not just his Mom!  All of us, too!  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Margo on September 25, 2014, 01:25:37 PM
The caption to a news story in a local paper:

"Bath Abbey, one of the city's tourist hotspots, is often next to where buskers perform" I want to know where the Abbey is the rest of the time. I visit Bath quite frequently, and it has always been in the same place when I've been in town...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on September 25, 2014, 02:20:13 PM
The caption to a news story in a local paper:

"Bath Abbey, one of the city's tourist hotspots, is often next to where buskers perform" I want to know where the Abbey is the rest of the time. I visit Bath quite frequently, and it has always been in the same place when I've been in town...

LOL. The Abbey is so attached to you that sometimes when you leave, it follows you home without your knowledge.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on September 25, 2014, 02:35:14 PM
Associated Press style says Mother's Day and Father's Day.

One usage that tripped me up for years is whether to use an apostrophe in phrases such as "girls basketball" or "nurses union" or "teachers strike." AP says if you can recast the phrase with the word "by" or "for," then don't use an apostrophe. If it works better with "of," then use one.

basketball for girls -- girls basketball
strike by teachers -- teachers strike

The union example is trickier, because it could be a union for teachers or a union of teachers -- but AP prefers no apostrophe.

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 25, 2014, 05:44:47 PM
Associated Press style says Mother's Day and Father's Day.

One usage that tripped me up for years is whether to use an apostrophe in phrases such as "girls basketball" or "nurses union" or "teachers strike." AP says if you can recast the phrase with the word "by" or "for," then don't use an apostrophe. If it works better with "of," then use one.

basketball for girls -- girls basketball
strike by teachers -- teachers strike

The union example is trickier, because it could be a union for teachers or a union of teachers -- but AP prefers no apostrophe.
But the Chicago Manual of Style says it should be girls' basketball and teachers' strike.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on September 26, 2014, 10:10:28 AM
Associated Press style says Mother's Day and Father's Day.

One usage that tripped me up for years is whether to use an apostrophe in phrases such as "girls basketball" or "nurses union" or "teachers strike." AP says if you can recast the phrase with the word "by" or "for," then don't use an apostrophe. If it works better with "of," then use one.

basketball for girls -- girls basketball
strike by teachers -- teachers strike

The union example is trickier, because it could be a union for teachers or a union of teachers -- but AP prefers no apostrophe.
But the Chicago Manual of Style says it should be girls' basketball and teachers' strike.

One of many differences between the two. Chicago Manual calls for apostrophe-S on names ending in S (Chris's book), and AP doesn't. Chicago Manual is all Oxford comma, all the time, and AP says only use it if one of the elements in the list contains a conjunction ("We had bacon, eggs and toast" but "We had toast, cereal, and bacon and eggs").

I just noticed that my copies of the Chicago Manual and AP stylebook are sitting right next to each other on the shelf. I should probably separate them before they start arguing.  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 26, 2014, 10:41:25 AM
Associated Press style says Mother's Day and Father's Day.

One usage that tripped me up for years is whether to use an apostrophe in phrases such as "girls basketball" or "nurses union" or "teachers strike." AP says if you can recast the phrase with the word "by" or "for," then don't use an apostrophe. If it works better with "of," then use one.

basketball for girls -- girls basketball
strike by teachers -- teachers strike

The union example is trickier, because it could be a union for teachers or a union of teachers -- but AP prefers no apostrophe.
But the Chicago Manual of Style says it should be girls' basketball and teachers' strike.

One of many differences between the two. Chicago Manual calls for apostrophe-S on names ending in S (Chris's book), and AP doesn't.
I don't like that convention -- it looks hissy.  And of course, I didn't realize how much I dislike it until a character swaggered out of my brain who called himself Farris.  I wound up recasting a lot of sentences to get rid of it. 
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: artk2002 on September 26, 2014, 02:52:29 PM
One of many differences between the two. Chicago Manual calls for apostrophe-S on names ending in S (Chris's book), and AP doesn't.
I don't like that convention -- it looks hissy.  And of course, I didn't realize how much I dislike it until a character swaggered out of my brain who called himself Farris.  I wound up recasting a lot of sentences to get rid of it.
[/quote]

In that case, it would be Farris' so I'm not sure what's hissy about it. Fariss's would look awful, but it would be wrong.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 26, 2014, 03:57:24 PM
And of course, I didn't realize how much I dislike it until a character swaggered out of my brain who called himself Farris.

O/T,  don't you hate how characters think they know their names more than you do? They just flop down in the nearest easy chair, extend a hand and say, "Hi, I'm Farriss. Now, get me a drink."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on September 26, 2014, 04:04:03 PM
And of course, I didn't realize how much I dislike it until a character swaggered out of my brain who called himself Farris.

O/T,  don't you hate how characters think they know their names more than you do? They just flop down in the nearest easy chair, extend a hand and say, "Hi, I'm Farriss. Now, get me a drink."
If only giving him a drink was that easy!  I was about three-quarters of the way through book 1, in which his sister was a secondary character.  Then he showed up  >:D and said "HEY! YOU'RE GONNA TELL MY STORY NOW!"
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: VorFemme on September 27, 2014, 05:30:48 PM
Diffuse instead of defuse. No...you defuse a bomb. You don't diffuse it. The latter is an extremely bad idea.

And doesn't a bomb "diffuse" itself when it explodes?

is it ironic that the word "Spelling" in the thread title mistakenly has three l's instead of 2?

I think it's an "insiders' joke".

+++

The last time I tried writing a story, the intended plot, characters, and setting tried to go to the theater and watch a play - which then tried to exit the stage and take over the paper I was writing on...

I have two wonderful scenes but they won't let me transfer them to paper without trying to invite another scene to strut its stuff upon the page (or screen, now that I use a keyboard more than a pen)....and I've just paraphrased Shakespeare!  You can't get away from his influence on the English language and the writer's craft easily...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Twik on September 29, 2014, 01:33:39 PM
I had one take over the story entirely.

"You're a secondary character in a flashback, then you die, OK?"

"Oh, heck no. I'm the hero."
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Onyx_TKD on September 29, 2014, 02:32:16 PM
I had one take over the story entirely.

"You're a secondary character in a flashback, then you die, OK?"

"Oh, heck no. I'm the hero."

Well can you blame him for trying to save himself? You're just lucky your character didn't follow the Malcolm Reynolds motto: "Someone ever tries to kill you, you try to kill 'em right back." By comparison, taking over the story seems downright reasonable.  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: whatsanenigma on September 29, 2014, 03:53:25 PM
I had one take over the story entirely.

"You're a secondary character in a flashback, then you die, OK?"

"Oh, heck no. I'm the hero."

Well can you blame him for trying to save himself? You're just lucky your character didn't follow the Malcolm Reynolds motto: "Someone ever tries to kill you, you try to kill 'em right back." By comparison, taking over the story seems downright reasonable.  ;)

Alternatively, he might have agreed to die in the flashback but in return, demand a prequel in which he is the hero.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: White Dragon on September 29, 2014, 10:10:11 PM
Last week I was at Home Depot and I think my head exploded.

In the space of 10 feet there were four signs.
Three of them were for:

Tall easle backed mirrors
Writting desks
Wardrob

It was too much, so I mentioned it to the associate.

I was back at the store two days later but could not bear to see if the signs had been fixed.
Instead, I just whimpered and buried my eyes on my husband"s shoulder when I saw the sign for miss-cut blinds.

One of the signs was computer printed (where was spell check?) The others were all hand written - in the same hand writing!  :o
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 30, 2014, 11:25:12 AM
Last week I was at Home Depot and I think my head exploded.

In the space of 10 feet there were four signs.
Three of them were for:

Tall easle backed mirrors
Writting desks
Wardrob

It was too much, so I mentioned it to the associate.

I was back at the store two days later but could not bear to see if the signs had been fixed.
Instead, I just whimpered and buried my eyes on my husband"s shoulder when I saw the sign for miss-cut blinds.

One of the signs was computer printed (where was spell check?) The others were all hand written - in the same hand writing!  :o

I see a lot of this. What gets me the most is that some of these signs are produced in an office somewhere, supposedly by a professional (I can dream!). It's ridiculous.  :P
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on September 30, 2014, 11:30:21 AM
I was watching the opening skit on last week's SNL. The cast member said, "Incidentses" instead of "incidents." This is a common mistake people make, but I have to admit it bugs me. FTR, it's not as if she was saying it this way to be funny; I honestly believe that the writers believe that is the correct way to say it. I know, I need to deal with the new world, but I don't have to like it!  :-\
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Eeep! on September 30, 2014, 04:01:37 PM
I was watching the opening skit on last week's SNL. The cast member said, "Incidentses" instead of "incidents." This is a common mistake people make, but I have to admit it bugs me. FTR, it's not as if she was saying it this way to be funny; I honestly believe that the writers believe that is the correct way to say it. I know, I need to deal with the new world, but I don't have to like it!  :-\

I think this happens because people are mixing up incidents with incidences.  Are you sure they weren't saying the latter?
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on September 30, 2014, 04:08:46 PM
I was watching the opening skit on last week's SNL. The cast member said, "Incidentses" instead of "incidents." This is a common mistake people make, but I have to admit it bugs me. FTR, it's not as if she was saying it this way to be funny; I honestly believe that the writers believe that is the correct way to say it. I know, I need to deal with the new world, but I don't have to like it!  :-\

I think this happens because people are mixing up incidents with incidences.  Are you sure they weren't saying the latter?

Maybe; or maybe Gollum is taking-over the world...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: baglady on September 30, 2014, 09:42:32 PM
I'm unemployed and applying for work in the public information/communications/marketing field.

Last week I answered a blind Craigslist ad for a "marketing/business manager/social media" position. I got this response (some details blurred):

Hello Kendrick,
 
What we like to do is before a interview we like to see a skill set. We give all applicants a design challenge. Attached is a [picture of a thing], We would like you to take the [picture of a thing] and recreate your own design. please do a little research on what we do.
We hope to hear from you!
 
 
Please open a new email and send it to this email.
 
Thank you,
[Guy's Name]

I did respond. I told him my name isn't Kendrick, I was not applying for a design position, and when I tried to "do a little research" by clicking the link to the company website on its Facebook page, I got a GoDaddy "this domain name is currently available" page.

If they hadn't lost me at "Kendrick," they would have lost me at "a interview."
     

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on October 01, 2014, 12:54:00 PM
I was watching the opening skit on last week's SNL. The cast member said, "Incidentses" instead of "incidents." This is a common mistake people make, but I have to admit it bugs me. FTR, it's not as if she was saying it this way to be funny; I honestly believe that the writers believe that is the correct way to say it. I know, I need to deal with the new world, but I don't have to like it!  :-\

I think this happens because people are mixing up incidents with incidences.  Are you sure they weren't saying the latter?

She did say the latter, and it should've been the former, incidents, plural of incident. This is a common mistake, but I would expect a professional writer to know the difference.

http://www.grammar-monster.com/easily_confused/incidence_incidents.htm
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: jaxsue on October 01, 2014, 12:54:38 PM
I was watching the opening skit on last week's SNL. The cast member said, "Incidentses" instead of "incidents." This is a common mistake people make, but I have to admit it bugs me. FTR, it's not as if she was saying it this way to be funny; I honestly believe that the writers believe that is the correct way to say it. I know, I need to deal with the new world, but I don't have to like it!  :-\

I think this happens because people are mixing up incidents with incidences.  Are you sure they weren't saying the latter?

Maybe; or maybe Gollum is taking-over the world...

Good point!  :)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: poundcake on October 19, 2014, 07:43:52 AM
I just read a FB status where someone posted about "my sister and I's favorite ___." I may have groan out loud.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Margo on October 27, 2014, 03:14:39 PM
I got an email yesterday, from someone wanting me to sign up for a convention next year. The writer hopes that the emailhas "perked my interest"


The e-mail also describes of the guests as  the convention's "first 3D guest artist". I now feel sorry for all the poor, 2 dimensional guest artists they have invited in the past.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 28, 2014, 06:21:32 AM
I got an email yesterday, from someone wanting me to sign up for a convention next year. The writer hopes that the emailhas "perked my interest"

I take your point: an ignorant error on the writer's part, where "pique" was what they were presumably thinking of.  I can't help feeling, though, that "perking one's interest" sounds not too bad in its own right, a bit poetic in fact. Overtones both of piquing the addressee's interest, and of their perking up at the mention of the subject -- maybe in the background, the suggestion of the aroma of fresh coffee percolating ("perking"), usually found an attractive thing.  Or perhaps I'm overly fond of Lewis Carroll's Humpty Dumpty, with his highly individual way with words...

Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Margo on October 28, 2014, 07:41:33 AM
Perking one's interest seems like a mush more racy thing, doesn't it?

The e-mail irritated me generally as it was really poorly written throughout (also badly formatted).  The punctuation was painful.

I would have been more amused if it had been a personal e-mail, but it wasn't, it was sent in a formal capacity (albeit by someone who is likely a volunteer). And in relation to an event focussed on books and writing.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: cabbageweevil on October 28, 2014, 10:32:52 AM
Perking one's interest seems like a mush more racy thing, doesn't it?

The e-mail irritated me generally as it was really poorly written throughout (also badly formatted).  The punctuation was painful.

I would have been more amused if it had been a personal e-mail, but it wasn't, it was sent in a formal capacity (albeit by someone who is likely a volunteer). And in relation to an event focussed on books and writing.

Perhaps the writer of the memo fancies themself as a creative writer / poet -- and was flexing their muscles re that ambition, in a rather inappropriate setting?  (And like e e cummings, doesn't have a lot of use for punctuation.)  Sorry -- I'm a bit addicted to playing devil's advocate, usually in situations where the person defended really hasn't got a leg to stand on   :) .
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Margo on October 28, 2014, 02:39:39 PM
Oh, there was lots of punctuation. Applied with great enthusiasm.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Elfmama on October 28, 2014, 03:23:14 PM
Oh; there was, "lots", of punctuation. Applied with great! *enthusiasm*.
Like that?  ;)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Another Sarah on October 29, 2014, 05:33:28 AM
I got an email yesterday, from someone wanting me to sign up for a convention next year. The writer hopes that the emailhas "perked my interest"

I take your point: an ignorant error on the writer's part, where "pique" was what they were presumably thinking of.  I can't help feeling, though, that "perking one's interest" sounds not too bad in its own right, a bit poetic in fact. Overtones both of piquing the addressee's interest, and of their perking up at the mention of the subject -- maybe in the background, the suggestion of the aroma of fresh coffee percolating ("perking"), usually found an attractive thing.  Or perhaps I'm overly fond of Lewis Carroll's Humpty Dumpty, with his highly individual way with words...

I think sometime people who've only heard a phrase and not seen it written down unconsciously substitute a word they know for a word they don't.

There used to be a TV show about 20-somethings on in the UK and one bit always cracked me up, when one of the characters announced that his gf's plan was "a damp squid", then when she corrected him, took the mick out of her because he thought she'd made up the word squib.

I think Joey from Friends did it once too: "It's a moo point, it's just moo"

But my favourite mental image will always be that sad lonely little squid, not wet, not dry, just damp.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: DaisyG on October 29, 2014, 07:45:52 AM
At my office, we've got a new manager who has quite a few documents to get up to date, so I'm getting a lot of emails from him. Most of them start: "Hope your well".
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Margo on October 29, 2014, 09:20:09 AM
I got an email yesterday, from someone wanting me to sign up for a convention next year. The writer hopes that the emailhas "perked my interest"

I take your point: an ignorant error on the writer's part, where "pique" was what they were presumably thinking of.  I can't help feeling, though, that "perking one's interest" sounds not too bad in its own right, a bit poetic in fact. Overtones both of piquing the addressee's interest, and of their perking up at the mention of the subject -- maybe in the background, the suggestion of the aroma of fresh coffee percolating ("perking"), usually found an attractive thing.  Or perhaps I'm overly fond of Lewis Carroll's Humpty Dumpty, with his highly individual way with words...

I think sometime people who've only heard a phrase and not seen it written down unconsciously substitute a word they know for a word they don't.

There used to be a TV show about 20-somethings on in the UK and one bit always cracked me up, when one of the characters announced that his gf's plan was "a damp squid", then when she corrected him, took the mick out of her because he thought she'd made up the word squib.

I think Joey from Friends did it once too: "It's a moo point, it's just moo"

But my favourite mental image will always be that sad lonely little squid, not wet, not dry, just damp.

thing is, surely squid *should* be damp? they would be terribly unhappy if they dried out. When I hear 'Damp Squid' I always feel that it should be describing something which good - eveything in the right place, nothing to worry about...


Elfmama - the punctuation wasn't quite that bad. I think her scattergun was only loaded with commas and full-stops, although some of them cuddled together for warmth and produces little baby colons and semi-colons.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Another Sarah on October 29, 2014, 10:27:53 AM
There used to be a TV show about 20-somethings on in the UK and one bit always cracked me up, when one of the characters announced that his gf's plan was "a damp squid", then when she corrected him, took the mick out of her because he thought she'd made up the word squib.

But my favourite mental image will always be that sad lonely little squid, not wet, not dry, just damp.
thing is, surely squid *should* be damp? they would be terribly unhappy if they dried out. When I hear 'Damp Squid' I always feel that it should be describing something which good - eveything in the right place, nothing to worry about...
In my head If it was in the sea it would be wet - it being damp means it got out and now doesn't know what to do with itself, so kind of the same meaning as the original but just that little bit sadder...
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on October 29, 2014, 10:59:19 AM
One of our local TV reporters does a few things that drive me batty.

She's the bucket of stupid they have doing all the fluff stories.  Her main offenses are:

1.  Liberal misuse of the word literally (i.e. "It's literally exploding with fun").
2.  She pronounces absolutely as "absolooley".
3.  She cannot, for some reason, say the word important.  I comes out of her mush mouth as "imporden".

Thank Deity for the mute button.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Redneck Gravy on October 29, 2014, 02:06:34 PM
One of our local TV reporters does a few things that drive me batty.

She's the bucket of stupid they have doing all the fluff stories.  Her main offenses are:

1.  Liberal misuse of the word literally (i.e. "It's literally exploding with fun").
2.  She pronounces absolutely as "absolooley".
3.  She cannot, for some reason, say the word important.  I comes out of her mush mouth as "imporden".

Thank Deity for the mute button.

Dear Deity ... and she's a TV reporter?

You would hope that at some point in her career that someone pointed out that she needed to take speech/diction classes or lessons to fix this problem.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: BeagleMommy on October 29, 2014, 02:10:23 PM
One of our local TV reporters does a few things that drive me batty.

She's the bucket of stupid they have doing all the fluff stories.  Her main offenses are:

1.  Liberal misuse of the word literally (i.e. "It's literally exploding with fun").
2.  She pronounces absolutely as "absolooley".
3.  She cannot, for some reason, say the word important.  I comes out of her mush mouth as "imporden".

Thank Deity for the mute button.

Dear Deity ... and she's a TV reporter?

You would hope that at some point in her career that someone pointed out that she needed to take speech/diction classes or lessons to fix this problem.

I'm guessing this is why she only does the fluff stories.  She has this perpetual wide-eyed, dopey look about her that makes me wonder if they only thing rattling around in her brain is the theme to Looney Tunes.
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on October 29, 2014, 11:25:32 PM
At my office, we've got a new manager who has quite a few documents to get up to date, so I'm getting a lot of emails from him. Most of them start: "Hope your well".

He gets bonus points for starting emails in a friendly manner. But I'd really want to write back "What about my well?"

(http://sherwoodinspection.com/residential/files/2011/03/Well.jpg)
Title: Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
Post by: Danika on October 30, 2014, 10:58:03 PM
My child has a classmate who is a nice, polite little girl. But she's not bright and has a really hard time with spelling. Her father is a realtor in our neighborhood. He frequently sends advertisements showing photos of houses he's sold. We just received a glossy flyer in our mailbox from him and the title at the top is about a house he just sold "in 2 day's". Then, there's a paragraph descr