Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange => Topic started by: Katana_Geldar on September 24, 2013, 05:52:26 PM

Title: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 24, 2013, 05:52:26 PM
In Australia, we have drive thrus but it's just for places like McDonald's or KFC. But from what I have heard, drive thrus are a bit if a thing over in the US, even for banks and wedding chapel ps.

Honestly, I find this not only odd but rather lazy. Is it too much trouble to get out if the car?

I do admit, the donut-shaped drive thru one if my friends told me about when she visited LA sounded fun.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Yvaine on September 24, 2013, 05:56:39 PM
Banks, yes. It's generally not because people are "lazy" but because they're in a hurry.

The wedding chapel drive-thrus are kind of a gimmick. I don't know of any outside Las Vegas; it's a quirk that's unique to that city, which is a city of many quirks. You won't find one on every corner.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 24, 2013, 05:59:47 PM
But we don't have coffee drive thrus or drive thrus for ANYTHING else except for American fast food. I doubt even Oporto, a local burger chain, has it.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Yvaine on September 24, 2013, 06:06:18 PM
But we don't have coffee drive thrus or drive thrus for ANYTHING else except for American fast food. I doubt even Oporto, a local burger chain, has it.

Most of our local burger chains don't either. It's mostly just banks and fast food here too.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: veronaz on September 24, 2013, 06:07:24 PM
I’m not real fond of drive-thrus, but I can understand why they exist.

Aside from fast food, lines in banks and pharmacies are usuallylong and slow-moving.  Business can service more customers if they have a drive-thru.  Of course, there is always the transaction which, for whatever reason, takes up more time - even in a druive-thru.

People with several young children in the car sometimes prefer to use the drive thru.  So it’s not necessarily laziness.

The drive thru wedding chapels are a novelty.  Certainly not something seen often (if at all) outside Vegas.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Oh Joy on September 24, 2013, 06:08:09 PM
Pharmacies!  I love being able to drop off and pick up my prescriptions without getting out of the car.  Either I've got sick kids with me who would be happier snuggled in their carseats than waiting inside, or I'm not feeling fantastic and would rather not care whether I'm looking terribly presentable.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: hobish on September 24, 2013, 06:08:47 PM
In Australia, we have drive thrus but it's just for places like McDonald's or KFC. But from what I have heard, drive thrus are a bit if a thing over in the US, even for banks and wedding chapel ps.

Honestly, I find this not only odd but rather lazy. Is it too much trouble to get out if the car?I do admit, the donut-shaped drive thru one if my friends told me about when she visited LA sounded fun.

Is that really necessary? You have already posted once about not liking how Americans speak, and now you want to call us lazy. What gives?

Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: nuit93 on September 24, 2013, 06:13:08 PM
If I've got pets in the car, I'd rather use the drive-through and keep the car running then have to risk leaving them out even for a short time.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Luci on September 24, 2013, 06:14:10 PM
When I was younger, I ran a lot of errands on my bicycle, so often it was better to use the drive-through for simple bank transactions.

I wasn't lazy. There was no place to lock my bicycle like there was at the grocery store and or pharmacy. I admit it was kind of nice not to have to get the kid in and out of the child carrier if I had one with me.

I would never call anyone who takes advantage of any drive-thru "lazy". Even with a handicap placard, it may be easier for some to be able to skip that one time of having to get in and out of the car which can often times be that "much trouble", the driver may be just exhausted from a hard day, have a small injury that doesn't allow a handicap plackard (sprained ankle with binding and crutches, for example),and sometimes when the line is short, the drive-thru may be faster than going inside.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Yvaine on September 24, 2013, 06:15:53 PM
Pharmacies!  I love being able to drop off and pick up my prescriptions without getting out of the car.  Either I've got sick kids with me who would be happier snuggled in their carseats than waiting inside, or I'm not feeling fantastic and would rather not care whether I'm looking terribly presentable.

Oh yes, I forgot pharmacies. I think that's a really handy place to have them. It's easier for the sick person because they don't have to come all the way in, and might help prevent the spread of disease too!

In Australia, we have drive thrus but it's just for places like McDonald's or KFC. But from what I have heard, drive thrus are a bit if a thing over in the US, even for banks and wedding chapel ps.

Honestly, I find this not only odd but rather lazy. Is it too much trouble to get out if the car?I do admit, the donut-shaped drive thru one if my friends told me about when she visited LA sounded fun.

Is that really necessary? You have already posted once about not liking how Americans speak, and now you want to call us lazy. What gives?



This too. OP, you seem to have started this out in an antagonistic way and I'm not really sure why.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 24, 2013, 06:21:09 PM
From my UK viewpoint, drive thru establishments that aren't fast food are definitely... odd, and like it or not, on the surface they do conjure up an image of "what, people can't be bothered to get out of the car?" whereas I'm sure if you dig deeper there are logistical reasons for it.

However, in thinking about it, American towns don't seem to be set up the same way ours are (I'm not even sure what the average town or city centre is like there - I have images of everywhere having strip malls and no town centre to speak of). We have banks on every high street and shopping centre so it's easy to pop in while you're in town. There aren't the same amount of local banks that you guys have - they're pretty much all high street chains. The banking system also seems quite different - we tend to have our wages deposited automatically and pay everything by direct debit, while the US banking system seems to lag behind in that respect with some people still having to deposit a paycheque and write cheques to pay their bills. So, I can see there's more need to 'go to the bank', whereas here, well - I can't remember the last time I even had to set foot in one. Everything's done automatically and I keep an eye on it with my online banking.

I can see the value of a drive through pharmacy - I hadn't thought about the sick kids, but that's a really good point.

The only drive throughs I've ever seen here are McD's, BK and KFC.

Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 24, 2013, 06:22:08 PM
Ok, first post did sound a bit antagonistic but that may be because as I said, drive thrus aren't as prevalent here. Antagonism wasn't my intention. And thank you perpetua of seeing my point.

Though I think we used have drive thru bottle-o (liquour store).

I do like the idea of pharmacies being drive thru.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 24, 2013, 06:33:22 PM
In Australia, we have drive thrus but it's just for places like McDonald's or KFC. But from what I have heard, drive thrus are a bit if a thing over in the US, even for banks and wedding chapel ps.

Honestly, I find this not only odd but rather lazy. Is it too much trouble to get out if the car?I do admit, the donut-shaped drive thru one if my friends told me about when she visited LA sounded fun.

Is that really necessary? You have already posted once about not liking how Americans speak, and now you want to call us lazy. What gives?

I don't think anyone's calling Americans lazy. I think mostly it's an issue of differences in town planning and to those who don't live there, some of these things do come across as a little odd or different.

My father could never understand why Americans seemingly drove everywhere, for example, even to do the shortest of errands. And then he visited a family member in the States and realised that there was not one single pavement (sidewalk) in the town, so there was nowhere to walk safely, and then it suddenly all made sense.

To someone who comes from a place that's set up for walking, it comes across as odd until you know the reason behind it. So, not understanding the drive-thru-setup is just a difference in how things are.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Bluenomi on September 24, 2013, 06:33:58 PM
Ok, first post did sound a bit antagonistic but that may be because as I said, drive thrus aren't as prevalent here. Antagonism wasn't my intention. And thank you perpetua of seeing my point.

Though I think we used have drive thru bottle-o (liquour store).

I do like the idea of pharmacies being drive thru.

We've still got the odd drive through bottle shop in my part of Oz but they are becoming rarer, I think it's the whole drink driving issue coming into play.

Drive thru chemists could be good but you could end up spending a fair bit of time waiting while they filled your prescription if they were busy

I've only ever seen drive through at the big fast food chains, usually the US ones, the only non US based chain to have one that I've seen is Red Rooster
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Luci on September 24, 2013, 06:35:06 PM

Honestly, I find this not only odd but rather lazy. Is it too much trouble to get out if the car?.

That was the line that I thought was antagonistic, not the simple fact that you don't have as many there.

I also thought of some other reasons, one being that finding a parking space is sometimes difficult, so the solution is the drive-thru.

I am a strong proponent of not JADEing, so usually I would just say that it works for the store and people like it and use it.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: guihong on September 24, 2013, 06:36:59 PM
I don't know if this is a fish tale or not, but a friend of mine told me that in a Louisiana town, there once was a drive-through on a funeral home  :o.  You could go to a viewing without even getting out of the car. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 24, 2013, 06:39:50 PM
In Australia, we have drive thrus but it's just for places like McDonald's or KFC. But from what I have heard, drive thrus are a bit if a thing over in the US, even for banks and wedding chapel ps.

Honestly, I find this not only odd but rather lazy. Is it too much trouble to get out if the car?I do admit, the donut-shaped drive thru one if my friends told me about when she visited LA sounded fun.

Is that really necessary? You have already posted once about not liking how Americans speak, and now you want to call us lazy. What gives?

I don't think anyone's calling Americans lazy. I think mostly it's an issue of differences in town planning and to those who don't live there, some of these things do come across as a little odd or different.

My father could never understand why Americans seemingly drove everywhere, for example, even to do the shortest of errands. And then he visited a family member in the States and realised that there was not one single pavement (sidewalk) in the town, so there was nowhere to walk safely, and then it suddenly all made sense.
How...is that possible?

I also would like to state that neither DH or I drive, but sometimes we wish we did. Usually when it means catching multiple busses while carrying heavy objects.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Yvaine on September 24, 2013, 06:47:59 PM
In Australia, we have drive thrus but it's just for places like McDonald's or KFC. But from what I have heard, drive thrus are a bit if a thing over in the US, even for banks and wedding chapel ps.

Honestly, I find this not only odd but rather lazy. Is it too much trouble to get out if the car?I do admit, the donut-shaped drive thru one if my friends told me about when she visited LA sounded fun.

Is that really necessary? You have already posted once about not liking how Americans speak, and now you want to call us lazy. What gives?

I don't think anyone's calling Americans lazy. I think mostly it's an issue of differences in town planning and to those who don't live there, some of these things do come across as a little odd or different.

My father could never understand why Americans seemingly drove everywhere, for example, even to do the shortest of errands. And then he visited a family member in the States and realised that there was not one single pavement (sidewalk) in the town, so there was nowhere to walk safely, and then it suddenly all made sense.
How...is that possible?

I also would like to state that neither DH or I drive, but sometimes we wish we did. Usually when it means catching multiple busses while carrying heavy objects.

Lots of neighborhoods have no sidewalks in the US. It's lawns all the way to the street.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: camlan on September 24, 2013, 06:51:13 PM
Drive-through banking has been around for decades, at least since the 1960s. The ATM made it easier, as you can drive up to an ATM during hours that the bank is closed.

Then there's the fast food drive-through, the coffee shop drive-through, the pharmacy drive-through and in one city I know, the convenience store drive-through. I think the wedding chapels are limited to Las Vegas and the surrounding area. There are also fast food places where you can drive up, park, roll down your window and order a meal, which will be brought to you at your car.

You can also call a lot of chain restaurants and order a meal to go, drive there and pick it up, sometimes without getting out of your car. And at least one supermarket chain will let you order on-line then drive to the store an hour later, where you can pull up in a special lane and your bagged groceries will be brought out to you.

You see fewer drive-throughs of any type in large cities, where more people take public transportation or walk everywhere.

But out in the suburbs, they abound. Everyone's in their car anyway, just to get any place. The drive-though means one less stop, one less attempt to find a parking space, one less trek through a crowded store.

I rarely use them myself, except to deposit the odd check at the bank (now that I have direct deposit), but I don't see anything wrong with choosing to use them for their convenience.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on September 24, 2013, 06:55:46 PM
In Australia there are ATMs everywhere and you can get cash out at most stores where you can pay by EFTPOS.  Most service stations have an ATM also so that's an easy place to stop if you need cash while on the run.  I can't imagine there being much additional benefit of a drive through ATM on top of whatw we're already used to.  Though I imagine its much like a dishwasher - you're fine with nothing having something unil you have it and then when its not avaialbel its a real inconvenience.

Drive through pharmacies - I think that would only benefit me if they were open in particularly late hours.  Also - I've seen a lot of people talk about long waits at the pharmacy for prescriptions.  I never wait more than 10 minutes - why does it take so long in the USA?
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: menley on September 24, 2013, 07:01:23 PM
Many drive-through pharmacies are open 24 hours.

I think the difference in wait time is packaging. I live in Europe now and all my medications come prepackaged in blister packs and boxes. But I grew up in the USA and the majority of medications are hand prepared at the pharmacy and placed into bottles. Very few prescriptions in the USA are prepackaged.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 24, 2013, 07:03:34 PM
Could it also be something to do with having to check insurance details? Not sure how it works in Australia but we don't have that here, so we just hand the prescription over and either pay for it or sign for your exemption if you don't pay.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: veronaz on September 24, 2013, 07:05:04 PM
I know a few people who drive but have difficulty walking.  One is in a wheelchair, one has cerebral palsy, and the other is recovering from knee surgery.  They all use drive-thrus, but probably wish they could walk normally.

Lazy?  No.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 24, 2013, 07:07:26 PM
Could it also be something to do with having to check insurance details? Not sure how it works in Australia but we don't have that here, so we just hand the prescription over and either pay for it or sign for your exemption if you don't pay.

And a lot of them keep your Medicare details on file.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: #borecore on September 24, 2013, 07:11:50 PM
We used a drive-through Taco Bell on our drive across the country a month and a half ago. That was the last time; I haven't noticed any drive-throughs except in the suburbs of our current town.

In our old town, I used to use a drive-through at the bank to deposit checks because my bank's indoor teller closed before I was done working for the day, every day. The drive-through stayed open until 6. I occasionally got tacos at a statewide chain restaurant on my waaaay too short dinner breaks, if I thought getting out of the car would waste too much time.

Otherwise, I strongly prefer to go into a business, such as a restaurant, pharmacy or bank, if it's at all feasible.

I've been to places that sell liquor/beer in drive-throughs, and in one particularly unpleasant town, there were places selling just cigarettes and frozen mixed (alcoholic) drinks) in drive-throughs. They taped over the hole in the top of the takeaway cup where the straw goes because "open containers" of alcohol were illegal in cars in our state.

Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: veronaz on September 24, 2013, 07:16:23 PM
It's safer to use a drive-thru than an outside ATM (imo).  I've seen reports of people being watched, approached/followed, and robbed.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 24, 2013, 07:20:25 PM
It's safer to use a drive-thru than an outside ATM (imo).  I've seen reports of people being watched, approached/followed, and robbed.
Not so sure about that, ATMs have been bombed here.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: mime on September 24, 2013, 07:25:25 PM
I also do all my banking online, so I rarely use the bank drive throughs. I always use the pharmacy drive-throughs. I can keep the kids (8, 3, and newborn) buckled up in the car. Besides that, all the sick people staying in their cars keeps the germs from spreading!

I haven't had delays with insurance. Our doctors email the Rx to the pharmacy, which already has our insurance info recorded, so I just give my name and address and they give me my meds. The only delay I've had is when I get any liquid medicine for my kids, I usually have them add grape flavor.

I'm in the suburbs in Minnesota, and my town sure isn't made for walking anywhere. My development has sidewalks on one side of most streets, which was considered to be a special feature in our neighborhood. The sidewalks wind around the ponds, woods, and parks for a nice walk, but the closest store/bank/restaurant/whatever is a couple miles away. That may not sound like much until you hit the half of the year where everything is snow-covered and frozen.



Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: nuit93 on September 24, 2013, 07:33:57 PM
Ok, first post did sound a bit antagonistic but that may be because as I said, drive thrus aren't as prevalent here. Antagonism wasn't my intention. And thank you perpetua of seeing my point.

Though I think we used have drive thru bottle-o (liquour store).

I do like the idea of pharmacies being drive thru.

We've still got the odd drive through bottle shop in my part of Oz but they are becoming rarer, I think it's the whole drink driving issue coming into play.

Drive thru chemists could be good but you could end up spending a fair bit of time waiting while they filled your prescription if they were busy

I've only ever seen drive through at the big fast food chains, usually the US ones, the only non US based chain to have one that I've seen is Red Rooster

I'm assuming the US equivalent is a pharmacy.

I don't wait for mine to be filled in the drive through, I either drop off a prescription (if it couldn't be called in), or pick one up.  I don't know of anyone who waits for theirs to be filled while in the drive through.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: veronaz on September 24, 2013, 07:34:37 PM
It's safer to use a drive-thru than an outside ATM (imo).  I've seen reports of people being watched, approached/followed, and robbed.
Not so sure about that, ATMs have been bombed here.

???
So.....what is it you're "not so sure" about? I said that ATM's were not particularly safe.  I'm not understanding what your point is.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Wordgeek on September 24, 2013, 07:38:10 PM
The discussion of the word "lazy" will now come to an end.  I'd like to remind everyone that the purpose of this folder is to bridge differences, and not to take such quick offense.  Cross-cultural communication requires patience and flexibility.  If you aren't willing to be patient and flexible, go away.

...and I'll take this opportunity to mention the drive-through liquor stores I saw in Oz.  >:D
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Sharnita on September 24, 2013, 07:47:17 PM
I have experieced actual temperatures well below zero and wind chills of -70. When the weather is that bitterly cold you avoid getting out of the car. In fact, when parking lots ate icy in genetal you might take the drive-thru option and avoid a slip and fall situation.

I do know other people who tend to use it because they have the kids with them and it is a lot more efficient than unloading the kids, taking them into X business, bringing thrm back out to the car and loading them back up.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on September 24, 2013, 07:49:58 PM
The discussion of the word "lazy" will now come to an end.  I'd like to remind everyone that the purpose of this folder is to bridge differences, and not to take such quick offense.  Cross-cultural communication requires patience and flexibility.  If you aren't willing to be patient and flexible, go away.

...and I'll take this opportunity to mention the drive-through liquor stores I saw in Oz.  >:D

As a side note, our drive through liquor stores still require you to get out of the car.  I'm not quite sure what the point is except as a slightly quicker transaction and less choice.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: ladyknight1 on September 24, 2013, 07:51:14 PM
Mainly just restaurants, both fast-food and quick-service here. Pharmacies and banks also. Drive through coffee shops are very popular.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 24, 2013, 07:51:59 PM
The discussion of the word "lazy" will now come to an end.  I'd like to remind everyone that the purpose of this folder is to bridge differences, and not to take such quick offense.  Cross-cultural communication requires patience and flexibility.  If you aren't willing to be patient and flexible, go away.

...and I'll take this opportunity to mention the drive-through liquor stores I saw in Oz.  >:D

As a side note, our drive through liquor stores still require you to get out of the car.  I'm not quite sure what the point is except as a slightly quicker transaction and less choice.
Some of them used to have car service, particularly if you were just going to be in and out. But they're rarer these days.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: shhh its me on September 24, 2013, 08:00:39 PM
I remember going to banks on a Friday in the 70s  the line might have been as long as a hour to deposit a check as of 10 years ago the lines at the credit union were 20 minutes plus on a Friday.  It was more comfortable to wait in your car where you could play the radio , the kids wouldn't act up as much(or if they did it didn't bother other people) , control the temperature ect. the drive through tending to be open later and on Saturdays. At this point I've noticed a much higher % of people inside of the banks have a more complicated transaction, there was also a tendency for them to try to sell you more stuff inside the bank.  Plus its a habit now.   Its like online banking, why bank online why not get your check and take it too the bank (its easier and there may be less fees)


As far as walking I live in a mid sized city there are still places without sidewalk/pathways plus you could live 2 miles form a bank or a grocery store.  That's not even talking about rural areas or new suburbs where it might be 5 , 10 or even 20 miles.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on September 24, 2013, 08:07:33 PM
Mist ATMs in the US charge a fee of $2-3 if it is not your bank.  ATMs in gas stations and convenience stores are often not affiliated with any bank, so everyone who uses them gets hit with the fee.  Some banks then charge a fee if you do an atm withdrawal at an atm that doesn't belong to that bank, so you could end up paying an extra $5 if you don't use an ATM affiliated with your bank.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 24, 2013, 08:09:33 PM
Just a query, how often is I that people are paid by cheque? My old work used to pay by cheque, which got rather annoying as I had to go to the bank to deposits it, they do have ATM deposits but I couldn't always count on them getting it that day.

Most people when I queued up to the bank were business customers with the days takings.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Library Dragon on September 24, 2013, 08:20:28 PM
I only use the drive thru pharmacy if I or someone else was ill.  Not dragging sick kids into the pharmacy I presumed was considerate of others.  Otherwise I go inside. 

The bank branch that is most convenient only has a drive thru and ATM.  No parking lot, no public lobby.  The main branch is on the city square and rarely has parking anywhere near it.  I'd have to park on the street near the drive thru branch. 

My neighborhood has no sidewalks and the main road has none for a few miles in either direction of my street.  When DSs wanted to walk to a store I made them call me so I knew they made it and were literally not in the ditch.  We also have no public transportation.  There's not even a taxi cab company.  This is common throughout the county.  People drive in 20-30 miles once a week and do all their errands.  They have to go into the grocery store, library, etc., so I think a few drive thrus are welcome.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 24, 2013, 08:28:00 PM
I use my credit unions drive through all the time.  the same tellers handle the lobby customers as the drive up customers.  So If I have to wait, I'd rather do it in my car, where I can listen to music and read a book while waiting. 

I use the drive up pharmacy for dropping off and picking up only.  So I will drop off a prescription and leave.  Or pick up a prescription and leave. I don't drop off and wait for them to fill the prescription.

I live in a large city and surrounding metro area.  Most places pay by direct deposit, but there may be a bit of a waiting period before it kicks in.  Not sure about more rural areas.  If I do have to deposit a check, my bank will give you the first $100, but the rest of the money has to wait for the holding period before funds are available. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hmmmmm on September 24, 2013, 08:50:36 PM
From my UK viewpoint, drive thru establishments that aren't fast food are definitely... odd, and like it or not, on the surface they do conjure up an image of "what, people can't be bothered to get out of the car?" whereas I'm sure if you dig deeper there are logistical reasons for it.

However, in thinking about it, American towns don't seem to be set up the same way ours are (I'm not even sure what the average town or city centre is like there - I have images of everywhere having strip malls and no town centre to speak of). We have banks on every high street and shopping centre so it's easy to pop in while you're in town. There aren't the same amount of local banks that you guys have - they're pretty much all high street chains. The banking system also seems quite different - we tend to have our wages deposited automatically and pay everything by direct debit, while the US banking system seems to lag behind in that respect with some people still having to deposit a paycheque and write cheques to pay their bills. So, I can see there's more need to 'go to the bank', whereas here, well - I can't remember the last time I even had to set foot in one. Everything's done automatically and I keep an eye on it with my online banking.

I can see the value of a drive through pharmacy - I hadn't thought about the sick kids, but that's a really good point.

The only drive throughs I've ever seen here are McD's, BK and KFC.

I think the majority of people with regular jobs and bank accounts use direct deposit for their pay checks. But there is a portion of our society that are not wiling or can't open a checking account and their only pay solution is cash or check. Using auto pay is a personal thing. We use it for monthly standard payments, use online banking for bills that vary by month, and right a check for those once in a blue moon instances. My DH and I probably write less than 2 checks per month and most of those are to school for some fundraiser or sending a check as a gift.

I'm trying to think of the type of drive thrus I use. I normally use a drive thru ATM for cash withdrawals or deposits, drive thru fast food, drive thru pharmacy is I'm feeling like crap and don't want to expose my germs to others. Oh, and my dry cleaner offers drive thru, so on the way home from work, you go to their drive thru and they bring the clothes out to you. They don't have a lot of parking where they are, so drive thru works better for them.

Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Sharnita on September 24, 2013, 08:52:58 PM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Psychopoesie on September 24, 2013, 08:58:12 PM
Another Aussie here who's often wondered about the reasons behind the popularity of drive thrus in the US.

Only local fast food drive thrus are maccas and KFC that I can recall. I've used them when I've been in a hurry or doing a long drive. Not sure they're that much quicker though.

There are a couple of drive thru bottle shops attached to hotels but I had to look them up to be sure because I've never used one. Maybe if I lived nearer, it'd be a handy option. I mostly buy alcohol at the supermarket or local grocery store so maybe not.

It doesn't really seem to be about driving to the shops vs walking. Most people I know drive somewhere to shop, park and go inside.

My mother has mobility issues and uses accessible parking. Drive thru might help for her but since she has to get out to grocery shop anyway, not sure it's be that much of a draw.

Where I live in Oz, there are no really long wait times for prescriptions at the pharmacy or to get money from ATMs. Even inside the bank, it's not usually that long a wait. Plus most of the banks or pharmacies I go to are in malls so a drive thru isn't a viable option.

I don't feel too worried about getting out of my car to use most ATMs outside a mall, even late at night. So maybe lower crime rates help there.

Most people I know get paid by directly into their account these days - fewer pay cheques than there used to be.

I expect that if there were more drive thru options here, some people would find them convenient.

Don't see a driving need for them tho. ;)
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: SiotehCat on September 24, 2013, 09:01:44 PM
I love drive thrus. I try to use them whenever I can. It's mostly fast food places and once every so often at the bank.

Sometimes it's out of laziness. My work is physically exhausting and if my choices are between a non drive thru restaurant or a drive thru one, the drive they will win.

Also, there are times when I want to interact with as few people as possible.

My grocery store had this thing where you can place your order online and go to their "drive thru" to pick it up. Never having to get out of your car. I've never used it before, but I would love to try.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hmmmmm on September 24, 2013, 09:09:06 PM
Having lived in Central Perth, it is a big difference to living where I do in Texas. I live in what is now considered close in to the city, but when it was built in the 1960s it was the outer suburbs. I walk to the elementary school. I walk to the neighborhood park, and I walk to a few friends homes in the neighborhood. But other than that, I drive every where. There are not stores or restaurants within a mile (1.6 kilometers). So if I'm going to a farmers market and I know they prefer cash, I'll drive by the drive thru ATM on my way to driving to the farmers market. US people in less car centric. I ties like NYC or Chicago probably do more walking and less drive thrus. But even where I live, I probably do less than one a week.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: ladyknight1 on September 24, 2013, 09:18:53 PM
DH works for a small company and direct deposit is not an option for them. He gets a check every week.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: MrsJWine on September 24, 2013, 09:26:41 PM
One of my least favorite things to do is get my kids in and out of the car. It's not so bad now, but when they were both in five-point harnesses, it took foreeeeeeverrrrr. I would actually walk with them the half mile and back to the grocery store rather than drive. That's how much I hated it. It's also the main reason I use the drive-through, since it's almost always faster (without kids) to go in. And then the three year old sees something shiny and wanders off while I'm paying. There's also the cold weather. It's not so bad here, but where I grew up, it got very, very cold (and we weren't even in the coldest part of the US).
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Please pass the Calgon on September 24, 2013, 09:51:44 PM

Drive thru chemists could be good but you could end up spending a fair bit of time waiting while they filled your prescription if they were busy


I love the drive thru pharmacy...in my area the doctors' offices calls the pharmacy to order the Rx for the patient, I have it set up w/ my pharmacy that I get a text from when it's ready and I just swing by and pick it up. On the rare occasion I've had to drop it off, they do not fill it while I hold up the line. Usually it's "please come back in 20 minutes".
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on September 24, 2013, 10:00:21 PM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

I think this is a good example of just how uncommon cheques are in Australia these days.  In your scenario above, I would direct transfer the money to my sister.

DH works for a small company and direct deposit is not an option for them. He gets a check every week.

Even small company's here use direct deposit.  I think its easier for them to reconcile their accounts because the transactions are instant.  Much better for someone without a trained employed bookkeeper.

One of my least favorite things to do is get my kids in and out of the car. It's not so bad now, but when they were both in five-point harnesses, it took foreeeeeeverrrrr. I would actually walk with them the half mile and back to the grocery store rather than drive. That's how much I hated it. It's also the main reason I use the drive-through, since it's almost always faster (without kids) to go in. And then the three year old sees something shiny and wanders off while I'm paying. There's also the cold weather. It's not so bad here, but where I grew up, it got very, very cold (and we weren't even in the coldest part of the US).

Most Supermarkets in Australia are one of 2 corporations and both do home delivery now for $7.  I think every parent I know feels that they save the $7 in time and energy (and rewards/shut up tokens) by not having to drag their kids to the shops.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: JoW on September 24, 2013, 10:19:22 PM
I'm usually not fond of drive-throughs, but when I was on crutches they were a godsend.

I have never heard of a bombing at an ATM in the US.  Mugging are much more common.  I routinely use a drive-up ATM even when I'm not on crutches.

The only drive-through funeral home I've ever heard of was in Florida.   Many Americans retire to the warmer parts of the country.  That includes Florida, which has a huge number of retirees. Someone who uses a wheel chair or walker might not be able to pay last respects to a friend if they have to get out of the car to go in the funeral home. 

Europeans often don't realize how the US sprawls.  Sure, our cities have centers.  We call them "business districts."  But the great American need for room means most people don't live in or near the downtown business district.  Bus service is limited, commuter trains are almost nonexistent.  We drive everywere.  Being able to stop at the bank or pick up fast food on the way home has a lot of appeal to many people.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hmmmmm on September 24, 2013, 10:25:32 PM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

I think this is a good example of just how uncommon cheques are in Australia these days.  In your scenario above, I would direct transfer the money to my sister.

DH works for a small company and direct deposit is not an option for them. He gets a check every week.

Even small company's here use direct deposit.  I think its easier for them to reconcile their accounts because the transactions are instant.  Much better for someone without a trained employed bookkeeper.

One of my least favorite things to do is get my kids in and out of the car. It's not so bad now, but when they were both in five-point harnesses, it took foreeeeeeverrrrr. I would actually walk with them the half mile and back to the grocery store rather than drive. That's how much I hated it. It's also the main reason I use the drive-through, since it's almost always faster (without kids) to go in. And then the three year old sees something shiny and wanders off while I'm paying. There's also the cold weather. It's not so bad here, but where I grew up, it got very, very cold (and we weren't even in the coldest part of the US).

Most Supermarkets in Australia are one of 2 corporations and both do home delivery now for $7.  I think every parent I know feels that they save the $7 in time and energy (and rewards/shut up tokens) by not having to drag their kids to the shops.
There are 3 grocers in my area who deliver but I prefer to go to the store, browse what looks good and select my own fresh produce, meats and seafood.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Bluenomi on September 24, 2013, 10:28:07 PM

Drive thru chemists could be good but you could end up spending a fair bit of time waiting while they filled your prescription if they were busy


I love the drive thru pharmacy...in my area the doctors' offices calls the pharmacy to order the Rx for the patient, I have it set up w/ my pharmacy that I get a text from when it's ready and I just swing by and pick it up. On the rare occasion I've had to drop it off, they do not fill it while I hold up the line. Usually it's "please come back in 20 minutes".

Ahh that would make it easier. Here the doctor has no idea what pharmacy I use and since I use 3 or 4 depending on which shops I'm going to it would be tricky to sort.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Bluenomi on September 24, 2013, 10:32:02 PM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

I think this is a good example of just how uncommon cheques are in Australia these days.  In your scenario above, I would direct transfer the money to my sister.

DH works for a small company and direct deposit is not an option for them. He gets a check every week.

Even small company's here use direct deposit.  I think its easier for them to reconcile their accounts because the transactions are instant.  Much better for someone without a trained employed bookkeeper.

One of my least favorite things to do is get my kids in and out of the car. It's not so bad now, but when they were both in five-point harnesses, it took foreeeeeeverrrrr. I would actually walk with them the half mile and back to the grocery store rather than drive. That's how much I hated it. It's also the main reason I use the drive-through, since it's almost always faster (without kids) to go in. And then the three year old sees something shiny and wanders off while I'm paying. There's also the cold weather. It's not so bad here, but where I grew up, it got very, very cold (and we weren't even in the coldest part of the US).

Most Supermarkets in Australia are one of 2 corporations and both do home delivery now for $7.  I think every parent I know feels that they save the $7 in time and energy (and rewards/shut up tokens) by not having to drag their kids to the shops.
There are 3 grocers in my area who deliver but I prefer to go to the store, browse what looks good and select my own fresh produce, meats and seafood.

I use the home delivery but mostly just for canned/frozen/packet stuff. I still get my fruit, veg and meat from the markets but getting everything else delivered saves me so much time and being very pregnant with twins, the pain of walking around the supermarket. It's pretty hard to stuff up when they just need to grab something off a shelf!
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on September 25, 2013, 12:18:25 AM

Drive thru chemists could be good but you could end up spending a fair bit of time waiting while they filled your prescription if they were busy


I love the drive thru pharmacy...in my area the doctors' offices calls the pharmacy to order the Rx for the patient, I have it set up w/ my pharmacy that I get a text from when it's ready and I just swing by and pick it up. On the rare occasion I've had to drop it off, they do not fill it while I hold up the line. Usually it's "please come back in 20 minutes".

Ahh that would make it easier. Here the doctor has no idea what pharmacy I use and since I use 3 or 4 depending on which shops I'm going to it would be tricky to sort.

Why does your doctor need to know what pharmacy you use?

I can take my script anywhere to be filled, depending on what is most convenient for me at the time.  I dont need to decide in advance and tell the doctor who is writing the script.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: nuit93 on September 25, 2013, 12:27:16 AM

Drive thru chemists could be good but you could end up spending a fair bit of time waiting while they filled your prescription if they were busy


I love the drive thru pharmacy...in my area the doctors' offices calls the pharmacy to order the Rx for the patient, I have it set up w/ my pharmacy that I get a text from when it's ready and I just swing by and pick it up. On the rare occasion I've had to drop it off, they do not fill it while I hold up the line. Usually it's "please come back in 20 minutes".

Ahh that would make it easier. Here the doctor has no idea what pharmacy I use and since I use 3 or 4 depending on which shops I'm going to it would be tricky to sort.

Why does your doctor need to know what pharmacy you use?

I can take my script anywhere to be filled, depending on what is most convenient for me at the time.  I dont need to decide in advance and tell the doctor who is writing the script.

It's recommended that patients fill all their prescriptions at the same pharmacy (or at least the same chain) so that a pharmacist can catch a potential contraindication.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 25, 2013, 12:32:31 AM
I was going to say the same thing.  My doctor gives me the option of either having them send it electronically or giving it to me as a written prescription.  I don't think my doctors care about where it's filled. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Bluenomi on September 25, 2013, 12:41:12 AM

Drive thru chemists could be good but you could end up spending a fair bit of time waiting while they filled your prescription if they were busy


I love the drive thru pharmacy...in my area the doctors' offices calls the pharmacy to order the Rx for the patient, I have it set up w/ my pharmacy that I get a text from when it's ready and I just swing by and pick it up. On the rare occasion I've had to drop it off, they do not fill it while I hold up the line. Usually it's "please come back in 20 minutes".

Ahh that would make it easier. Here the doctor has no idea what pharmacy I use and since I use 3 or 4 depending on which shops I'm going to it would be tricky to sort.

Why does your doctor need to know what pharmacy you use?

I can take my script anywhere to be filled, depending on what is most convenient for me at the time.  I dont need to decide in advance and tell the doctor who is writing the script.

Well Please pass the Calgon said her doctor sends her script to the pharmacy so in order to do that, they need to know where to send it. I was just saying that I use a few so that wouldn't really work for me.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on September 25, 2013, 01:29:56 AM

Drive thru chemists could be good but you could end up spending a fair bit of time waiting while they filled your prescription if they were busy


I love the drive thru pharmacy...in my area the doctors' offices calls the pharmacy to order the Rx for the patient, I have it set up w/ my pharmacy that I get a text from when it's ready and I just swing by and pick it up. On the rare occasion I've had to drop it off, they do not fill it while I hold up the line. Usually it's "please come back in 20 minutes".

Ahh that would make it easier. Here the doctor has no idea what pharmacy I use and since I use 3 or 4 depending on which shops I'm going to it would be tricky to sort.

Why does your doctor need to know what pharmacy you use?

I can take my script anywhere to be filled, depending on what is most convenient for me at the time.  I dont need to decide in advance and tell the doctor who is writing the script.

Well Please pass the Calgon said her doctor sends her script to the pharmacy so in order to do that, they need to know where to send it. I was just saying that I use a few so that wouldn't really work for me.

It wasn't an interrogation of you per se, just that the comment seemed to accept that your doctor might ever need to know.  Scripts aren't sent to pharmacy's electronically, as far as I'm aware.  I always get a written script.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 25, 2013, 02:51:20 AM
Here in the UK the doctor prints out the prescription on special prescription paper and gives it to you. It looks like this:

(http://www.ashcroftsurgery.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/prescription.jpg)

Prescriptions must have a doctor's 'stamp' on them containing the surgery's name and address to prove they're genuine. This used to be an actual rubber stamp, but now is computerised, mostly. It also had to be signed by the GP, although I'm not sure if that's still a rule with the electronic-ness of the stamp now. The doctor then gives you the prescription and you take it to whatever chemist you like - there are usually a few independents plus chains like Boots or Superdrug on every high street, a lot of big supermarkets have a pharmacy dept, many small local shopping areas on housing estates and the like have an independent, and there'll usually be one close to the GP's surgery - and wait while it's prepared. It doesn't usually take any more than 10 minutes even if there are a few people in front of you.

Prescription charges are 7-something per item in England but free in other parts of the UK. People on certain benefits don't have to pay for their prescriptons and must tick the clause that applies to them on the back of the prescription and sign it before handing it to the chemist. People with certain chronic conditions like epilepsy also don't have to pay, and have what's called an 'exemption certificate'. So, there's no checking of insurance details on the computer when you take it in because you either tick or pay. Even if you do have medical insurance and see a private doctor, I think they'd still give you the same prescription and you'd take it to the chemist and pay the prescription charge, but don't quote me on that because I don't have it.

Many chemists operate a delivery service for people who are elderly or mobility impaired and can't get out to pick up their prescriptions. In that case, the GP's surgery will send all the prescriptions that need to be delivered to the chemist (usually the one closest to the GP's surgery who deals with them all) and there will be a delivery round sometime usually late afternoon. It's a really good service and doesn't cost anything to the patient. My elderly father uses that service all the time and I've used it on occasions when my mobility has been too bad to get out.

On my last GP's appt, the doctor told me that they've just started sending prescriptions electronically; you have to have a 'nominated' chemist on your medical records and then it'll automatically go there and you can pick it up. I prefer to have it in my hand though.

In the picture, that's a 'repeat prescription', for meds that you have to take all the time. The white piece on the right is the repeat slip, and you retain that when you give the script to the chemist. When you're about to run out you tick what you need, drop it into your surgery and they'll do you a prescription to pick up. You usually have to give 2 days notice, ie, drop the repeat slip back and your script will be ready to collect a couple of days later.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: veryfluffy on September 25, 2013, 03:57:14 AM
Here in the UK the doctor prints out the prescription on special prescription paper and gives it to you. ...

On my last GP's appt, the doctor told me that they've just started sending prescriptions electronically; you have to have a 'nominated' chemist on your medical records and then it'll automatically go there and you can pick it up. I prefer to have it in my hand though.

I live in a village with one doctors' surgery and one chemist. I could probably get a printed prescription and take it to whatever chemist I wanted, but generally it is just sent electronically to the shop and I pick it up the next day. For my repeat prescriptions, I just have to telephone the surgery and then go to collect it.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 25, 2013, 04:18:12 AM
Here in the UK the doctor prints out the prescription on special prescription paper and gives it to you. ...

On my last GP's appt, the doctor told me that they've just started sending prescriptions electronically; you have to have a 'nominated' chemist on your medical records and then it'll automatically go there and you can pick it up. I prefer to have it in my hand though.

I live in a village with one doctors' surgery and one chemist. I could probably get a printed prescription and take it to whatever chemist I wanted, but generally it is just sent electronically to the shop and I pick it up the next day. For my repeat prescriptions, I just have to telephone the surgery and then go to collect it.

Yeah, see that makes perfect sense in the place you live in for them to do that. I live in a big city, so there's any number of places I can take it.

My surgery doesn't do repeats over the phone. They'll do it in an emergency, but not as a matter of course. I'm not sure why - perhaps because it's a large inner city practice with bazillions of patients and they have to stick to a 'system'.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: 123sandy on September 25, 2013, 05:03:09 AM
Many years ago, when we lived in America, we used to pass a drive-thru, topless liquor store. I wish we had had the guts to go through and see what it was like...
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Thipu1 on September 25, 2013, 10:00:44 AM
Besides fast food places and banks, I've never seen a drive-thru.

  A few years ago, there was a proposal for a drive-thru bank branch in our city neighborhood. This was generally considered a bone-headed idea because of the space involved and the traffic problems. 

Where we live, driving is frequently more trouble than it's worth. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Goosey on September 25, 2013, 10:11:52 AM
I get my medications delivered AND even preorder my groceries and have them taken directly to my car - is that lazier than drive through?  ;D

There are several reasons I do this:

(1) I'm not a social person and drive throughs/deliveries limit my social interactions (seriously, a work day is about all I can handle lol)
(2) It keeps me from superfluous shopping
(3) It makes sure I don't forget anything (to call in a refill/buy something on my list, etc)
(4) Limits the time I need to be running errands and away from home
(5) I often have my dogs in the car with me and I don't like leaving them alone in there
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on September 25, 2013, 10:12:20 AM
I love my drive thru pharmacy.  My meds are all maintenance and set up on automatic refill, so I get an email telling me they're ready.  I just drive down, 2 minutes in the drive thru, and I'm off.  My doctor is part of a large medical group which includes all kinds of specialties, and they're all electronically linked to the pharmacy, so if there's a new prescription it's sent to the pharmacy while I'm in the office and ready for me to pick up by the time I get there.

I also work from home and suffer from mild to moderate depression.  Most days I look like hammered hell, and it's sometimes a struggle just to get in my car and drive the 5 miles or so to the pharmacy.  If I had to worry about looking like a human being on top of it, I'd never get there.  This way, as long as the relevant bits are covered, it doesn't matter if they're covered by ratty sweatpants and my husband's old flannel shirt.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: cwm on September 25, 2013, 11:48:17 AM
Here's my take on the pharmacy thing, from the midwest US. Doctors can and will give me a written physical prescription and I can take it to any pharmacy I durn well please. Frequently they ask me if there's any particular pharmacy that I prefer, as they can send the prescription electronically. I usually choose this, as often when they send the request ahead of time, my medicine is waiting for me by the time I get to the pharmacy. It's the option I choose, but I could also choose to switch to any other pharmacy at any time.

I do the drive-through because the pharmacy itself is located in the very back of the store. The best time for me to go get my medicine is also the best time for a lot of other people to go out shopping. When I was at a pharmacy without a drive-through I had to wait behind people who wanted to ask the pharmacy techs questions on every single thing, who wanted to discuss payment options, who wanted to argue about the prescription from their doctor. These people effectively blocked everyone else who wanted/needed anything.

Now that I go to a drive-thru pharmacy, I know my medicines are ready (I get text alerts from them, and can refill everything electronically as well) and go to the window. They have someone working specifically drive-through and someone working specifically the counter, so I don't have to wait for someone who wants to stand at the counter waiting for their medicine (sometimes takes 20-30 minutes to fill, if they don't step aside the tech can't check anyone else out). I also have my medicine completely covered by my insurance, so all I have to do is show up, verify my address on file, they give me medicines. No payment, nothing. It's simple.

As far as anything else goes, it's sometimes a matter of time, sometimes of convenience. If I've got to go to the bank to deposit one check (birthday money, rebate check, etc.) and the drive through lane is nearly empty while the parking lot is nearly full, I'm going to assume it's faster to do drive-through. Also, personally, when the weather is well into the 90s-100s or well below freezing (both of which we get with annual frequency) I'd prefer to stay in my car. It takes a while for my car to warm up/cool down, and even just a few minutes in a building tends to do a good job at getting the temperature on par with the outside temperature.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Kaypeep on September 25, 2013, 01:51:58 PM
On Long Island in New York there is a drive thru convenience store, I think it's called "Dairy Barn".  You can pick up milk, eggs, bread and other basic grocery items, plus coffee and beer I think.  I believe the premise is that it's all about convenience as some of the PP's have mentioned (not having to get kids out of the car, late at night safety, etc.)  I believe it's also safer and more economical for the shop owner.  They are less likely to be robbed in the middle of the night by an intruder, they don't have to have extra staff to maintain the shelves and do cleanup/stocking, etc.    Plus they are usually located in small parcel lots that don't have big parking lots, so the land and rent is ostensibly cheaper.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on September 25, 2013, 02:12:40 PM
Just thought of one...who remembers the old photo processing booths (the Kodak Fotomat)?  They were tiny drive up booths in the parking lot of major shopping malls or department stores where you could drop off your film and pick it up later.  Not many casual photographers use film any more,  but I remember spending a lot of time with my mom getting our film developed.

There's also a lot of small coffee shop drive thrus around.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Library Dragon on September 25, 2013, 02:15:55 PM
Just thought of one...who remembers the old photo processing booths (the Kodak Fotomat)?  They were tiny drive up booths in the parking lot of major shopping malls or department stores where you could drop off your film and pick it up later.  Not many casual photographers use film any more,  but I remember spending a lot of time with my mom getting our film developed.

There's also a lot of small coffee shop drive thrus around.

I forgot about the photo booths.  They were about the size of a largish closet, but were EVERYWHERE that I lived in the US. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Betelnut on September 25, 2013, 02:58:19 PM
Just thought of one...who remembers the old photo processing booths (the Kodak Fotomat)?  They were tiny drive up booths in the parking lot of major shopping malls or department stores where you could drop off your film and pick it up later.  Not many casual photographers use film any more,  but I remember spending a lot of time with my mom getting our film developed.

There's also a lot of small coffee shop drive thrus around.

I actually worked in one of those in the 1980s for probably about a year to a year and a half.  I was called a "Fotomate". ::)

It was an interesting job because it was a lot of responsilbity really--customer service, inventory, opening and closing out a cash register, etc.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: #borecore on September 25, 2013, 03:47:43 PM
Just thought of one...who remembers the old photo processing booths (the Kodak Fotomat)?  They were tiny drive up booths in the parking lot of major shopping malls or department stores where you could drop off your film and pick it up later.  Not many casual photographers use film any more,  but I remember spending a lot of time with my mom getting our film developed.

There's also a lot of small coffee shop drive thrus around.

I actually worked in one of those in the 1980s for probably about a year to a year and a half.  I was called a "Fotomate". ::)

It was an interesting job because it was a lot of responsilbity really--customer service, inventory, opening and closing out a cash register, etc.

We had those, but I haven't seen one in a while. The last one I knew of became a "drive through postal center" when just doing film became too much. I just walked in, though.
I believe they closed sometime in the last five years.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: ladyknight1 on September 25, 2013, 04:25:47 PM
We have drive through ice cream stores.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: BigBadBetty on September 25, 2013, 05:28:34 PM
I didn't see anyone else mention this, but I live where is gets very cold. I like the drive-thru pharmacy so I don't have to get out of my warm car into the freezing weather and then into a warm store. It's a lot of bundling and unbundling. I pretty much never have to go to the credit union (like a bank). I do everything electronically. However, my dog loves car rides. The credit union has dog treats in the drive thru. Once in a while, I will take my dog with me to the credit union.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: that_one_girl on September 25, 2013, 05:45:27 PM
PODding what BigBadBetty said!
I am in favor of anything that keeps me from having to leave groceries in the car where my dog can get into them or getting out of the car in the snow and ice and possibly hurting myself!
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: kherbert05 on September 25, 2013, 06:54:48 PM
Ok, first post did sound a bit antagonistic but that may be because as I said, drive thrus aren't as prevalent here. Antagonism wasn't my intention. And thank you perpetua of seeing my point.

Though I think we used have drive thru bottle-o (liquour store).

I do like the idea of pharmacies being drive thru.

We've still got the odd drive through bottle shop in my part of Oz but they are becoming rarer, I think it's the whole drink driving issue coming into play.

Drive thru chemists could be good but you could end up spending a fair bit of time waiting while they filled your prescription if they were busy

I've only ever seen drive through at the big fast food chains, usually the US ones, the only non US based chain to have one that I've seen is Red Rooster
Drive thru pharmacies - I haven't taken a prescription to a pharmacy in years. The doctor's office submits it to my pharmacy on line/by phone and it is ready when I get there. I often need OTC meds also so I don't use the drive thru. The only time my prescription hasn't been ready when I got there it was because the docs at the walk in clinic (allergic reaction needed stronger meds on a Sunday) did NOT listen and prescribed something I can't take (In a family of drugs but was new to me). They had to get my permission to call the doc back.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: dawnfire on September 25, 2013, 09:32:07 PM
The discussion of the word "lazy" will now come to an end.  I'd like to remind everyone that the purpose of this folder is to bridge differences, and not to take such quick offense.  Cross-cultural communication requires patience and flexibility.  If you aren't willing to be patient and flexible, go away.

...and I'll take this opportunity to mention the drive-through liquor stores I saw in Oz.  >:D

As a side note, our drive through liquor stores still require you to get out of the car.  I'm not quite sure what the point is except as a slightly quicker transaction and less choice.

I think it less distance to lug heavy items like cases of beer.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: WillyNilly on September 26, 2013, 11:37:57 AM
On Long Island in New York there is a drive thru convenience store, I think it's called "Dairy Barn".  You can pick up milk, eggs, bread and other basic grocery items, plus coffee and beer I think.  I believe the premise is that it's all about convenience as some of the PP's have mentioned (not having to get kids out of the car, late at night safety, etc.)  I believe it's also safer and more economical for the shop owner.  They are less likely to be robbed in the middle of the night by an intruder, they don't have to have extra staff to maintain the shelves and do cleanup/stocking, etc.    Plus they are usually located in small parcel lots that don't have big parking lots, so the land and rent is ostensibly cheaper.

I used to live near a Dairy barn and it was great for lazy weekend mornings: I could go straight to my car in my PJs, drive to DB for bacon, eggs, and a newspaper and go straight home. I didn't have to worry about being dressed because I was never leaving my car, and the whole thing was very quick and easy.

But the small lots I think are a big thing. Most fast food, banks, and all sorts of other businesses in NYC and even in neighboring Nassau (Long Island) don't have big parking lots, or any parking lot at all. By having a drive-thru they are able to court customers in cars that would otherwise not realistically be able to get to the business at all because they would have no where to park.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 26, 2013, 12:21:21 PM
But the small lots I think are a big thing. Most fast food, banks, and all sorts of other businesses in NYC and even in neighboring Nassau (Long Island) don't have big parking lots, or any parking lot at all. By having a drive-thru they are able to court customers in cars that would otherwise not realistically be able to get to the business at all because they would have no where to park.

Are there no businesses situated in town centres that people can walk to? This is what confuses me, why someone has to drive to and park at the bank. Here, we'd either drive into town and park in the car park, or get the bus into town, and 'town' is somewhere you can walk around and take care of all your business and shopping.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: cwm on September 26, 2013, 12:35:00 PM
But the small lots I think are a big thing. Most fast food, banks, and all sorts of other businesses in NYC and even in neighboring Nassau (Long Island) don't have big parking lots, or any parking lot at all. By having a drive-thru they are able to court customers in cars that would otherwise not realistically be able to get to the business at all because they would have no where to park.

Are there no businesses situated in town centres that people can walk to? This is what confuses me, why someone has to drive to and park at the bank. Here, we'd either drive into town and park in the car park, or get the bus into town, and 'town' is somewhere you can walk around and take care of all your business and shopping.

Ah, the joys of suburban sprawl. Where I live grew up, up the street there was a grocery store, pharmacy, one bank, a few fast food places, and a few hole in the wall stores, as well as a couple of liquor stores and a gas station.

Up another street and around a corner, about just as far away, had an actual strip mall with a few chain stores, a grocery store, a few boutiques, a pharmacy, a gas station, and one bank.

Go in a third direction from my home and at about half the distance was a grocery store, a few restaurants, a few more boutique shops, an eyeglasses shop, a tailor, a gas station, and two banks.

Each of these places is about a mile in any direction from my home. But if you didn't belong to any of those three banks, you'd have to go further to get to your bank. And the grocery stores varied wildly as quality of produce/meat and price. Plus where and when I grew up, there was no public transportation. Now there are a very few limited stops along the street where the first shopping center is, but it's nearly prohibitively expensive to ride it, it doesn't take you where you need to go, and if you need to go into the next state over (I live in a city that straddles two states), you'll have to get off of our buses and wait on one of theirs. And there's one county in my state that just doesn't connect well with anything else. I've never seen public transit there. I don't know if they have any.

The nearest hospital growing up was about two and a half miles away, but we were lucky to have a dentist within a block that I could walk to when I was old enough. Optometrists that were covered on our insurance were quite a drive away, I'm fairly certain it took us 10-15 minutes driving to get there. Same for orthodontists. And the doctor's office was at the hospital (large medical building, several practices attached to a massive hospital), but if I had to see a specialist, I had to go to another hospital more than seven miles away.

And outside the major city centers, suburban sprawl is pretty normal in the US. People rely on their cars to get them places because there's no infrastructure for public transit and nothing is close enough to get to by walking. That's the trade off for large yards and single family homes.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on September 26, 2013, 12:56:11 PM
In places I've lived, there's not a central 'car park' with multiple businesses located around it.  The closest thing might be a shopping center or mall - but even then, you're not likely to find all of your needs (bank, pharmacy, grocery) located there - it's more clothes, department stores, maybe a few specialty stores.  Some places are building pedestrian malls, which do have a central parking area and many stores within walking distance, but they tend to have the same assortment of stores.  Your daily life destinations will more likely be located in separate buildings and have their own parking lots.  I'm lucky; my bank has an ATM in the grocery store I frequent, so I can deposit my husband's check there when I go shopping, and there's a KMart (discount department store) nearby, but it's still 6-7 miles to the grocery store, another mile down the road to KMart, and another 2 miles to the pharmacy.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: camlan on September 26, 2013, 01:29:13 PM


Are there no businesses situated in town centres that people can walk to? This is what confuses me, why someone has to drive to and park at the bank. Here, we'd either drive into town and park in the car park, or get the bus into town, and 'town' is somewhere you can walk around and take care of all your business and shopping.

This really depends on where you live in the US.

When I lived in Boston, a car was more a liability than anything else. I walked or took public transportation everywhere. There was a supermarket on the way home from work, so I could stop in whenever I needed to buy food. My apartment was a 10-15 minute walk from several major shopping areas.

Currently, I live in a small city in New Hampshire. It's an older city, so there is a town center. Within a mile walk is the Post Office, library, City Hall, several churches, the best pizza place in town, a drug store, a dry cleaners, a sub shop, a Chinese restaurant, an awesome bakery and three banks.

What's not within walking distance is a large supermarket or any store along the lines of Target, Home Depot, Walmart--any chain store, really. The downtown shopping district has a lovely yarn shop, a couple of jewelry stores, a yoga place, a music store, a few card shops--but no real stores for the things you need day to day. It does have a central parking lot and on-street parking. But for the necessities, I pretty much have to take the car and drive to an area with several shopping plazas. (Even 50 years ago, there would have been a greater diversity of stores in the town center. But as chains took over, they moved to the outskirts of town where there is better space for huge parking lots.)

When you look at newer towns or suburbs, the situation is even more bleak. Acres of nothing but houses, with a good chance of no sidewalks. The stores are in strip malls, isolated in one area. And as Hillia points out, you still need to drive from one strip mall to another to get all your errands done.

And then there are the rural areas. Even here in New Hampshire, there are towns with no supermarket. Nothing but one or two convenience stores connected to a gas station. People who live in those towns pretty much have to drive to buy anything. And the further west you go, the longer the distances that people have to drive to find a shopping center of any kind.

It's a completely different model of city/town planning.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 26, 2013, 01:53:54 PM
There's actually a drive-through sex toy store here, although it's kind of a gimmick (located in an old bank building).  Pull up, ring the doorbell (literally a regular plastic doorbell) and someone will come ask what you want and will hold up whatever choices they have in the window so you can see them and make a selection.  This all despite the fact that it's technically illegal to sell "three-dimensional devices" here (read: anything except girlie magazines) except in specific situations.  It's convenient for when you know exactly what you want and you're in a hurry, but not so great for browsing  :P  (Disclosure: I've only done the drive-through once, partly for the novelty and partly because I had an infant Babybartfast in the car.  You can't come inside an "adult" store in the US unless you're 18, no exceptions, apparently including babies.)
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Library Dragon on September 26, 2013, 01:59:25 PM
There's actually a drive-through sex toy store here, although it's kind of a gimmick (located in an old bank building).  Pull up, ring the doorbell (literally a regular plastic doorbell) and someone will come ask what you want and will hold up whatever choices they have in the window so you can see them and make a selection.  This all despite the fact that it's technically illegal to sell "three-dimensional devices" here (read: anything except girlie magazines) except in specific situations.  It's convenient for when you know exactly what you want and you're in a hurry, but not so great for browsing  :P  (Disclosure: I've only done the drive-through once, partly for the novelty and partly because I had an infant Babybartfast in the car.  You can't come inside an "adult" store in the US unless you're 18, no exceptions, apparently including babies.)

Neighbor!  I had forgotten about this place.  Yes, here in Dixie you have to have a Dr.'s prescription for "marital aides". 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Harriet Jones on September 26, 2013, 02:27:37 PM


Are there no businesses situated in town centres that people can walk to? This is what confuses me, why someone has to drive to and park at the bank. Here, we'd either drive into town and park in the car park, or get the bus into town, and 'town' is somewhere you can walk around and take care of all your business and shopping.

This really depends on where you live in the US.

 

Definitely.  I live in a semi-rural suburb. The closest retail establishment (convenience store) is about 3 miles away.   The closest "real" grocery store is 5 miles away.  While there are closer banks, the closest branch of the one I use is 15 miles away.   We do have a town nearby similar to what perpetua describes, however, most of the businesses there aren't really the kind most people need on a daily basis, like a model train store.

The local library has a drive-thru - you can put books on hold and pick them up at the window, although I prefer to go in and browse when I'm picking up.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: WillyNilly on September 26, 2013, 03:11:03 PM


Are there no businesses situated in town centres that people can walk to? This is what confuses me, why someone has to drive to and park at the bank. Here, we'd either drive into town and park in the car park, or get the bus into town, and 'town' is somewhere you can walk around and take care of all your business and shopping.

This really depends on where you live in the US...

In Nassau County NY sure there are concentrations of stores, and some have huge parking lots (and some only miniscule lots). But its not unusual for there to be no way to get, on foot, from one set of stores to another. The road might well be 6 lanes wide (Old Country rd, 106/107, etc) with sparse traffic lights and no crosswalks. There might be no footpath from the parking lot to the sidewalk (only from the parking lot to its specific store or group of stores). Etc.

Within NYC, parking is at a major premium and quite expensive and often had to come by. Usually being in a car means you are on the go, although you might still want to run some errands while out and about.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Library Dragon on September 26, 2013, 03:30:03 PM
Good point (and Old Country Rd. jangles my nerves driving, I cannot imagine trying to cross by foot). 

Where I live a restaurant may appear to be an easy walk over to the store in the next lot.  There are actually two 4 feet deep ditches and a street separating the two businesses.  No sidewalks or other easy/safe means to walk.  It's very frustrating. 

One area in Arizona that I lived the ditches were 8 feet deep. 

While I would like to easily walk from one to another it gets very dangerous. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: camlan on September 26, 2013, 03:32:04 PM
Not exactly a drive-through, but do other countries have drive-in movie theaters?
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Library Dragon on September 26, 2013, 03:33:14 PM
We do in my city.   8) 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 26, 2013, 05:00:43 PM
Not exactly a drive-through, but do other countries have drive-in movie theaters?

they are slowly coming back in fashion.  A lot of them went out of business 15 or so years ago
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: pharmagal on September 26, 2013, 06:26:09 PM
Where I live, we have the usual McD's, KFC drive throughs.  Also the national'state chains like Red Rooster and the like.   And of course the drive through bottle shop. (Supermarkets here don't sell beer or wine)   But the best drive through has got to be Muzz Buzz.  Best coffee evah!!

I don't know of any pharmacies in the Western Australian area that have drive through, or any banks.  That's not say they don't exist here, just that I've never seen them.

When I lived in NZ, I only knew of one drive through pharmacy in the 4 different provinces I lived in, and that was the one that one of the owners of the pharmacy I worked in, owned in another town.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: ladiedeathe on September 26, 2013, 09:55:24 PM
I live in Wisconsin, USA. In the winter here a temp of -10 degrees F (-23 C) would not be unusual. Our deepest recorded depth of snow during ONE storm was 83 inches which fell over 8 hours.

My bank is 18 miles away. The chemist is 1.7 miles away, and the grocery store 1 mile. Can you imagine not driving in the winter? Can you imagine getting out of the car in the winter to walk if you didn't have to? In 1996 temperatures hit -55 degrees F (-48 C), with a windchill making it -75 F.

Drive thrus aren't lazy- they make winter living possible.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: hyzenthlay on September 26, 2013, 10:21:51 PM
Are there no businesses situated in town centres that people can walk to? This is what confuses me, why someone has to drive to and park at the bank. Here, we'd either drive into town and park in the car park, or get the bus into town, and 'town' is somewhere you can walk around and take care of all your business and shopping.

I live in the Southwest US. It is 2.5 miles to the nearest convenience store, 5 miles to a grocery store, 5 miles to a branch of my bank (which is still about a half mile away from said grocery store and is separated by a 6 lane surface road) and 20 miles to my work.

As there is a river running right through town public transportation to many places would be at least a 1 hour ordeal using 3 buses. We don't have enough bridges.

I use the drive through at my bank because their parking spaces are narrow and scary, and at fast food because if I'm getting junk food it's after my workout and I'm too gross to be seen in public  ;D  And when my kids were little and ill it was a relief to be able to drive up to get their prescription.

I don't use drive through's out of laziness, sometimes they are just the convenient option for a people that are mostly car drivers.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Sophia on September 26, 2013, 10:28:50 PM
I am surprised no one has mentioned drive-thru dry cleaners.  Maybe because it is an errand I hate, I love a drive-thru dry cleaner. 

I am also surprised no one has mentioned ... I forget the name.  Restaurants where you sit in the car and they bring the food to you.  Popular in the 50's, but still around as the Sonic or A&W chains. 

We are just more car-centric here.  Where I live in Texas, walking any distance is weird enough to attract police attention if you aren't wearing work-out clothes or with small children or dog(s).  I know of two people who were charged with public intoxication while they were quietly walking home after drinking. 

I ALWAYS use the drive-thru at the pharmacy.  A cousin is a pharmacist working for large pharmacy chain.  Even if they have the script ready they are instructed to say "It will be ready in 10-15 minutes".  That isn't enough time to annoy the customer, but enough time for them to buy lots of stuff they didn't know they needed.  In the drive-thru, they just give it to you.  If I am getting something, it is because I or a loved one is miserable. 

Although, I get a bit grumpy about the existence of drive-thru coffee shop.  I don't know why.  I also don't like to use them at fast food places.  Maybe because I always seem to request stuff left off.  The error rate is much less inside than the drive-thru.  Although, if I am alone and listening to an audio book I will sometimes use the drive-thru and eat in the parking lot.  That way I only have to pause the story twice. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: jaxsue on September 26, 2013, 11:07:50 PM
From my UK viewpoint, drive thru establishments that aren't fast food are definitely... odd, and like it or not, on the surface they do conjure up an image of "what, people can't be bothered to get out of the car?" whereas I'm sure if you dig deeper there are logistical reasons for it.

However, in thinking about it, American towns don't seem to be set up the same way ours are (I'm not even sure what the average town or city centre is like there - I have images of everywhere having strip malls and no town centre to speak of). We have banks on every high street and shopping centre so it's easy to pop in while you're in town. There aren't the same amount of local banks that you guys have - they're pretty much all high street chains. The banking system also seems quite different - we tend to have our wages deposited automatically and pay everything by direct debit, while the US banking system seems to lag behind in that respect with some people still having to deposit a paycheque and write cheques to pay their bills. So, I can see there's more need to 'go to the bank', whereas here, well - I can't remember the last time I even had to set foot in one. Everything's done automatically and I keep an eye on it with my online banking.

I can see the value of a drive through pharmacy - I hadn't thought about the sick kids, but that's a really good point.

The only drive throughs I've ever seen here are McD's, BK and KFC.

Allow me to address the bolded parts. First of all, the USA is really big, especially compared to most European countries. There is a lot of variety in towns. Some are all strip malls, others villages with a town center. There is not "one" type of US town. Take my town, for instance. Founded in the mid-1600s, it is quite old for an American town. It has a very traditional town center, with stores that require that you park on the street and walk. In fact, most towns I've lived in have town centers, "downtowns" in our lingo.

Secondly, the banks: many of us do have direct deposit. It's quite normal, in fact. Not sure who you know here in the states, but if they're getting a paper check, that is actually becoming more and more rare. I do all of my banking online, and I'm not unusual. So, the person who is telling you this stuff is not in the majority.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: jaxsue on September 26, 2013, 11:13:09 PM
In Australia, we have drive thrus but it's just for places like McDonald's or KFC. But from what I have heard, drive thrus are a bit if a thing over in the US, even for banks and wedding chapel ps.

Honestly, I find this not only odd but rather lazy. Is it too much trouble to get out if the car?

I do admit, the donut-shaped drive thru one if my friends told me about when she visited LA sounded fun.

I find your assessment to be judgmental, but I'll bite anyway.

Yes, we have drive-ins, but they're not on every corner and in some places like city centers, are very rare. I live in a mid-sized NJ town. I have to walk into my bank and pharmacy. I don't mind. In fact, I always walk to the pharmacy - it's only a 1/2 mile away.

Drive-throughs are more common here, yes, but if you have a vehicle full of kids or you are sick, a drive-through pharmacy is a god send. I don't use them because I'm trying to lose a few pounds; hence, I walk as much as I can. But I don't judge someone else for using the drive-through.

Edited to remove word that admin requested not be used.

 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: jaxsue on September 26, 2013, 11:18:25 PM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: jaxsue on September 26, 2013, 11:21:17 PM
On Long Island in New York there is a drive thru convenience store, I think it's called "Dairy Barn".  You can pick up milk, eggs, bread and other basic grocery items, plus coffee and beer I think.  I believe the premise is that it's all about convenience as some of the PP's have mentioned (not having to get kids out of the car, late at night safety, etc.)  I believe it's also safer and more economical for the shop owner.  They are less likely to be robbed in the middle of the night by an intruder, they don't have to have extra staff to maintain the shelves and do cleanup/stocking, etc.    Plus they are usually located in small parcel lots that don't have big parking lots, so the land and rent is ostensibly cheaper.

I go to LI quite often (friends there). I've seen those Dairy Barns.  :)
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: jaxsue on September 26, 2013, 11:25:36 PM
But the small lots I think are a big thing. Most fast food, banks, and all sorts of other businesses in NYC and even in neighboring Nassau (Long Island) don't have big parking lots, or any parking lot at all. By having a drive-thru they are able to court customers in cars that would otherwise not realistically be able to get to the business at all because they would have no where to park.

Are there no businesses situated in town centres that people can walk to? This is what confuses me, why someone has to drive to and park at the bank. Here, we'd either drive into town and park in the car park, or get the bus into town, and 'town' is somewhere you can walk around and take care of all your business and shopping.

Per the bolded: Yes, there are lots of towns with downtowns (town centers). Not every place here is spread out with mini-malls. I find more of the sprawl in the more recently-developed areas. Where I live, in NJ, you have towns that have been here for 300+ yrs, so we have downtowns with everything you need. I can easily walk downtown and take care of all my needs. That is one reason I chose this town to live in. I wanted that. I didn't want to have to jump in my car for everything.
Add to that, we have a great public transit system - buses and trains - if you don't have a car.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Goosey on September 27, 2013, 07:26:25 AM
But the small lots I think are a big thing. Most fast food, banks, and all sorts of other businesses in NYC and even in neighboring Nassau (Long Island) don't have big parking lots, or any parking lot at all. By having a drive-thru they are able to court customers in cars that would otherwise not realistically be able to get to the business at all because they would have no where to park.

Are there no businesses situated in town centres that people can walk to? This is what confuses me, why someone has to drive to and park at the bank. Here, we'd either drive into town and park in the car park, or get the bus into town, and 'town' is somewhere you can walk around and take care of all your business and shopping.

I am about a 15 minute drive from my nearest grocery. My bank is a 10 min drive in another direction. The "town center" is a half an hour drive away in yet ANOTHER direction and only has clothes shopping, restaurants and things like that.

I would love to be able to walk everywhere. I really would. But, practically - I could spend all day walking to my bank and back or I could drive there, be done within and hour and get back home to get the housework done. Or, I could drive to the bank and then drive to the hardware store, grocery, etc to get the rest of my errands done.

And I'm not saying all of the US is like this, but in my experience, it's rare in the US for public transportation to be reliable or even available. It's not (always) laziness that persuades Americans to drive everywhere and use drive throughs. Often, there is no choice but to drive everywhere. And others have pointed out some really good reasons why they use drive throughs (kids, pets, time, etc).

I guess what I'm saying is to be really really careful when buying into the media hype about how "lazy" Americans are.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Jones on September 27, 2013, 07:50:32 AM
My downtown center is as follows:
Two overpriced, low-quality steak-and-potato restaurants
Two specialized bookstores (both have a certain selection and if it isn't there, you should go to Amazon because it'll get here faster)
One game and hobby store
One coffee shop
One bar
Sears
children's clothing boutique
Curves
Smoke shop
Two tattoo parlors
Furniture store
Two banks (one with drive through, one without)
Adult movie theater

If you want groceries, gas, to pay your bills, pharmaceuticals, insurance, or virtually anything else you don't go to the "downtown" area. The town stretches out with Lowes and Walmart 2.5 miles to the west of center, and restaurants and feed stores 2.5 miles to the east of center, everything in between. My home is almost exactly 1 mile from center. The closest grocery to my home is 2 miles, but I'm lucky to have a gas station/convenience store a little less than a mile away (different direction from center)

Most businesses are located along the big highway, though a few are nestled in back roads. Not even the highway has a solid sidewalk, it disappears and reappears a few blocks later. Our public transport system (1 year old) consists of a couple tiny busses that run M-F, 7 AM to 6 PM and only go to certain strip malls, shopping centers, the library and one hospital. If I had to do my errands and shopping while depending on the current system, I'd probably walk and use a little red wagon rather than try to plan around the bus schedule and bags of groceries, followed by a 1 mile walk home from the closest bus stop anyway.

PS Our drive throughs are primarily fast food, there is also a pizza place where you call it in then come get it; there is one new pharmacy that has a drive through. And a couple of the banks. Our liquor store doesn't have a drive through.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Winterlight on September 27, 2013, 08:52:40 AM
Where I grew up public transportation was minimal at best. The closest a bus line came to my home was 3 miles away, and that route vanished in the early eighties. Living without a car simply wasn't an option. Especially in winter, when it's regularly -40F.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: marcel on September 27, 2013, 10:11:14 AM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on September 27, 2013, 10:21:13 AM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Yvaine on September 27, 2013, 10:31:20 AM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

Yeah, here we don't do bank transfers for personal transactions like giving $20 to your friend. One might write a check or just give them cash, or if you and they are both internet savvy you might paypal it to them. How does the bank transfer thing work? Do you have their account number and have to fill out a form with their bank and so on? Not snarking, just unfamiliar with the process.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: cwm on September 27, 2013, 10:46:42 AM
From my UK viewpoint, drive thru establishments that aren't fast food are definitely... odd, and like it or not, on the surface they do conjure up an image of "what, people can't be bothered to get out of the car?" whereas I'm sure if you dig deeper there are logistical reasons for it.

However, in thinking about it, American towns don't seem to be set up the same way ours are (I'm not even sure what the average town or city centre is like there - I have images of everywhere having strip malls and no town centre to speak of). We have banks on every high street and shopping centre so it's easy to pop in while you're in town. There aren't the same amount of local banks that you guys have - they're pretty much all high street chains. The banking system also seems quite different - we tend to have our wages deposited automatically and pay everything by direct debit, while the US banking system seems to lag behind in that respect with some people still having to deposit a paycheque and write cheques to pay their bills. So, I can see there's more need to 'go to the bank', whereas here, well - I can't remember the last time I even had to set foot in one. Everything's done automatically and I keep an eye on it with my online banking.

I can see the value of a drive through pharmacy - I hadn't thought about the sick kids, but that's a really good point.

The only drive throughs I've ever seen here are McD's, BK and KFC.

Allow me to address the bolded parts. First of all, the USA is really big, especially compared to most European countries. There is a lot of variety in towns. Some are all strip malls, others villages with a town center. There is not "one" type of US town. Take my town, for instance. Founded in the mid-1600s, it is quite old for an American town. It has a very traditional town center, with stores that require that you park on the street and walk. In fact, most towns I've lived in have town centers, "downtowns" in our lingo.

Secondly, the banks: many of us do have direct deposit. It's quite normal, in fact. Not sure who you know here in the states, but if they're getting a paper check, that is actually becoming more and more rare. I do all of my banking online, and I'm not unusual. So, the person who is telling you this stuff is not in the majority.

Where I live, there's a huge difference between "downtown" and "city center" as perpetua describes it. The downtown area here is all high-rise office buildings, high-rise hotels, the big convention center, some old churches, some old theatres, and maybe a bank or two. There's a few fast food places that cater to the lunch breaks of those who work in the offices. But there aren't any real stores for anything. You go downtown for a night out, have a dinner beforehand and go to a show. You go downtown to go to a convention (or the car show, but that's another beast entirely). You can park in one place, pay a huge fee (there is no free parking) and walk around wherever you need to go, then drive back home.

The "city centers" that I was describing are out in the suburbs. The city I grew up in doesn't have a downtown area. It has two strip malls and City Hall and the police station are halfway in between, right behind the high school. The next city over (one of the other shopping areas I mentioned before) has an old downtown filled with boutiques and a new downtown filled with offices. If you need to do a one-stop shopping area, you have to go to the mall where you can get the department stores, electronics stores, specialty clothes stores, and a food court. Then drive to the pet store if you need it, and stop by the grocery store on your way home. There is no one place to get everything.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Psychopoesie on September 27, 2013, 10:53:26 AM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

Yeah, here we don't do bank transfers for personal transactions like giving $20 to your friend. One might write a check or just give them cash, or if you and they are both internet savvy you might paypal it to them. How does the bank transfer thing work? Do you have their account number and have to fill out a form with their bank and so on? Not snarking, just unfamiliar with the process.

I use internet banking to deposit the money in the friend's account. All I need to know is their bank branch and account number. & I type in a little free text description of what it's for (e.g., weddinggiftLiz, payforboattrip or whatever).

It's something I'd do if we were all chipping in for something like a wedding gift for a friend, concert tickets or something like that where it was easier for one person to do the organising. It's handy if you don't live near the other person or won't have time to see them to physically hand over the money.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 27, 2013, 11:53:17 AM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

Yeah, here we don't do bank transfers for personal transactions like giving $20 to your friend. One might write a check or just give them cash, or if you and they are both internet savvy you might paypal it to them. How does the bank transfer thing work? Do you have their account number and have to fill out a form with their bank and so on? Not snarking, just unfamiliar with the process.

I use internet banking to deposit the money in the friend's account. All I need to know is their bank branch and account number. & I type in a little free text description of what it's for (e.g., weddinggiftLiz, payforboattrip or whatever).

It's something I'd do if we were all chipping in for something like a wedding gift for a friend, concert tickets or something like that where it was easier for one person to do the organising. It's handy if you don't live near the other person or won't have time to see them to physically hand over the money.

Yeah, I do that all the time if I'm giving a friend money for anything. I do it on my online banking. You put in the account number and sort code (don't know if you have those there? a 6-figure number that identifies the bank and branch in the format 12-34-56), put in the description and submit and off it goes. Then when it arrives in the recipient's account it'll show on the statement who it's from and the text field you typed in shows up as the reference for what it's for.

My dad sometimes transfers some money into my bank account but he doesn't have online banking, so he goes to his bank, fills out a slip with my sort code and account number on it, and hands it to the cashier and they do it.

I can't remember the last time I wrote a cheque. They started phasing them out here years ago. I haven't even had a chequebook for about 7 or 8 years, I don't think. All my monthly bills are done on direct debit, my rent goes out via standing order and I use my debit card for anything I buy in shops or online, which debits it directly from my account. I don't even use the cash machine that often.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on September 27, 2013, 11:59:02 AM
If you have someone's routing number (sounds similar to teh sort code, a number that identifies the bank) and account number, there are ways you could use their account to pay your own bills.  That information is typically closely guarded in the US - you may trust your friend/family member, but it's something a lot of people wouldn't be comfortable sharing.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: stargazer on September 27, 2013, 12:02:48 PM
Yeah I would not be sharing my account number with anyone!

I just used the drive thru at the coffee shop near my house today.  (And when I say near, I mean it's maybe a 10 minute walk.)  So why did I use the drive thru?  Because today is my one work from home day, I didn't feel like getting out of sweats, and I was picking up drinks and breakfast for myself and my DH.  So I was not going to carry 2 drinks + 2 breakfast sandwiches and it's a lot easier to have them just hand them to you in your car and you can put them in a cup holder to keep them from spilling.  Plus, it was COLD this morning!
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hmmmmm on September 27, 2013, 12:17:51 PM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

Yeah, here we don't do bank transfers for personal transactions like giving $20 to your friend. One might write a check or just give them cash, or if you and they are both internet savvy you might paypal it to them. How does the bank transfer thing work? Do you have their account number and have to fill out a form with their bank and so on? Not snarking, just unfamiliar with the process.

My US bank has the service and I think others do to. But both parties have to been signed up for this type of transfer (can be different banks).

For Wells Fargo and Bank of America customers, they sign into their online banking app. To receive it, you have to have an email reference to your account. So if I want to receive money I tell the person that email address and that I'm a BofA or Well's Fargo customer.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 27, 2013, 12:18:55 PM
I'm trying to think of what a typical town centre in the UK would be like so I can describe it. There are many different types so there isn't really a 'typical' town, but this is pretty accurate for many of them.

I'm going to use the town of Woking in Surrey as an example, because I know it well. It's an average sized town by UK standards and has a population of about 65,000. It's a commuter town serving London (about 30 miles south west of the capital) and has a large railway station. The town centre consists of two or three fairly large shopping streets and two undercover shopping centres, what you guys would call 'malls'.

Most of the chain stores - clothes shops, homewares shops, shoe shops, mobile phone stores, department stores etc, are located in the malls.  There are two malls: Peacocks and Wolesey Place. Between them they house around 150 shops. Here's a list of what you'll find in there:

http://www.shoppingwoking.co.uk/shopping/

The larger one also contains a cinema and there's a theatre just off to the side of it too. There's a large car park on top of the bigger centre which has approximately 2000 spaces.

There are more shops on the outside shopping streets. There you'll find things like banks, estate agents, temp agencies, hairdressers, charity shops, cafes, market stalls, restuarants and pubs, basically anything that isn't a large chain.

In addition to all this, there are office buildings and other places of business where people would go to work.

All of this is concentrated into a fairly small area. Here's an arial shot of Woking to give you an idea of its size/layout: http://goo.gl/maps/x3I0o

You can see the town centre concentrated in the middle with the outlying residential areas around it.

Each of these main housing areas is on a bus route, so you can get a bus into town in about five or ten minutes. Buses are usually about ten minutes apart and the return fare into town is about 2.50 (although i've not been there in a few years, it may be more now).

There is also a small 'out of town' shopping area, what you guys would call a strip mall, I think, which has a big DIY superstore, a pet superstore, and places like that, and elsewhere on the outskirts of town there are a couple of large supermarkets with their own parking (Morrisons, Sainsbury's and a big Tesco in the next town) where people would go to do their weekly food shop.

So, you really can go 'into town' and do everything you need to do.

The majority of average-to-large sized UK towns are like this. Of course we have other types of towns too. There are very small towns which might have one shopping street (usually a throughfare through the middle of it), and villages, which are very small and predominantly residential and might have a local grocery shop, a pub, a small post office and a church. People who live in places like this would normally drive to the nearest town to take care of whatever they needed to.

Bigger cities like London and Birmingham are a bit different to this and it'd take a separate post to describe those.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: lowspark on September 27, 2013, 12:20:45 PM
It's all about convenience. The same thing that motivates someone to drive through McDonalds is what motivates them to drive through the bank, the pharmacy, the cleaners, whatever. The business is offering the customer the convenience of doing business without getting out of the car. And yes, the customer takes advantage of that convenience. Why not?

I live in Houston where everything is completely spread out. We live in our cars. With very few exceptions, the city is simply not set up for walking. There are a few neighborhood areas where shopping/restaurants are concentrated and yes, those areas might have a drug store and a bank (not all do). Usually no grocery stores in those areas though. So for people who happen to live near those, maybe they can do most of their errands by walking. But for the vast majority of the population here, every errand is likely to be in a different direction and far away from each other.

In addition, I run my errands on my way home from work or on my lunch hour some times. So, I'm going to hop in my car and try to get it all done as fast as possible. So yeah, drive-up ATM? You bet. Drive through pharmacy and cleaners? Thank you!

I can see where it might not make sense in every city. But of course, as much as every person is different, so is every city. Just because one city is set up in a certain way doesn't mean every other city is.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 27, 2013, 12:27:58 PM
bank to bank transfers are much more common overseas.  When I went to South America it was much more common for people to send money directly to people's accounts.  Esp in Brazil
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on September 27, 2013, 12:43:24 PM

My US bank has the service and I think others do to. But both parties have to been signed up for this type of transfer (can be different banks).

For Wells Fargo and Bank of America customers, they sign into their online banking app. To receive it, you have to have an email reference to your account. So if I want to receive money I tell the person that email address and that I'm a BofA or Well's Fargo customer.

But it's *only* between Wells Fargo and BOA - if I want to get money to my son's account at a credit union or other bank, it won't work.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: jaxsue on September 27, 2013, 12:44:18 PM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I wish the traditional check would go out of fashion here, but it is slowly disappearing. Our bank apps also allow us to transfer funds to people. I can tell you that seeing someone pull out a checkbook at the grocery store is very uncommon now; most people use debit cards instead.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: jaxsue on September 27, 2013, 12:46:09 PM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

There are definitely limits right now. I'm hoping that in the near future it will become easy to do transfers from any bank to any account.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: ladyknight1 on September 27, 2013, 12:57:09 PM
If you have someone's routing number (sounds similar to teh sort code, a number that identifies the bank) and account number, there are ways you could use their account to pay your own bills.  That information is typically closely guarded in the US - you may trust your friend/family member, but it's something a lot of people wouldn't be comfortable sharing.

Routing numbers are public information.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: stargazer on September 27, 2013, 01:05:00 PM
If you have someone's routing number (sounds similar to teh sort code, a number that identifies the bank) and account number, there are ways you could use their account to pay your own bills.  That information is typically closely guarded in the US - you may trust your friend/family member, but it's something a lot of people wouldn't be comfortable sharing.

Routing numbers are public information.

Account numbers aren't though.  My DH and I have set up transfers between our accounts (we both have Wells Fargo) and my dad and I have the same thing, but I would not be comfortable giving that information to anyone but close family.  Certainly not to just any friend who owes me money.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Sophia on September 27, 2013, 04:35:01 PM
My credit union doesn't even let me transfer money into my parent's account in the same bank.  They used to, but they stopped that.  I guess when I got married and they realized I was an adult. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: camlan on September 27, 2013, 04:37:28 PM
The thing is, here in the US, if you have someone's routing number and account number, you could just as easily take money out as put it into their account. I think, on a similar thread about banking a while ago, someone said that in their country, there is one account number for transferring money to an account and a second, separate, number for transferring money out of the account. Until we get something like that, individuals transferring money between their bank accounts is not going to happen on a regular basis.

You need to keep in mind that until about 1990, no bank was allowed to have branches in more than one state. There might be banks with the same name in two or more states, but they were set up to be separate entities. There is no one bank with branches in all 50 states, although we are starting to get more internet-only banks. There is no national bank. Nothing like the UK system where people can have savings accounts at the Post Office. There are states which have regulations that make it difficult or impossible to get a bank account if you have a really low credit score or other credit problems, so there is a surprising amount of people who do not have a bank account.

As a result of this, banks aren't used to working together in a way that helps the individual bank customer. There are still a lot of old regulations on the books.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: WillyNilly on September 27, 2013, 04:49:27 PM
In the US your routing number and account number are printed on the bottom every check you write - its how the bank knows it s legitimate check. So every time you hand someone, anyone, a check you are giving them your routing number and account number.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: ladyknight1 on September 27, 2013, 05:01:35 PM
Yes, we had a check that was sent with a bill stolen out of the mail and our account was hijacked. It took two months to fix it all.  :(
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Sophia on September 27, 2013, 05:02:39 PM
In the US your routing number and account number are printed on the bottom every check you write - its how the bank knows it s legitimate check. So every time you hand someone, anyone, a check you are giving them your routing number and account number.
It is like handing someone your credit card.  There is a lot of trust involved, and prosecution when people are caught. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 27, 2013, 05:05:39 PM
Whereas in Australia, we have the Big 4 banks that have branches everywhere. Commonwealth, NAB, ANZ and Westpac. There are smaller banks, but these are the main ones.

The Commonwealth Bank used to be owned by the government until it was sold.

And here electronic transfers between banks are no issue at all. But getting someone's BSB number and account isn't enough to withdraw funds, as they'd need your ID and signature as well. Think of it like giving some you're address as opposed of the keys to your house.

Companies will often put account details on invoices.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Yvaine on September 27, 2013, 05:14:27 PM
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

Yeah, here we don't do bank transfers for personal transactions like giving $20 to your friend. One might write a check or just give them cash, or if you and they are both internet savvy you might paypal it to them. How does the bank transfer thing work? Do you have their account number and have to fill out a form with their bank and so on? Not snarking, just unfamiliar with the process.

I use internet banking to deposit the money in the friend's account. All I need to know is their bank branch and account number. & I type in a little free text description of what it's for (e.g., weddinggiftLiz, payforboattrip or whatever).

It's something I'd do if we were all chipping in for something like a wedding gift for a friend, concert tickets or something like that where it was easier for one person to do the organising. It's handy if you don't live near the other person or won't have time to see them to physically hand over the money.

Gotcha! So it's actually kind of similar to the process of paypal'ing it to them, it's just that in the US we tend to do that with the paypal middleman in between so nobody knows each other's account number--just their email address.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 27, 2013, 06:18:48 PM
It's also worth noting that a pretty fair percentage of Americans don't have bank accounts at all.  (A quick Google search says 8% overall but dramatically overrepresented by minorities - ~20% of African-American families don't have savings or checking accounts.)  This is almost entirely among the poorer population, which is especially bad because those people then have to go to check-cashing places and pay extra fees to get paychecks cashed.  Now banks, grocery stores, and independent cashing firms will all happily cash your check, but they'll charge you $2-$6 for the privilege (and sometimes even more, if they're charging a percentage instead of a flat fee).  Add up $6 coming out of each and every paycheck you make and you're looking at ~$150 a year that more affluent people (those who have enough cash on hand to keep a bank account open) don't have to pay.  People living paycheck to paycheck also are at risk for overdraft and other bank fees, which can quickly eat up any extra money they've been able to save  :-\
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 27, 2013, 06:25:44 PM
The thing is, here in the US, if you have someone's routing number and account number, you could just as easily take money out as put it into their account.

I'm not understanding how this could happen. How would someone take money out of your account using just the account number and routing number (I presume that's what we call a sort code)? Do you not have to show ID if you withdraw money at a bank in America?

And like someone says, every time you give someone a cheque, that information is there for all to see.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 27, 2013, 07:17:28 PM
It's also worth noting that a pretty fair percentage of Americans don't have bank accounts at all.  (A quick Google search says 8% overall but dramatically overrepresented by minorities - ~20% of African-American families don't have savings or checking accounts.)  This is almost entirely among the poorer population, which is especially bad because those people then have to go to check-cashing places and pay extra fees to get paychecks cashed.  Now banks, grocery stores, and independent cashing firms will all happily cash your check, but they'll charge you $2-$6 for the privilege (and sometimes even more, if they're charging a percentage instead of a flat fee).  Add up $6 coming out of each and every paycheck you make and you're looking at ~$150 a year that more affluent people (those who have enough cash on hand to keep a bank account open) don't have to pay.  People living paycheck to paycheck also are at risk for overdraft and other bank fees, which can quickly eat up any extra money they've been able to save  :-\

Is there a particular reason for that? Bank fees? Credit scores too low to open one?

Most of our banks offer a basic no frills account, which allows you to have your wages paid in, direct debits to go out and you get a cash machine card/debit card. You can't go overdrawn on those accounts so you don't have to pass a credit check to get one.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 27, 2013, 08:00:45 PM
It's also worth noting that a pretty fair percentage of Americans don't have bank accounts at all.  (A quick Google search says 8% overall but dramatically overrepresented by minorities - ~20% of African-American families don't have savings or checking accounts.)  This is almost entirely among the poorer population, which is especially bad because those people then have to go to check-cashing places and pay extra fees to get paychecks cashed.  Now banks, grocery stores, and independent cashing firms will all happily cash your check, but they'll charge you $2-$6 for the privilege (and sometimes even more, if they're charging a percentage instead of a flat fee).  Add up $6 coming out of each and every paycheck you make and you're looking at ~$150 a year that more affluent people (those who have enough cash on hand to keep a bank account open) don't have to pay.  People living paycheck to paycheck also are at risk for overdraft and other bank fees, which can quickly eat up any extra money they've been able to save  :-\

Is there a particular reason for that? Bank fees? Credit scores too low to open one?

Most of our banks offer a basic no frills account, which allows you to have your wages paid in, direct debits to go out and you get a cash machine card/debit card. You can't go overdrawn on those accounts so you don't have to pass a credit check to get one.

A lot of banks have started pulling credit scores in order to even open up a basic savings account.  I have a credit union account and they will allow you to open a basic savings account.  A lot of people don't know that many credit unions are part of a nationwide network that allows members to go to any network credit union to handle account issues.  the only thing you can't do is open up loan accounts.

Also quite a few banks here charge a fee unless you have a certain amount of money in your account.  They also charge a fee if you go to another banks ATM, so you can get hit with 2 withdrawal fees.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on September 27, 2013, 08:13:31 PM
There are also ID requirements; not everyone has a government-issued ID, especially folks in the same population that can't get a bank account for other reasons.

To get someone's money with just routing/bank account info: you can't just go in and withdraw it, but you could pay bills online with that info, depending on the site.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Joeschmo on September 27, 2013, 08:53:12 PM
A couple of other reasons not to have a bank account are if you've overdrated previously and not payed it off some banks won't give you a checking account although I don't know if this applies to savings.  Another reason would be if you owe money to companies and there is a judgement by the courts against you to pay it your entire bank account could be taken as a garnishment except for $0.01.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: guihong on September 28, 2013, 09:29:36 AM
The interstate system, started in the 1950's, pulled a lot of business out of small towns and closer to the interchanges.  Also, the rise of suburbs from after WWII contributed to a lot more sprawl than in England, for instance.  We just have more space to spread out!

Many small rural towns, especially county seats, still have a "town square" and the courthouse close by, but the coming of Wal-Marts and big box stores like that pull business outwards to the outskirts.  It's nice to see downtowns revitalized, though.   In the days before automobiles, of course, people would bring their horses and buggies and tie them up outside the buildings.  But like someone else said, "Downtown" of a large-ish city tends to be mostly skyscrapers, old churches, and historical buildings.   Little Rock, for instance, began with the Statehouse right on the river and mushroomed outwards.

What's interesting is the difference in city planning from East to West in this country, from those areas that used to be the colonies, out to the "West".

Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Thipu1 on September 28, 2013, 10:36:04 AM
We also have to remember that, after WWII, Americans entered into a great love affair with the automobile.  In the 1950's, drive-in movies became very popular.  There were also drive-in churches. Cars were within the price range of almost everyone. 

There's an interesting story about how far this went.  In order to protest racial inequality, there was a plan for African-Americans to drive their cars and block the entrances to the 1964 World's Fair in Flushing, NY.  The Soviet Union was all set to play this up as an example of how horrible conditions were in the USA until someone at Tass figured out that they couldn't do it because, 'These oppressed people are staging a protest by driving their cars.  Our people don't have cars.' 

Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: jalutaja on September 28, 2013, 03:05:57 PM
Not exactly a drive-through, but do other countries have drive-in movie theaters?

You mean - only for the rich people, who own cars?

But movies are pastime of workers, common people, not just for the rich who have personal cars!

OK, now we do have many cars ... but most movie houses have been closed, so still a no-go here!
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on September 28, 2013, 03:17:18 PM
Not exactly a drive-through, but do other countries have drive-in movie theaters?

You mean - only for the rich people, who own cars?

But movies are pastime of workers, common people, not just for the rich who have personal cars!

OK, now we do have many cars ... but most movie houses have been closed, so still a no-go here!

In the US, many people own cars, not just the wealthy.  And drive in movies are actually more affordable than regular movies for families with children.  Regular movie theaters charge by the person, and you cannot bring your own food/drink in, but must purchase it at high prices at the snack bar.  A drive in charges by the carload, and you can bring your own food/drink.  Plus a drive in generally features two movies for one admission, so you can load up the car with kids, park in the parking lot, and pass out the munchies and juice boxes.  As the kids fall asleep, just bed them down in the back seat or on an air mattress in the back of the truck.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Yvaine on September 28, 2013, 04:21:12 PM
Not exactly a drive-through, but do other countries have drive-in movie theaters?

You mean - only for the rich people, who own cars?

But movies are pastime of workers, common people, not just for the rich who have personal cars!

OK, now we do have many cars ... but most movie houses have been closed, so still a no-go here!

In the US, many people own cars, not just the wealthy. 

Yeah, if you're poor, for the most part you have a crummy car. For the same reasons enumerated upthread, a lot of cities are laid out so you can't really get around on foot (either because of traffic safety issues or just sheer distances) and a lot have awful public transportation. Poor people tend to shell out (relatively) modest sums of money for a junky used car. These cars do end up requiring a lot of repairs, but sadly, such is life when you don't have the initial payment and/or the credit rating to buy new. And friends who can fix cars are highly valued. :)
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Harriet Jones on September 28, 2013, 04:40:10 PM
There is a dentist in my town who has their office in a former bank, so there's a drive-through.  I don't know that they actually use it for anything, though.   ;)
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Library Dragon on September 28, 2013, 06:00:31 PM
The Warner Drive-In (http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/5531 (http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/5531)) in Huntington Beach, California was the only way we could afford movies at $1.50 per carload.  We popped our own corn, brought a gallon of iced tea and cups.  For kids wearing pajamas was required. 

Seeing The Ten Commandments on the huge screen made an impact on my tween brain. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 28, 2013, 06:22:25 PM
Not exactly a drive-through, but do other countries have drive-in movie theaters?

You mean - only for the rich people, who own cars?

But movies are pastime of workers, common people, not just for the rich who have personal cars!

OK, now we do have many cars ... but most movie houses have been closed, so still a no-go here!

In the US, many people own cars, not just the wealthy.  And drive in movies are actually more affordable than regular movies for families with children.  Regular movie theaters charge by the person, and you cannot bring your own food/drink in, but must purchase it at high prices at the snack bar.  A drive in charges by the carload, and you can bring your own food/drink.  Plus a drive in generally features two movies for one admission, so you can load up the car with kids, park in the parking lot, and pass out the munchies and juice boxes.  As the kids fall asleep, just bed them down in the back seat or on an air mattress in the back of the truck.
Drive ins are rare here , I don't think they exist anymore.

And I sometimes bring my own food to the movies I've purchased elsewhere. As do others I've seen .
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Yvaine on September 28, 2013, 06:42:03 PM
In the US, drive-ins boomed during the car-crazy 1950s but then kind of died out in later decades. They're making a consciously retro comeback at the moment.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: JoW on September 28, 2013, 08:49:28 PM
You mean - only for the rich people, who own cars?

The other posters are right.  Except in really large cities like New York and Boston public transportation is between bad and terrible.  All but the poorest of the poor own a car.  Its the only way to get to work.

Many families have more than one car.  Most people get their driver's licence at age 16.  A normal suburban middle-class nuclear family - mom, dad, a 16-year old and an 18-year-old - will have 4, or at least 3, cars.  Typically the kids drive the oldest cars in the household. 

My state, Nebraska, has a lot of rural farm land.  State law allows for this and will issue kids as young as 14 a school-only driver's licence.  That licence only allows them to drive on rural roads from home to their school.  That 14-year-old kid will have a car.  The parents own the car.  They maintain it and pay taxes and insurance on it, but the 14-year-old is the primary driver.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 28, 2013, 08:59:52 PM
You mean - only for the rich people, who own cars?

The other posters are right.  Except in really large cities like New York and Boston public transportation is between bad and terrible.  All but the poorest of the poor own a car.  Its the only way to get to work.

Many families have more than one car.  Most people get their driver's licence at age 16.  A normal suburban middle-class nuclear family - mom, dad, a 16-year old and an 18-year-old - will have 4, or at least 3, cars.  Typically the kids drive the oldest cars in the household. 

My state, Nebraska, has a lot of rural farm land.  State law allows for this and will issue kids as young as 14 a school-only driver's licence.  That licence only allows them to drive on rural roads from home to their school.  That 14-year-old kid will have a car.  The parents own the car.  They maintain it and pay taxes and insurance on it, but the 14-year-old is the primary driver.

3 cars is a bit much in my area.  2 is the norm, with 3 being an exception.  Usually the kids use Mom or Dad's car with permission.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: JoW on September 28, 2013, 09:05:23 PM
Again, it depends on where you are.

In my neighborhood there is NO public transportation.  If Mom and Dad both work they both drive.  If the high-school age kids have after-school jobs or want to do after-school sports the family has to have a 3rd and possibly a 4th car. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 28, 2013, 10:10:21 PM
Even the places that have public transportation here, don't have public transportation.  My city (not big enough for a subway but on the larger side as far as medium-sized cities go) theoretically has a bus system:

(http://www.hsvcity.com/Publictran/maps/Bus_routes_all_large-2013.jpg)

As you can see, there are large sections of the city where the busses don't go at all.  Even if your home, work, grocery store, doctor, etc. are all within walking distance of a bus line, you're looking at up to 30 minutes of waiting at a bus stop (and that's if the busses are all running equally spaced and on time), plus walking time to get there, plus the extra time it takes to ride the route (and transfer to a different line, potentially) over what it would take if you owned a car, including all the extra stops and distance it goes.  Sure, fare is a dollar, but you're giving up two hours of your day just to get to the store (and that doesn't include the time you're actually shopping).

When I was a librarian, my branch was in a little town about 20 minutes away from the city.  Median income was right at the poverty line (~$15,000/year).  There were a significant number of adults in that town who *couldn't* work - they couldn't afford a car, there was no transportation to anywhere they could get jobs, and the one tiny grocery store in town only needed two part-time employees.  It was really a waste of manpower, because all those people were forced to waste their days watching TV and collecting meager government checks when they could easily have been earning something more substantial and really contributing to something  :-\
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 29, 2013, 01:49:05 AM
The UK has similar car owning habits but to a lesser degree and it's concentrated in certain areas. People in small rural areas can't get by without one, because it might be a 15 mile drive to the shops and the town you work in and the public transport in your area is so rubbish that there are only 2 buses a week into the nearest town. Families who live in areas like this might have two cars if both parents drive. If you live in the affluent suburbs and are of that persuasion yourself, you'd likely have more than one car. People in cities, especially younger people, are often less likely to own them. It is illegal not to have car insurance here (not sure if that's the case in America) and the cost is infinitely greater in cities because of the higher risk of having it stolen. Add into that the fact that the younger you are the more expensive insurance is. So oftentimes it's just too expensive to insure your car in big cities to make owning one worth it.

I have had both experiences; I lived in a rural area where I couldn't have survived without my car, but when I moved to London I didn't own one for several years. I have one now; I can afford to run and insure it because I'm at an age where insurance has become cheaper (it still costs me 40-something a month for basic third party fire and theft because I live in a high risk area), but I wouldn't use it for driving to work - public transport takes care of that. I use it for social activities, though.

I've never seen a drive in movie happening here. I would love to give that a try, it sounds like a great experience. The closest we get to that, I think, is open air screenings of classic films in the parks during arts festivals and the like.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Slartibartfast on September 29, 2013, 02:38:18 AM
Yes, insurance is required here too.  The exact regulations vary by state, though - some are a lot stricter than others about what counts as "insured."  And of course there's nothing stopping someone from driving even when they don't have a license and insurance - the fines are higher if they're caught, but that doesn't help if they cause an accident  :-\  We have "uninsured motorist" coverage as part of our insurance, which basically says if someone else causes damage to us or our car and isn't insured enough to pay for it, our insurance company will pay the extra (after deductible, which we'd still have to pay off the top anyway).  I don't think all insurance options have that, though - in my state you can get by with insurance which basically only covers the other guy.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hmmmmm on September 29, 2013, 07:47:30 AM
I spent yesterday looking for a car for my 16 yr old son. Our DD has hers at college with her. And even though DH and I primarily work from home, we've become frustrated sharing our two cars with our son the last couple of months. We could manage and coordinate or delay activities more but we've decided we want the convenience of him having his own car.  On insurance, our cost jumped as soon as DS got his license and had to have insurance. Adding a 4th car to our policy will raise it more but not as much as just adding a 16 yr old male to our policy.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: JoW on September 29, 2013, 08:15:37 AM
Slartibartfast's posts are a very good description of my city, too.  We have a not-too-terrible bus system in the city, almost none in the residential areas.  The bus stop nearest my home is about 3 miles (4.8 km) away.  And my area gets foul weather - blizzards in the winter, tornadoes in the spring, life-threatening heat in the summer.   The last thing you need is to walk to school or work then, hours later, be stranded by foul weather.

In my state liability insurance, which pays for the damage to the car or building you hit, is mandatory.  Collision insurance, which pays for damage to your car, is optional by law but may be required by your lender.  I typically keep collision insurance on my car until its about 10 years old.  At that point the premiums are more than the potential payout. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: menley on September 29, 2013, 08:22:52 AM
In my hometown, my family lived in the suburbs and city buses only stopped at one "central" spot for pick-up and drop-off to downtown. The central pick-up spot was not a walkable distance and downtown was 25 miles or so. So if you wanted to go somewhere other than downtown, you had to drive :) My family was not wealthy by any means but we had four cars as my sister and I both had after-school activities and my parents both worked. To say my car was a beater would've been an understatement though... it occasionally caught on fire :)
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on September 29, 2013, 09:53:38 AM
To add my 2-cents to previous conversation, no permission is required from mine or anyone elses bank or credit union to perform the transfer.  I give my bank the account details of where I want to send money, and off it goes.

Yeah I would not be sharing my account number with anyone!

IME the account number is on the cheque anyway...

Having someone's account number to transfer money to them doesn't give me any kind of access to their account.  Hell, unless I pay an overt amount of attention to BSB (sorting) numbers I don't even know which bank they bank with!  And if I did, and they used online banking, I still woudn't know their login information to access the account.

I think here its just not considered to be particularly personal information.

The thing is, here in the US, if you have someone's routing number and account number, you could just as easily take money out as put it into their account. I think, on a similar thread about banking a while ago, someone said that in their country, there is one account number for transferring money to an account and a second, separate, number for transferring money out of the account. Until we get something like that, individuals transferring money between their bank accounts is not going to happen on a regular basis.

How would you do that?
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: menley on September 29, 2013, 11:23:11 AM

The thing is, here in the US, if you have someone's routing number and account number, you could just as easily take money out as put it into their account. I think, on a similar thread about banking a while ago, someone said that in their country, there is one account number for transferring money to an account and a second, separate, number for transferring money out of the account. Until we get something like that, individuals transferring money between their bank accounts is not going to happen on a regular basis.

How would you do that?

If you mean how would you take money out of an account with the routing and account number, it's pretty easy. While it wouldn't work for in-person transactions, many online payment methods (including Paypal) allow you to use a banking account for payment purposes, and the information you need is just the routing and account number. Now, I imagine that most websites have security checks (making sure the shipping address matches records, for example) to prevent that since the information is so easily accessible.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: VorFemme on September 29, 2013, 11:34:14 AM
But the small lots I think are a big thing. Most fast food, banks, and all sorts of other businesses in NYC and even in neighboring Nassau (Long Island) don't have big parking lots, or any parking lot at all. By having a drive-thru they are able to court customers in cars that would otherwise not realistically be able to get to the business at all because they would have no where to park.

Are there no businesses situated in town centres that people can walk to? This is what confuses me, why someone has to drive to and park at the bank. Here, we'd either drive into town and park in the car park, or get the bus into town, and 'town' is somewhere you can walk around and take care of all your business and shopping.

Town centers may be all businesses and a few restaurants (some expensive, a few for the lower paid employees to grab lunch at) - with the only other "food" being whatever snacks might be sold at a fuel station.

The grocery stores will be few & far between - and the prices may be high, the stock low, and sometimes the risk of the store being robbed being high is part of why the prices are high.  Depends on the city.

Houston - I don't spend much time downtown - parking costs money and the one time of year that I want to go downtown for the quilt festival - the price of a parking space will have gone from $6 or $7 across the street from the convention center to $25 or more across the street from the convention center, $20 or more within walking distance, and only the city meters will be the same price - there aren't many meters close to the festival.  Walking a half mile or MORE from your parking place to the festival takes time & energy. 

There are other places where a "city center" is next to a large mall - but no grocery stores in that area, so it is a different type of shopping being done.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on September 29, 2013, 11:38:13 AM

The thing is, here in the US, if you have someone's routing number and account number, you could just as easily take money out as put it into their account. I think, on a similar thread about banking a while ago, someone said that in their country, there is one account number for transferring money to an account and a second, separate, number for transferring money out of the account. Until we get something like that, individuals transferring money between their bank accounts is not going to happen on a regular basis.

How would you do that?

If you mean how would you take money out of an account with the routing and account number, it's pretty easy. While it wouldn't work for in-person transactions, many online payment methods (including Paypal) allow you to use a banking account for payment purposes, and the information you need is just the routing and account number. Now, I imagine that most websites have security checks (making sure the shipping address matches records, for example) to prevent that since the information is so easily accessible.

Well yes, this is what I wasn't understanding. If someone got hold of my account number and sort code and say, tried to set up their monthly direct debit to pay their electric bill with it, there would presumably be checks at a) the electric company and b) the bank to make sure that the account holder was the same person. Plus also presumably you check your bank regularly, and if anything fraudulent occurs, you report it and get that money back. That's pretty much how it works here anyway.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: shhh its me on September 29, 2013, 12:01:44 PM

The thing is, here in the US, if you have someone's routing number and account number, you could just as easily take money out as put it into their account. I think, on a similar thread about banking a while ago, someone said that in their country, there is one account number for transferring money to an account and a second, separate, number for transferring money out of the account. Until we get something like that, individuals transferring money between their bank accounts is not going to happen on a regular basis.

How would you do that?

If you mean how would you take money out of an account with the routing and account number, it's pretty easy. While it wouldn't work for in-person transactions, many online payment methods (including Paypal) allow you to use a banking account for payment purposes, and the information you need is just the routing and account number. Now, I imagine that most websites have security checks (making sure the shipping address matches records, for example) to prevent that since the information is so easily accessible.

Well yes, this is what I wasn't understanding. If someone got hold of my account number and sort code and say, tried to set up their monthly direct debit to pay their electric bill with it, there would presumably be checks at a) the electric company and b) the bank to make sure that the account holder was the same person. Plus also presumably you check your bank regularly, and if anything fraudulent occurs, you report it and get that money back. That's pretty much how it works here anyway.

there would not be unless the bank account holder complained.   You can use anyone bank account to pay a bill by phone with the information printed on mist checks ( you need the zip code they live in too)  The electric company doesn't say "hey why is Mrs Smith from Anytown paying Bob Jones from Othertowns electric bill? we should check into this." if you have the routing and account numbers and the name of the person the checking account belongs too and thier address/zip code they will take the payment.  They will tke the payment if  a woman is calling to use a mans account.  Now  of course once the account holder sees money being taken out to play an electric bill it could be resolved and it would be obvious who stole the money. I've not seen it with checking account(excluding taking actual checks) but it was somewhat common for a relative to steal a credit card and the victim to be unwilling to prosecute, because they don't want to send their child/cousin/best friend to prison.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Curious Cat on September 29, 2013, 12:20:57 PM
Yeah, as long as the company is getting paid they really don't care who is paying for it.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 29, 2013, 05:03:16 PM
That would not be possible with Paypal as they perform a check to make sure the account is your before you complete a single transaction.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: shhh its me on September 29, 2013, 06:59:19 PM
That would not be possible with Paypal as they perform a check to make sure the account is your before you complete a single transaction.

It been a long time since I sent up my paypal account but my recollection is they withdraw a penny and then ad it back and hold the account from making further paypal transaction for 3-7 days?  I don't recall there being anymore steps
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 29, 2013, 07:06:42 PM
That would not be possible with Paypal as they perform a check to make sure the account is your before you complete a single transaction.

It been a long time since I sent up my paypal account but my recollection is they withdraw a penny and then ad it back and hold the account from making further paypal transaction for 3-7 days?  I don't recall there being anymore steps
Yes, but you need to be able to access a persons online banking to see that transaction, and that requires different numbers than a bank account and BSB.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 29, 2013, 07:08:42 PM
That would not be possible with Paypal as they perform a check to make sure the account is your before you complete a single transaction.

It been a long time since I sent up my paypal account but my recollection is they withdraw a penny and then ad it back and hold the account from making further paypal transaction for 3-7 days?  I don't recall there being anymore steps


Paypal puts 2 random amounts into your account.  You have to tell Paypal what those exact amounts were before you can use that account for payments.  If you don't the bank account is not available for use.  So someone can't take another person's bank account info and use it in their paypal UNLESS they also have access to their bank account statements as well
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on September 29, 2013, 07:25:08 PM

The thing is, here in the US, if you have someone's routing number and account number, you could just as easily take money out as put it into their account. I think, on a similar thread about banking a while ago, someone said that in their country, there is one account number for transferring money to an account and a second, separate, number for transferring money out of the account. Until we get something like that, individuals transferring money between their bank accounts is not going to happen on a regular basis.

How would you do that?

If you mean how would you take money out of an account with the routing and account number, it's pretty easy. While it wouldn't work for in-person transactions, many online payment methods (including Paypal) allow you to use a banking account for payment purposes, and the information you need is just the routing and account number. Now, I imagine that most websites have security checks (making sure the shipping address matches records, for example) to prevent that since the information is so easily accessible.

Oh, you mean if I tried to add your account to my PayPal, claiming it was mine to use?  I have only linked cards not accounts so I don't know what the security details are like, but they must have some.
The cards required the printed security code so you have to be holding the card in your hand.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on September 29, 2013, 07:28:06 PM

The thing is, here in the US, if you have someone's routing number and account number, you could just as easily take money out as put it into their account. I think, on a similar thread about banking a while ago, someone said that in their country, there is one account number for transferring money to an account and a second, separate, number for transferring money out of the account. Until we get something like that, individuals transferring money between their bank accounts is not going to happen on a regular basis.

How would you do that?

If you mean how would you take money out of an account with the routing and account number, it's pretty easy. While it wouldn't work for in-person transactions, many online payment methods (including Paypal) allow you to use a banking account for payment purposes, and the information you need is just the routing and account number. Now, I imagine that most websites have security checks (making sure the shipping address matches records, for example) to prevent that since the information is so easily accessible.

Well yes, this is what I wasn't understanding. If someone got hold of my account number and sort code and say, tried to set up their monthly direct debit to pay their electric bill with it, there would presumably be checks at a) the electric company and b) the bank to make sure that the account holder was the same person. Plus also presumably you check your bank regularly, and if anything fraudulent occurs, you report it and get that money back. That's pretty much how it works here anyway.

Actually I doubt either would check.  The Electic Co don't care who pays the bill.  Its not their business if you have a private arragement for someone else to pay it.  Same with the bank.  They don't look into whose account you paid.  Its us to you to monitor your account.  The bank security only really has capacity to look for big red flags - suspicious tiny chages, large charges, unexpected international charges etc.
I can't imagine how much time it would take to check the account holder info, not to mention the privacy breaches...
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: suzieQ on September 29, 2013, 07:30:41 PM
But the small lots I think are a big thing. Most fast food, banks, and all sorts of other businesses in NYC and even in neighboring Nassau (Long Island) don't have big parking lots, or any parking lot at all. By having a drive-thru they are able to court customers in cars that would otherwise not realistically be able to get to the business at all because they would have no where to park.

Are there no businesses situated in town centres that people can walk to? This is what confuses me, why someone has to drive to and park at the bank. Here, we'd either drive into town and park in the car park, or get the bus into town, and 'town' is somewhere you can walk around and take care of all your business and shopping.
I live 5 miles from anything at all. 5 miles from my house is a gas station. It's another 7 miles down a HUGE hill to get to where I work, and another 2 miles from work to the closest grocery store. Walmart? Another 5 miles.
Around here, we have to drive.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: shhh its me on September 29, 2013, 07:34:58 PM
That would not be possible with Paypal as they perform a check to make sure the account is your before you complete a single transaction.

It been a long time since I sent up my paypal account but my recollection is they withdraw a penny and then ad it back and hold the account from making further paypal transaction for 3-7 days?  I don't recall there being anymore steps


Paypal puts 2 random amounts into your account.  You have to tell Paypal what those exact amounts were before you can use that account for payments.  If you don't the bank account is not available for use.  So someone can't take another person's bank account info and use it in their paypal UNLESS they also have access to their bank account statements as well

thanks it has been a long time
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: PastryGoddess on September 29, 2013, 08:37:47 PM
IMO if a business chooses to put a drive through in for their customers to use, then customers should use it.  I don't think it's fair to call people lazy for taking advantage of a service the business offers.

I'm completely arbitrary in the drive throughs I use. I definitely use the bank and pharmacy drive throughs, BUT not all the time.  I don't use the drive through at the Starbucks at all.  It's 70/30 using the drive throughs at fast food places.  My state just allowed open bottles of wine to be taken out of restaurants 4-5 years ago, and mail order wine just after that.  Gambling was just Ok'd 4 or so years ago.  We might have drive through liquor stores in 2030...maybe.  I'm not sure about the regulations on adult stores.  I'm guessing we might have drive through adult stores sometime around the 12th of never.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: IslandMama on September 30, 2013, 05:53:31 AM
I'm Australian, on the Gold Coast, in fact.  We have the standard fast food drive thru's here, we also have the bottle-o (liquor shop or bottle shop... you can see how we Aussie's really do like to nickname things), a drive thru coffee hut, a drive thru dry cleaner, can collect our pre-ordered/pre-paid groceries via Click and Collect (the pick up version of home delivery) and there are two more that I'm thinking of but can't quite picture... but different industries, again.

As for the banking thing, it seems quite bizarre to an Australian that knowing your sort code and account number could cause such a problem.  That's because we don't provide those to companies when we're paying our bills, we log into the internet banking site with an id (mine is an eight digit number that has nothing to do with my account number) and password (one of those "Must use a capital letter, a numeral and be a minimum of seven characters long") and there is the option to get a token from my bank which will produce a random number every time I press it and I can add that as part of the log in series as another layer of protection. 

Once you get through that then you can use the account to Bpay a bill (which is how you would do it with a bill, Bpay is the system they all use) or transfer internally - either between your own accounts or to other accounts in your bank - or transfer externally to another bank.  If I transfer externally I then have to use an external transfer password which is six letters and two digits that the bank sent me.  Just putting my sort code and account number in the payment section of a bill would do nothing except get it returned to me with a late fee and possibly a default fee for not paying the bill.

The other way to pay is online/over the phone through an automated system with a credit card.  I have a Visa Debit from my bank (and an American Express credit card which sees far too much action at times, too!) and do that quite frequently.  I'm always asked for the CCV number. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: lowspark on September 30, 2013, 09:21:35 AM
In the US your routing number and account number are printed on the bottom every check you write - its how the bank knows it s legitimate check. So every time you hand someone, anyone, a check you are giving them your routing number and account number.

This is why I quit writing checks to anyone except people I personally know. I've had my checking account hacked multiple times. As soon as I hand my check over, I'm giving anyone who has access to that check all the information they need to create checks that have my account & routing information on them.

They then can write checks on my account. As I say, it's happened to me multiple times. They can write several checks before the bank catches it. The bank always covered the fraudulent checks and reimbursed me for the amounts but it's still a huge pain and can affect your ability to write checks to businesses who have your name on a fraud list.

Back in the olden days when I used to write checks everywhere, it was really bad. Now I just use my credit card to pay for everything. I actually write a check about five or six times a year now.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: cwm on September 30, 2013, 11:33:19 AM
Slartibartfast's posts are a very good description of my city, too.  We have a not-too-terrible bus system in the city, almost none in the residential areas.  The bus stop nearest my home is about 3 miles (4.8 km) away.  And my area gets foul weather - blizzards in the winter, tornadoes in the spring, life-threatening heat in the summer.   The last thing you need is to walk to school or work then, hours later, be stranded by foul weather.

In my state liability insurance, which pays for the damage to the car or building you hit, is mandatory.  Collision insurance, which pays for damage to your car, is optional by law but may be required by your lender.  I typically keep collision insurance on my car until its about 10 years old.  At that point the premiums are more than the potential payout.

JoW, I think you may live near where I do. At least in the same geographical area. Spring means tornadoes and floods (and road construction), summer is lethal heat (and road construction), fall is either more storms or early blizzards (and road construction), and winter is sleet, ice, freezing weather, and just difficulty in getting around. At least there's no road construction.

As to the banking issue, I've actually had someone get a check of mine (I wrote it for a legitimate purpose) and they signed me up for "extra insurance protection" without my knowledge, took out something like $30 every month for over a year. I couldn't use online banking at that point and all of my statements were going to my parents' house. (I was in college, the university firewall really hated that bank's systems, and I didn't want to have to go in to get new checks every year when I changed dorm rooms, so I left my parents' address listed and they couldn't send the statements anywhere else.) The bank could only refund so much money, I think it was limited to two month's worth of charges, simply because it had been going on for so long and I hadn't said anything before that.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: JoW on October 01, 2013, 10:01:02 PM
I'm in Omaha, Nebraska.  That weather pattern describes Nebraska and most of the near-by states.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Sneezy on October 01, 2013, 11:13:51 PM
In much of the US, there is often no safe way where a person can walk from business to business even if they didn't mind the greater distances involved here. The area between or around larger stores stores or strip plazas is generally surrounded by a large moat of parking lot where it may not be very safe to walk due to lack of visibility, distracted drivers, and other factors. The intersections leading to such places are even less safe for crossing on foot.

Where I live in Texas, there is really no way to walk from the bank to the grocery store to a place for a quick snack and then to buy shoes like I remember doing in Germany. It's a very rare downtown area that has more than office buildings, courthouses, and the occasional restaurant that is only open during weekday lunches. Even then, downtown is only there for the nightlife, not for general daytime errands.

To do the same set of errands I could walk to in Germany after a short bus ride, one will end up having to get in and out of the car four times and drive a few miles between the places rather than walking a few minutes between each stop. Throw some kids into the mix, it's even less fun. Make it over 100 degrees outside where your car turns into a blast furnace in ten minutes or less during each errand, and it becomes downright miserable.

If you're like me and can't drive, you get to enjoy the pleasure of dodging cars in the 100+ temperatures under blazing sunlight that obstructs both your vision and the drivers' vision around you while walking at least a quarter mile between stores (if you're lucky enough to find a strip center that has more than one business that you need to visit there). You also get to alarm those working in stores when you carry your shopping from your previous errand with you, since they will often assume you're shoplifting since you're bringing in a shopping bag with you. I totally get why people buy coffee at drive throughs. This place just isn't designed for people - it's designed for cars. Seriously, for most of us in the US, the notion of wondering what you'd say if you saw someone walking down the street is not something you'd literally consider. What you'd say seeing them in the grocery store, sure. But no one walks down the street here unless their car broke down.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Library Dragon on October 01, 2013, 11:31:24 PM
In much of the US, there is often no safe way where a person can walk from business to business even if they didn't mind the greater distances involved here. The area between or around larger stores stores or strip plazas is generally surrounded by a large moat of parking lot where it may not be very safe to walk due to lack of visibility, distracted drivers, and other factors. The intersections leading to such places are even less safe for crossing on foot.

Where I live in Texas, there is really no way to walk from the bank to the grocery store to a place for a quick snack and then to buy shoes like I remember doing in Germany. It's a very rare downtown area that has more than office buildings, courthouses, and the occasional restaurant that is only open during weekday lunches. Even then, downtown is only there for the nightlife, not for general daytime errands.

To do the same set of errands I could walk to in Germany after a short bus ride, one will end up having to get in and out of the car four times and drive a few miles between the places rather than walking a few minutes between each stop. Throw some kids into the mix, it's even less fun. Make it over 100 degrees outside where your car turns into a blast furnace in ten minutes or less during each errand, and it becomes downright miserable.

If you're like me and can't drive, you get to enjoy the pleasure of dodging cars in the 100+ temperatures under blazing sunlight that obstructs both your vision and the drivers' vision around you while walking at least a quarter mile between stores (if you're lucky enough to find a strip center that has more than one business that you need to visit there). You also get to alarm those working in stores when you carry your shopping from your previous errand with you, since they will often assume you're shoplifting since you're bringing in a shopping bag with you. I totally get why people buy coffee at drive throughs. This place just isn't designed for people - it's designed for cars. Seriously, for most of us in the US, the notion of wondering what you'd say if you saw someone walking down the street is not something you'd literally consider. What you'd say seeing them in the grocery store, sure. But no one walks down the street here unless their car broke down.

Regarding the bold section:  It is sometimes a challenge if you want to walk somewhere. 

My library is near the historic area and within a nice 5 minute walk to the Episcopal church, which is open during the day.  I've been trying to take my lunch time and walk over and have quiet time in the garden or church.  Getting to and from has been the biggest challenge.  Staff and patrons stop and ask if I need a ride.  I reassured the library staff that I have my phone and will call if I need help.  My nice "stress free walk" often turns into a social fest because surely I'm not purposely walking in a neighborhood where I don't live. 

On the other end, my neighborhood had only one road in and is popular with fitness walkers from multiple neighborhoods.  This is a common site and I just have to remember to watch for walkers on my way to work.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: shhh its me on October 02, 2013, 10:09:44 PM
In much of the US, there is often no safe way where a person can walk from business to business even if they didn't mind the greater distances involved here. The area between or around larger stores stores or strip plazas is generally surrounded by a large moat of parking lot where it may not be very safe to walk due to lack of visibility, distracted drivers, and other factors. The intersections leading to such places are even less safe for crossing on foot.

Where I live in Texas, there is really no way to walk from the bank to the grocery store to a place for a quick snack and then to buy shoes like I remember doing in Germany. It's a very rare downtown area that has more than office buildings, courthouses, and the occasional restaurant that is only open during weekday lunches. Even then, downtown is only there for the nightlife, not for general daytime errands.

To do the same set of errands I could walk to in Germany after a short bus ride, one will end up having to get in and out of the car four times and drive a few miles between the places rather than walking a few minutes between each stop. Throw some kids into the mix, it's even less fun. Make it over 100 degrees outside where your car turns into a blast furnace in ten minutes or less during each errand, and it becomes downright miserable.

If you're like me and can't drive, you get to enjoy the pleasure of dodging cars in the 100+ temperatures under blazing sunlight that obstructs both your vision and the drivers' vision around you while walking at least a quarter mile between stores (if you're lucky enough to find a strip center that has more than one business that you need to visit there). You also get to alarm those working in stores when you carry your shopping from your previous errand with you, since they will often assume you're shoplifting since you're bringing in a shopping bag with you. I totally get why people buy coffee at drive throughs. This place just isn't designed for people - it's designed for cars. Seriously, for most of us in the US, the notion of wondering what you'd say if you saw someone walking down the street is not something you'd literally consider. What you'd say seeing them in the grocery store, sure. But no one walks down the street here unless their car broke down.

Regarding the bold section:  It is sometimes a challenge if you want to walk somewhere. 

My library is near the historic area and within a nice 5 minute walk to the Episcopal church, which is open during the day.  I've been trying to take my lunch time and walk over and have quiet time in the garden or church.  Getting to and from has been the biggest challenge.  Staff and patrons stop and ask if I need a ride.  I reassured the library staff that I have my phone and will call if I need help.  My nice "stress free walk" often turns into a social fest because surely I'm not purposely walking in a neighborhood where I don't live. 

On the other end, my neighborhood had only one road in and is popular with fitness walkers from multiple neighborhoods.  This is a common site and I just have to remember to watch for walkers on my way to work.

When I was a SAHM and only drove about 5,000 miles a year at least once a month I would see a car/truck have a near miss with a pedestrian ( the pedestrians always had the right of way)
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Library Dragon on October 02, 2013, 10:16:44 PM
Yes, pedestrians have the right away, but the person coming around the curve, toward me, on my side of road, wearing grey, in the fog, can be a challenge to see.  Especially when I'm also focusing on not having my Kia Soul run down by one of the Hummers in the neighborhood.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on October 02, 2013, 10:26:30 PM
DH and I live in the inner suburbs of Sydney's north shore. We're a relativist good area for transport like buses and to a lesser extent trains, and we don't have a car. We also live walking distance from a a shopping centre which basically has everything, including banks, doctors, dentist and a sizable department store.

We are getting to the stage where we'd like a car, as we're limited sometimes where we can go and sometimes public transport makes no sense on routes.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: jedikaiti on October 02, 2013, 11:35:47 PM
Ok, first post did sound a bit antagonistic but that may be because as I said, drive thrus aren't as prevalent here. Antagonism wasn't my intention. And thank you perpetua of seeing my point.

Though I think we used have drive thru bottle-o (liquour store).

I do like the idea of pharmacies being drive thru.

A few areas have drive through liquor stores, and in one state I have seen drive-through daiquiri shops - you just have to keep the straw out of the cup and not drink until you get home.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Snooks on October 10, 2013, 05:30:19 PM
This was raised early in this thread - can you go through a drive through on a push bike?

There's a Starbucks on the A14 (big East-West dual carriageway (70mph speed limit) in England) that makes me really annoyed every time I pass it because the sign proudly announces "Drive To", not drive through.  Essentially it's just saying "We have parking", of course you do, you're on the A14 no-one's coming to you without a car!

The drive throughs I've used have always been because I'm passing somewhere on the way home and want food to take out, why go in and queue when I can sit in my car with the radio on?  The drive through near me doesn't quite seem to have grasped the fact that it's supposed to be quick and convenient because they end up taking your order, your money and delivering your order all from the same window, rather than ordering at one point, paying at the next collect at the last one.

I wish we had drive through Starbucks, although my consumption would increase at an alarming rate.

As far as town access goes, I live 20 minutes walk from the city center and both DH and I own cars.  He uses his for work but I've worked within walking distance of our home the entire time we've lived there and generally worked places I couldn't park on site.  I can hand on heart say a lot of the time if I could have parked at work I would have driven rather than walked.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on October 10, 2013, 05:50:53 PM
So, here's something my state has that seems to surprise even the out-of-state but still from the US vistors. We've got drive thru liquor stores. That's right, they're small little liquor stores (if you go inside you can barely turn around without hitting something) with a little drive up window. And yes, anything available for sale inside is available for sale via the drive thru.

Drive thrus are popular where I live because of the heat in the summer. 120 is a normal occurrence during summer. Some places get so hot that the asphalt on the road starts to get soft and plyable. So being able to keep your car's AC running while you handle your errands makes us all very happy.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: BigBadBetty on October 10, 2013, 05:52:30 PM
This was raised early in this thread - can you go through a drive through on a push bike?

Is a push bike = bicycle? If so, yes. Twenty years ago, I used to be a bank teller in the drive-up. (I don't know why it was called a drive up rather than drive through.) We have customers on bikes, motorcycles and on foot. The majority of customers were in cars. The drive-up was open earlier and later than the main bank. Dogs were also prohibited in the bank so we had a lot of people walking with dogs. We gave treats to the dogs and candy to the children.

We had a special area for walkers so that they didn't have to share a lane with cars. I don't think that is very common in the U.S. However, I worked in a pedestrian friendly neighborhood.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Betelnut on October 10, 2013, 05:57:40 PM
Drive through car washes.  Did it this past weekend.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on October 10, 2013, 08:03:57 PM
This was raised early in this thread - can you go through a drive through on a push bike?

I don't know what the 'laws' are, but around here many resturants won't serve people who aren't in a motor vehicle as policy.  Probably insurance related.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: MrsJWine on October 10, 2013, 11:47:21 PM
I would love a drive through liquor store, for a myriad of reasons, but the main one is that dragging your kids into a store full of shiny glass bottles is a complete nightmare. When my kids were still in the touch-everything-shiny phase, I had one time that it was a necessity (or near to one) to go into a liquor store. My kids had never been there before. I was having a party, and my husband had been sent out of town for his work on short notice.

My older kid was in a stage where she declared every single thing to be her favorite. We walked into the liquor store, and she declared, "This is my FAVORITE store!" in a loud voice. The cashier was still laughing when I went up to pay for my wine.

So that particular story is funny, but most of the time, until recently, I avoid buying wine at all unless I absolutely have to. I'll ask a friend to pick it up for me, or I'll go after my husband gets home from work. But it would be wonderful if there were a drive-through.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: cwm on October 11, 2013, 08:38:20 AM
This was raised early in this thread - can you go through a drive through on a push bike?

I've been to several fast-food drive-throughs and no, you can't. Some of them rely on pressure sensors to notice when a car arrives, which a bike can't trigger. Also, it's a liability to serve through a window anyone who's not in a car for most fast food places. Unless you're on a motorcycle, which is fine. Never understood that...

For a bank or a pharmacy, it's probably not a problem to go through on a bike, though.

I don't know about a grocery shop or liquor store, I've never stopped and thought about that too much.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on October 11, 2013, 10:06:59 AM
I would love a drive through liquor store, for a myriad of reasons, but the main one is that dragging your kids into a store full of shiny glass bottles is a complete nightmare. When my kids were still in the touch-everything-shiny phase, I had one time that it was a necessity (or near to one) to go into a liquor store. My kids had never been there before. I was having a party, and my husband had been sent out of town for his work on short notice.

My older kid was in a stage where she declared every single thing to be her favorite. We walked into the liquor store, and she declared, "This is my FAVORITE store!" in a loud voice. The cashier was still laughing when I went up to pay for my wine.

So that particular story is funny, but most of the time, until recently, I avoid buying wine at all unless I absolutely have to. I'll ask a friend to pick it up for me, or I'll go after my husband gets home from work. But it would be wonderful if there were a drive-through.

I find that hilarious! But yes, all the shiny bottles, I want to touch them all! And I know ours has lots of candy too. And if I understand children correctly, they enjoy candy.

Now, here's where my state keeps getting odd to outsiders, the whole time I was reading your story I was like "Just go to the grocery store", yes in our grocery stores you can buy all the same alcohol you can buy in a liquor store. Right there, usually near the soda aisle. Sometimes the selection is a bit more limited, but you'll find all your basics, anything crazy popular, and seasonal specialties. I've had several conversations of "I want to get something to drink with dinner", "Ok, we'll pick something up at the grocery store", "No I mean alcoholic", "Right, like I said, grocery store", "No, not like beer, like liquor or wine", "Yeah, all the grocery stores here have that" and then  :o, usually I just take them to prove to it to them. And the only time you can buy booze is between 2am-6am, used to be until noon on Sunday but we changed that.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 11, 2013, 10:21:43 AM
In my state different counties have different rules.  Some counties allow alcohol to be sold in grocery stores, others don't
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: cwm on October 11, 2013, 11:28:05 AM
In my state different counties have different rules.  Some counties allow alcohol to be sold in grocery stores, others don't

When I was in college, the state finally allowed Sunday liquor sales to be up to the cities. The city the college was in didn't allow it, but all the surrounding cities did. Guess where everyone went on Sundays to get beer that they'd forgotten to get before the big game?

Where I live now, there's tons of suburbs spread out, so it varies city to city, but just across the state line, they've always sold liquor on Sundays, and always sold it in grocery stores. Actually, one grocery store right on our side of the state line has a liquor store right across the street. According to their interal systems, the liquor store is part of that grocery store, but according to state laws, it's in the other state that can sell on Sunday.

Also, weirdly enough, in that state you can buy beer and liquor at gas stations. It's just so weird to me to go to a QuikTrip to get some snacks and be presented with a Wall O' Booze.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on October 11, 2013, 11:37:32 AM
In my state different counties have different rules.  Some counties allow alcohol to be sold in grocery stores, others don't

When I was in college, the state finally allowed Sunday liquor sales to be up to the cities. The city the college was in didn't allow it, but all the surrounding cities did. Guess where everyone went on Sundays to get beer that they'd forgotten to get before the big game?

Where I live now, there's tons of suburbs spread out, so it varies city to city, but just across the state line, they've always sold liquor on Sundays, and always sold it in grocery stores. Actually, one grocery store right on our side of the state line has a liquor store right across the street. According to their interal systems, the liquor store is part of that grocery store, but according to state laws, it's in the other state that can sell on Sunday.

Also, weirdly enough, in that state you can buy beer and liquor at gas stations. It's just so weird to me to go to a QuikTrip to get some snacks and be presented with a Wall O' Booze.

We got that in our state too! Circle K (one of our gas stations), has a "beer cave", it's the coolest thing ever. It's a huge walk-in with floor to ceiling beer. I just like standing in there in summer, great place to cool off.. We're the west, we were settled by cowboys (or something), and we like to drink darn it!
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on October 11, 2013, 03:31:29 PM
We don't have alcohol at supermarkets here, but the bottle-o normally is near a supermarket anyway.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: MrsJWine on October 11, 2013, 03:40:14 PM
Glitter, my home state is Wisconsin. No matter how tiny the grocery store, there is always at least an aisle full of whatever you can think of. Priorities!

Here, the only alcohol allowed outside of the state liquor store is beer. And it's not even really beer. The alcohol content is capped at 3.2%. It tastes like dirty water with hops added in. Blech.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Jones on October 11, 2013, 04:12:03 PM
Glitter, my home state is Wisconsin. No matter how tiny the grocery store, there is always at least an aisle full of whatever you can think of. Priorities!

Here, the only alcohol allowed outside of the state liquor store is beer. And it's not even really beer. The alcohol content is capped at 3.2%. It tastes like dirty water with hops added in. Blech.
When we lived in New Mexico we could get hard liquor at the late night gas station. Now, in Utah, we can't even get Mike's hard lemonade anywhere but the liquor store...which has short hours (11-7 Mon-Sat) and, as a state run store with a monopoly, gets to set its own prices.

Some days I miss my buggy, desert home! (Not just due to liquor, that makes me sound like an addict.. )
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Yvaine on October 11, 2013, 04:42:57 PM
I would love a drive through liquor store, for a myriad of reasons, but the main one is that dragging your kids into a store full of shiny glass bottles is a complete nightmare. When my kids were still in the touch-everything-shiny phase, I had one time that it was a necessity (or near to one) to go into a liquor store. My kids had never been there before. I was having a party, and my husband had been sent out of town for his work on short notice.

My older kid was in a stage where she declared every single thing to be her favorite. We walked into the liquor store, and she declared, "This is my FAVORITE store!" in a loud voice. The cashier was still laughing when I went up to pay for my wine.

So that particular story is funny, but most of the time, until recently, I avoid buying wine at all unless I absolutely have to. I'll ask a friend to pick it up for me, or I'll go after my husband gets home from work. But it would be wonderful if there were a drive-through.

I find that hilarious! But yes, all the shiny bottles, I want to touch them all! And I know ours has lots of candy too. And if I understand children correctly, they enjoy candy.

 ;D ;D ;D But yes, the bottles! All the shiny bottles with different colors of liquids inside. If my parents had drunk, I'm sure I'd have loved the liquor store as a kid too. As it was, my favorite aisle of any store was the shampoo aisle. Back then, it all came in clear bottles so you had all these bottles gleaming with green Pert and pink Suave strawberry and so on. It reminded me of the evil witch's potions from Snow White.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: BigBadBetty on October 11, 2013, 04:56:18 PM
Glitter, my home state is Wisconsin. No matter how tiny the grocery store, there is always at least an aisle full of whatever you can think of. Priorities!

Here, the only alcohol allowed outside of the state liquor store is beer. And it's not even really beer. The alcohol content is capped at 3.2%. It tastes like dirty water with hops added in. Blech.

I was in college when someone from Minnesota was telling me about 3.2 beer. She told me they never bought beer at the convenience store because it was 3.2 beer. I thought she was pulling my leg. I didn't believe that all the breweries would make special watered-down beer.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: MrsJWine on October 11, 2013, 05:10:26 PM
Glitter, my home state is Wisconsin. No matter how tiny the grocery store, there is always at least an aisle full of whatever you can think of. Priorities!

Here, the only alcohol allowed outside of the state liquor store is beer. And it's not even really beer. The alcohol content is capped at 3.2%. It tastes like dirty water with hops added in. Blech.

I was in college when someone from Minnesota was telling me about 3.2 beer. She told me they never bought beer at the convenience store because it was 3.2 beer. I thought she was pulling my leg. I didn't believe that all the breweries would make special watered-down beer.

I wouldn't mind so much if it actually tasted the same (hey, I get to enjoy more beer before I reach my limit!), but it doesn't. At all. We bought a 6-pack of my favorite beer when we first moved here, and we didn't yet know the laws. I was so dismayed that my favorite beer suddenly tasted so awful.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Psychopoesie on October 11, 2013, 08:54:21 PM
We don't have alcohol at supermarkets here, but the bottle-o normally is near a supermarket anyway.

It depends where you live in Oz.

My local Coles has a liquor aisle and the Woollies connects to a bottle-o (can enter it from the store or from the mall proper). At the other shopping centre I visit regularly, it's more like Katana_Geldar describes.

Many, if not all, of the small suburban grocery stores in my city also have a decent range of beer, wine and spirits, although the prices are a bit higher (in general, not just for liquor).
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: mrs_deb on October 11, 2013, 10:34:10 PM
Also, weirdly enough, in that state you can buy beer and liquor at gas stations. It's just so weird to me to go to a QuikTrip to get some snacks and be presented with a Wall O' Booze.

I was never so surprised as when I moved from Massachusetts (at that time, all alcoholic beverages only at liquor stores, and never on Sunday) to Illinois in the late 80s.  I walked into a 7-11 to get a newspaper and ran into the aforementioned Wall O'Booze.  I excitedly rushed up to the poor clerk.  "Oh wow!  You have liquor?  You sell hard liquor here?  Oh my gosh!  What's up with that!"
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Bethczar on October 11, 2013, 11:33:05 PM
Heck, you can get wine and beer at Walgreens now. That freaked me out the first time I saw it.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: camlan on October 12, 2013, 06:24:09 AM
Also, weirdly enough, in that state you can buy beer and liquor at gas stations. It's just so weird to me to go to a QuikTrip to get some snacks and be presented with a Wall O' Booze.

I was never so surprised as when I moved from Massachusetts (at that time, all alcoholic beverages only at liquor stores, and never on Sunday) to Illinois in the late 80s.  I walked into a 7-11 to get a newspaper and ran into the aforementioned Wall O'Booze.  I excitedly rushed up to the poor clerk.  "Oh wow!  You have liquor?  You sell hard liquor here?  Oh my gosh!  What's up with that!"

Massachusetts will now allow five (5) stores in a supermarket chain to sell beer and wine. For example, Stop N Shop has over 100 stores in Mass. Five of them can carry liquor. If you don't live near one of them, you have to buy from a liquor store.

It's a total shock to drive up to New Hampshire, where the supermarkets have aisles of beer and wine. And it's hard to explain to visiting friends from out-of-state that they have to make a separate trip to buy wine for dinner.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Thipu1 on October 12, 2013, 07:10:33 AM
NYC alcohol laws are a little odd.

You can buy beer at just about any corner store but, for wine or liquor you have to go to a liquor store.  Liquor stores can carry things like wine glasses and and books about alcohol but you can't buy beer, soft drinks or snacks. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Sophia on October 12, 2013, 02:10:05 PM
Until a couple of months ago you couldn't buy hard liquor anywhere in the city.  City is in the top 50 biggest.  The liquor stores were the same size as everywhere else.  They just filled the space with lots and lots of wine and a better beer selection. 
I do remember the first time I went into a 7-11 and Mondavi wine was next to the Big Gulp machine. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on October 12, 2013, 11:05:48 PM
We don't have alcohol at supermarkets here, but the bottle-o normally is near a supermarket anyway.

It depends where you live in Oz.

My local Coles has a liquor aisle and the Woollies connects to a bottle-o (can enter it from the store or from the mall proper). At the other shopping centre I visit regularly, it's more like Katana_Geldar describes.

Many, if not all, of the small suburban grocery stores in my city also have a decent range of beer, wine and spirits, although the prices are a bit higher (in general, not just for liquor).

Those ones you have to make a separate transaction though - ALDI now has an actual in store section with alcohol - you just need to go through a specific register - like when you buy cigarettes.  But its all one transaction.

Heck, you can get wine and beer at Walgreens now. That freaked me out the first time I saw it.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Psychopoesie on October 13, 2013, 12:29:57 AM
We don't have alcohol at supermarkets here, but the bottle-o normally is near a supermarket anyway.

It depends where you live in Oz.

My local Coles has a liquor aisle and the Woollies connects to a bottle-o (can enter it from the store or from the mall proper). At the other shopping centre I visit regularly, it's more like Katana_Geldar describes.

Many, if not all, of the small suburban grocery stores in my city also have a decent range of beer, wine and spirits, although the prices are a bit higher (in general, not just for liquor).

Those ones you have to make a separate transaction though - ALDI now has an actual in store section with alcohol - you just need to go through a specific register - like when you buy cigarettes.  But its all one transaction.

Heck, you can get wine and beer at Walgreens now. That freaked me out the first time I saw it.

No separate transaction is required at that Coles supermarket. The registers have a lighted sign above them that indicates if they are ok to process alcohol or not.

Not sure about the Woollies with the connected liquor shop - been a while since I've purchased anything with alcohol from there.

I completely forgot about the Aldi. Had noticed their wines. They offer a different choice to most other shops.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on October 13, 2013, 02:19:31 AM
Drive in funerals, #5 on this list: http://www.cracked.com/blog/the-6-most-shameless-gimmicks-used-by-funeral-homes/ (http://www.cracked.com/blog/the-6-most-shameless-gimmicks-used-by-funeral-homes/)

WARNING: this site (and this article) are very NSFW and contain language that some will find objectionable.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on October 13, 2013, 03:48:04 AM
We don't have alcohol at supermarkets here, but the bottle-o normally is near a supermarket anyway.

It depends where you live in Oz.

My local Coles has a liquor aisle and the Woollies connects to a bottle-o (can enter it from the store or from the mall proper). At the other shopping centre I visit regularly, it's more like Katana_Geldar describes.

Many, if not all, of the small suburban grocery stores in my city also have a decent range of beer, wine and spirits, although the prices are a bit higher (in general, not just for liquor).

Those ones you have to make a separate transaction though - ALDI now has an actual in store section with alcohol - you just need to go through a specific register - like when you buy cigarettes.  But its all one transaction.

Heck, you can get wine and beer at Walgreens now. That freaked me out the first time I saw it.

No separate transaction is required at that Coles supermarket. The registers have a lighted sign above them that indicates if they are ok to process alcohol or not.

Not sure about the Woollies with the connected liquor shop - been a while since I've purchased anything with alcohol from there.

I completely forgot about the Aldi. Had noticed their wines. They offer a different choice to most other shops.

Really?  What state are you in?  I'm in NSW (Sydney) and I've not seen that at a Woolies or Coles here.  Some stores have the internal doors but you can't take liquor back into the main store to buy it and yoyou can't get a whole trolley load at the liquor store - no proper registers.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Psychopoesie on October 13, 2013, 04:21:32 AM
We don't have alcohol at supermarkets here, but the bottle-o normally is near a supermarket anyway.

It depends where you live in Oz.

My local Coles has a liquor aisle and the Woollies connects to a bottle-o (can enter it from the store or from the mall proper). At the other shopping centre I visit regularly, it's more like Katana_Geldar describes.

Many, if not all, of the small suburban grocery stores in my city also have a decent range of beer, wine and spirits, although the prices are a bit higher (in general, not just for liquor).

Those ones you have to make a separate transaction though - ALDI now has an actual in store section with alcohol - you just need to go through a specific register - like when you buy cigarettes.  But its all one transaction.

Heck, you can get wine and beer at Walgreens now. That freaked me out the first time I saw it.

No separate transaction is required at that Coles supermarket. The registers have a lighted sign above them that indicates if they are ok to process alcohol or not.

Not sure about the Woollies with the connected liquor shop - been a while since I've purchased anything with alcohol from there.

I completely forgot about the Aldi. Had noticed their wines. They offer a different choice to most other shops.

Really?  What state are you in?  I'm in NSW (Sydney) and I've not seen that at a Woolies or Coles here.  Some stores have the internal doors but you can't take liquor back into the main store to buy it and yoyou can't get a whole trolley load at the liquor store - no proper registers.

I'm in the ACT. The Coles is the one I regularly shop at & I just shove the wine in the trolley with the rest of the shop. The liquor aisle has been there for a few years now at least. Assumed it was a Coles thing.

Will suss out the Woollies with attached store later - admit I'm curious now. Wouldn't be surprised if it's the same as those you've encountered. The other nearby woollies doesn't have an attached liquor outlet - you have to go elsewhere in the mall.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on October 13, 2013, 05:57:56 AM
I'm in the ACT. The Coles is the one I regularly shop at & I just shove the wine in the trolley with the rest of the shop. The liquor aisle has been there for a few years now at least. Assumed it was a Coles thing.

Will suss out the Woollies with attached store later - admit I'm curious now. Wouldn't be surprised if it's the same as those you've encountered. The other nearby woollies doesn't have an attached liquor outlet - you have to go elsewhere in the mall.

I think its an ACT thing.  I vaguely recall that being a novelty last time I was shopping down there.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: IslandMama on October 17, 2013, 03:32:26 PM
I'm in the ACT. The Coles is the one I regularly shop at & I just shove the wine in the trolley with the rest of the shop. The liquor aisle has been there for a few years now at least. Assumed it was a Coles thing.

Will suss out the Woollies with attached store later - admit I'm curious now. Wouldn't be surprised if it's the same as those you've encountered. The other nearby woollies doesn't have an attached liquor outlet - you have to go elsewhere in the mall.

I think its an ACT thing.  I vaguely recall that being a novelty last time I was shopping down there.

Along with the vast choice of fireworks...
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Leafy on October 17, 2013, 11:54:03 PM
Just taking us all back to the drive-in pharmacy discussion, which by the way makes a huge deal of sense when you are talking about keeping children in the car and keeping germs from spreading. I just wanted to point out that pharmacies (also called chemists) in Australia are quite different to those that I saw when I was in the US. I went into a few Walgreens and to me they were much more like a grocery store with a small pharmacy section. Pharmacies here tend to be smaller stores with just medicine and personal products, but with a smaller range than a grocery store. So you might have vitamins, haircare, contact lens solutions, baby products, body lotions and similar sorts of items.

Prescription meds are pre-prepared and packaged, a very few are made on site and these would be only at some pharmacies.


I am fascinated by the notion that some places don't have any footpaths. It's very unusual here (Perth, Western Australia) to not have a footpath on at least one side of the road. I'm wondering if mums in these areas don't go for walks with their babies in prams/strollers? Having taken my little one for a walk this morning in our surrounding streets and seen at least a half dozen other mums with prams it has me wondering.


Oh, and on the notion of drive-through bottle shops (I can think of two in my area, though I've only ever bought bags of ice from one - very handy), even though you can purchase alcohol from your car you aren't allowed to open it or drink it until you get to your destination.

One more thing that I just remembered; there was a news article this week proclaiming that drive through convenience stores are on there way here.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: katycoo on October 18, 2013, 12:37:50 AM
Oh, and on the notion of drive-through bottle shops (I can think of two in my area, though I've only ever bought bags of ice from one - very handy), even though you can purchase alcohol from your car you aren't allowed to open it or drink it until you get to your destination.

I'm not sure that's true for passengers.  At least, not in NSW I don't think. I checked once but it was ages ago...
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 18, 2013, 01:04:35 AM
Just taking us all back to the drive-in pharmacy discussion, which by the way makes a huge deal of sense when you are talking about keeping children in the car and keeping germs from spreading. I just wanted to point out that pharmacies (also called chemists) in Australia are quite different to those that I saw when I was in the US. I went into a few Walgreens and to me they were much more like a grocery store with a small pharmacy section. Pharmacies here tend to be smaller stores with just medicine and personal products, but with a smaller range than a grocery store. So you might have vitamins, haircare, contact lens solutions, baby products, body lotions and similar sorts of items.

Prescription meds are pre-prepared and packaged, a very few are made on site and these would be only at some pharmacies.


I am fascinated by the notion that some places don't have any footpaths. It's very unusual here (Perth, Western Australia) to not have a footpath on at least one side of the road. I'm wondering if mums in these areas don't go for walks with their babies in prams/strollers? Having taken my little one for a walk this morning in our surrounding streets and seen at least a half dozen other mums with prams it has me wondering.


Oh, and on the notion of drive-through bottle shops (I can think of two in my area, though I've only ever bought bags of ice from one - very handy), even though you can purchase alcohol from your car you aren't allowed to open it or drink it until you get to your destination.

One more thing that I just remembered; there was a news article this week proclaiming that drive through convenience stores are on there way here.

It depends on where you are from.  I grew up just outside of Baltimore and most of the streets have sidewalks.  However, I work in and around Washington DC, quite a few of the suburbs in MD do not have sidewalks. The property goes down to the street and the streets are extra wide to accommodate parking in front of the house.  When I first saw that, I was horrified.  However, when I talk to co-workers and friends who live there, I have heard that some homeowners do not want sidewalks added because homeowners feel they will lose their parking spaces and up to 5ft of their property. 

I believe that new construction has to have sidewalks included, but older suburbs were grandfathered in
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: menley on October 18, 2013, 04:15:13 AM
<snip>
I am fascinated by the notion that some places don't have any footpaths. It's very unusual here (Perth, Western Australia) to not have a footpath on at least one side of the road. I'm wondering if mums in these areas don't go for walks with their babies in prams/strollers? Having taken my little one for a walk this morning in our surrounding streets and seen at least a half dozen other mums with prams it has me wondering.
<snip>

My neighborhood in Texas does have sidewalks, but the neighborhood directly next to us doesn't. It's pretty funny as one of the streets has a very strange boundary line for the neighborhood, and so one house at the end of the street doesn't have a sidewalk but the rest on the street do - so the sidewalk ends directly in a flowerbed! In our area, sidewalks were done by the neighborhood association at the time (our area was built up around the 1940s and 1950s) and so what each group decided back then has, for the most part, stuck around today.

The other thing is that while many neighborhoods do have sidewalks, those sidewalks don't take you to anywhere that you could get shopping or banking done - they're purely residential. So yes, I could walk around my neighborhood with a stroller, but there's a large gap between where our neighborhood ends and the nearest grocery store and banks are. I'd have to walk in the street to access those, which I'm not comfortable doing (Texas drivers are INSANE. And yes, I'm one of them :) )
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Sharnita on October 18, 2013, 08:18:12 AM
There was a news story about sidewalks in a neighborhood near us not being used, people being forced to walk in the street because the sidewalk isn't maintained by property owners.

There is overgrown grass and weeds in the summer and ice and snow in the winter. People feel the road is safer if they need to walk somewhere. Some of those properties are abandoned so the is nobody to care for that section.

In other areas there might not be community support for the cost of sidewalks. There night be other things preventing them as well.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Slartibartfast on October 18, 2013, 08:33:28 AM
US houses tend to be in one of two setups:

1) Houses built along regular streets which connect on both ends to other places, and which get through traffic from people who don't live there, and

2) Houses in dead-end neighborhoods with cul-de-sacs and looped roads which don't connect to anywhere else.

The latter is usually a large plot of land bought and developed by one builder or developer and then sold by individual houses, and almost always includes sidewalks.  When people in these neighborhoods go out for a walk, it's recreational because you can't actually get anywhere except other houses.

The former is usually in older neighborhoods, larger cities, and bits and pieces of town sandwiched in between commercial districts.  These may or may not have sidewalks, depending on how the city is laid out and how old the streets are.  Sometimes residents here can walk to a grocery store or a bank, but that's still unusual outside urban areas.

There's a third setup, in rural areas, where houses are separated by farms and may be a long ways back from the road.  Getting your mail is often enough of a walk ;-)
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: #borecore on October 18, 2013, 08:46:02 AM
Regarding sidewalks--there was a neighborhood near mine (which did have sidewalks) that was very similar, just a tad bit more upscale and maybe 1-2 years older or newer, I don't recall which, but both were built up primarily in the '70s and '80s, and it intentionally was built without sidewalks.

It had something to do with privacy rights, I think, and people not wanting others to walk on their lawns. The streets are supposedly safe enough to walk on, but I say bah humbug to that. They're just discouraging to walkers of all kinds.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Sophia on October 18, 2013, 09:00:30 AM
In my neighborhood in TX, there are sidewalks on both sides of the street and a public library 0.85 miles away (heaven).  But, I think I only walked there 2 or 3 times when DD was a baby.  The residential area walking was just fine.  But outside the residential it got a little scary.  There was a major intersection to get through and curbs everywhere which didn't work with the stroller (pram). 

I remember my aunt in Minnesota saying that sidewalks lowered the value of the house because you were expected to keep it free of snow. 
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: perpetua on October 18, 2013, 09:10:02 AM
There was a news story about sidewalks in a neighborhood near us not being used, people being forced to walk in the street because the sidewalk isn't maintained by property owners.

There is overgrown grass and weeds in the summer and ice and snow in the winter. People feel the road is safer if they need to walk somewhere. Some of those properties are abandoned so the is nobody to care for that section.

In other areas there might not be community support for the cost of sidewalks. There night be other things preventing them as well.

This concept is so alien to me. Here, pavements are maintained by the local council.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Hillia on October 18, 2013, 09:42:54 AM
When we lived in Denver, city code required that homeowners cleared the snow in front of their homes within 24 hours.  My rental on the corner lot, which looked great in the summer, became a major PITA in winter because I had twice as much shoveling to do.  I don't know if they actually cited people for it; I was always very careful to clear the snow immediately because our street bordered a bus route, and there were lots of people walking to the bus stops.  (Many of them showed their appreciation for a clear, dry sidewalk by throwing bottles, fast food trash, and dirty diapers into my front yard, but that's a whole other story).
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: cwm on October 18, 2013, 10:55:17 AM
I grew up on a horseshoe street. Basically the block just had two streets that actually left it, everything else is enclosed.

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Kinda like that, where the top and bottom streets go through on the right, and the right street goes through, but nothing else does. We had sidewalks on the left street and the top street, but not the bottom. The sidewalk on the top street went down another block to the main street it connected to, and the right street got a sidewalk about half a block down from this, but it only went half a block to the next main street. But unless you're on a major street in my neighborhood, you don't need a sidewalk. I grew up playing in the street, riding my bike along the streets, walking through the streets to get to the park a few more blocks away. It's such a residential area that drivers know to watch out for people. It's how my city is, if you're not on a major street and there's no sidewalk (or if there is, but it's horribly maintaned and not safe), everyone will be in the street.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Betelnut on October 18, 2013, 11:07:59 AM
I live in Southern Maryland.  Sidewalks are very hit or miss.  Usually within a development there are sidewalks but to get out of the development you have to walk on busy roads or the in the grass by the busy roads.  I hate it!  We still go to the store by walking but scurry across the busy road to the side where there is a sidewalk for part of the walk.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on October 18, 2013, 11:40:13 AM
We have sidewalks just about everywhere out here. I mean in less you're way way out of the city, or there's construction that requires "shutting down" the sidewalk. The idea of a housing development just not having a side walk is so odd to me. And we have more drivers then pedestrians for sure, our cities aren't really set up to be able to walk around them.

Sidewalks are also maintained by the city. Or maybe county...
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Katana_Geldar on October 18, 2013, 03:30:19 PM
There was a news story about sidewalks in a neighborhood near us not being used, people being forced to walk in the street because the sidewalk isn't maintained by property owners.

There is overgrown grass and weeds in the summer and ice and snow in the winter. People feel the road is safer if they need to walk somewhere. Some of those properties are abandoned so the is nobody to care for that section.

In other areas there might not be community support for the cost of sidewalks. There night be other things preventing them as well.

This concept is so alien to me. Here, pavements are maintained by the local council.

Same here, but there's usually no snow to clear.

In finding out a lot if fascinating differences in this thread.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Judah on October 18, 2013, 04:27:56 PM
I am fascinated by the notion that some places don't have any footpaths. It's very unusual here (Perth, Western Australia) to not have a footpath on at least one side of the road. I'm wondering if mums in these areas don't go for walks with their babies in prams/strollers? Having taken my little one for a walk this morning in our surrounding streets and seen at least a half dozen other mums with prams it has me wondering.

My town has sidewalks only on the very busiest streets, no neighborhoods have sidewalks. We still take our babies for walks, we walk our dogs, run, and do all the same things everyone with sidewalks do, we just do it on the edge of the street.
Title: Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
Post by: Seraphia on October 18, 2013, 05:28:56 PM
Where I grew up, we were a minimum ten minute drive from just about everything save church and the combination canoe rental/ice cream place on the river. The only people walking were my parents after dinner with the dog.  :P We lived a bit out of town though.

Where I live now, I can walk to a few places safely, but not everywhere. The town is a bit of an oddity, because on one hand, we have parts that were developed early in the country's history, so there's a downtown with stone buildings, brick walks and lots of fancy homes within walking distance, but there are also arms of road that lead to sprawl, where you have nice subdivisions, but no sidewalks or way to safely cross the street to get to the walmart/bbq joint/bank/what have you that's across the way. So, I can walk to the bank branch that's on main street from my work (a hike, but definitely possible) but there's no way I'd do anything but drive to the one that's by the movie theater, since it would mean crossing five lanes of traffic with no crosswalk or sidewalk.