Etiquette Hell

General Etiquette => Life...in general => Holidays => Topic started by: pierrotlunaire0 on November 20, 2013, 05:44:59 PM

Title: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on November 20, 2013, 05:44:59 PM
You know, those things that happened years ago, and everyone still talks about them.

1. I was about 4 and a half, my sister not even 2.  My mother had scored some major bargains that year, and my parents were so excited about all the gifts that they woke us up to catch the awe and joy on our faces.  So there are photos of my sister and I, eyes bleary with sleep, staring blankly at all these toys with only the enthusiasm a catatonic can muster.  My mother said she learned to let us wake up on our own from there on in.

2.  A few years ago, my sister decided to have all the females do the "spa" thing in the late afternoon when there is that deadly lull.  We were doing paraffin treatments on our hands and feet, and cleansing pores, etc.  My brother in law sneaks out in the kitchen to sneak a turkey sandwich, and right next to the refrigerator is a jar of Brown Sugar something.  Neat!  Some sweet condiment!  He takes a generous spoonful of Brown Sugar Skin Scrub.  He rinsed his mouth out about a dozen times and still complained about the taste.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: BarensMom on November 20, 2013, 06:58:31 PM
When I was about 21, we all managed to get together for one of the last Christmases spent as a whole family.  During present unwrapping, one of my sisters got the idea to stick the bow on my father's head.  Everyone else after that either draped or stuck their bows onto my father.  Someone in the family has a picture of my father covered in bows, trying to cart all the boxes to the trash.

That was also the Christmas that we had 16 pies for 12 people.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: *inviteseller on November 20, 2013, 07:57:26 PM
Of course I remember each of my girls first Christmas's when they really realized something good was happening, but the Christmas we still talk about was my mom's last.  I was 5, my sister 11, my brother 13..my grandparents were in from Buffalo and I remember opening a shoe box that had these 5 miniature Barbie's I had wanted so bad.  My mom got an oil lamp she had been admiring, and my poor sister got her first bra  ;D ;D.  Sadly, she passed away 3 months later of cancer.  This will be our first Christmas without my dad and my sister, older DD and myself have been bringing up stories of Christmas's with him and I now realize how incredibly special they were for DD when she was growing up.   :'(
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: cwm on November 21, 2013, 08:46:45 AM
Every year we'd do Christmas Eve at dad's parents' house. We'd come home, as a family, and each unwrap one gift from under the tree at home, then go to bed and do the rest later. I got the boxiest, shiniest looking gift I could get, and sis unwrapped hers and got something really cool, and I unwrapped mine to find...

...a set of bed sheets. I very nearly cried at that.

Then there was the year where we finally had snow on Christmas (it was about 50/50 if we'd actually get it any given year). I must have been about 6 or 7, meaning Sis was 4 or 5. Sometime in the night, some squirrels had run across our roof, so when we looked up, we saw reindeer hoof tracks! I asked where the sleigh runner marks were, but dad explained that the sleigh floated, that's how it could actually fly, so we wouldn't see any marks from that. Quick thinking on his part, and it really sold it to me and Sis.

I've probably told this story before, but I don't know if I'll ever really fully get over it. About two or three years ago, I was working on Christmas Eve. Dad's mom had passed, but we still went out to grandpa's house on Christmas Eve, it was tradition. Except it was snowing too hard that year. Mom and dad had a Jeep, a really big one. I had a sports car, for all intents and purposes. Mom called me and told me not to come out to grandpa's when I got off work, the roads were too bad. I went to her mom's house, half a mile from our house where I lived with mom and dad. The roads really were bad, and I barely made it to grandma's without a few accidents, I never would have made it to grandpa's. Then that spring, he had a heart attack and passed. I'm still mad at the situation and the weather, that I didn't get to see him on his last Christmas.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Outdoor Girl on November 21, 2013, 09:06:25 AM
I have a raft of stories.

When my 5 years older than me brother was little, he told my parents he was going to go out on the front lawn and look for reindeer tracks Christmas morning.  So at midnight, Christmas Eve, my Dad is out on the front lawn with 2X4's strapped to his feet, using a deer hoof pointer to make tracks.  And then my brother forgot the next morning.  You can bet that Dad dragged him outside to look.  The neighbours must have thought he was nuts!

Years later, my brother pulled me out of the house to look on the flat porch roof.  There were sleigh marks near the edge of the roof, with footprints over to the chimney.  And since it had snowed some, they were all partially filled in.  That was pretty cool.

My brother and I would leave our letters to Santa on the fireplace hearth.  DB was in on the gig but I was still waffling.  But my parents must have decided it was time.  My DB's letter had a 'By the way, Santa, could you please fix my snowmobile?' at the bottom.  The next morning, in my Dad's handwriting, was the response, 'Fix your own dingdangity snowmobile.  What do you think I am, a mechanic?'

And finally, when my nephews were little, they'd made 'reindeer food' at daycare.  It was mostly oatmeal but had some sparkles in it.  When my Dad asked what the sparkles were for, my youngest nephew replied, 'So the reindeer can see it, of course!'  YN and my SIL went out and sprinkled it on the front lawn.  The next morning, there were deer tracks everywhere.  The local deer had come in for a little snack.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: SamiHami on November 21, 2013, 10:38:44 AM
Mine was Christmas when I was in first grade. My dad had been sent to fight in Viet Nam and we missed him terribly. he surprised us by showing up for Christmas! He was given 3 weeks leave to come home to us and spend the holidays. He didn't have time to buy us gifts, so he picked up a couple of things at one of the airports. Even now at 49 I still have the Mickey Mouse watch he picked up for me (doesn't work anymore, but who cares?) and the little plastic Mickey statue that came with it.

That same Christmas I was talking to Mommy in the kitchen on Christmas eve. She asked me if I thought Santa would bring me everything I wanted. I said yes, especially the Easy Bake Oven!  :o Mom didn't know I wanted one. But that was okay 'cause I told Santa and I was positive he would bring it.

So, as the story goes, Mom and Dad head out on Xmas eve to find what was one of the hottest toys that year (this was 1970. It was a big deal). They go from store to store to store...sold out everywhere. They drive to the next town. No luck. They drive to yet another town. They find one, but it's a display model. The manager says he can't sell it. Mom goes all mama bear on him and insists he sell it to her! I don't know how she convinced him but she did.

Oh, and they had no money to pay for it. So they wound up using their first ever credit card for the very first time to buy if for me (remember Mastercharge?)

I didn't hear these stories until I was an adult. I'm sorry they went to so much trouble, but I really did love that Easy Bake Oven!

ETA: The worst was in Kindergarten, when Santa and his helper showed up at school. Yay! Santa! We queued up to sit on his lap and tell him what we wanted, but they surprised us by...giving us a shot! Yes, someone thought it was a good idea to have Santa vaccinate children.  :(
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: blueyzca01 on November 21, 2013, 04:20:24 PM
Last year!

DH and I were at my sisterís place, and my nieces went to their dadís for the afternoon, so DH, Sis, Sisís BF (Kevin) and I played Pictionary all afternoon.

First it was couple again couple, then girls against the boys, and finally DH and Sis against Kevin and me.  It was AWESOME.  I canít remember the last time I had so much fun. We realized later that Kevin was the weakest linkÖHe never won a single game.  But it was a blast.

We had wine and munchies, realized that my sister and hubby kick some major Pictionary butt, and then made the perfect simple Christmas dinner: turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing and gravy  (Yeah, we do Thanksgiving dinner twice a year).  It was so relaxing and fun.  We laughed A LOT.

 

Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: jedikaiti on November 21, 2013, 04:25:52 PM
Every year we'd do Christmas Eve at dad's parents' house. We'd come home, as a family, and each unwrap one gift from under the tree at home, then go to bed and do the rest later. I got the boxiest, shiniest looking gift I could get, and sis unwrapped hers and got something really cool, and I unwrapped mine to find...

...a set of bed sheets. I very nearly cried at that.

In my family, we each open one gift on Christmas Eve - this was started when I was little as a Keep Kaiti Busy tactic. They always picked the gift I would open, so there were no unpleasant surprises on Xmas eve.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: #borecore on November 21, 2013, 05:18:11 PM
When my baby brother was 2 or 3, he got a couple packs of batteries in his stocking. My mom always stuffed our stockings full of useful and fun things, but batteries were definitely befuddling to the little guy. He got this amazing expression of shock and sadness, stared at the batteries, and bellow-squeaked, in the way only a sweet, confused toddler can, "Baaaatteries? Why did I get baaatteries?"

My mom was very coy, telling him that he'd just have to find out, but maybe one of his gifts would use batteries. He wasn't sure that made sense, but eventually he opened something awesome and electronic, batteries not included. *Lightbulb!*

Ever since, if a gift needs batteries, you can be sure you'll get some in your stocking. Bonus points for an equally befuddled query.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Petticoats on November 22, 2013, 08:53:36 AM
This is such a fun thread. It's so nice to get to share these stories.

I have two that spring to mind. One is the Christmas of plum wine. I think I was a teen. Mom, Dad, and my grandmother all liked to eat at Chinese restaurants, and Mom and Dad got to like the plum wine that some of these restaurants served. So Mom approached me to ask if I thought a bottle of plum wine would be a nice Christmas present for Dad. I said yes and went shopping with her to pick out a bottle. I was designated gift wrapper in the family, so I wrapped it and tucked it away. Then Dad approached me and said, "I'm thinking about giving your mom a bottle of plum wine for Christmas." I said, "That's a great idea!" and when we shopped for it I steered him toward the same brand. I wrapped that one also and tucked it away as well. They were surprised and delighted on Christmas day... and then it turned out my grandmother had bought them a bottle too. Same brand. :)

Some years before that, my grandmother gave mom a gift that didn't go over as well: a big ceramic kitchen-utensil holder in the shape of a fat, laughing chef. Mom thanked my GM politely, but Dad and I could tell she was far from thrilled. So when GM had returned to her house to get Christmas dinner under way, and I was helping Mom cook the dishes we were going to bring, Dad came into the kitchen with a grin on his face. "Come out to the back yard." "Why?" "Just come out and see."

He had set the jolly chef up on the platform where he placed the targets for shooting his pellet rifle. Dad had loaded up the rifle, and the three of us took turns--even my sweet, nonviolent mom--destroying the jolly chef.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: blueyzca01 on November 22, 2013, 12:20:57 PM
^^ Nothing says 'The Holidays' like guns and ammo.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: amylouky on November 22, 2013, 12:44:23 PM
ETA: The worst was in Kindergarten, when Santa and his helper showed up at school. Yay! Santa! We queued up to sit on his lap and tell him what we wanted, but they surprised us by...giving us a shot! Yes, someone thought it was a good idea to have Santa vaccinate children.  :(

Okay, I literally just spit coke out my nose. That is horrible!
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: cwm on November 22, 2013, 02:08:02 PM
Okay, everyone with a twin will probably have it worse than me, but...

My sister and I are a year and a half apart in age. But I always knew what I would get for my birthday because sis would get it 6 months earlier. And Christmas we always got the exact same things, usually just in different colors. Except dad could never get our color preferences straight, so we'd have to trade with each other anyway. It ruined the magic of the gift circle we did. We'd all amass all of our gifts, then go around in a circle opening one at a time. Sis and I never sat next to each other, but we'd know that the matching boxes would be the same.

It was even worse once he retired from his job and got another part time job, it was at an outdoor store and he'd get nearly everything from there, regardless of what we actually wanted or would enjoy/use. One year we were living in an apartment together and had a very tiny deck. We never used it because it was so tiny and the boards were so rough that we'd need shoes, which we always left at the front door. That year we each got a set of bird feeders. Identical. We couldn't use them due to rules at the apartment, but we wouldn't want to even if we could.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: guihong on November 22, 2013, 02:22:10 PM
I had three brothers, and when we grew up (all three were much older than me), one stayed nearby and the other two lived in other states.  One Christmas, the out of state two both said they couldn't come home for Christmas.  We were all disappointed, of course.  Then it came to pass that plans changed, and they both could come-but all three brothers decided to play a surprise on my parents.  Since it was supposed to be just me, parents, and the youngest brother, we decided to go out to eat on Christmas Eve.   Somehow, behind the scenes, YB collected both older brothers at the airport and kept them out of sight.  Later, with the restaurant in on it, the waiter took our drink orders-and my middle brother served us.  Then, we ordered our entrees, and my oldest brother was the server :).  It actually took my parents several minutes to recognize them  ;D.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Team HoundMom on November 22, 2013, 02:24:14 PM
I would have been about 4 so it's a very faint memory.  My godfather was visiting for Christmas that year and we all went to church on Christmas Eve - even my super-athiest dad.  That year my godfather stayed back at the house and met up with us at church later.  I forget the reason he gave.  After church my parents hustled me past the big livingroom picture window and past the livingroom door inside and into bed so Santa Claus could come.  I remember sneaking a peek in the window and seeing stuff under the tree.  The next morning of course Santa had been there and presents, etc.  It wasn't until I was an adult that I clued in that my godfather stayed back to set up all the presents under the tree "from Santa".

Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: twiggy on November 25, 2013, 12:50:28 AM
I don't remember this, but it's become the stuff of family legend. I have a basic timeframe, that I was younger than 7 based on the house it occurred in.

It was family tradition for everyone to come over to one house on Christmas Eve, spend the night, the adults would go to Midnight Mass and then everyone would wake up together and open all our gifts, have breakfast, play with the new toys and eat all day. Late Christmas night everyone would finally head home. I remember it being fun as a kid, but as an adult I shudder at the logistics, and there's no way I would be able to handle 36 hours of family fun.

One year Mom's Cousin was there. All the kids were asleep and the adults went to Midnight Mass, except Cousin. He stayed at our house and started drinking. By the time the adults got home from Mass, he was 3 sheets to the wind. And at some point he saw all the pretty packages and bows and just couldn't help himself. He unwrapped the presents (all the kids' presents) and when he saw a hotwheels track, he just had to have it. Mom, her 5 siblings, and the husbands walked in to see her grown, drunk cousin happily sitting in front of the tree with wrapping paper strewn about, playing with the hotwheels track.

A whisper screaming tirade followed as he was chewed out by 5 formidable women. Dad and his brothers-in-law put Cousin to bed while Mom and her sisters re-wrapped all the presents. There was apparently some birthday paper turned inside out, as they exhausted Mom's supply of excess paper. And some of the adult presents were carefully unwrapped to get enough paper to re-wrap kid gifts.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Mergatroyd on November 28, 2013, 03:38:41 PM
When my baby brother was 2 or 3, he got a couple packs of batteries in his stocking. My mom always stuffed our stockings full of useful and fun things, but batteries were definitely befuddling to the little guy. He got this amazing expression of shock and sadness, stared at the batteries, and bellow-squeaked, in the way only a sweet, confused toddler can, "Baaaatteries? Why did I get baaatteries?"

My mom was very coy, telling him that he'd just have to find out, but maybe one of his gifts would use batteries. He wasn't sure that made sense, but eventually he opened something awesome and electronic, batteries not included. *Lightbulb!*

Ever since, if a gift needs batteries, you can be sure you'll get some in your stocking. Bonus points for an equally befuddled query.


If my oldest got batteries in his stocking, he'd cheer like crazy and tell his brother that now when the wii remotes run out, they don't have to ask mom for new ones!  >:D

I have a raft of stories.

When my 5 years older than me brother was little, he told my parents he was going to go out on the front lawn and look for reindeer tracks Christmas morning.  So at midnight, Christmas Eve, my Dad is out on the front lawn with 2X4's strapped to his feet, using a deer hoof pointer to make tracks.  And then my brother forgot the next morning.  You can bet that Dad dragged him outside to look.  The neighbours must have thought he was nuts!

Years later, my brother pulled me out of the house to look on the flat porch roof.  There were sleigh marks near the edge of the roof, with footprints over to the chimney.  And since it had snowed some, they were all partially filled in.  That was pretty cool.

My brother and I would leave our letters to Santa on the fireplace hearth.  DB was in on the gig but I was still waffling.  But my parents must have decided it was time.  My DB's letter had a 'By the way, Santa, could you please fix my snowmobile?' at the bottom.  The next morning, in my Dad's handwriting, was the response, 'Fix your own dingdangity snowmobile.  What do you think I am, a mechanic?'

And finally, when my nephews were little, they'd made 'reindeer food' at daycare.  It was mostly oatmeal but had some sparkles in it.  When my Dad asked what the sparkles were for, my youngest nephew replied, 'So the reindeer can see it, of course!'  YN and my SIL went out and sprinkled it on the front lawn.  The next morning, there were deer tracks everywhere.  The local deer had come in for a little snack.

Am I really the only one who thought "glittery raindeer poop!!"?
Lol
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: readingchick on November 28, 2013, 05:08:33 PM
I had to have been twelve or thirteen. My maternal great-aunt gave me a huge box. I opened it to find another box. Repeat steps until I find four small boxes. I chose one, opened it and found....a gift certificate to Victoria's Secret. Apparently my face turned really red.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: bansidhe on November 28, 2013, 05:45:12 PM
Story Number One

When I was four years old, I used to love to play in the frame of my old crib. It was just a square, wooden structure with rails all the way around and it was painted red. No clue why I found it so entertaining, but stuff like that is cool when you're four. My parents jokingly called it my "cage." It had seen better days at that point and was starting to fall apart.

Around Christmas of that year, my parents dutifully packed up my older sister and me and took us to see the mall Santa. When my turn finally came, I was deposited on Santa's lap and of course, he asked me what I wanted for Christmas. I announced quite loudly, "My mommy and daddy say I need a new cage!"

These days I'm sure someone would notify the authorities but as this occurred in 1968, my parents emerged unscathed, if terribly embarrassed.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: bansidhe on November 28, 2013, 05:45:45 PM
Story Number Two

I ruined Christmas in 2009. On December 23, I woke up early in the morning with a terrible, burning pain in my upper left arm. It was closely followed by nausea, then lower back and abdominal pain. It was a confusing array of symptoms, but I figured I'd caught some virus and aggravated my chronic back problems while throwing up. My husband went off to work, saying he would call later to check up on me. I went back to bed (fortunately I had the day off anyway.)

The nausea would not let up and as time wore on, the back and abdomen pain got worse and worse - as in some of the worst pain I've experienced. I couldn't reach my husband as he was in court, and the nearest hospital is an hour's drive away; however, I figured I could make it to the little medical clinic in my town so off I went.

The folks at the clinic saw a middle-aged woman with pain in the left arm radiating down into her back, nausea, and faintness, and in spite of a normal EKG and over my protests that it wasn't my heart, I went by ambulance to the nearest hospital.

Long story short, the doctor there pretty obviously thought I'd herniated my disk again and was either being a giant wuss or was seeking drugs. He discounted all the other symptoms, which now included low-grade fever and elevated blood pressure. I got morphine and stayed overnight.

The afternoon after I was released, my husband found the cause of my woes: the squashed corpse of the Black Widow who'd crawled into bed with me and bitten me twice. It took a full week for the bite marks to show up, for some reason.

I spent Christmas Day in a drugged haze at home rather than going to Phoenix as usual. My husband had let my mother know what was going on but my younger sister fell through the cracks: he thought my mother was going to call her and my mother thought he was. That resulted in my sister calling me on Christmas Eve to find out where I was and having to endure a very confusing conversation, as I was drugged to the gills and had no idea who she was or what was going on.

We had a make-up Christmas at New Year's.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: cwm on December 03, 2013, 10:44:41 AM
I have one from this year already, and it's going to go down as the Great Tea Debacle.

So my sis doesn't have a lot of money to spend on Christmas. I know this, so all I asked from her was makeup, and we'd go shopping some time while she's on break from work (she works in a school) so I get all the right colors. She's been my makeup go-to girl for years now, so this isn't unusual. That's all I wanted from her. Anything else was gravy.

She called me in tears Sunday night saying that she'd ruined Christmas and she was so sorry, could I ever forgive her? As it turns out, she had gone to the mall with her boyfriend. She knew I liked tea, and they have a Teavana (loose leaf tea store) so she went in and tasted some of their samples. There was one she thought I'd really like, so she decided to buy some.

My sister, keep in mind, doesn't know much about loose leaf tea. She decided to buy a half a pound, thinking it might last me a few months. And she wasn't paying too much attention, so when the clerk was very excited and said the price, she thought that the woman said $26. She thought it was a bit expensive, but hey, it's Christmas and a very thoughtful gift, right?

Two stores down, her boyfriend asked why she was freaking out about an extra $5 at breakfast that morning, but dropped nearly $50 on tea for me. It was actually $46, and it was too late to take back. She managed to keep herself calm all day around his family, but by the time she called me she was convinced that I'd hate her because she wouldn't be able to buy me any makeup and she hoped that I liked tea.

Folks, a half pound of tea will last me more than a year. Easily. I had to reassure her that she did not ruin Christmas, that I could afford my own makeup as long as she'd still go shopping with me to pick it out, and that the tea would be around for a long while yet. I explained that it only took a very small amount to make a cup of tea, or a pitcher, and she started crying again because she was so embarassed that she didn't realize that.

Long story short, she's going to keep some of the tea for cold and flu season so she'll be able to breathe, and I'll have at least a quarter pound of tea, if not more, to share with anyone who comes over.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: tinkytinky on December 03, 2013, 11:32:38 AM
I have one from this year already, and it's going to go down as the Great Tea Debacle.

So my sis doesn't have a lot of money to spend on Christmas. I know this, so all I asked from her was makeup, and we'd go shopping some time while she's on break from work (she works in a school) so I get all the right colors. She's been my makeup go-to girl for years now, so this isn't unusual. That's all I wanted from her. Anything else was gravy.

She called me in tears Sunday night saying that she'd ruined Christmas and she was so sorry, could I ever forgive her? As it turns out, she had gone to the mall with her boyfriend. She knew I liked tea, and they have a Teavana (loose leaf tea store) so she went in and tasted some of their samples. There was one she thought I'd really like, so she decided to buy some.

My sister, keep in mind, doesn't know much about loose leaf tea. She decided to buy a half a pound, thinking it might last me a few months. And she wasn't paying too much attention, so when the clerk was very excited and said the price, she thought that the woman said $26. She thought it was a bit expensive, but hey, it's Christmas and a very thoughtful gift, right?

Two stores down, her boyfriend asked why she was freaking out about an extra $5 at breakfast that morning, but dropped nearly $50 on tea for me. It was actually $46, and it was too late to take back. She managed to keep herself calm all day around his family, but by the time she called me she was convinced that I'd hate her because she wouldn't be able to buy me any makeup and she hoped that I liked tea.

Folks, a half pound of tea will last me more than a year. Easily. I had to reassure her that she did not ruin Christmas, that I could afford my own makeup as long as she'd still go shopping with me to pick it out, and that the tea would be around for a long while yet. I explained that it only took a very small amount to make a cup of tea, or a pitcher, and she started crying again because she was so embarassed that she didn't realize that.

Long story short, she's going to keep some of the tea for cold and flu season so she'll be able to breathe, and I'll have at least a quarter pound of tea, if not more, to share with anyone who comes over.

The poor thing! I am glad that it worked out for you guys.  (if there is plenty, maybe you and your sister could use a small portion of it to make tea soap/tea lotion bars. You can find recipes on the internet/pinterest that wouldn't cost a lot of money, it would be another bonding experience, and possibly ideas for future holiday gifts for others.)
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: whiskeytangofoxtrot on December 03, 2013, 01:09:19 PM
I found out the truth about Santa Claus when I was 4 years old. My folks told me on Christmas Eve that Santa would put up and decorate the tree for us, so when I heard a glass ornament fall to the hardwood floor and break, naturally I got up to see The Man Himself. Bus-TED! Yeah, I was kinda ticked off! LOL

A few years later on a night just before Christmas, we were on the way home when I saw a red light on top of a distant radio tower. I managed to convince my younger sister that it was Rudolph's nose, while the adults in the front seat struggled  to stifle their giggles. I had her sold on it until we passed a break in the tree line and the light below it became visible, too. The kid was gullible, but she wasn't stupid. ;D

Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: siamesecat2965 on December 03, 2013, 02:13:09 PM
My story is kind of  sad, but wht happened after was very comforting. My dad was diagnosed with cancer at the end of Sept., and went through radiation, chemo, etc. and just before Christmas, went back in the hospital, where sadly, he passed away on Christmas morning. So my mom and I are just kind of numb; and having gotten back from the hospital, we are just kind of wandering about like we had no clue what to do. My mom didn't want to call anyone, family or friends, until the next day so as not to "ruin" anyone else's holiday.

A bit later, the doorbell rings, and its her awesome next door neighbor is there, holding a container of soup, and a plate of homemade biscuits. In the middle of prepping for her OWN family's big holiday dinner, she MADE us soup. I know she made it then since it was still hot, and not just something she pulled out of the fridge and freezer. She's a great cook, and that soup was just waht we needed. we had been supposed to go to friend's for dinner, but didn't, so we had nothing in the house. This was perfect.

And I still insist that my mom get me a bag of pistachios for my stocking since my dad always did, adn I don't want to break that tradition.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: HGolightly on December 04, 2013, 10:16:40 AM
The Year of Cabbage Patch Kids. The Christmas they came out was crazy and it was incredibly hard to find one. One of the local dept stores had this amazing nursery display set up and I fell in absolute love with one doll in particular. As I still young and Santa was a big deal I of course asked for a CPK and to my parents relief I told Santa I did not care what it looked like I would be glad to have any one. My dad travelled a lot so he would try to get one in any city he was in to no avail. My mom was home with two kids so shopping time was limited and she could not get one either. Days before Christmas, my cousin who was managing a store in another city called them to ask if they needed a CPK and he would bring it to them on Christmas Eve as he was going to be in town. Arrangements made with much gratitude and the doll was dropped off at 10pm already wrapped. I opened it up and saw.....the very doll I had fallen in love with.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: SamiHami on December 04, 2013, 10:25:59 AM
The Year of Cabbage Patch Kids. The Christmas they came out was crazy and it was incredibly hard to find one. One of the local dept stores had this amazing nursery display set up and I fell in absolute love with one doll in particular. As I still young and Santa was a big deal I of course asked for a CPK and to my parents relief I told Santa I did not care what it looked like I would be glad to have any one. My dad travelled a lot so he would try to get one in any city he was in to no avail. My mom was home with two kids so shopping time was limited and she could not get one either. Days before Christmas, my cousin who was managing a store in another city called them to ask if they needed a CPK and he would bring it to them on Christmas Eve as he was going to be in town. Arrangements made with much gratitude and the doll was dropped off at 10pm already wrapped. I opened it up and saw.....the very doll I had fallen in love with.

Awww...Santa was listening!
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Valentines Mommy on December 04, 2013, 10:59:01 AM
This isn't a downer story, I hope. My favorite Christmas was 1996; it was the last one Papa was alive.

We went to Midnight mass. We all woke up around 7 am. We unwrapped presents and drank coffee together. Papa got everyone silly slippers. Mine were fuzzy green Grinch slippers, comets with Grinch heads bobbling at the toes. We made a huge breakfast and drove to Tucson to spend the afternoon with my paternal grandparents. My Nina made a leg of lamb. More presents, all the cousins made it to lunch. Papa decided he wanted to continue to Phoenix to see mom's family too. It was the first time in 12 years we all went together. We picked at dinner (still full from earlier) and had a sleepover with all of my paternal cousins. We stayed up all night watching movies and telling old stories.

To me, it was perfect. It was ordinary and extraordinary and it can never happen again. So to me, it is my most precious and cherished Christmas memory because it truly was my last childhood Christmas.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Valentines Mommy on December 04, 2013, 11:13:43 AM
My first story was sadder than I thought; how about a funny one?

One year, everyone went on a low carb diet. So the holiday meal was a leg of lamb, a roast, a turkey and a ham. No rolls, potatoes, rice at all. Ok, fine, but no veggies or fruit either! All we had was meat, as far as the eye could see. And alcohol! A real cave person's delight, much to the chagrin of a cousin's vegan boyfriend!

Then there was the year my brother got me and my sister a hamster for Christmas. Cute but nothing like being women on Christmas morning to the words: your present is on the loose somewhere in the house. Find it before the cat does!

Hamsters also play a role in the second Christmas DH and I shared. I really wanted a dog but I lived with mama and she did not want pets. DH got her permission somehow to get me a hamster! It was a sweet gesture. So a week after I received Tequilla, I went to clean his cage. I found out that Tequilla was a she and the very proud mama of eight tiny babies! Good thing mama taught second grade; the babies were all given good homes. I called Tequilla the gift that kept on giving.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: dawbs on December 04, 2013, 12:45:29 PM
On 'good' surprises, I'll share one--although trigger/TMI warning, it is about infertility and doesn't really start as a Christmas story.

A few years ago, after a lot of weirdnesses in our lives, Mr. Dawbs and I had been trying for children for a few years.  This had been challenging and stressful, in part, because when my hormones take their natural course, I have daily migraines with nausea.  So I'd been in pain for the better part of 3 years and the treatments we'd discovered were incompatible with even *trying* to be pregnant according to the doctor (my rantings on my disagreement w/ the doctors on that can be another topic--it's moot because the doctors control the prescription pads)

Aenyhoo, in October, the doctor gave both Mr. Dawbs and I a whole battery of tests and the consensus was given to us around a not-very-pleasant-Thanksgiving that with our collective issues it was 'highly highly unlikely' that we would ever have a child without tremendous amounts of medical intervention.  The fact that hormones in my system cause me no end of pain meant that it was going to be a bit extra challenging to have said interventions.  I said that we needed to think on it, to sleep on it, and to all around have some time to grieve/process/figure out budgets/figure out some stuff before we took our next steps.  I was entering my 'busy season' at work so said we would take our time and we'd decide how to proceed by spring.
We had much debating with the docs over the status of the prescriptions for the intervening time and eventually I prevailed on the doctors to allow me to keep absurdly close track of my cycles--so I was taking pregnancy tests essentially every-other-day and, since they were inevitably negative, I was allowed to take my medications every day, after my negative test (For the record, that was incredibly disheartening and depressing.  Nothing like "oh, yeah, another negative pregnancy test, now I can take my moderately in-effective medications in order to take my pain level from an 11 to a 4 today.  yay?".
(On the plus side, I learned you can buy cheap, no-name pregnancy test strips (without the plasticky things that surround them) in bulk, online, for something like .27c/test) 

Christmas morning, I woke up and felt like hell.  THat wasn't really surprising, I felt like hell a lot then--the previous few days had been pretty migraine-nausea bad.  I decided washing my medications down with tasty Christmas wine was the way to go and, as always, I pulled out the morning's pregnancy test.   Except, this time, it was positive.
Best Christmas present *EVER*.
(although I didn't ever get my wine.  In fact, I didn't really get Christmas dinner--I had impressive morning sickness)
(And, it's really really hard to trust a piece of paper you paid 27c. for.  Of course, Christmas day, it wasn't like I could just hop on down to the corner store and buy a second test.  So, I used about $1.08 worth of cheap tests and dealt with the crazy the next day to be able to confirm with something not made by the lowest bidder)

We were headed over to my IL's house, but made a quick detour to my parent's house, where we told my family (OK, we didn't tell gramps, because he couldn't keep a secret to save his life--and I didn't need *EVERYONE* knowing on that day), and at my IL's house, I handed my MIL a gift-bag with a tiny baby outfit (I'd been working on sewing something; I had take me 3 years to sew it--I am not speedy) and watching her process that was amazing.
(and, FWIW, the child hated that carefully [if badly] sewn outfit, and wore it all of 2x.)
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Mergatroyd on December 05, 2013, 09:13:57 AM
On 'good' surprises, I'll share one--although trigger/TMI warning, it is about infertility and doesn't really start as a Christmas story.

A few years ago, after a lot of weirdnesses in our lives, Mr. Dawbs and I had been trying for children for a few years.  This had been challenging and stressful, in part, because when my hormones take their natural course, I have daily migraines with nausea.  So I'd been in pain for the better part of 3 years and the treatments we'd discovered were incompatible with even *trying* to be pregnant according to the doctor (my rantings on my disagreement w/ the doctors on that can be another topic--it's moot because the doctors control the prescription pads)

Aenyhoo, in October, the doctor gave both Mr. Dawbs and I a whole battery of tests and the consensus was given to us around a not-very-pleasant-Thanksgiving that with our collective issues it was 'highly highly unlikely' that we would ever have a child without tremendous amounts of medical intervention.  The fact that hormones in my system cause me no end of pain meant that it was going to be a bit extra challenging to have said interventions.  I said that we needed to think on it, to sleep on it, and to all around have some time to grieve/process/figure out budgets/figure out some stuff before we took our next steps.  I was entering my 'busy season' at work so said we would take our time and we'd decide how to proceed by spring.
We had much debating with the docs over the status of the prescriptions for the intervening time and eventually I prevailed on the doctors to allow me to keep absurdly close track of my cycles--so I was taking pregnancy tests essentially every-other-day and, since they were inevitably negative, I was allowed to take my medications every day, after my negative test (For the record, that was incredibly disheartening and depressing.  Nothing like "oh, yeah, another negative pregnancy test, now I can take my moderately in-effective medications in order to take my pain level from an 11 to a 4 today.  yay?".
(On the plus side, I learned you can buy cheap, no-name pregnancy test strips (without the plasticky things that surround them) in bulk, online, for something like .27c/test) 

Christmas morning, I woke up and felt like hell.  THat wasn't really surprising, I felt like hell a lot then--the previous few days had been pretty migraine-nausea bad.  I decided washing my medications down with tasty Christmas wine was the way to go and, as always, I pulled out the morning's pregnancy test.   Except, this time, it was positive.
Best Christmas present *EVER*.
(although I didn't ever get my wine.  In fact, I didn't really get Christmas dinner--I had impressive morning sickness)
(And, it's really really hard to trust a piece of paper you paid 27c. for.  Of course, Christmas day, it wasn't like I could just hop on down to the corner store and buy a second test.  So, I used about $1.08 worth of cheap tests and dealt with the crazy the next day to be able to confirm with something not made by the lowest bidder)

We were headed over to my IL's house, but made a quick detour to my parent's house, where we told my family (OK, we didn't tell gramps, because he couldn't keep a secret to save his life--and I didn't need *EVERYONE* knowing on that day), and at my IL's house, I handed my MIL a gift-bag with a tiny baby outfit (I'd been working on sewing something; I had take me 3 years to sew it--I am not speedy) and watching her process that was amazing.
(and, FWIW, the child hated that carefully [if badly] sewn outfit, and wore it all of 2x.)

What a great surprise! I bet the scream shook the rafters!
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Team HoundMom on December 06, 2013, 11:27:07 AM
Well I can tell you about the Christmas morning when I woke up to an empty stocking and no gifts.

I had broken my own rule and was seeing a guy who was a single parent.  His son was 5. I was in college and my roommate moved away so this guy let me live with them because I couldn't afford a place on my own. This is what apparently transpired on Christmas Eve. He knew there was an expensive moisturizer I loved, but of course being a dude he didn't know exactly what so he got me 2 $25 Sears gift cards to get it.  He also got me a big fluffy teddy bear and his buddy was supposed to take him shopping for stocking stuffers for me. (He didn't have a vehicle at the time.)  So on Christmas Eve he goes to his mom's house and it turns out her boyfriend's sons each gave him a gift and he hadn't bought anything for them...so he gave them the gift cards.  Then his brother and brother's daughter (age 9 or so?) showed up and he hadn't bought them gifts...so he gave her the teddy bear.  Then his buddy couldn't be bothered to take him shopping (I guess taking the bus or finding another ride wasn't an option  ::)) so he didn't get anything for my stocking.

So there I was on Christmas morning with an empty stocking, no presents, and a little kid going "Daddy, why didn't Santa bring Hurricane anything?"

Even though as a "starving student" I still managed to scrape up presents for him and his son.

I felt extra guilty for feeling hurt because Christmas is supposed to be all about "giving not receiving" and "for the children" and as an adult (27) I had no right to feel hurt or resentful about not getting any Christmas gifts given to me. I've had bad Christmases before and after, but that one would be the worst.  (I left him very shortly after, not because of that but because I couldn't handle living with a child and because he simply wasn't the "right guy" for me.)
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: rm247 on December 08, 2013, 04:40:57 AM
This was a few years ago when one of the Gameboy versions had just come out (I think it was GBA) and my sister was about 13

I always give my sister a pile of presents, one of her favourite Christmas memories was when I pulled a sledge into the front room stacked with presents for her. She is allowed to open one present on Christmas Eve and I was adamant that THIS UNREMARKABLE PRESENT couldn't be opened as she wouldn't be able to use it till Christmas Day when she opens her other presents. so after I brought her attention to THIS UNREMARKABLE PRESENT that just so happened to be the same shape, size and weight of a GBA, she had figured out what it was, you can imagine how excited she was.

Christmas morning and this was her first present, I can still see the look on her face as she opened it and found... A GBA shaped metal pencil case! She did her best not to look disappointed and grateful right up to the point when I told to open the pencil case. Inside was the actual GBA. She screamed.

Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Thipu1 on December 10, 2013, 08:27:36 AM
I have a raft of Christmas stories but this is one I remember well. 

I was about six years of age and, when my Dad was mowing the lawn in warm weather,  I would follow him with my doll carriage and pretend to be mowing along with him. 

That Christmas, one of the gifts I received was a toy lawn mower that could actually work. 

I loved the gift but it was December and there was nothing to mow.  Being an inventive child, I decided that it would be a good idea to mow the Christmas tree.  I did so with great gusto and, of course, the entire seven foot tree crashed to the floor.

I had to be punished and the punishment was severe.  I was denied access to the public library for a
full three weeks. My Dad wanted to give me a good whoopin' but Mom vetoed that because she had done something similar to her family's tree when she was my age. 

The next year, the annual recital at my dancing school had the theme of 'Holidays'.  I was 'Labor Day' and had a solo.  I performed a tap dance in a red, white and blue tutu with the lawn mower as a
prop.

Thus was the lawn mower rehabilitated in our family.         
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: cwm on December 10, 2013, 10:37:15 AM
The saving places in line thread made me remember another holiday tradition I'm glad my mom is continuing. Someone posted about a woman stocking up for nuclear winter, a comment on the amount of canned and non-perishable goods in her cart.

We've always had a spirit of charity in our family. Every year when Harvesters had their big donation push, we'd go to Aldi's or Costco or Sam's Club and stock up on canned goods. When Sis and I got to high school and our school did a canned good drive, they'd give us each $50 during the drive to spend how we wanted. Trust me, I got great at budgeting that $50, and as a senior when we had friends with jobs, memberships to the bulk store clubs, and cars, we'd coordinate who was getting what, when, how much they had, and how much extra they could spend if we'd pay them back.

My favorite memory was when one of our regular restaurants had a food drive. It was through a registered charity, and the owners of the restaurant were going to match pound for pound the food donated. Dad went and spent $150 at Aldi's and Sam's Club, brought in literally two loads of food in the back of a Jeep with the back seats down. The owners of the restaurant had to slightly change their donation amount to their maximum they could because Dad had met it.

I still stop and buy nonperishables when I'm shopping and there's a certain charity at the store. They're not pushy, I can afford to give a few dollars worth of food to them, but I'm looking forward to the giant trip with mom and sis to load up the whole car full of food for the needy.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Thipu1 on December 12, 2013, 08:37:33 AM
There is the story of the box. 

One year, a cousin got a seasonal job at a very posh department store.  It was a place we'd never think of shopping but Cousin got a hefty discount and many of us received gifts in the distinctive box of the store. 

Everyone on both sides of the family lived within ten miles of each other and we were all on good terms.  Nobody thought anything about re-using gift boxes.  Often, these were from places that had gone out of business years before.  The box from posh store that originally contained my Mother's gift attained legendary status in the family. 

The year after she received it, Mom used it for her sister's gift.  The year after that, it went to Dad's side of the family.  The game was on!

After a few years, the question during the Christmas morning barrage of phone calls was, 'Who got the box this year?'

Repaired with tape, that box had a life of over 20 years.  Its end came when an Aunt welcomed a new bride to the family by packing a shower gift in it.  The Bride knew about the tradition but was not impressed.  She was insulted by the 'ratty' box and threw it away.

The family was not surprised to learn that the marriage was dissolved within the year. 





 
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: #borecore on December 12, 2013, 09:48:25 AM
Heh, we had a nice Lord & Taylor box (but not actually remarkable in any way) that was used for gifts for at least 15 years.It only circulated within my mom's house, though.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Asharah on December 12, 2013, 11:33:02 AM
Erma Bombeck: "Every Christmas I get something from my mother in a NeimanMarcus box. It's always the same box. My mother's never been in NeimanMarcus in her life."
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: mime on December 12, 2013, 04:01:49 PM
We have a "box" story, too. In my extended family, any box will do when wrapping gifts. One year, Auntie wrapped some smaller gifts for my brother in a box that had originally contained envelopes. He unwrapped the box, saw that it was a box of envelopes, and kindly thanked Auntie for the gift.

Later, Auntie realized Brother had never even opened the box, so our mom had him open it and look inside. I think it had some special baseball cards and baseball-themed pencils, etc. in it. Way better than envelopes!

Now every year, someone gets a gift in an envelope box. When it is unwrapped, we act delighted and say "Oooooh, envelopes! Just what I needed! Thank you so much for the envelopes!"
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: mime on December 12, 2013, 04:21:52 PM
one more:

As I grew up, every Christmas dinner was at my mom's cousin's house. Cousin was in a family with several brothers and sisters who were always there, too.

The cousins had a rough childhood. Their dad (my great-uncle who got the cut-direct from most of the family) was awful to them before finally leaving for good. He left great-aunt who barely spoke english and a houseful of kids with almost nothing, and no way to support themselves. One year Cousin was lamenting the fact that they really did't have any pictures from their childhood. She knew some had been taken over the years, but never saw them herself. She had seen less than five photographs of her or her brothers and sisters from childhood. Ever.

My mom made it her mission to find pictures for the next Christmas. She really went to bat against my grandmother and another aunt who were the self-appointed gatekeepers of all family-related stuff, and very unwilling to share. Eventually, my mom got her hands on piles of photographs of Cousin's family from the 40s, 50s, 60s, and into the 70s taken by other relatives. She got copies of everything for Cousin. This was before stores had in-shop equipment to do this type of thing. She had to go to a specialty shop to have negatives made, then get the negatives developed, and it was mostly a mail-order thing. She did it in small batches for fear of losing it all in the mail. By next Christmas, she had over 200 pictures for Cousin.

She wrapped them in calico and ribbons in small stacks of 10 pictures each and put them in a basket, so it looked like a big basket full of little presents. When Cousin opened the first stack and realized that the basket was full of pictures, she burst into tears, which didn't stop flowing until all of the pictures had been seen. The other cousins (siblings) were equally excited and started to grab at the stacks too. Cousin grabbed the basket and said "no-- I don't want to miss anything. I'll pass everything around as I open them", and the whole evening was spent with everyone in tears, looking at old pictures and sharing memories.

The next year, Cousin had enough copies of all of the pictures made to give a photobook to each of her siblings.

I remember my mom working so hard on that all year. It's been a long time, but we still talk about how wonderful it was to watch the whole family see this gift.

Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Amara on December 12, 2013, 05:48:17 PM
That is an incredibly touching story, mime.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: violinp on December 12, 2013, 09:36:13 PM
I've had a lot of great Christmases, but the one really bad one from when we were 6 sticks out in my mind. :P Our family calls it "The Christmas from Hell."

To start off, Cabbage, the night of the church Christmas pageant, came down with croup. Yes, she still had to do her lines.  :-\ Mom took her to the hospital afterward, and she got medicine.

Then, we traveled down to Louisiana to spend Christmas with Mom's parents and grandma. Mom's dad was a pastor, and we all went to church on Christmas Eve. After the service, Gramps is talking with some members about a new security system, and how he doesn't see a need to update the security system. Just as he says that, Dad comes back in to let the family know that our car has been stolen.

Cabbage and I freaked out and started crying, but fortunately for our family, two things happened. One, the only car Gran and Gramps had was a van, so we could all go back home together. Two, the police chief attended Gramps' church, so we got our car into police custody later that night. The retrieval of the car may or may not have been aided by criminals who were almost stupid to live - they stole our car to drive to another place to steal another car to drive to another place to steal another car.  :o  ::)  :P

Then, Mom, Gran, and Great - Grandma all got pneumonia days after Christmas, and Dad came down with a cold, as well as Cabbage still recovering from croup. Since Great - Grandma was older and frail, she went to the hospital for treatment...and they gave her the antibiotics she was allergic to. Her throat almost swelled shut, plus she still had pneumonia.

Yeah, that was a *lovely* Christmas. NOT.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: CakeEater on December 13, 2013, 04:42:29 AM
My grandparents had relations in England, and went to visit often (from Australia, in the 70s and 80s when that was an even more major journey than it is now).

By the time they were no longer able to travel, my parents and I had planned a separate, but at the same time trip to England (long story) and made a point to visit the relations on my grandparents' behalf. My grandfather had be telling us about a table that English relations (ER) had that was about 2 feet high and had arms that folded out in various places in order to hold plates, and the hostess would put a little plate of cake or sandwiches on each arm at afternoon tea time. He was most impressed with the wworking of this table and described it at length.

When we arrived at ER's house, there was the table with  the plates on it as described and during the course of the visit, ER (who was quite elderly herself) insisted that we take the table back to Australia for my grandfather, because he had always loved it so much.

So my poor parents had to lug this folded table around for the rest of their two week trip, and get it home as extra luggage. It was worth it, though, when we presented it to my grandfather at Christmas. He was so stunned, and impressed to have received this table, and knew what it had meant to its owner, and the relationship that they'd had, that he welled up with tears, and was just speechless as he sat with this table. It was such a lovely moment.

My cousin, who knew none of the back story, kind-of broke the moment with her comment, "I'm amazed!(pause for effect)... and confused."
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Outdoor Girl on December 13, 2013, 08:07:29 AM
My parents moved us a 4-5 hour drive from where their siblings lived when I was very little.  So every year, there was usually a trip, by us, back to the area sometime before Christmas to deliver and pick up gifts.

One year, I stayed home with Mom and my brother, who was driving by this time, and my Dad made the trip.  They'd seen Dad's relatives and were heading to my Mom's sister's place to spend the night and then head home.  My Aunt was going to come to our house for Christmas but wasn't planning on coming until closer to Christmas.

As they were driving down the highway, with my Dad driving, a car coming out from a side road didn't stop.  Dad had seen them and had slowed down but still T-boned them, going a pretty good clip.  The other guy had two little girls in the front seat with him, none of them wearing seatbelts.  My Dad and brother were both wearing theirs.

My brother jumped out to go give the guy what for; my Dad struggled because his door would only open a foot and hollered to my brother to make sure they were OK first, before he lit into the guy.   :D  Police showed up, wanted my Dad and brother to go to the hospital to be checked out.  Dad had seatbelt bruises, brother had bruises on his arms because he braced on the dash (no airbags) but other than that, they were OK and refused to go to hospital.  Police dropped them off at Aunt's house.

So on the day they were expected back home, they arrived with my Aunt.  And that's when we heard what had happened; Dad didn't want to tell Mom over the phone because he knew she'd freak out.  I was just thrilled because I got more time with my favourite Aunt.

Dad called the insurance agent to get moving on that, let him know that Dad was going to buy a new car.  The insurance agent tried to stall him, saying it wasn't a sure thing that the car would be written off.  Dad told him that if it wasn't written off, he didn't want it back.  The engine had moved right back against the fire wall, the sway bars in the trunk were bent; no way was he taking it back, fixed.

So Mom got a new car for Christmas.  Dad went out and bought the same car, put it in the garage with a bow on it and didn't let Mom go see it until Christmas morning.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: cwm on December 13, 2013, 09:45:06 AM
Violinp, that reminds me of my worst Christmas ever. It was just me, but I got sick Christmas Eve, so I missed dad's family gathering, mom stayed home with me. The next day I was running a fever and still sick. We had to reschedule Christmas Breakfast, something that was always at our house because it was mom and dad's immediate families both, and calling people at a time where they may well have left their homes in the days before cell phones to reschedule the location wasn't fun. I watched the scramble and cried because I couldn't have any of the homemade cinnamon rolls. Mom ONLY made them for Christmas, and she wasn't going to save any for me because she didn't know when I'd feel well enough to eat them.

Grandma stayed home with me and skipped her only Christmas time, and then mom and dad and sis went to mom's extended family celebrations. And I will never forget how my sister "accidentally" unwrapped every single of my presents in the back seat, both on Christmas Eve and on Christmas Day. Even the things that were the same between her and me. Every year my dad's mom got all the grandkids a calendar and a pair of gloves. Everyone knew exactly what those two presents were. Sis's and mine were always identical so we wouldn't argue (usually cute kittens or puppies on the calendar and pink or purple gloves) and she still says she forgot and thought they were hers. Even though she could read my name. And had been told not to.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Thipu1 on December 14, 2013, 09:59:36 AM
The most uncomfortable Christmas.

When I was in my early teens, we received a phone call from a relative about another relative i'll call Mary.  I don't remember the reason but although Mary was staying with these other relatives, she would be coming to Christmas dinner with us.  Her hosts would not be attending. 

Normally, this would not be a problem but there was something about Mary that was a bit unsettling.    40 years bafore this Christmas she had murdered her husband with a meat cleaver and had since been living in a facility for the criminally insane. 

My mother should have nipped this idea in the bud but she was a kind-hearted soul and couldn't turn down any request from her in-laws.  Special precautions had to be taken so my parents and I had a
meeting to plan strategy.

Under no circumstances was Mary to be allowed in the kitchen. I was 14. Mary was in her 70s.    I had never met her and had only heard about her in the vaguest of terms.  Still, it would be my job to keep her entertained in the Dining Room or den until dinner was served.  I was to keep the
conversation light and cheerful.  Nothing was to be done that could 'set her off'. 

Talk about walking on egg shells! 

As it turned out, Mary was quite a pleasant lady who read a lot.  We had plenty to discuss.  The only glitch came when Mary stated that she preferred smooth cranberry sauce to the whole berry variety my mother had made. When Mary wasn't happy you could hear a pin drop. 

The encounter wasn't horrible but we all breathed a sigh of relief when the relatives came to take
Mary back to their house.

When you're 14, how often can you say you had Christmas dinner with a distant relative who was also a murderer?
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: aussie_chick on December 14, 2013, 05:20:06 PM
As a child growing up in a household with usually only healthy food (no white bread, only grain, no cordials or soda, only water or occasionally 100% fruit juice etc etc) Christmas was always a time for treats and naughty food in our house. My mother would always ask us what special treat we wanted. For me one year it was Coca Cola. We always had the rule that on Christmas, you could basically do/eat whatever you wanted.

My family still tells the story about the Coca Cola Christmas where I bounced out of bed announcing to the whole family that i was having Coke for breakfast because it's Christmas and i'm allowed to! I had my Coke, it was awful for breakfast and i've never done it again but even now, 25 + years on, my sister still offers me Coke for breakfast on Christmas day!
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Figgie on December 14, 2013, 08:48:03 PM
After we kids were too old for Santa, Mom got bored just putting "from Mom and Dad" on the Christmas tags.  So she started putting down the names of movie stars, TV stars and anyone else who was famous.  She would put those tags on gifts that were things like socks, underwear, nightgowns, robes and so on.

Which led to some hysterically funny Christmas present openings. 

I've carried that on with the kids.  I'm giving our youngest some clothes for her cats.  This is her "toy" present, as she loved to dress her dollies when she was little.  :)  The tags will probably say something like:  "Mike says do NOT open this gift.  Remember, I know where you sleep!"  Spike says:  "Hiss, hiss, HISS, Growl!!!  That means if you even THINK about unwrapping this gift you had better start sleeping with your eyes open!"

Since all of the grandparents are gone, Christmas is now just the four of us and I try to do what I can to carry on some of the funner stuff from their/my childhood.

I still remember when our oldest opened up underwear that my Mom  had put came from Debbie Gibson.  He looked so puzzled and asked her why she had bought him underwear while the rest of us laughed our heads off.  :)
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: gramma dishes on December 14, 2013, 10:19:51 PM

...   (And, it's really really hard to trust a piece of paper you paid 27c. for.  Of course, Christmas day, it wasn't like I could just hop on down to the corner store and buy a second test.  So, I used about $1.08 worth of cheap tests and dealt with the crazy the next day to be able to confirm with something not made by the lowest bidder). ...


Dawbs, I not only loved the happy ending to your story, but I love the way you told it.  I could feel the pain and anguish, the repeated disappointment and the final exhilaration right along with you as I was reading it.

Plus, it was funny!  Fun to read.

 
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: gramma dishes on December 14, 2013, 10:26:30 PM
 
We had bought a tree from the same place we always bought our trees.  One day we heard rain.  Except it wasn't raining.  Yet we continued to hear more and more rain.  Suddenly one of my kids came running up the steps and said, "Mommy!! Mommy!!  Something terrible is happening to our tree.  It's all falling apart."  And indeed it was.  The needles were falling and hitting other needles as they fell, knocking them off like dominoes. 

Oh no!!  Grandma and Grandpa were coming and it would be the first time they'd been to our house at Christmastime.  What to do?

The kids had one of those cardboard houses that hook together at the corner.  They turned it "inside out" so that the plain brown cardboard showed on the outside.  They drew boards on the sides.  We put a cradle in there with a doll and they brought down all their stuffed animals to be at the "manger". 

Grandma was quite impressed.  She thought it was wonderful that we had 'chosen' to concentrate on the real meaning of Christmas instead of having all that commercial holiday stuff.    ;D
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Thipu1 on December 15, 2013, 10:49:29 AM
May we assume that the defective tree was taken down before Grandma and Grandpa arrived?

My Mother's side ofthe family was German so we were what could be what might be gently described as 'Christmas Crazies'. A big tradition was the Christmas Eve afternoon tradition of 'bringing out the bags'. 

Our tree went up as early as possible.  Gifts for friends and relatives were wrapped as bought or finished and put under our tree.  A job of mine was to decorate paper shopping bags that would be used to deliver the gifts. 

On Christmas Eve afternoon, Mom and I would pack up the gifts going to other households.  Dad and I would then drive out to make deliveries.  It was always great fun because other relatives were doing the same thing.  We'd stop at a house, pick up our bag and enjoy a snack with residents. I'd get to chat with my cousins and maybe put an ornament or two on their tree. 

Back home, Mom was playing the host and feeding snacks to other relatives delivering presents to us.  Everybody enjoyed this sort of reverse 'Trick or Treat'. 

After a light Christmas Eve supper, we'd open the bags and put out the gifts we had been delivered under the tree.  Watching the different wrappings come out was always fun. 

You knew that the package wrapped in plain white tissue and tied with red string came from Aunt Carol.  You also knew that the box would contain a cap and a pair of mittens made from scraps she'd collected throughout the year.  They may have looked weird but they were warm. 

The package wrapped in the Sunday comics or the paper patterned with pink and lime Martians
would be from Cousin Jane.  She was the artistic one in the family and her gifts were always cool. They might be a box of colored pencils and a roll of butcher paper but Cousin Jane's gift was always one of my favorites.

Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: gramma dishes on December 15, 2013, 11:03:22 AM
May we assume that the defective tree was taken down before Grandma and Grandpa arrived?  ...


Yes, the new "stable" was constructed in precisely the same spot vacated by the naked tree before my parents arrived.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: NestHolder on December 15, 2013, 03:33:31 PM
We have a "box" story, too. In my extended family, any box will do when wrapping gifts. One year, Auntie wrapped some smaller gifts for my brother in a box that had originally contained envelopes. He unwrapped the box, saw that it was a box of envelopes, and kindly thanked Auntie for the gift.

Later, Auntie realized Brother had never even opened the box, so our mom had him open it and look inside. I think it had some special baseball cards and baseball-themed pencils, etc. in it. Way better than envelopes!

Now every year, someone gets a gift in an envelope box. When it is unwrapped, we act delighted and say "Oooooh, envelopes! Just what I needed! Thank you so much for the envelopes!"

This reminds me that one year my FIL actually asked for cheap brown envelopes for Christmas.  I flatly refused to get him anything so un-giftlike.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: dawbs on December 15, 2013, 07:29:49 PM
Thanks...I told the kiddo about it being the day we found out she would exist and 3 year olds don't quite know what to do with that information ;)
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: faithlessone on December 16, 2013, 06:49:44 AM
Got reminded of one yesterday!

The village where my grandparents live is visited by Santa every year, about two weeks or so before Christmas. He comes around on a sleigh pulled by horses (the reindeer need to rest before the big day!). This has been going on for the last 30 years or so, and my grandparents have always held a Christmas party on the day, which features a trip to see Santa with all the kids.

It's always a fun occasion, but it was particularly funny four years ago. My youngest cousin (Tilly) had just turned 3, and it was the first year that she was really getting excited about Christmas. We had told her that someone special was coming to the village, and if she was very good, she might get a treat.

When the time came, we heard the Christmas music outside, and bells, and our grandparents came to "take us". We left the house, walked up the road to the green, and saw the lights and the sleigh and the horses. I asked Tilly what she was going to ask for, and she said...

"Strawberry with a flake!"

Yup, she thought Santa was the Ice Cream Man.

She was not happy when all she got was a candy cane and a promise that Santa would be back with her presents the following week!!!
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Mikayla on December 16, 2013, 03:16:16 PM
Great thread!  The first thing that occurred to me happened about 5 years ago, when my cousin begged all of us to come to her place for Christmas.  We talked it over and decided it might be different for a change.

A  couple of us stayed at her place, and she had toddlers. Unbeknownst to me, she had some kind of clamps on the toilet for nighttime to prevent them from...doing whatever toddlers aren't supposed to do in a toilet.  Anyway, I woke up in the middle of the night, had to go bigtime, ran into the powder room, and I could not get those things open! 

I had no choice.  I went out front and did my bizness in the bushes.  This set off a sensor alarm, which resulted in several awakened adults (all carrying weapons, including my BIL with a lamp (lol), and a quick call to the cops that all was well.  It's a story that won't die.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Marisol on December 17, 2013, 08:28:18 AM
MiKayla, I would have done the exact same thing. 
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: SeptGurl on December 17, 2013, 09:21:19 AM
Story 1: macaroni and cheese

DH and I were married 5 years ago. He has three adult DSs, and I have a 12-year-old DS from previous marriages. Since we married, we've been starting new traditions for our new family. One of them is that we always attend the Christmas Eve service at church after dinner. We then go home, put on our PJs, drink hot chocolate, and watch "A Christmas Story" on TV. When DS was little and still a "believer," this was followed by hustling him to bed and playing Santa with DH.

A few years ago, my stepsons were coming for Christmas Eve dinner, and I decided to add an item to the Christmas Eve tradition: macaroni and cheese. This is no ordinary mac and cheese. It's kind of fancy and a bit of a production to make. The first year I tried this, I worked in the kitchen grating cheese by hand and organizing all the other ingredients. I turned on the oven to preheat, and that's when it happened: The heating element in the oven lit up like firecrackers. I turned the oven off, but it was still sparking. I had to turn the electricity off at the breaker to get it to stop. Now I had a ton of shredded cheese, family arriving soon for dinner, and no oven. 

DH spun into action and called the nearby grocery store. The manager there set us up with a huge turkey dinner with all the trimmings plus two pies. That took care of Christmas Eve dinner plus some. The day after Christmas, we went out and bought a new stove. The mac and cheese waited until New Year's Eve. And it was still yummy. It also did become our Christmas Eve tradition. DS asks for it every year.

Story 2: If a Christmas tree falls in the living room and no one is there, does it still make a sound?

My freshman year in college, my family put up the Christmas tree during my first weekend back home. It was a Sunday afternoon. My parents bought an enormous tree, and for some reason, they insisted on using the same very small tree stand that they'd always used. My dad struggled with getting the tree into the stand, wrangling and cursing at it. Finally, it was up and ready to be decorated. We spent the afternoon decorating the tree and hanging tinsel all over it.

The next morning, I got up after everyone else had gone to work and school. There was a note on the kitchen table. "Coley, please fix the Christmas tree. It fell last night." I went into the living room, and although someone had put it back up, it was obvious what had happened. The tinsel looked like it had been through a windstorm. Ornaments had fallen off the tree and were all over the place. I spent most of that day putting the Christmas tree back together. First, I had to take all that tinsel off the tree to figure out if ornaments had fallen off the branches or were stuck. The tinsel got all tangled up in the branches when the tree fell. Then I found all the ornaments and put them back on the tree. Then I had to put the tinsel back on. That's the first and only time I have decorated the same tree twice in one year.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Outdoor Girl on December 17, 2013, 09:36:18 AM
Coley, your story reminded me...

I used to babysit for this family.  The first time I was there, I brought my usual bag of tricks - colouring books and crayons, pencil crayons and stencils and a big storybook, just so I'd have something different for the kids to do.  Apparently, the parents wondered if I was expecting to stay overnight, rather than them drive me home when they got in.  And the next morning, they asked the kids what they thought of me.  'We don't like her; she's strict!'  Needless to say, I was their sitter until I went away to University.

So at Christmas time, we'd do all sorts of little crafts to keep them busy.  We strung popcorn and made paper chains and made dough ornaments, along with cookies and muffins and all sorts of stuff.  I arrived at the house one morning to a not very happy Mr. Smith.  You see, when we'd decorated the tree with all the dough ornaments, we didn't get them balanced because we couldn't reach the back and the tree fell over!  Oops.

They would get so excited the closer it got to Christmas and they'd be driving me nuts.  So for some peace and quiet one night, we did a 'Monk's dinner'.  No talking allowed and instead of using a regular utensil to eat your dinner, you had to reach into a bag and choose something.  So you might get a serving spoon or a whisk or spaghetti fork/lifter thing.  I got a little peace and quiet, the kids had a blast.  Their mother told me, years later, that they'd talked about that dinner for ages.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Thipu1 on December 17, 2013, 09:51:32 AM
The first artificial tree in the family.

It was the early 1950s.  Grandma and Grandpa had just celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary.  A big, live tree was their Christmas tradition but they thought a change would be 'modern' and less work.   They ordered an artificial tree from the Monkey Ward catalog. 

The thing arrived and was put up. It resembled a set of green bottle-brushes stuck on a hat stand.  No one was happy and Grandma sent Grandpa out on Christmas Eve afternoon to secure a real tree.

Of course, by that time,, the pickings were slim and there was no time to put the tree in a bucket of water and let it relax in the partially heated garage for a few days. As a result, the real specimen didn't look much better than the fake but it was a live tree and so the tradition was preserved, in a way. 
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Delta on December 18, 2013, 10:55:32 PM
Every year, Mom and I reminisce about what we call "The Christmas Dad got her THAT sweater."

My father, bless his heart, has absolutely NO CLUE how to shop for Mom at Christmas. Up until I was old enough to do the holiday shopping for Mom for him, he'd just give her cash so she could buy herself whatever she wanted.

Until THAT Christmas.

To this day we don't know what got into his head, but apparently a woman who he worked with was a seamstress of sorts. She designed the t-shirts for the company-wide "trivia bowl" contest and I guess Dad was impressed. So he commissioned a sweater for my Mom as his Christmas gift for her.

Dad LOVES music, and actually used to go to a weekly "music trivia" event at his veterans legion each week. He thought that a music-themed sweater would be a good gift.

Mom HATES the color yellow. Its her least favorite color of all - you can see where this is going I'm sure.

So comes Christmas morning, Dad makes a big production out of handing her his gift - mentioning how this is one he KNOWS she's going to love, its super special you see, he had it MADE just for her!! Go on, open it Mom!!!

Imagine, if you will, a short-sleeved wool sweater. A fluorescent yellow wool sweater. With blue, green, purple, orange, red, and black musical symbols all over it.

The look on Mom's face was priceless (how Dad missed it, I'll never know - we both think perhaps he was momentarily blinded by the supernova like glare coming from it.) I quickly had to excuse myself and get a cup of coffee from the kitchen, so not to burst into laughter. Poor Mom was struggling to find enough words of admiration and gratitude to make Dad happy, while I'm sure she was dying a little inside. Dad preened all evening with pride, and of course INSISTED she wear her Christmas Sweater to the family dinner at my Grandmother's house that evening.

The sweater was also about 3 sizes too big.

The next day, Dad said perhaps she could wash it and shrink it so it could fit better???

We dutifully did that.....the fact that the washing machine somehow spewed forth boiling hot water that shrank the shirt to the size of a tea-towel is something nobody could explain *wink*
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Valentines Mommy on December 19, 2013, 01:39:42 PM
Oh, wow! That is hilarious!
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: JoyinVirginia on December 19, 2013, 02:25:48 PM
Delta, your story made me laugh so hard I cried! Thanks for sharing it!
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: HGolightly on December 20, 2013, 10:55:44 AM
Delta that is possibly one of the greatest Christmas stories ever told. I am howling with laughter.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: *new*mommyagain36 on December 20, 2013, 02:22:40 PM
Similiar to pierrotlunaire0's post about 1/2 asleep photos.  My Dad always had this look on his face that I call "Jim from Taxi" in the photos from my childhood (the 70's-80's).  We always woke up at the butt crack of dawn to open gifts and my mother would snap photo after photo.  Dad liked to lounge about in underwear only so Mom would try to avoid photographing him directly but there are plenty of gems where you see his face in the corner or in the background of a pic.  Also, equally hysterical are the photos where it appears Dad was attempting to escape the photo because there would be the occasional "back of a man wearing only underwear fleeing the room" pics as well.   ;D
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Outdoor Girl on December 20, 2013, 03:45:17 PM
This happened a few years ago:

I got $20 GC's for a local grocery store, using my Air Miles points, to give out as Christmas tips.  I left one for the paper carrier.  A few days later, I happened to see him and asked what he'd done with his GC (the previous one spent it on pop and chips  ;D).  He had a TY note for me.  His Mom happened to be helping him that day and I got talking to her.  Turns out, the Dad was working 3 hours away and was only home on weekends, when he was able to get home.  There were 4 kids and the paper route money was helping to support the family.  The boy really wanted ribs for dinner some night and when he got the GC, he took it to his Mom, 'Can we have ribs tonight?'  Mom had planned to make KD for dinner so instead, they got ribs, salad and a loaf of bread, on me.  Mom gave me a hug and I went away pretty teary but feeling good.   :)
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: zyrs on December 22, 2013, 02:05:51 AM
I called my mother today to make sure that what I remember about this specific Christmas actually happened

About 50 years ago, we did a round of visiting relatives Christmas day.  It ended with us being at the paternal grandparents' at the end of the evening.

My favorite present from this group was an air pump cork rifle.  It was as realistic looking as any piece of formed metal and wood could be and I was very happy to have it.  The only drawback I saw to the rifle's spiffiness was the string which attached the cork to the rifle.  I thought the string was lame ... so I removed it.

This made the rifle much more interesting, as I could pump it up and the cork would fly faster and farther the more I pumped it.  So I practiced out in the entrance while the grownups talked and visited and it got later and later.  And I started getting bored.  I knew enough not to shoot it at anyone, but I was getting tired of stacking the block set to see if I could knock it down (the answer was yes, but you had to make sure you had enough pressure).

Then things happened fairly quickly.  I had just finished pumping the air pump for a really long time - my grandmother's very old cuckoo clock hit the hour - I aimed and fired without thinking about it (hey, I was 6 at the oldest) and the cork,  sailing through the air like it had been shot by a rifle, arrived right at the cuckoo just as it came out the little door and knocked it off the clock.

My memory is hazy about everything after that, but I believe it involved corporal punishment and a lot of yelling.
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: gmatoy on December 22, 2013, 03:26:44 AM
I was 18, serving in the Army and was 3000 miles from home. It was my first Christmas away from home and I was so homesick. In our company, we had bays which were divided into spaces; two women to a space. The woman I shared with grew up a few hundred miles from where we were stationed. She refused to leave me and stayed with me that Christmas. I will remember that kindness to my dying day. (Thank you, MJB.)
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Ms Marple on December 22, 2013, 03:31:03 AM
I think Zyrs should have received a medal for shooting the cuckoo. May I bestow you the Honor of the Cuckoo, albeit a few years late?

(My gran also had a cuckoo clock.   ::) )
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: Lady Snowdon on December 22, 2013, 12:57:55 PM
A couple of years ago, my IL's got a ham from FIL's boss for Christmas and that was going to be the centerpiece of our Christmas dinner with them.  It was your standard spiral cut ham, nothing special or fancy.  It was decided that adding the glaze would make the ham harder to cut somehow ( ??? ), so it was just a plain ham that was baked.  FIL decided, as the man in the family, that he is going to carve the ham.  He couldn't figure out how to do so at all.  The ham was being twisted and turned and flopped about, ham juice was flying everywhere, and I didn't know FIL knew so many swear words as he exhibited that day.  We were all dying of laughter, which caused FIL to get very mad at us as well, since we weren't helping.  The best moment came when MIL was trying to clean up some of the mess caused by FIL, who had just successfully managed to cut his first slice (probably ten minutes into trying).  He bellowed, "WOMAN!  Keep out of the kitchen while I'm cutting the ham!", and that was it.  I couldn't stop giggling for the rest of dinner, and we left soon after eating, mostly because there was no point in antagonizing FIL any more than we had to.

FIL is getting another ham from his boss for Christmas this year.  I'm already anticipating what will happen!
Title: Re: Share Your Christmas Stories
Post by: kherbert05 on December 22, 2013, 04:59:12 PM
Palais Royal used to have this day that kids could go in and buy Christmas Presents for their family without adults. I want to say it was kids 5- 12. I felt so grown up. Cousin C and I fought all the time but it was one of those hey that is my cousin/sister/brother no-one but me can pick on her type of situations. Since Cousin C was an definate Alpha girl, it protected me from a lot of the mean girl stuff even though we went to different schools because she went to church with a lot of my classmates. One time this girl started in on me - and was stopped by the words (That is Cousin C's full name 1st cousin and another cousin's full name 2nd cousin) The girl stopped in her tracks said sorry and literally turned on her heels.

So one year I found the "Perfect earrings" for her at the Palais Royal thing. But when she opened them the box was empty. She was so upset and at first thought I had done it to be mean. MOm and Aunt pointed out the box had been professionally wrapped at the store and that in the confusion of serving so many kids they must have made a mistake. MOm took us back a couple of days later. The manager fell over himself appologizing and gave all 3 (Cousin C, Me, and sis) 2 pair of earrings apiece.

We had pierced ears - but I HATED them. They always got infected no matter how much I cleaned them and the doctor kept pointing out that having piercing when you have my skin condition is just stupid. (When I got the pierced I told the lady doing and my Aunt Dr. George is going to yell at me and I'm going to tell him to Yell at you instead. He did. I did. He did = yes he actually called my Aunt and chewed her out. He also chewed out my Mom.  Well I finally got away with not wearing my earings so they healed over. So Aunt was going to buy me pierced earings for Christmas and Cousin C asked her why, since my ears were healed and I just gave the earings to sis or her. Thanks a lot cuz. I got hauled down the the jewlery store again. What amazes me as that they did it. I'm the one getting a hole punched in her ear - and objecting very loudly and they still did it. What is really weird is my family isn't toxic, for most things you set your boundaries and at a fairly young age they were respected. But this one thing they pushed.

Then there was the back to back years I "ruined" Christmas, according to little sis. We used to keep my AUnt's dog every Christmas while she flew back to England. Mom noticed that I got sick every Christmas and suspected the dog. So told Aunt we couldn't keep Barnie. Cue Sis not speaking to me. THing was I still got sick. Dad went and picked up our tree, brought it in and set it up. I was sleeping and woke up sick as a dog.

So Day after Christmas Mom goes to the Christmas Store and buys an artifical tree. The next year we get to keep Barnie, but have the artifical. Sis is so steamed about me ruining Christmas because we can't have a real tree, that mom lets her have a wreath in her room. I don't know about it, I come home from school - and 30 minutes later I can't breathe. Mom throws the wreath out. I'm ok a day or so later. Sis goes out and cuts small branches from Pine Trees (we lived in Piney point) sneaks them in her room. I don't get sick. She does a big reveal obviously I'm faking (the only time she ever said that). MOm and Dad do some research - it isn't the trees I'm reacting to. It is the perservatives they spray them down with.