Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange => Food => Topic started by: DangerousKitten on November 26, 2013, 12:14:26 PM

Title: Meat Pies
Post by: DangerousKitten on November 26, 2013, 12:14:26 PM
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Sharnita on November 26, 2013, 12:16:45 PM
Pasties are extremely common in Michigan,  particularly the Upper Peninsula.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: DangerousKitten on November 26, 2013, 12:46:52 PM
What shape are they, and what do they contain?

Here in the UK the classic is of course the cornish pasty which is shaped kind of like a croissant and contains a fairly dryish meat mixture with potato, onion, and often peas, swede or other diced vegetables. A lot of places also serve flat, rectangular pasties containing beef chunks in gravy, and increasingly there are other flavours such as chicken and mushroom or cheese and onion.

I think I saw the guy on Man vs Food trying an American meat pasty, and he put ketchup on it, which I found bizzare and offputting.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: veronaz on November 26, 2013, 12:52:44 PM
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

No, not true.
Chicken pot pie, also beef are common.
Pastries are very common in US, homemade and in bakeries and delis.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Sharnita on November 26, 2013, 12:53:28 PM
Dry, meat, veggies,  potatoes (there is a rutabaga debate with many contending real pasties have them). Kind of half moon shaped, dense. Some people put gravy on them, some add ketchup,  some don't do either.  The area was a huge mining area and I believe they were ideal for miners to bring into the mines with them.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: BigBadBetty on November 26, 2013, 12:57:57 PM
I think pasties are not common in most parts of the United States. However, we have something similar called a pot pie which is common. Pot pies are not as portable as pasties, but I don't know the exact difference. I live in the Midwest. We had influx of miners from Cornwall so pasties are not uncommon. We also have the South American version: the empanada.

Here's article on pasties in the Midwest:
http://expressmilwaukee.com/article-18157-cornwall's-gift-to-the-midwest:-the-pasty.html
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Nikko-chan on November 26, 2013, 12:58:23 PM
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

No, not true.
Chicken pot pie, also beef are common.
Pastries are very common in US, homemade and in bakeries and delis.

I think DangerousKitten is talking about a different kind of meat pie veronaz. Something like this:

http://www.farmgirlfare.com/2012/11/recipe-traditional-english-cornish.html



And to answer your question DangerousKitten, if you have a recipe that is foolproof, yes I would like that recipe. I tried to make pasties before. They... did not come out well.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: DangerousKitten on November 26, 2013, 05:01:57 PM
It's really interesting to see that the traditional Cornish pasty has made it over to the US!

A place near us has started selling traditional miner's pasties - cornish one end, apple the other for dessert.

For my cornish pasties I use all butter for the pastry - I know traditionally lard is used but I find lard pastry gets all fall-apart-y on me.

Pastry:
110g butter
200g plain flour
touch of salt and pepper
2 egg yolks

Insides:
250g minced beef or diced braising/stewing steak
One medium-sized white potatoe
1 white onion
2 cloves garlic
1/2 pint liquid - either beef stock or half beef stock half stout
1 diced carrot
A handful of peas
Any other winter/root vegetables you have lying around, diced - swede, turnip and parsnip all go down pretty well
A little basil and rosemary
Salt
Black pepper

So, 110g butter, 200g plain flour, little salt and pepper, mashed up with cold hands until it forms a kind-of dough. Then knead in an egg yolk to make a proper pliant pastry dough and stick in the fridge.

If I'm doing it properly at this point I already have about half a pint of beef stock made from bones - otherwise packaged beef stock is fine.

Cook 1-2 diced white onions until browning, then add around 500g minced beef (or diced braising steak for extra yum) to brown until it's sticking to the pan. Add the garlic, diced, at the same time as the beef. Pour in the stock (or for a decadent British flavour, half stock half stout) and herbs. Let this simmer for  45-minutes to an hour, adding the vegetables at the appropriate points for them: potato nearly straight away, carrot and other root vegetables not long after, peas near the end.

Do this uncovered and stir occaisionally, more often as the liquid reduces.

Salt and pepper as you're going but bear in mind you will be reducing the liquid down.

At this point you ought to have very little liquid left. The key to getting a cornish to work is making sure the filling is really quite dry; you ought to be able to spoon it like cookie dough. If not, gently heat it to reduce a little more, or consider adding corn flour or gravy granules to thicken it.

Let the mixture cool while you sort out the pastry. It should be rolled pretty thick (this recipe makes one 'sharer' cornish for 2-3 people or 2 individual ones), and in a kind of fat oval shape.

Spoon the *cool* mixture into the middle, pull up the sides till they meet and squish it together with your fingers to create that signature cornish pasty ridge on top.

Glaze it with the remaining egg yolk, and stick on a greased baking tray for about 20 minutes at 160 Celsius.

--

That one never goes wrong for me except if I try to get fancy and use lard in the dough or put the mixture in when it's too wet or not cool.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Harriet Jones on November 26, 2013, 05:58:00 PM
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

No, not true.
Chicken pot pie, also beef are common.
Pastries are very common in US, homemade and in bakeries and delis.

Pasties, not pastries
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Sharnita on November 26, 2013, 06:09:11 PM
Cornish people made it over here, they brought the food when they came.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: katycoo on November 26, 2013, 06:41:57 PM
What shape are they, and what do they contain?

Here in the UK the classic is of course the cornish pasty which is shaped kind of like a croissant and contains a fairly dryish meat mixture with potato, onion, and often peas, swede or other diced vegetables. A lot of places also serve flat, rectangular pasties containing beef chunks in gravy, and increasingly there are other flavours such as chicken and mushroom or cheese and onion.

I think I saw the guy on Man vs Food trying an American meat pasty, and he put ketchup on it, which I found bizzare and offputting.

I would put tomato sauce on a meat pie, sausage roll, or any meat-based pasty.  Seems perfectly normal and delicious to me.

An Australian meat pie is fully contained in pastry (so, not a pot pie) and most commonly contained beef chunks in gravy.  YUM-MO.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: hobish on November 26, 2013, 06:50:28 PM
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

No, not true.
Chicken pot pie, also beef are common.
Pastries are very common in US, homemade and in bakeries and delis.

Pasties, not pastries

Maybe this is a dumb question ... is it still pronounced like it would be without the "r" or is it pasties like repast meaning meal? I am sure it is not based on the one my inner 12 year old is having fun with but I really never heard it pronounced. I've seen things like them in the US but i can't think where. Not HotPockets, somewhere real.  :) The recipe looks delicious.


Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Dazi on November 26, 2013, 06:59:35 PM
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

No, not true.
Chicken pot pie, also beef are common.
Pastries are very common in US, homemade and in bakeries and delis.

Pasties, not pastries

Maybe this is a dumb question ... is it still pronounced like it would be without the "r" or is it pasties like repast meaning meal? I am sure it is not based on the one my inner 12 year old is having fun with but I really never heard it pronounced. I've seen things like them in the US but i can't think where. Not HotPockets, somewhere real.  :) The recipe looks delicious.

Everywhere I've seen them, they've been called empanadas.  I'm not sure if it's the exact same thing or something similar.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Sharnita on November 26, 2013, 07:02:59 PM
"Past" as opposed to "paste".
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: cwm on November 27, 2013, 11:48:36 AM
For me, pasties are a completely different thing altogether, and not at all appropriate for a thread like this. It took me a bit wondering if everyone was just misspelling.

It's not uncommon here to get chicken or beef pot pies, which are miniature pie crusts filled with thick stew-like meat and vegetables, then topped with more pie crust. You can get them in the frozen food aisle, though I've never seen the proper crusts or pans to make them at home, which makes me sad.

I'm actually familiar with meat pies. Every year at the Ren Fest, the Scottish Highland Games, the International Cultural Festival, and Irish Fest there's a meat pie vendor. My friend's dad, raised in Liverpool and Glasgow, has said they're the best meat pies he's had since coming to the USA.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Nikko-chan on November 27, 2013, 11:52:25 AM
Also: since the topic says "Meat Pies" did anyone think of Sweeney Todd?
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: cwm on November 27, 2013, 11:55:56 AM
Also: since the topic says "Meat Pies" did anyone think of Sweeney Todd?

Best meat pies in all of London!
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: hobish on November 27, 2013, 12:09:00 PM
"Past" as opposed to "paste".

Ahhhh! Thank you! I've been saying it wrong in my head all this time.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Ms_Cellany on November 27, 2013, 12:12:26 PM

Everywhere I've seen them, they've been called empanadas.  I'm not sure if it's the exact same thing or something similar.

bit of a threadjack, but I had a lightbulb moment recently when I realized that because pan is "bread," empanadas is "in-bread-thingies."
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: DangerousKitten on November 27, 2013, 12:50:44 PM
It's not uncommon here to get chicken or beef pot pies, which are miniature pie crusts filled with thick stew-like meat and vegetables, then topped with more pie crust. You can get them in the frozen food aisle, though I've never seen the proper crusts or pans to make them at home, which makes me sad.

From the pictures I've seen those are a much lighter, flakier pastry, right? Afraid I only know how to make shortcrust, so I can't help there.

I did make normal shortcrust meat pies in cupcake tins once for 'individual-sized' pies, so they were probably like shortcrust versions of pot pies.

I'd be kind interested to go to a Ren Faire, except I'm worried it might be a little like the last time I was in the states when we went to some kind of castle-themed fast food place and the servers kept coming out with all of the 'funny American is clueless on UK history' stereotype stuff that made me a little embarrassed for them. Literally 'do you know the Queen' kind of things.

I mean, I guess I know a similarly small amount about, say, the US Civil War, but I like to think I am more cognisant of my ignorance.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: cwm on November 27, 2013, 01:52:02 PM
It's not uncommon here to get chicken or beef pot pies, which are miniature pie crusts filled with thick stew-like meat and vegetables, then topped with more pie crust. You can get them in the frozen food aisle, though I've never seen the proper crusts or pans to make them at home, which makes me sad.

From the pictures I've seen those are a much lighter, flakier pastry, right? Afraid I only know how to make shortcrust, so I can't help there.

I did make normal shortcrust meat pies in cupcake tins once for 'individual-sized' pies, so they were probably like shortcrust versions of pot pies.

I'd be kind interested to go to a Ren Faire, except I'm worried it might be a little like the last time I was in the states when we went to some kind of castle-themed fast food place and the servers kept coming out with all of the 'funny American is clueless on UK history' stereotype stuff that made me a little embarrassed for them. Literally 'do you know the Queen' kind of things.

I mean, I guess I know a similarly small amount about, say, the US Civil War, but I like to think I am more cognisant of my ignorance.

Our Ren Faire is so much better than a place like that. Most of the people who work there as character actors or entertainers are actual history buffs. And there's more than a few Anglophiles thrown in for good mix.

Looking it up, shortcrust is probably what they use for pot pies. It's not really all that flaky, it's usually pretty dense to hold in all the delicious meats and sauces. Cupcake tins would be a bit smaller than the ones I usually see, but it wouldn't be a bad idea to try that. It could end up being delicious, I'll have to try it sometime.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on November 27, 2013, 02:13:07 PM
An Aussie meat pie usually has twin kinds of pastry. A kind of short crust which uses lard instead of butter which makes it dense and hard so you can grip it in one hand without bending it. The upper crust is usually a puff pastry, but my favorite pie topping is mashed potato which goes all hard and crispy.

And yes, it's normally served with tomato sauce.

Pasties, traditionally, are last nights baked dinner out inside puff pastry. Meat, potato, peas, carrots all inside a pastry shell folded over. Sweet ones I call a turnover.

We have pot pies quite a bit at home because they're easy, just filling and pastry on top. I make chicken and leek, DH makes beef and burgundy. But the best pies we have are the shepherds pies we make with leftover roast lamb. We get a leg of lamb that's a bit too big for us, roast it, eat what we can and use the rest the next day for pies. Magnificent.

I can make pastry, but DH says I make it too thick. I usually use butter but I also have a recipe for olive oil pastry that's not bad. Pastry does work best with butter though, the olive oil lacks crumb lines and elasticity.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: DangerousKitten on November 27, 2013, 03:28:24 PM

Our Ren Faire is so much better than a place like that. Most of the people who work there as character actors or entertainers are actual history buffs. And there's more than a few Anglophiles thrown in for good mix.
Well if I get a chance I should try to visit one.

We don't have Ren Faires as such, but we do have several castles/ruins you can visit where part of the day is that there are people in costume and character to entertain and educate - mostly for the kids.

There's also the Leeds Armouries, a museum of war and weaponry through the ages, that stages jousts in the summer. But members of the public do not dress up or be in character at these events.

I guess the closest would be war reenactments, which I understand the US has as well, but ours tend to be further back in history so can include similar costumes/characters to a Ren Faire.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: gingerzing on November 27, 2013, 03:56:32 PM
Also in Nebraska they have Runzas which are sort of similar.  I found a recipe for them years ago.
Ground/minced beef browned with chopped onions and shredded cabbage.  Can also put a little cheese in it.   
I think the recipe that I use to have used "bang"biscuits - refrigerated tube biscuits.   Specifically Grands.   
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: #borecore on November 27, 2013, 07:04:36 PM
As far as portable stuffed foods, I'm much more familiar with kolaches (sweet or savory, Czech in origin but expanded upon a great deal in Texas) and empanadas than pasties or hand pies, though I've had them all.

For my money, empanadas win every time. There were pig-shaped ones filled with pumpkin or apple filling that I just loved from the grocery store (minus, for some reason, the caraway seeds in the dough sometimes), and I've made both sweet and savory ones.

I don't eat meat, but I did have a few options from the supposedly authentic Aussie-style pie place in my old city and found the dough ratio really unpleasant. The crust probably has to be thick for them to be portable, but I didn't like it that thick. Maybe I'm just used to thin pie crusts.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on November 27, 2013, 07:15:38 PM
Sitting down with a potato pie for lunch and a neenish tart. :D
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: crella on November 28, 2013, 01:14:45 AM
"Past" as opposed to "paste".

Ahhhh! Thank you! I've been saying it wrong in my head all this time.


Me, too!
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: 123sandy on November 28, 2013, 06:22:29 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch_pie

This is the kind of pie I'm used to at home. I never found anything like it in the USA, including at a Scottish Highland games that had "Scottish" food I had never seen or heard of before. (More points of because the band they had playing was Irish, not Scottish!)  ;)
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: iridaceae on November 28, 2013, 06:36:02 AM
Pasties are found here and there in Wisconsin; Mineral Point in particular had a lot of Cornish miners and there is or was a company based out of the Milwaukee area which makes pasties. Frozen ones. I bought them now and again.

Empanadas are found here in Arizona.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Snooks on November 30, 2013, 02:46:52 PM
What shape are they, and what do they contain?

Here in the UK the classic is of course the cornish pasty which is shaped kind of like a croissant and contains a fairly dryish meat mixture with potato, onion, and often peas, swede or other diced vegetables. A lot of places also serve flat, rectangular pasties containing beef chunks in gravy, and increasingly there are other flavours such as chicken and mushroom or cheese and onion.

I think I saw the guy on Man vs Food trying an American meat pasty, and he put ketchup on it, which I found bizzare and offputting.

I would put tomato sauce on a meat pie, sausage roll, or any meat-based pasty.  Seems perfectly normal and delicious to me.

An Australian meat pie is fully contained in pastry (so, not a pot pie) and most commonly contained beef chunks in gravy.  YUM-MO.

Now I really want a sausage roll.  I've just had my dinner too.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Nikko-chan on November 30, 2013, 02:50:25 PM
can you put ground beef in meat pies?
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Hmmmmm on November 30, 2013, 02:55:34 PM
We've made Natchitoches meat pies with ground beef and pork sausage.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on November 30, 2013, 03:45:52 PM
can you put ground beef in meat pies?
Plain meat pies usually contain mince, or ground beef in gravy. Chunky steak pies are nice though.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: DangerousKitten on November 30, 2013, 05:17:11 PM
can you put ground beef in meat pies?
Yeah, lots of pies over here, in particular cornish pasties, usually contain minced beef (which I believe is the same thing as ground beef).
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Nikko-chan on November 30, 2013, 05:54:10 PM
can you put ground beef in meat pies?
Yeah, lots of pies over here, in particular cornish pasties, usually contain minced beef (which I believe is the same thing as ground beef).

It is the same thing. (and note that I only know that because i have a lot of friends in the UK and I know a bit of British English and am constantly "interpreting" so to speak)
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: FauxFoodist on December 01, 2013, 01:14:16 PM
There's a local take-out restaurant here called "The Pasty Shack."  They sell pasties and fries (chips on the menu).  I tried the Cornish, the Chicken and Veggies and the Vegetarian.  They are okay but nothing special.  I'd give them another shot though.

I've never heard of Scotch pies before.  They look interesting so if I ever see them on a menu around here, I'll give one a shot.  There's a place around here called the "Kilt Pub," but the menu doesn't look any different than the English and Irish places around here (shepherd's pie, fish & chips, bangers & mash), although the owner *is* Scottish from what I've read on Yelp.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: DangerousKitten on December 01, 2013, 04:55:20 PM
I've never heard of Scotch pies before.  They look interesting so if I ever see them on a menu around here, I'll give one a shot.  There's a place around here called the "Kilt Pub," but the menu doesn't look any different than the English and Irish places around here (shepherd's pie, fish & chips, bangers & mash), although the owner *is* Scottish from what I've read on Yelp.
From my experience of Scotland, they're big on all of the British classics such as the dishes you mentioned, they just additionally have a bunch of more specifically Scotch cuisine such as haggis, black pudding, etc. Could be the Scottish owner just thought the more Scottish stuff wouldn't sell, but I don't see why Scotch pies wouldn't. (I can see non-Scottish people shying away from haggis, black pudding and so on).

Legend has it that British favourite pseudo-Indian dish Chicken Tikka Masala was invented in Glasgow as well.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: SamiHami on December 01, 2013, 07:48:20 PM
I am so all over this thread. I am thinking of all sorts of things to put in some pasties...what a wonderful idea! The only really similar thing I've had here in the US is crawfish pies in New Orleans which were spectacularly wonderful-great enough that I have bought them mail order. Now that I'm gluten free I can make my own. It seems these would be great to freeze & reheat!
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on December 01, 2013, 07:53:00 PM
This is the recipe I use (roughly) for shepherds pies.

http://www.bestrecipes.com.au/recipe/leftover-lamb-shepherds-pie-L4791.html

We season the lamb with mint sauce, so the lamb has a wonderful vinegary taste.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Snooks on December 02, 2013, 11:57:24 AM
I've never heard of Scotch pies before.  They look interesting so if I ever see them on a menu around here, I'll give one a shot.  There's a place around here called the "Kilt Pub," but the menu doesn't look any different than the English and Irish places around here (shepherd's pie, fish & chips, bangers & mash), although the owner *is* Scottish from what I've read on Yelp.
From my experience of Scotland, they're big on all of the British classics such as the dishes you mentioned, they just additionally have a bunch of more specifically Scotch cuisine such as haggis, black pudding, etc. Could be the Scottish owner just thought the more Scottish stuff wouldn't sell, but I don't see why Scotch pies wouldn't. (I can see non-Scottish people shying away from haggis, black pudding and so on).

Legend has it that British favourite pseudo-Indian dish Chicken Tikka Masala was invented in Glasgow as well.

Black pudding isn't exclusively Scottish, it makes up part of a full English breakfast  ;) White pudding is Scottish, I've never seen that anywhere south of the border.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: jaxsue on December 02, 2013, 02:25:08 PM
Pasties are extremely common in Michigan,  particularly the Upper Peninsula.

Yep. I grew up just south of the Mackinaw Bridge (which connects the peninsulas), and pasties were common where we were. I miss them.  :-[
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: jaxsue on December 02, 2013, 02:27:33 PM
For me, pasties are a completely different thing altogether, and not at all appropriate for a thread like this. It took me a bit wondering if everyone was just misspelling.

It's not uncommon here to get chicken or beef pot pies, which are miniature pie crusts filled with thick stew-like meat and vegetables, then topped with more pie crust. You can get them in the frozen food aisle, though I've never seen the proper crusts or pans to make them at home, which makes me sad.

I'm actually familiar with meat pies. Every year at the Ren Fest, the Scottish Highland Games, the International Cultural Festival, and Irish Fest there's a meat pie vendor. My friend's dad, raised in Liverpool and Glasgow, has said they're the best meat pies he's had since coming to the USA.

Per the bolded: Pasties (rhymes with past) are a legit thing, and you're likely to get a  :o if you call them anything else where I grew up.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: jaxsue on December 02, 2013, 02:28:56 PM
Pasties are found here and there in Wisconsin; Mineral Point in particular had a lot of Cornish miners and there is or was a company based out of the Milwaukee area which makes pasties. Frozen ones. I bought them now and again.

Empanadas are found here in Arizona.

Empanadas are common in NJ, too. I like them.  8)
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: SamiHami on December 02, 2013, 02:31:22 PM
Interesting, reading up on pasties on the internet. Apparently it is a protected recipe in England now in order to be considered authentic!

I don't care though-I think it's a great idea and intend to make my own Americanized version with whatever appeals to me. And my English coworker laughed when I told her about the protected status, and started rattling off the different ways her grandfather used to make them.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Browyn on December 02, 2013, 09:27:06 PM
Southern Massachusetts/Rhode Island you find "french style meat pies" and every family has a recipe.  Its basically cooked ground meat (beef, veal, pork - what have you) cooked with onions and spices, mixed with mashed potatoes so its solid and baked in a two crust pie.

Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives toured Morin's Diner in my old hometown, and posted the recipe.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/10-inch-french-meat-pie-recipe/index.html

Here is my recipe (much easier but less authentic)

Meat Pie

You need enough pie crust for a two crust pie. Store bought works just fine. While the crust is warming up get out your frying pan. A couple of handfuls of chopped onions (maybe 1/2 cup to a cup full, I keep a bag of chopped onions in the freezer) plus a pound of any ground meat. Last one I used meatloaf mix (beef, veal & pork). Brown the meat and onions. add spices. My Mom just used salt and pepper but I use salt, pepper, garlic powder and onion powder. If you have just pork or ground turkey* you might want sage or something else. Its very mix and match.

Add a little water (1/4 cup?) then start adding dry instant mashed potatoes. A handful at a time until it won't really absorb anymore. If you prefer to use real mashed potatoes eliminate the water and drain the meat.

Put the meat into the bottom crust, pat down firmly and put the top crust on and seal it. Cut some vents in the crust and bake at 425 until golden (30-45 minutes). Serve with gravy - what type depends on the meat.

*with ground turkey used the pre-seasoned stuffing instead of potatoes.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: MurPl1 on December 03, 2013, 06:28:46 PM
I did a market research study once where we were asked our opinion about pies.  I'm in Dallas, Texas.  Everyone had sweet pies on their mind.  Peach, pecan, apple, pumpkin.  Then they started asking us about "savory" pies.  Um, uh, like the minced meat pie grandma made for Thanksgiving every year as a kid? 

Then they started explaining the concept as more "pot pie" but in hand pie format.  So now I've got a mash up of chicken pot pie and the McDonald's fried apple pie in my head. 

So then they brought some out for us to try.  I'm sort of picky but the chicken and beef ones were good enough.  But the fish one?  Not a winner.

Apparently what the company that paid for the research was looking to do was open up a chain of restaurants in shopping mall food courts.  Have an English pub style decor and these savory meat hand pies.  Overall the feedback was "notsomuch"

I haven't seen one pop up in the last 15 years so perhaps they decided Dallas wasn't their market.  But now I suspect I've got a twisted idea of what these meat pies might be. :)
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: PastryGoddess on December 04, 2013, 12:08:47 AM
Not common in the Mid Atlantic area as pasties, but they look and sound just like Empanadas or Calzones to me.  and I LOVE empanadas especially Chilean filled ones.

Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: katycoo on December 04, 2013, 05:53:08 PM
So then they brought some out for us to try.  I'm sort of picky but the chicken and beef ones were good enough.  But the fish one?  Not a winner.

Fish pies and generally very hit and miss.  Chicken IME is often disappointing too.  Beef and lamb and usually winners every time.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on December 09, 2013, 01:38:08 AM
Having this tonight. I bought pies and we have left over one and ham soup.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie_floater
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: FauxFoodist on December 09, 2013, 02:13:46 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch_pie

I just saw these this weekend, which means I saw them a few years ago, too, but didn't remember them.  DH and I went to the annual Dickens Faire, and the meat pie vendor had them.  I would've bought one, but they were $6 (after having to fix multiple things in our house in only a few days, plus buying some things we knew in advance we'd want from the faire, we were hanging back from unnecessary extras at the faire, like the food expense).  I'll have to try one next year when we go.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Thipu1 on December 10, 2013, 07:24:07 AM
Here in Brooklyn, we have a variety of meat pies available

We have empanadas.  They're tasty but quite small.    You'd need several to make a meal.

We also have the Jamaican meat pies.  They're half-moon shaped and come in beef, chicken or vegetable varieties.  The crust on these is flaky. Every so often we'll make an excursion to Flatbush Avenue and pick up a dozen for the freezer from Christie's. 

We're also have an Australian pie shop in the neighborhood.  My favorite is the mince and cheese. 

Of course, calzones are as common here as pigeons.  However, I tend to think of these as a self-contained slice of pizza rather than as a pie.

When we roast a bird it's last appearance on the table will be as a pot pie.  This is made with left-over cooked chicken mixed with vegetables and gravy. It only has a top crust and we make ours using filo. 

 
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: SamiHami on December 10, 2013, 09:27:36 AM
For gluten free people like myself, I was delighted to see an ad for Bob's Red Mill GF pie crust mix! I don't know if it is a new product or if I had just never noticed it before, but I either way I am happy. I'll get some tomorrow and use it to try out my own pasties.

And Thipu1, I have a Jamaican coworker who also happens to be an excellent cook (his jerk chicken is amazing...!!!)  I will have to ask him if he has any good recipes!
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: English1 on December 10, 2013, 11:02:26 AM
"Pasties (rhymes with past)" - not when I say it, it doesn't.  :D

then there are pies that are eaten cold - they are 'raised' pies, with hot water pastry, topped up with meat jelly, like pork pie, or game pie. This is a pork pie picture. Do you have pies like these in the US?

(https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRbrhg2nSfL1DOFgEi2VNIQRhUFwN29coke09b3pj2VESLEQPR4zQ)
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Sharnita on December 10, 2013, 05:40:07 PM
I haven't seem anything like that.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Thipu1 on December 10, 2013, 09:47:24 PM
"Pasties (rhymes with past)" - not when I say it, it doesn't.  :D

then there are pies that are eaten cold - they are 'raised' pies, with hot water pastry, topped up with meat jelly, like pork pie, or game pie. This is a pork pie picture. Do you have pies like these in the US?

(https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRbrhg2nSfL1DOFgEi2VNIQRhUFwN29coke09b3pj2VESLEQPR4zQ)


We do have those but you have to go to a place like the 'Chip Shop' to find them. 
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Browyn on December 11, 2013, 07:49:04 AM
"Pasties (rhymes with past)" - not when I say it, it doesn't.  :D

then there are pies that are eaten cold - they are 'raised' pies, with hot water pastry, topped up with meat jelly, like pork pie, or game pie. This is a pork pie picture. Do you have pies like these in the US?

(https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRbrhg2nSfL1DOFgEi2VNIQRhUFwN29coke09b3pj2VESLEQPR4zQ)


We do have those but you have to go to a place like the 'Chip Shop' to find them.

This is what th Rhode Island pie looks like

(http://cache.thephoenix.com/secure/uploadedImages/The_Phoenix/News/This_Just_In/TJI_pie_main.jpg)
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: katycoo on December 11, 2013, 04:57:08 PM
These pies all look so sad and dry.  Australian pies are full of gravy and meat/vege chunks, not solidly packed with meat.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on December 11, 2013, 05:02:56 PM
I want one now, and I had one for lunch yesterday. :(

With a Neenish tart. They're hard to find these days, Neenish tarts.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: katycoo on December 11, 2013, 05:16:10 PM
Oh I've never liked Neenish tarts.  You can have all those.  I find they're still pretty available at little non-chain bakeries.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on December 11, 2013, 05:24:15 PM
It's hard to find one of those. They've either gone gourmet or cafe like these days. Along with tea buns, cream buns and sponge cakes.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: katycoo on December 11, 2013, 06:47:19 PM
Not everywhere.  I work in the Sutherland Shire and there are quite a few - 3 breadshops and a proper sweet bakery all in walking distance (and that's excluding the supermarkets and bker's delight, and Michels and Gloria Jeans who I think might sell neenish tarts too)
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on December 11, 2013, 08:43:10 PM
Not Gloria jeans. The bakery on the other side of the railroad tricks near my Dads place had Neenish tarts and nice croissants. Luddys has them good too.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Bluenomi on December 11, 2013, 11:20:41 PM
It's hard to find one of those. They've either gone gourmet or cafe like these days. Along with tea buns, cream buns and sponge cakes.

You need to find a Vietnamese bakery. They seem to always have the cool old school stuff. Also bakeries in the suburbs seem to have them more often, I can think of quite a few near me. DD was very impressed with her first needish tart because it was pink.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Ms_Cellany on December 12, 2013, 11:20:40 AM
I'd never heard of a "Neenish Tart," so I looked it up in Wikipedia.

This section appears to me to be in hilarious violation of Wikipedia's neutrality standard:

Imitations

It has become increasingly evident that the major supermarket brands are flooding the market with imitation Neenish Tarts. These imitation tarts do not meet the traditional criteria that the Australian market has come to love. These tarts use a white icing in place of the pink icing adjoining the chocolate half. Predominantly these tarts are sold at Woolworths or Coles, and should be avoided if you wish to enjoy the authentic Neenish Tart experience. http://www2.woolworthsonline.com.au/Shop/ProductDetails?Stockcode=755529&name=woolworths-select-tart-neenish
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: katycoo on December 12, 2013, 06:59:29 PM
I wonder if the writer's only complaint is the colour of the icing?
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Thipu1 on December 13, 2013, 06:55:33 AM
Thanks for the discussion about the neenish tart.  I've never seen such a thing here but, big, black and white cookies are a NYC staple. 
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on December 13, 2013, 03:10:41 PM
I wouldn't be brave enough to try them from Woollies. They'd find a way to ruin it. Also, it wouldn't be fresh cream.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Psychopoesie on December 14, 2013, 03:52:34 AM
I wouldn't be brave enough to try them from Woollies. They'd find a way to ruin it. Also, it wouldn't be fresh cream.

Saw some neenish tarts at Michel's Patisserie today. Can't vouch for taste - not a fan of them generally.

(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5539/11364607764_6fac8fc937.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/69105263@N08/11364607764/)
cake dispay (http://www.flickr.com/photos/69105263@N08/11364607764/) by psychopoesie1 (http://www.flickr.com/people/69105263@N08/), on Flickr

Edited to add the pic.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Bijou on December 16, 2013, 12:54:52 PM
I had them from a place on the peninsula below San Francisco, about 35 years ago.  They called them pasties (pronounced Pah-sties).  What I recall is that they had something like turnip or rutabaga in them as well as beef, potatoes and other veggies.  They were on the dry side, not moist, and the main thing I remember is that they seemed to have a lot of ground black pepper.  They were pretty good.
I don't do pastry type stuff (for the outside) so if I made them it would be just the filling and fake them out with some kind of scooped out roll for the outside.  Warm with butter...on the side of a big bowl of kale soup. 
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on December 26, 2013, 08:06:12 PM
Got some leftover lamb from Christmas we're making into shepherds pies later.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: LTrew on January 24, 2014, 08:26:39 AM
No peas in pasties! That is pasty sacrilege!

Beef, potato, onion and swede (rutabaga) only. The beef can be either chopped steak or "mince" and the pastry can be flaky or short crust.  Also the crimping must be on the side.

Pasties are serious business in my family.  I'm not even allowed to try the other varieties pasty shops here sell or I'd be disowned.  :P

(At home I eat them on a plate, with a knife and fork, and with ketchup.  My husband is dismayed but looks past it.  I have the good sense to eat them properly [with your hands, out of the bag] out in public.)
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Venus193 on June 09, 2015, 08:36:18 AM
In NYC we have lots of different versions of this.  I don't know the name of the Greek version, but those are round and made with filo dough.  There is a place in my area with a full bakery that makes those along with other savory treats.

My version of meat pies is a shortcut and I used to make them when I was in the SCA.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Psychopoesie on June 09, 2017, 10:59:14 AM
LadyJaneinMD, that does sound delicious. Also more like what I'd consider a Cornish pasty than a pie.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Katana_Geldar on June 09, 2017, 08:59:23 PM
The tradition for a Cornish pasty is to put in last nights roast dinner.
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Psychopoesie on June 09, 2017, 09:48:57 PM
The tradition for a Cornish pasty is to put in last nights roast dinner.

Sounds yummy and very practical, though the history of pasties seems to encompass a wide range of traditions over several centuries. Not sure how many of the poor tin miners would've been having many roast dinners back in the day(1700/1800s)?

http://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/The-Cornish-Pasty/ (http://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/The-Cornish-Pasty/)

http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/about-the-pasty/history/ (http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/about-the-pasty/history/)

It's apparently got a protected status as a regional food product within the EU, with strict specifications on how and where it is made to be considered genuine.

http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/about-the-pasty/ (http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/about-the-pasty/)
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Nuku on August 07, 2017, 06:16:57 PM
The tradition for a Cornish pasty is to put in last nights roast dinner.

Sounds yummy and very practical, though the history of pasties seems to encompass a wide range of traditions over several centuries. Not sure how many of the poor tin miners would've been having many roast dinners back in the day(1700/1800s)?

http://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/The-Cornish-Pasty/ (http://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/The-Cornish-Pasty/)

http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/about-the-pasty/history/ (http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/about-the-pasty/history/)

It's apparently got a protected status as a regional food product within the EU, with strict specifications on how and where it is made to be considered genuine.

http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/about-the-pasty/ (http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/about-the-pasty/)

Has somebody told Michigan's UP (Upper Peninsula) about this?
Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: jayhawk on August 11, 2017, 01:34:39 PM
Reminds me of Bierocks (similar to the Runzas in Nebraska USA):

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/24675/bierocks-german-meat-turnovers/

Title: Re: Meat Pies
Post by: Nuku on August 14, 2017, 05:22:37 PM
Reminds me of Bierocks (similar to the Runzas in Nebraska USA):

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/24675/bierocks-german-meat-turnovers/

I used to know someone who had lived in Nebraska until she was 14. When her family moved to Florida, she missed runzas terribly. (I believe she said they were a Czech-American dish.)