Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange => Topic started by: Katana_Geldar on January 21, 2014, 01:43:42 AM

Title: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on January 21, 2014, 01:43:42 AM
Well, do you?

I thought this was something everyone did, but I've heard in so e countries it's seen as almost quaint and a sign of poverty or lack of a dryer. I realise that in certain climates, line drying isn't always possible, but even with access to a dryer I still choose to air dry some things. Sound clothes can't be put in the dryer, and some things like bed linen I consumer a waste of time in the dryer.

I live in an apartment without a dryer. We have a washing machine bug we usually air dry outside or inside in bad weather. DH wants to get a washer/dryer for when the baby comes. But in every backyard in Australia you are almost guaranteed to find a hills hoist, it's absence is often marked.

So, do you air dry your laundry, just use a dryer or use some combination of the two?
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Bluenomi on January 21, 2014, 02:05:45 AM
Line dry here when I can like most Aussies. I only use the dryer in winter if it's wet and only for some things that won't shrink.

When I lived in the UK most people used dryers, none of our neighbours had clothes lines. I hated it, so many if my clothes shrank! Our house also ended up with clothes drapped across radiators a lot.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: cicero on January 21, 2014, 02:35:49 AM
american living in israel here.

we have a portable line thing that we use inside the apartment or on the terrace, depending on the weather. (it's just me and DS). I also never understood why people consider laundry hanging outside a sign of poverty - to me it's just a sign that people live there. Many of the newer construction in israel (probably in the last 20 years or more) have the area sort of covered with slats (where air can circulate but he laundry isn't very visible) like this (http://www.bull-deck.com/Pages/ajax_flip_carusel?PageID=16723):

We do have a dryer but i haven't used it in about 8 years (not even sure it still works) - it's just too darned expensive to run. DS is in charge of the laundry - he sorts, washes, hangs - and he has a whole system of getting it all done on Friday and by Saturday afternoon it's usually all dry. (depending on the weather, he either puts ito on the balcony or in the Living Room near the radiator. )
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Library Dragon on January 21, 2014, 02:45:02 AM
Not outside.  In the summer it's too humid. I have a rack that I hang many of my cardigans on and also a series of screened shelves for drying clothes. 

Sometimes I'll dry things 90% air dry and toss them in the dryer.  It finishes drying them and removes wrinkles.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: iridaceae on January 21, 2014, 02:50:47 AM
I do not. I live in apartment complex and it is written into the lease that you cannot airdry your clothes outside. They turn a blind eye to swimsuits, one or two bath towels (it's presumed they are drying after drying yourself off after swimming) and bathmats as long as it's a temporary drying and not there for days.

Add to that I do not have a washing machine in my apartment and I'm not hauling back wet laundry to dry inside my apartment. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: ktanne on January 21, 2014, 03:03:25 AM
Line dry always - I don't even have a dryer any more, I used it so little - but then again, line drying is pretty easy in Perth!  (on Saturday afternoon, the first lot of washing was dry by the time I went to hang out the second lot... sometimes in summer, I dry things on racks inside, so they don't get too hot & stiff!! haha)

One of the things I hated about the UK was never being able to air dry my clothes (even on warm/ dry days, it always seemed a little too humid for clothes to dry properly).  I find dryers hard on both your clothes & your wallet, and I feel like your washing always smells a bit damp... 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on January 21, 2014, 03:11:45 AM
Queenslander here.

I usually hang stuff outside. Actually I have no choice at the moment. Our dryer died just before we moved house recently and we haven't gotten around to replacing it yet. But when we did have a dryer I'd use it more than I should've, as I just couldn't be bothered hanging it all up. I especially hate hanging out dozens of small things like undies and socks. (I like to pair the socks up before hanging hence making it extra fiddly and time consuming).

I prefer the feel of towels from the dryer as they're softer.

This past winter was very wet and it was a real challenge getting things dry without a dryer. I have no idea why we didn't just go and buy a new one.  ::)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: menley on January 21, 2014, 04:00:59 AM
Living in the US (and growing up in humid Houston), line drying was indeed seen as something that you would only do if you were poor. If you put wet laundry on the wash, it'd likely still be damp days later due to the humidity!

Additionally, I had the same experience as iridaceae with apartments and homes in HOA areas that prohibit line-drying laundry.

Now, living in central Europe, our washer/dryer combo is a disaster, and while our landlord also provides a separate dryer, it is so low-powered that once I timed how long it took to dry a pair of jeans constantly in the dryer - it was 9 hours. That's ridiculous. So I bought a drying rack from IKEA that can hold something like 25 items, and I do laundry just before bed and put the items on the rack. In the morning, they're 95% dry, and I just toss them in the dryer for 15 minutes to get out the stiffness and that last bit of moisture.

Now that I've had that experience, I will definitely be doing the same when we return to the US, because I've noticed that the clothes just hold up better when they don't spend as much time in the dryer. It will have to be inside, though, because we will still have those same humidity issues.

A question for those who do line dry outside - doesn't it smell bad or get dirt or bird droppings on it? Whenever I've been outside there's sort of an undefinable "outside" smell that clings to my clothes, and we have so many birds and squirrels in our backyard in Texas that I wouldn't trust leaving my clothes out there, even if it were permitted by the HOA.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: perpetua on January 21, 2014, 04:05:55 AM
UK here. I tumble dry in the winter when it's too cold and damp to line dry (a new thing for me, I've only just bought one; before I used the clothes airer indoors but my flat is old and cold and it takes a couple of days for things to dry like that). In the summer I hang it outdoors. I'm certainly not going to spend money on running the tumble drier when the sun can do it for free! Electric is expensive here.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on January 21, 2014, 04:26:08 AM
I've never had a problem with birds or small animals wherever I've hung up washing. Occasionally there are insects I find, small spiders and the like, but nothing more.

As for smells, the only smells I've noticed are maybe smoke if there's bush fires about, and sometimes you'd get ash if they were close but that would be it. And I probably wouldn't put my washing out if there were fires about anyway.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: CakeEater on January 21, 2014, 04:33:07 AM

A question for those who do line dry outside - doesn't it smell bad or get dirt or bird droppings on it? Whenever I've been outside there's sort of an undefinable "outside" smell that clings to my clothes, and we have so many birds and squirrels in our backyard in Texas that I wouldn't trust leaving my clothes out there, even if it were permitted by the HOA.

Maybe I don't notice any smell, because I've never owned a drier, but no, I can't say there's an 'outside' smell. My parents have some trouble with bats flying over their house at twilight, so they try to get clothes in before then.

If I leave clothes outside overnight, I'll find that moths are resting in the clothes when I bring them in. Not the clothes-eating kind, just outdoor moths.

It was ridiculously hot and dry today here - it took about 10 minutes to dry a pair of jeans.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on January 21, 2014, 04:35:19 AM
A question for those who do line dry outside - doesn't it smell bad or get dirt or bird droppings on it? Whenever I've been outside there's sort of an undefinable "outside" smell that clings to my clothes, and we have so many birds and squirrels in our backyard in Texas that I wouldn't trust leaving my clothes out there, even if it were permitted by the HOA.

I can't say I've ever experienced that, and I've never personally come across anyone else who's had those problem either. Quite the opposite actually - if I've left a load in the washing machine too long (which has happened one more than one occasion... ::) ) then the quickest way to get rid of the smell is to rinse it again and then hang it outside in the fresh air.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Psychopoesie on January 21, 2014, 04:42:42 AM
Sheets dried outside smell like the sun and fresh air. Lovely to put them straight onto the bed. Best sleep ever.

Have had no problems with birds or other animals when drying clothes outside. Occasional insect wandering in.

Use the dryer in winter here (or a clothes horse for the more delicate stuff) and for towels because they feel so much softer.

Didn't have a dryer growing up in Darwin (very hot and humid all year round) yet didn't have major problems getting stuff dry outside except in the wet season. Then it could be hard to find enough rain free time to dry out the clothes properly.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Iris on January 21, 2014, 04:56:41 AM
Like a 'proper' Aussie I have a largish backyard that features a hills hoist and I use it all the time. At the moment it would be rare for it to be empty at all because the we hang out swimmers and beach towels on it after the pool or the beach. I own a dryer which I use for the bath towels (softer) and emergencies but that's all. I find it wrecks clothes.

As to birds, they won't roost on a line when there are clothes hung there although they will use it when it's empty. Dirt would only be a problem if there were a dust storm which is very rare where I live now, and where I used to live you saw it coming and brought the washing in. As for smell, I like the 'fresh air' smell of line dried clothes and dislike the 'indoors' smell of dryer clothes so maybe it's personal preference.

I had a friend who went on exchange to a Scandinavian country where it was too cold to use a line and she used to hang her clothes outside for a while after they dried because she got so homesick for the smell.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on January 21, 2014, 04:58:08 AM
UK here, I line dry in the summer, and put stuff on radiators or a clothes horse in winter. I think tumble driers are wasteful, plus the smell of outdoor-dried laundry is wonderful.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: oz diva on January 21, 2014, 05:03:51 AM
I do not. I live in apartment complex and it is written into the lease that you cannot airdry your clothes outside. They turn a blind eye to swimsuits, one or two bath towels (it's presumed they are drying after drying yourself off after swimming) and bathmats as long as it's a temporary drying and not there for days.

Add to that I do not have a washing machine in my apartment and I'm not hauling back wet laundry to dry inside my apartment.
This actually makes me weep for the planet.

I love line drying, washing smells so good when it's line dried. I have never had a problem with bird poo or odd smells. Not to mention that sunshine is the best way to get tomato stains out. And it's FREE!!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: iridaceae on January 21, 2014, 05:07:47 AM
This actually makes me weep for the planet.

I love line drying, washing smells so good when it's line dried. I have never had a problem with bird poo or odd smells. Not to mention that sunshine is the best way to get tomato stains out. And it's FREE!!

I figure I make up for it by living in an apartment and not having kids.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: oz diva on January 21, 2014, 05:12:53 AM
This actually makes me weep for the planet.

I love line drying, washing smells so good when it's line dried. I have never had a problem with bird poo or odd smells. Not to mention that sunshine is the best way to get tomato stains out. And it's FREE!!

I figure I make up for it by living in an apartment and not having kids.
Sorry, I'm not blaming you, I'm blaming the policy.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on January 21, 2014, 05:14:25 AM
Why is it written into the lease that you can't airdry your laundry? Is it because it looks 'messy'? I want to whack whoever decided that rule! What a snob! And let me tell you, the effects of climate change are a whole lot messier than a bit of laundry.

Of course, I don't blame the people who have to abide by the rule, but the person who made it makes my blood boil.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on January 21, 2014, 05:20:12 AM
From what I understand, laundry lines are associated with poverty and can look rather unsightly in an apartment complex. And some people do t like the look of washing on the line, particularly underwear. Personally, I don't mind it. It s a fact of life. We wear clothes,clothes need cleaning.

Where I live, we aren't allowed to have laundry on the balcony, either over the railing or on a clothes horse. But we have a drying area outside to do laundry in (though it can get crowded and some of the lines need restringing). My dad had to take down a washing line on his balcony and he has no such place for drying clothes, but then he lives by himself.

I found this article, I honestly wonder about the author. I've never had any if these problems myself.
http://laundry.about.com/od/linedryinglaundry/a/6-Reasons-To-Not-Dry-Your-Clothes-Outside.htm
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: iridaceae on January 21, 2014, 05:36:41 AM
Where I live Valley Fever( well the Western US's version of it) is endemic. I have wondered if drying outside is a bad idea because of the spores would get onto clothes.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on January 21, 2014, 05:45:56 AM
Where I live Valley Fever( well the Western US's version of it) is endemic. I have wondered if drying outside is a bad idea because of the spores would get onto clothes.

I'd think that the risk of catching an airborne disease (or being adversely affected by spores, dust, etc) would be about the same whether you line-dried your laundry or whether you just went outdoors, opened doors/windows, or whatever. Unless you're going to extra lengths to prevent disease (masks, extra washing, etc), then I can't imagine that the risk is appreciably higher.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: iridaceae on January 21, 2014, 05:49:43 AM
Where I live Valley Fever( well the Western US's version of it) is endemic. I have wondered if drying outside is a bad idea because of the spores would get onto clothes.

I'd think that the risk of catching an airborne disease (or being adversely affected by spores, dust, etc) would be about the same whether you line-dried your laundry or whether you just went outdoors, opened doors/windows, or whatever. Unless you're going to extra lengths to prevent disease (masks, extra washing, etc), then I can't imagine that the risk is appreciably higher.

During certain times of the year they will issue warnings about Valley Fever and how if you have compromised immune systems, are elderly etc. you should stay inside and not open windows. It can be nasty; one of the local newscasters contracted it and was hospitalized tor two ir three weeks.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Dazi on January 21, 2014, 05:50:34 AM
I'd love to, but I simply cannot.  My allergies are so bad that line drying outside would just have me rewashing the load to get the pollen off (pretty much if it's a tree, grass, or mold, I'm allergic to it). I live in Florida and there is pretty much outdoor allergens year round, it's just worse during certain times of  the year. I used to line dry and then toss in the dryer for a few minutes, but I was still breaking out in hives.  I do line dry my non-dryer clothes on an indoor rack...there isn't room for all my laundry on it though.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Carotte on January 21, 2014, 05:56:26 AM
I have to air dry in my small Parisian flat. No dryer, we'd have trouble to find a place for it and washer/dryers are not good enough on their own.
In the summer it's ok, we have a wire rack in front of the window, drape the bed linens over the closets doors and everything is dry in a matter of hours.
In the winter it's cold and humid, putting everything that I can on hangers and hanging them all over cuts down on the drying time. A hanger-hanging shirt will take maybe 6hours versus 24 and more on the rack. The rack just doesn't allow enough air flow.
If they're all bunched up on the rack with clothspin my SO boxers take days to dry, and I don't like always having the rack open and taking place in the bedroom.  :(
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Jones on January 21, 2014, 07:11:13 AM
Western US here. We don't air dry outside for a multitude of reasons. We do have lines strung through the hall and family area. I hate how they look but put tinsel on them at Christmas and streamers at parties so I hope people think they are part of my decorating plan.

When it is warm we hang the laundry and turn on the fans and the house cools nicely.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 21, 2014, 07:45:34 AM
In my area, there were some housing developments that had rules prohibiting clothes lines.  Not exactly HOA but it was a local by-law or something.  It has been struck down at a provincial level but they can still prohibit some types of outside lines.  For example, it has to be a compact one that can be removed and put away once the clothes are dry.

Not that there's any prohibition in my neighbourhood but my neighbours have this type of line dryer and use it as long as there isn't snow on the ground.

I don't dry my laundry outside.  It adds too much work for me that I can't handle.  I'd have to take my laundry basket out the garage door, circle around outside the house into the back yard and then up to the deck if I had a traditional line.  I do end up hanging a bunch of stuff, mostly shirts, lingerie and high tech fabrics, to dry on a rack I have in my bedroom.  I do 4 loads of laundry every 3 weeks and usually only have 3 dryer loads because I can combine a couple of washer loads into one dryer load when I pull out all my shirts.

I remember reading a story about a woman who line dried everything.  She had an older bachelor neighbour and her mother thought she shouldn't hang everything out on the line so as not to offend this gentleman.  The woman ignored her mother and carried on.  And found out when her neighbour's 50th birthday was.  So she proceeded to hang 50 pieces of lingerie out on the line that day.  Neighbour apparently got a good laugh out of it.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Flibbertigibbet on January 21, 2014, 07:55:36 AM
UK here and I line dry everything in the summer and use radiators etc inside in the winter. I do have a dryer, but use it only very rarely because of the expense, and also because I don't generally need the items that are drying for a couple of days or more so have time to wait for it to dry naturally. If I need the item faster, then I use the dryer.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: camlan on January 21, 2014, 07:56:50 AM
US here.

Growing up, we pretty much line-dried everything outside whenever possible. (Military family, some places we lived didn't have outside clotheslines and we weren't allowed to put one up.)

As an adult, living mostly in apartments, it's been mixed. In my current place, there is no place outside to dry clothing. Some things can be dried inside, but during the humid summers we have here, stuff takes days to dry indoors and can start to smell before it is dry. So pretty much everything goes in the drier.

In the winter, with the heat on, things dry much faster. But there isn't room to hang up a sheet to dry, so I probably dry half my laundry in the machine and half on drying racks in the house in the winter. And I have to admit, dragging a full laundry basket of wet, heavy clothes up two flights of stairs gets tiring. Stuff would freeze outside before it would dry, most of the winter. (Right now, it is 4 degrees F (-15 C).

I have had apartments with outdoor drying areas and did take full advantage of them. My last place was a Boston three decker--a three family house in a neighborhood full of 2 and 3 family homes. The area was built up during the 1920s, and pretty much all the houses had at one time had clotheslines. Mostly pulley clotheslines that extended from the back porch to a tall pole in the back yard, so that the people living on the second and third floors wouldn't have to carry their laundry up and down stairs--they could just go out to the back porch and hang it up. My next door neighbors still had the pulley clotheslines, and you could see markings on the pole where my apartment must have had one as well, but it was long gone.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: cutejellybeen on January 21, 2014, 08:12:54 AM
I live in Eastern Canada (The atlantic provinces) lines are used by about 50% of the people I would say. I never grew up using them, and therefor cant stand having my clothes dried on a line outside - I find them stiff, crunchy and they smelled odd.

I lived with my ex at his parents house one summer. I did all my own laundry, but one day came home to find that his mother didn't like how I was doing her precious baby's things and had put all my laundry through the wash, and had a line out of my underwear for the neighbourhood to see. I went to a laundromat after that. (I.was.livid.)

That said, in my own house, I have a clothes horse for most of my clothes that might shrink in the dryer. The only things I use the dryer for are socks, underwear, towels and sheets. My hubby puts most of his things in the dryer.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on January 21, 2014, 08:15:41 AM
I think the clothes only go stiff if you don't use fabric softner. I also don't give two hoots about anybody seeing my pants. It's just some fabric. If anybody finds that salacious in this day and age, more power to them. They are going to be SHOCKED when they discover the internet.  ;)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: VorFemme on January 21, 2014, 08:22:22 AM
I'm 56 - I grew up in West Texas with a clothes line in the back yard of my house (and most of the relatives' houses) until I was 16 or so - the climate there can be described as "semi-arid" or possibly "mostly dry".

But, as times changed, clothes dryers became an appliance instead of wires or thin rope strung across the backyard.

My allergies to pollen, mold, and dust do better with the clothes in the dryer - my clothes might last a bit longer if they stayed OUT of the dryer...some of my pants might even BE longer if they hadn't shrunk in the dryer!

On the whole - I don't miss hanging clothes on the line and brining them in (I was the oldest and got to take over that chore as soon as I was tall enough - or at least "checking" the line for Mom to see if things were dry yet).  On a windy day in West Texas, towels might be almost as soft dried outside as inside and it might take about the same amount of time (less than an hour), too. 

Sheets smelled good - but my allergies act up less if the sheets are done in the clothes dryer instead of the clothesline...and in Houston, the weather is still humid enough that things don't dry that fast as well as the Home Owners' Associations having all kinds of rules about what can be seen from the street - so a discrete line that could be put away when not in use might be okay, it might also catch some flack if you left clothes on it "too long"....and in a humid climate, things just don't finish drying in only an hour.....

Anything with elastic (Lycra or other stretchy fibers) in the fabric or garment gets hung to dry inside (no hideaway clothes line outside) - bras, swimwear, sweaters (pullovers) that are loosely enough knit to look like "hand knit" instead of t-shirts, and the like still get hung to dry inside, under a ceiling fan, if possible (faster drying).  But that's to protect them from being damaged by the heat of the clothes dryer....
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Harriet Jones on January 21, 2014, 08:38:25 AM
Our neighbors use their clothesline all the time.  (We're in the US).  I rarely use ours.  Rain, air quality, and sheer volume of laundry keep me from using it more.  I'll line dry some things inside, though.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Sophia on January 21, 2014, 08:42:21 AM
We don't line dry and we have a dryer that stopped heating about a year ago.  In my city (in the top 50 biggest in the US), clothes lines are illegal.  Although almost everyone has a fenced backyard, so if you had a line it is unlikely anyone would complain. 

But, I do have an obscenely large laundry room.  Probably 8'x10'  (I don't have a large house, and the master bath is 6'x8').  Just large laundry rooms were a fashion when my house was built.  I have a clothes rod going across the room high overheard.  So, if it can be hung on a clothesrod.  I hang it.   In a few months we will be moving to a house with gas, and we'll be getting a gas dryer then.  But, for a long time we were perfectly happy to just have the electric dryer tumble the clothes until they were dry.  Only towels took a long time. Maybe it is because I am hanging them up inside, but towels are incredibly stiff if hung up.  My skin is extremely sensitive, so I don't use fabric softeners. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: veronaz on January 21, 2014, 09:12:48 AM
Midwest USA

I almost never see clothes hung outside anymore, except in rural areas out in the country – and even that is rare.

It used to be common, but not so much anymore.  When I was a kid living on the outskirts of town we hung clothes out using clothespins all the time.  I love the smell of fresh sheets that have been dried outside!  :)

But I also recall running with my mother out to take things down if it started to rain.  Also, I don’t remember what we did in the winter.

I have a drying rack (small) that I use for lingerie or even a towel after I wash my hair sometimes.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: camlan on January 21, 2014, 09:16:00 AM
Drying things outside when it is windy will help to keep them from getting stiff. Ironing them after they dry will also un-stiffen them. But so will wearing them for about 5 minutes.

Looking back, even though we line-dried most stuff when I was a kid, there were also 9 people in the family. We did 2-4 loads of laundry a day, except Sundays. Sure, we could miss a day here or there, but if it was raining for days on end, we also used the dryer. There was simply too much laundry to miss more than a day or two here or there.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: #borecore on January 21, 2014, 09:40:40 AM
We use the laundromat's dryer for anything that's not delicate or prone to shrinking. It works poorly (takes for-ev-er), but we don't have space for 3 weeks of clothes to dry in our apartment (we do laundry every 2+ weeks). I have a folding wire rack for the delicates. There is literally no way to hang anything outside at our apartment -- we have screened-in windows, no porch, and we're on the third floor in an urban area.

I find clothes that were dried outside unpleasantly stiff to wear, and smelly (and often dirtier than when they came out of the wash). Sheets or towels are even worse. (And no, I don't used scented fabric softener in the dryer.)

Growing up (Texas coast) we only regularly hung beach towels and swimsuits and large, fluffy blankets that didn't fit in the dryer; I believe we line-dried more when we lived in Michigan.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Thipu1 on January 21, 2014, 09:48:04 AM
NYC here.  Where we live it would not be possible to line dry laundry.  Many people who live in brownstones have backyards so they might but it couldn't be seen from the street. 

We have a drier and use that. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Jones on January 21, 2014, 09:57:04 AM
Continuation of previous post...

In my area, line drying outside when there's so much as a breeze results in dirt attaching itself to the damp seams and then drying on. More than a slight breeze and there's a good chance of losing some of my socks or other small laundry, and almost definitely have to rewash the bigger stuff. Those are some of the reasons I don't hang laundry outside...others include, but not limited to, cottonwood trees, ragweed, thieving perverts (more of a concern where I used to live than here), my forgetting a thing out there and having to rewash it, the weather changing 3 times a day, the funny marks left by the wires, and neighborhood cats. We don't use fabric softener because DH has sensitivities of varying degrees to every brand I've tried, and even when we hang stuff in the house we generally tumble dry it when damp to get the stiffness out.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Redwing on January 21, 2014, 11:32:26 AM
I live in the Midwest, about 35 miles northwest of Chicago, to be exact.  We line dry outside as soon as it is feasible in Spring and as late into the Autumn as we can.  Love the smell of line-dried sheets and towels!  In the winter, we hang our laundry on 2-3 racks.  Yes, they take longer to dry, but the clothes seem to be the better for it.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: magicdomino on January 21, 2014, 11:59:15 AM
Mid-Atlantic area of the U.S.  Thanks to pollen allergies, I can't line dry as much as I'd like.  Bedding pretty much has to go in the dryer, but I can get away with jeans and shorts outside, at least if the oaks aren't in full pollen dispersal mode.  I don't worry too much about what the neighbors think as the neighbors on both sides have 6 foot privacy fences.  Then again, I've wondered if the neighbor on the clothesline side put up the privacy fence partly so that he doesn't have to look at my clothes.

In winter, I have a wooden clothes rack next to the fireplace for jeans, sweatpants, bras, and anything else that I don't feel like putting in the dryer..
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: BigBadBetty on January 21, 2014, 12:23:19 PM
I live in Midwest USA. I use a dryer for all things but shirts, bras, nice pants and other delicates. I have a drying rack and also use hangers on the shower rod. I live in an apartment-style condo so I would have nowhere to hang it. My boyfriend lives in the country. He doesn't have a line to dry clothes. His neighbors use theirs often. We couldn't dry sheets outside anyway due to his allergies. We can't use fabric softener either or he will be itchy.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: kckgirl on January 21, 2014, 12:55:20 PM
I have a clothes drying rack (http://www.qvc.com/Green-Rack-High-Capacity-Foldable-Drying-and-Storage-System-Search-Results.product.V32256.html?sc=V32256-SRCH&cm_sp=VIEWPOSITION-_-1-_-V32256&catentryImage=http://images-p.qvc.com/is/image/v/56/v32256.001?$uslarge$) where I hang delicates and occasionally sheets and towels. My other clothing goes about 15-20 minutes in the dryer to knock out any wrinkles, then gets hung on hangers and put on my other rack (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Hodedah-Double-Post-Coat-Rack/28762121) with a fan blowing on it.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 21, 2014, 03:06:30 PM
Southern US. I'm late 40s and haven't lived in a house with an outside clothesline since I was 5. The only things that don't go into the dryer are sweaters or delicates and those go on an indoor clothes rack.

I know lots of people like the smell of outdoor dried clothes but I hate that smell. My mom would put blankets too big for the dryer outside to hang and I couldn't wait for that smell to go away. Occasionally I'll need to hand wash a delicate item to wear quickly and will hang it outside to dry in the sun. I end up wearing too much perfume to mask that "wonderful" outdoors smell.

And I like the outdoors. I do tons of hiking, camping, walking. I just don't want my clothes to smell like that. (My nose is wrinkled just thinking about it).

Line drying also seems like a lot of work.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: guihong on January 21, 2014, 03:25:37 PM
I grew up in suburban Midwest and now live in the upper South.  I've never hung clothes out to dry in the States.  I didn't see it as a kid; only in the country.

We had a dingy clothesline outside our room in China.  It almost wasn't worth washing the clothes, as hanging them out in that smog and particulates just re-dirtied them.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: katycoo on January 21, 2014, 04:06:09 PM
We line dry too.  We have both an outside line and an indoor airer rack.  The dryer only gets used in wet weather.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Silversurfer on January 21, 2014, 05:28:40 PM
Another Australian here!
We live in a house with a backyard and a hill's hoist.
We line dry all our clothes, sheets, towels, etc. We did buy a dryer a few months ago - we have a DD who is 4 months old in cloth nappies so we needed the dryer in case of emergencies!
The dryer rarely gets used, maybe once a month and normally for more emergency things, like needing to quickly wash and dry pajamas or something like that.

I have never had any problems with bird droppings or dust on my clothes that have been hung out to dry. I also dont rewash if they get rained on, i consider that a rinse!

When i lived in an apartment in Singapore we always dried our clothes outside. Basically you put you clothes on a big bamboo rod (usually inserting the slevees, pant legs over the rod so they cant fall off) then put that whole thing out the window where it sticks straight out perpendicular to the building. Underware was dried inside or outside, depending on your mood.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: kckgirl on January 21, 2014, 05:38:58 PM
One of my neighbors said that when it was supposed to rain her mother washed her sheets and towels so they could get the rainwater rinse on the clothesline. She said it made them softer.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: blue2000 on January 21, 2014, 05:46:43 PM
Southern Ontario, Canada. I don't line dry outside - I live in an apartment. I used to line dry most things inside, but they take forever to dry in the winter (I don't have the heat turned up much) and they start to smell funny. So right now I use the dryer.

If I ever get a nice place I'm drying everything outside. The clothes last longer and they don't shrink.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: emwithme on January 21, 2014, 05:50:08 PM
UK here.

Grew up with line drying only, now could not live without my tumble drier. 

I *love* the smell of line dried sheets and towels but, of the four places I've most recently lived in, we only line dried in one (two flats ago).  Our last flat had no outside space at all (first floor flat above a chip shop!), an earlier one had a roof terrace only accessible by a (very steep) ladder through a sky-light and our current property has a communal garden (with holes in the ground that you can put a rotary drier into) but we only moved in in September so missed the summer. 

However, due to my disabilities, I find it very difficult to peg washing out and so it's far easier for me to just pop the wet washing into the dryer, turn a dial and press a button, and hey presto. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Promise on January 21, 2014, 07:15:06 PM
I didn't have an outside line in the suburbs and was beyond happy that when I moved to a small town that I had a pole in the ground and a line to the shed. There is nothing better than the smell of line dried clothes.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Julian on January 21, 2014, 07:25:51 PM
Another Aussie here.

I just put up a folding external clothes line on Saturday - the old Hills Hoist at Chez Backwater hasn't been fit for use in the whole time I've lived here.  I've been using a folding inside clothes line and hangers and the clothes dryer up until now.  The new line is on the north side of the house, so full sun all day, but the Hoist is on the south side, and gets lots of shade - silly spot to put it really.

I can't recall any place I've lived where there wasn't an outside line. 

The only time I've had a problem with clothes on the line was years ago, when I left some white sheets out when the mulberries were in season.  Washing sheets after the flying foxes have pooped mulberry all over them is not fun.  Not so many flying foxes down here, so it's not an issue.

The only plants I seem to be allergic to aren't growing locally, so there's no pollen problems.  I will avoid using the line if there's fires around.  The climate here in winter is not the best for line drying either - sometimes the fog doesn't lift all day - so I imagine the line will get less usage then too.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: kherbert05 on January 21, 2014, 09:06:23 PM
Houston - In the summer if you hung something outside to dry there is a good chance it would mildew before it dried. There is also the polution and pollen. Air drying outside during ragweed season - it would be kinder to take a belt sander to my skin. I have a clothes horse I use for clothes. Sheets and towel are in the drier.

On PEI - at least in the summer all my relatives hang clothes to dry. They have driers if it is raining and also for the winter.

West Texas - They were in the middle of a 10 year drought when I lived there. It there was any wind -and there is always wind - clothes hung outside would be loaded with the dust. We couldn't even leave our swimsuits outside to dry. They would be a muddy mess. If it rained - it rained mud.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Dindrane on January 21, 2014, 10:35:46 PM
I'm in the US, and I have a washer/dryer combo machine that is kind of on its last legs. We're trying to baby it so we don't have to replace it before we move (which will be in the next couple of years). We had long been out of the habit of tumble drying everything, choosing instead to hang stuff up on hangers over the shower rod.

I hang up just about all of my clothes that way so they don't shrink, except that now my pants are all rather baggy on me so I dry those to make them shrink a little. They do last longer, and end up being less wrinkled (since I'm careful when I hang them up).

But I'm absolutely not willing to dry my clothes outside. I really dislike how line-dried clothing feels, and it seems like it would be too much of a pain. It's one thing to hang up shirts and pants on the hangers they will hang off of in my closet. It's another thing to hang up an entire load of laundry with clothes pins.

I'm also never willing to air dry sheets or towels. They're too big and hold too much water to dry properly in any climate I've ever lived in. We don't like to risk washing or drying them in our combo unit these days, so we take them to the coin-operated machines in my apartment complex.

I also prefer not to use fabric softener. My husband kind of insists on using dryer sheets, but fabric softener can interfere with the absorbency of a lot of things (like towels), and I don't really feel that my clothes are any softer when I use it vs. not.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Mrs S on January 21, 2014, 11:33:27 PM
Aussie here (and a desert one too)

Where i live you would be silly to use a dryer, those who have one only use it 3 or 4 times a year if you are lucky (only need it when it rains)

I am very lucky and can do all my washing in one day. You wash load A then hang it out, then put load b on, when that is finished you hang it out then get load A off. Everything dries in about 5-10min nearly all year round (winter takes overnight if you put it out close to 4pm, as the temp drops majorly).

Hubby wants a dryer but i have told him we needed a chest freezer (our chriisy pressie yay!) and my 30 year old vacum cleaner replaced first.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: perpetua on January 22, 2014, 02:15:24 AM

I'm also never willing to air dry sheets or towels. They're too big and hold too much water to dry properly in any climate I've ever lived in.

One thing that occurs reading this: Climate issues aside, how fast do US washing machines spin? I know they're different, what with the top loading thing and all, so I wonder if they don't spin as fast as our front-loaders and don't get enough moisture out to make line drying effective.

I can't get my head around the idea of a town that makes drying outside illegal, as someone posted unthread (sorry, can't find it to quote right now). What's the thinking behind that, does anyone know?
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: cicero on January 22, 2014, 02:58:05 AM

I'm also never willing to air dry sheets or towels. They're too big and hold too much water to dry properly in any climate I've ever lived in.

One thing that occurs reading this: Climate issues aside, how fast do US washing machines spin? I know they're different, what with the top loading thing and all, so I wonder if they don't spin as fast as our front-loaders and don't get enough moisture out to make line drying effective.

I can't get my head around the idea of a town that makes drying outside illegal, as someone posted unthread (sorry, can't find it to quote right now). What's the thinking behind that, does anyone know?
i was about to ask the same question - when we remove our wash from the washer - it's "just" wet, not dripping, not full of moisture.

I'm glad i live in a place where the weather is (most of the year) conducive for line drying, there isn't that much pollution, it's not too humid and it's not illegal to dry my clothing. ???
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on January 22, 2014, 03:30:17 AM
I'm glad i live in a place where the weather is (most of the year) conducive for line drying, there isn't that much pollution, it's not too humid and it's not illegal to dry my clothing. ???

Ditto. The illegal situation blows my mind. :o
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: crella on January 22, 2014, 03:47:47 AM
I live on Awaji island in Japan. The situation is mixed here, but in single-home situations in our area most laundry is hung out. The Japanese do laundry daily, due to smaller washing machine sizes and lack of space for many days of dirty laundry. High humidity also makes it impractical to leave laundry unwashed for long. Housing developments usually don't have any rules about laundry (the only place I can think of that might in my area is Rokurokusou, a VERY ritzy gated community, where celebrities live). Condominiums do! Some don't let you hang out anything, some just don't let you hang out futon (Japanese bedding, not like American futon). For the Japanese lots of different colored bedding hanging off all the balconies looks like poverty  :D Regular laundry hanging out means your house is CLEAN, flaunt that laundry!  ;D If someone doesn't have laundry out for 4-5 days, neighbors may ask if you're ok, or assume you're away :D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on January 22, 2014, 03:55:31 AM

I'm also never willing to air dry sheets or towels. They're too big and hold too much water to dry properly in any climate I've ever lived in.

One thing that occurs reading this: Climate issues aside, how fast do US washing machines spin? I know they're different, what with the top loading thing and all, so I wonder if they don't spin as fast as our front-loaders and don't get enough moisture out to make line drying effective.

I can't get my head around the idea of a town that makes drying outside illegal, as someone posted unthread (sorry, can't find it to quote right now). What's the thinking behind that, does anyone know?

I think it's that washing drying looks 'poor'. Or something.

I too wonder if US washing machines leave clothes wetter. Actually, it's my experience of top loading machines that this is definitely the case. When I take clothes out of my (front loading) washing machine, I'd say that they were damp, not wet. When I've been abroad, and used top loading machines, in some cases the clothes have been dripping!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: paintpots on January 22, 2014, 03:57:14 AM
UK Here.

I line dry in the summer and in the winter we have two clothes horses that we alternate next to a radiator, and it normally takes ~24 hours for clothes to dry. Woolens/delicates take longer because our washing machine has a gentler spinning programme for them, and occasionally I have had to put a tray under the horse to catch all the drips! Our washing machine is in our kitchen, which is a bit of a pain (it can be quite noisy). My parents have a separate laundry room with what we call a 'dutch airer' (a wooden frame with about 4-6 wooden beams that you can lower to hang and then hoist up so the clothes don't get in the way.

I do have friends here that aren't allowed to dry outside though - they're not even allowed to let their clothes dry near the windows of their flat. They live in a block of flats with a large communal garden though, which sort of explains the line drying restriction, but I don't understand the 'not near windows' one!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: mechtilde on January 22, 2014, 04:04:00 AM
I'm like most of the other UK E-Hellions here- line dry in summer (if not raining...) use airers inside, and tumble dry if no other option. Well- I'm lazy so any small things like socks go in the dryer...

I got towel rails put in the kitchen and shower room when we were having work done and they are amazing at getting things dry quickly. They are just as effective as ordinary radiators at heating the room too.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on January 22, 2014, 04:18:49 AM
Genuine question for those who think drying washing outside makes people look poor - outside clotheslines here are as standard a part of the home as the mailbox.  I've always lived in nice areas and most people hang their washing out to dry. Most people's clotheslines can't be seen from the street, but if for some reason some could be, would you consider those homeowners to be poor?

I've just returned from Asia and it was commonplace to see washing hanging out of windows/balconies, but as housing space there is severely restricted and most live in flats, I just assumed it was standard for people to dry their stuff that way. I'm sure some of those people were poor, but I'd think it a bit judgmental to assume they all were based solely on their clothes drying habits.

Bit OT: When I was pregnant with DS1 my elderly neighbour said she couldn't wait to see my line full of nice clean nappies blowing in the wind. :D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Margo on January 22, 2014, 04:28:18 AM
UK here - I've never owned a dryer. I put washing out outside as much as I can, and much prefer the fresh scent you get that way. As my garden is really small, I have a retractable line so when it isn't in use it isn't in the way. I have rosemary and lavender bushes in the garden undernewth the clothes line which add to the lovely fresh, clean washing feel!

I very rarely have an issue with bird droppings or anything of that kind, even in blackberry season!

When it is wet I use airers indoors. My grandmother had one of these https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ceiling+clothes+airer&rlz=1C1CHMO_en-gbGB547GB547&espv=210&es_sm=122&tbm=isch&source=iu&imgil=y6GAvLtt34ku-M%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcQ-9OlIfWLGKdAlE9cGSpmnxqbE6SZpIi-ARIA7FYY-zDaBBPIU%253B650%253B432%253BtfOsfh-etV2yTM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.navitron.org.uk%25252Fforum%25252Findex.php%25253Ftopic%2525253D12708.0&sa=X&ei=rJvfUs_tC-_b7AbxxYCwBg&ved=0CGsQ9QEwAg&biw=1006&bih=614#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=y6GAvLtt34ku-M%253A%3BtfOsfh-etV2yTM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.navitron.org.uk%252Fforum%252Findex.php%25253Faction%25253Ddlattach%25253Btopic%25253D12708.0%25253Battach%25253D6238%25253Bimage%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.navitron.org.uk%252Fforum%252Findex.php%253Ftopic%253D12708.0%3B650%3B432 (https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ceiling+clothes+airer&rlz=1C1CHMO_en-gbGB547GB547&espv=210&es_sm=122&tbm=isch&source=iu&imgil=y6GAvLtt34ku-M%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcQ-9OlIfWLGKdAlE9cGSpmnxqbE6SZpIi-ARIA7FYY-zDaBBPIU%253B650%253B432%253BtfOsfh-etV2yTM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.navitron.org.uk%25252Fforum%25252Findex.php%25253Ftopic%2525253D12708.0&sa=X&ei=rJvfUs_tC-_b7AbxxYCwBg&ved=0CGsQ9QEwAg&biw=1006&bih=614#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=y6GAvLtt34ku-M%253A%3BtfOsfh-etV2yTM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.navitron.org.uk%252Fforum%252Findex.php%25253Faction%25253Ddlattach%25253Btopic%25253D12708.0%25253Battach%25253D6238%25253Bimage%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.navitron.org.uk%252Fforum%252Findex.php%253Ftopic%253D12708.0%3B650%3B432), which was great - if I ever have a kitchen or utility room suitable I would definitely get one .

The people I know her ewho have driers are mostly parents with young children, who have a *lot* pof washing and limited space for airers, and even then, most will only use the dryer if it is too wet to hag stuff outside.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: veryfluffy on January 22, 2014, 04:32:16 AM
UK here -- I line dry everything in the summer, and dry breezy days almost all year. In winter, I use a drying rack next to the radiator in my spare room for most clothes, except socks because they are a pain to hang up. Sheets and towels are awkward to hang inside, so I often reluctantly put them in the dryer until they are mostly dry, then I might drape them over the radiator to dry out completely.

I get the feeling that electricity is generally much cheaper in the US? I'm just not rich enough to run my dryer for everything -- and sheets and towels smell lovely when they have dried outside.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: menley on January 22, 2014, 05:04:11 AM
For the most part, it's not that there is actually a law on the books prohibiting line drying, but that homeowners' associations have banned it within neighborhoods. Depending on the terms of your HOA, violating HOA rules and regulations could result in massive fines and has even resulted in foreclosure on homes in some states.

The main reason given by HOA for banning line drying is appearance. Not necessarily an appearance of poverty, but a cluttered, untidy appearance. My parents' HOA, for example, has rules about the type of landscaping, paint colors, trash pickup (I think you can get a hefty fine if your trash bin stays out more than 1 hour after pickup - luckily their pickup people bring the bins back to the backyard for them!), etc. Clotheslines are just one additional prohibition intended to keep the neighborhood looking neat and tidy.

I did find this article mentioning states being able to overturn these HOA rules in some situations - http://daily.sightline.org/2012/02/21/clothesline-bans-void-in-19-states/ (http://daily.sightline.org/2012/02/21/clothesline-bans-void-in-19-states/)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Psychopoesie on January 22, 2014, 05:10:21 AM

I'm also never willing to air dry sheets or towels. They're too big and hold too much water to dry properly in any climate I've ever lived in.

One thing that occurs reading this: Climate issues aside, how fast do US washing machines spin? I know they're different, what with the top loading thing and all, so I wonder if they don't spin as fast as our front-loaders and don't get enough moisture out to make line drying effective.

I can't get my head around the idea of a town that makes drying outside illegal, as someone posted unthread (sorry, can't find it to quote right now). What's the thinking behind that, does anyone know?
i was about to ask the same question - when we remove our wash from the washer - it's "just" wet, not dripping, not full of moisture.

I'm glad i live in a place where the weather is (most of the year) conducive for line drying, there isn't that much pollution, it's not too humid and it's not illegal to dry my clothing. ???

Aussie here. Have mostly had top loading machines here although my current machine is front loading. No appreciable difference except front loader more efficient with water use.

Both my front loader and mum's current top loading washer deliver pretty much the same result after spin cycle. Although my front loader does take a lot longer to get through a cycle.

Maybe US machines are different. (After some of the trans-Atlantic toilet comparisons, I'd believe anything). That would also explain why people have problems getting stuff dry in humid climates in US when that's not generally an issue in similar climates here.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: perpetua on January 22, 2014, 05:12:12 AM
The main reason given by HOA for banning line drying is appearance. Not necessarily an appearance of poverty, but a cluttered, untidy appearance.


Mostly here people have washing lines in their back gardens behind the house, so they can't be seen from the street. Would they still be banned?
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: menley on January 22, 2014, 05:19:17 AM
The main reason given by HOA for banning line drying is appearance. Not necessarily an appearance of poverty, but a cluttered, untidy appearance.


Mostly here people have washing lines in their back gardens behind the house, so they can't be seen from the street. Would they still be banned?

In most cases, yes. In my parents' HOA (and in most that I've heard of), the rule is that it cannot be visible from the street or from other properties in the neighborhood. Because nearly all of the properties in their neighborhood are two-story, they would be able to look out their window and see into the backyards of several neighbors, meaning that those backyards couldn't have clotheslines.

And it's not just clotheslines - lots of things are banned in backyards, like children's play equipment of a certain height. For example, when I was a little girl, we lived in a non-HOA area and had a swingset with a slide and monkeybars. We weren't able to bring that when we moved to the HOA neighborhood, as the monkeybars would have been visible and that was banned.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on January 22, 2014, 05:21:02 AM
The main reason given by HOA for banning line drying is appearance. Not necessarily an appearance of poverty, but a cluttered, untidy appearance.


Mostly here people have washing lines in their back gardens behind the house, so they can't be seen from the street. Would they still be banned?

This is the setup I'm familiar with too, so I'm puzzled as to how it can be untidy if no one can see it.

Our last house was built in an area that had a covenant that mentioned something about clotheslines not being visible from the street, but due to the fact that most blocks were large corner ones, that was rather impractical to enforce a lot of the time. I never felt it made the area look untidy or poor, and none of the other residents seemed to have a problem with it either.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on January 22, 2014, 05:35:13 AM
The main reason given by HOA for banning line drying is appearance. Not necessarily an appearance of poverty, but a cluttered, untidy appearance.


Mostly here people have washing lines in their back gardens behind the house, so they can't be seen from the street. Would they still be banned?

In most cases, yes. In my parents' HOA (and in most that I've heard of), the rule is that it cannot be visible from the street or from other properties in the neighborhood. Because nearly all of the properties in their neighborhood are two-story, they would be able to look out their window and see into the backyards of several neighbors, meaning that those backyards couldn't have clotheslines.

And it's not just clotheslines - lots of things are banned in backyards, like children's play equipment of a certain height. For example, when I was a little girl, we lived in a non-HOA area and had a swingset with a slide and monkeybars. We weren't able to bring that when we moved to the HOA neighborhood, as the monkeybars would have been visible and that was banned.

There are people out there who complain about what they can see in somebody else's back garden?  :o I really, really, really want to take such people on a tour of a refugee camp, or into a sweatshop, or to a famine region so that they can find something productive to be bothered about.

I mean, I know that some people's worlds are very small, but I'm surprised there's room for anybody in a world view that miniscule.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: menley on January 22, 2014, 05:42:14 AM
Yeah - HOAs are really, really frustrating, in my experience. Luckily, when my husband and I bought a house, our neighborhood had a "voluntary" HOA and we simply chose not to join. They do some good, yes - for example, my parents have some neighbors that would never mow their lawn if it wasn't for the fines that they got for having foot-tall grass - but overall I believe they have far too much power and focus on things that are not at all important. And the fact that homes can be foreclosed upon for not paying HOA dues, in some states, is just mind-boggling to me.

This is perhaps another reason that people have the perception that line drying = poor in some parts of the USA - poorer neighborhoods generally don't have HOAs, and are thus more likely to have visible clotheslines.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: scotcat60 on January 22, 2014, 06:04:25 AM
UK here.

I line dry in summer, weather permitting, as mechtilde said "if not raining", after all this is the UK! Indoor dry on clothes horse, and radiators in winter. I did have a tumble dryer, but I never used it, and it was so much torubel to pull it out into the middle of the kitchen and set it up. In the end I scrapped it, and put a small freezer in it's place.

I believe the philanthropist Titus Salt had a clause for the tenants of his model town, that they were not permitted to dry their washing outside.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: crella on January 22, 2014, 07:23:50 AM
Genuine question for those who think drying washing outside makes people look poor - outside clotheslines here are as standard a part of the home as the mailbox.  I've always lived in nice areas and most people hang their washing out to dry. Most people's clotheslines can't be seen from the street, but if for some reason some could be, would you consider those homeowners to be poor?

I've just returned from Asia and it was commonplace to see washing hanging out of windows/balconies, but as housing space there is severely restricted and most live in flats, I just assumed it was standard for people to dry their stuff that way. I'm sure some of those people were poor, but I'd think it a bit judgmental to assume they all were based solely on their clothes drying habits.

Bit OT: When I was pregnant with DS1 my elderly neighbour said she couldn't wait to see my line full of nice clean nappies blowing in the wind. :D


I can only answer for what I wrote, but it's not it's thought people are poor, or that there is anything wrong with being poor...societal attitudes have changed and it's no longer acceptable to hang bedding out in some condos, as it's seen as making the place look bad....it harkens back to 'the old days' when Japan as a whole was much poorer...rather than 'poor' perhaps 'unsophisticated' would be better? The Japanese phrase I hear most frequently by Japanese when referring to this is 'hin ga nai' 、akin to 'no class'.

I hang my bedding out ( a down comforter in our case) on the side of the house away from the street, and hang out all our laundry except in pollen season in the spring.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Yvaine on January 22, 2014, 08:15:37 AM
Genuine question for those who think drying washing outside makes people look poor - outside clotheslines here are as standard a part of the home as the mailbox.  I've always lived in nice areas and most people hang their washing out to dry. Most people's clotheslines can't be seen from the street, but if for some reason some could be, would you consider those homeowners to be poor?

Most of us, here on ehell, don't think it makes anyone "look poor" no matter where it's placed. We're more explaining the thinking that went into the laws and HOA rules, many of which are decades old and come from a time when having a clothes dryer was a big status symbol. There are actually laws being passed now against clothesline bans, because people are starting to like the look and the environmental benefits again, but it's only in some locales.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Harriet Jones on January 22, 2014, 08:19:28 AM



I too wonder if US washing machines leave clothes wetter. Actually, it's my experience of top loading machines that this is definitely the case. When I take clothes out of my (front loading) washing machine, I'd say that they were damp, not wet. When I've been abroad, and used top loading machines, in some cases the clothes have been dripping!

The old top-loader we had definitely left a lot more water behind.  The newer high-efficiency washers (top- and front-loaders) are a lot better about spinning water out.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Dindrane on January 22, 2014, 08:50:04 AM

I'm also never willing to air dry sheets or towels. They're too big and hold too much water to dry properly in any climate I've ever lived in.

One thing that occurs reading this: Climate issues aside, how fast do US washing machines spin? I know they're different, what with the top loading thing and all, so I wonder if they don't spin as fast as our front-loaders and don't get enough moisture out to make line drying effective.

I use a front-loading washer where I live now that is probably comparable in its features to washers commonly available in other parts of the world. Before it got old enough that we were concerned about it breaking on us, we would typically spin the clothes at the top speed after washing (1200 rpm). That got normal clothes to that just-damp stage, and it's rare for things like shirts or pants to take more than a day to dry once we hang them up.

But that's normal clothing. Towels absorb a lot more water, and sheets are very large, so neither of them would be likely to dry properly within a day. If they stay damp much longer than that, they'd start to smell weird. I live in a part of the US that is very similar to the UK, which means drying things outside in the winter is pretty much a no-go (and my apartment is not heated with radiant heat, so there's no help there). I'm not about to air dry clothing outside in the summer, because we have a lot of pollen in this area and it gets on everything. I'm not allergic, but it makes things dirty.

Where I used to live, the climate was basically tropical for 9 months of the year, and torrential rain storms were common year round. I still hang up some of my clothes to dry when I do laundry at my parents' house, but even with air conditioning serving to de-humidify things inside, my stuff takes twice as long to dry.

As far as electricity in the US, it is absolutely cheaper. Given that I don't pay an arm and a leg to use a tumble dryer, and that my time and effort are not free, I frequently choose to tumble dry laundry.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: crella on January 22, 2014, 08:59:20 AM
Genuine question for those who think drying washing outside makes people look poor - outside clotheslines here are as standard a part of the home as the mailbox.  I've always lived in nice areas and most people hang their washing out to dry. Most people's clotheslines can't be seen from the street, but if for some reason some could be, would you consider those homeowners to be poor?

Most of us, here on ehell, don't think it makes anyone "look poor" no matter where it's placed. We're more explaining the thinking that went into the laws and HOA rules, many of which are decades old and come from a time when having a clothes dryer was a big status symbol. There are actually laws being passed now against clothesline bans, because people are starting to like the look and the environmental benefits again, but it's only in some locales.

Well said!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on January 22, 2014, 09:03:53 AM
I just looked it up, and electricity in the UK costs around double that in the US. So I'm sure that's at least partically to do with it.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 22, 2014, 10:02:45 AM
The main reason given by HOA for banning line drying is appearance. Not necessarily an appearance of poverty, but a cluttered, untidy appearance.


Mostly here people have washing lines in their back gardens behind the house, so they can't be seen from the street. Would they still be banned?

In most cases, yes. In my parents' HOA (and in most that I've heard of), the rule is that it cannot be visible from the street or from other properties in the neighborhood. Because nearly all of the properties in their neighborhood are two-story, they would be able to look out their window and see into the backyards of several neighbors, meaning that those backyards couldn't have clotheslines.

And it's not just clotheslines - lots of things are banned in backyards, like children's play equipment of a certain height. For example, when I was a little girl, we lived in a non-HOA area and had a swingset with a slide and monkeybars. We weren't able to bring that when we moved to the HOA neighborhood, as the monkeybars would have been visible and that was banned.

There are people out there who complain about what they can see in somebody else's back garden?  :o I really, really, really want to take such people on a tour of a refugee camp, or into a sweatshop, or to a famine region so that they can find something productive to be bothered about.

I mean, I know that some people's worlds are very small, but I'm surprised there's room for anybody in a world view that miniscule.

I find your statement offensive. I have worked in famine regions and witnessed horrible conditions and have volunteered my time and money to rectify human suffering when I can. But that doesn't mean that I also wish to look out my back window from upstairs and see the neighbors junked rusting out car in their back yard or a gazebo full of wood rot and falling down. I paid a considerable amount of funds for my home and property restrictions assist with maintaining property values.

You could say the same about anyone being concerned about etiquette. Why worry about such a mundane topic when there are starving children.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Corvid on January 22, 2014, 10:09:13 AM
I am way too lazy to hang clothes outside to dry.  Grab them out of the washer, throw them into the dryer, fold or hang forty or so minutes later after I've bummed around doing something else.  Done.

I don't do ironing either.  I'm way too lazy to iron.

Anything that requires more effort than I need to make, no.  I'm way too lazy.

I do admire all you energetic line-drying types, though.   :D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on January 22, 2014, 10:15:34 AM
The main reason given by HOA for banning line drying is appearance. Not necessarily an appearance of poverty, but a cluttered, untidy appearance.


Mostly here people have washing lines in their back gardens behind the house, so they can't be seen from the street. Would they still be banned?

In most cases, yes. In my parents' HOA (and in most that I've heard of), the rule is that it cannot be visible from the street or from other properties in the neighborhood. Because nearly all of the properties in their neighborhood are two-story, they would be able to look out their window and see into the backyards of several neighbors, meaning that those backyards couldn't have clotheslines.

And it's not just clotheslines - lots of things are banned in backyards, like children's play equipment of a certain height. For example, when I was a little girl, we lived in a non-HOA area and had a swingset with a slide and monkeybars. We weren't able to bring that when we moved to the HOA neighborhood, as the monkeybars would have been visible and that was banned.

There are people out there who complain about what they can see in somebody else's back garden?  :o I really, really, really want to take such people on a tour of a refugee camp, or into a sweatshop, or to a famine region so that they can find something productive to be bothered about.

I mean, I know that some people's worlds are very small, but I'm surprised there's room for anybody in a world view that miniscule.

I find your statement offensive. I have worked in famine regions and witnessed horrible conditions and have volunteered my time and money to rectify human suffering when I can. But that doesn't mean that I also wish to look out my back window from upstairs and see the neighbors junked rusting out car in their back yard or a gazebo full of wood rot and falling down. I paid a considerable amount of funds for my home and property restrictions assist with maintaining property values.

You could say the same about anyone being concerned about etiquette. Why worry about such a mundane topic when there are starving children.

Fair enough. I just think that, as long as what somebody has/is doing on their property isn't dangerous and has no potential to spread to your property (like some kind of infestation), then so what if they keep a rusty car in the back garden?

I really, really don't see how that affects property values, if the neighbourhood looks well kept and pleasant at street level. To me, you might as well care about how dusty your neighbour's mantlepiece is. It's micromanaging the lives of others, and does lead me to suppose that such people need bigger things to care about.

FWIW, I feel the same about points of etiquette that aren't covered by 'be kind and be reasonable'.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: perpetua on January 22, 2014, 10:34:02 AM
I can understand not wanting to look at rusting out cars (although I personally wouldn't be bothered by that), but most of these HOA rules seem to be, as Teenyweeny says, about micromanaging the way other people live. I mean really - people are forbidden from having swings in their own back gardens in case the neighbours don't like looking at them? I find that ridiculous. I think if you're (you general) that precious about what you see when you look out of the window, then perhaps you should live somewhere with enough land that you can control it yourself and not within eye-line of anyone else.

I have to say, I'm really glad this isn't a thing here. I wouldn't be able to live somewhere like that.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Harriet Jones on January 22, 2014, 10:41:08 AM
Fair enough. I just think that, as long as what somebody has/is doing on their property isn't dangerous and has no potential to spread to your property (like some kind of infestation), then so what if they keep a rusty car in the back garden?

Rusted out cars can harbor animals you don't necessarily want living near your house, like snakes or rodents.

However, I'm not in favor of overly restrictive HOAs.  In a previous house, we got a nasty letter because we didn't have a cover on our grill.  ::)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Layla Miller on January 22, 2014, 01:08:23 PM
I am way too lazy to hang clothes outside to dry.  Grab them out of the washer, throw them into the dryer, fold or hang forty or so minutes later after I've bummed around doing something else.  Done.

I don't do ironing either.  I'm way too lazy to iron.

Anything that requires more effort than I need to make, no.  I'm way too lazy.

I do admire all you energetic line-drying types, though.   :D

This is about where I land, too.  I've done the line-drying thing, and it was okay--aside from having to swat away icky creepy-crawlies from time to time.  (I'm a bit arachnophobic, so I'm sure the neighbors enjoyed seeing me hop around the clothes, swatting wildly at them before I took them off the line.  ;D)

Basically, for me it comes down to chucking them straight from the washer into the dryer vs. hauling the clothes upstairs, out the door, and hanging them one by one on a line.  I just don't have it in me!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: katycoo on January 22, 2014, 03:31:51 PM
The main reason given by HOA for banning line drying is appearance. Not necessarily an appearance of poverty, but a cluttered, untidy appearance.


Mostly here people have washing lines in their back gardens behind the house, so they can't be seen from the street. Would they still be banned?

In most cases, yes. In my parents' HOA (and in most that I've heard of), the rule is that it cannot be visible from the street or from other properties in the neighborhood. Because nearly all of the properties in their neighborhood are two-story, they would be able to look out their window and see into the backyards of several neighbors, meaning that those backyards couldn't have clotheslines.

And it's not just clotheslines - lots of things are banned in backyards, like children's play equipment of a certain height. For example, when I was a little girl, we lived in a non-HOA area and had a swingset with a slide and monkeybars. We weren't able to bring that when we moved to the HOA neighborhood, as the monkeybars would have been visible and that was banned.

That is ridiculous.  My backyard = I'll put what I dingdangity well want in it TYVM.  Note to self: if moving to the USA, live somewhere with no HOA.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: twiggy on January 22, 2014, 03:53:31 PM
This is an interesting thread and I'd hate for it to get locked over HOAs.

That said, and back on topic, I hang dry a lot. I live in AZ. Our catchphrase it, "yeah, but it's a dry heat." (tshirts have this phrase captioning a picture of a skeleton languishing in the desert, or sometimes a roast in an oven) I can dry 3-4 loads per day during the summer, but I like to throw jeans and towels in the dryer for a bit to get out stiffness. In the summer I would rather hang clothes because my electric bill is already higher from having to run the ac, and the dryer warms the house.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Gwywnnydd on January 22, 2014, 07:20:56 PM
Pacific NW here.
I line dry in the summertime, when there's a strong chance it wont rain.
Wintertime, I use the electric dryer. I do at least one load a day, and I suffered through one winter where I had to line dry everything (dryer was broken). It would take days for stuff to dry, because it gets so humid in the winter.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: baglady on January 22, 2014, 07:57:45 PM
Northeastern U.S. I grew up without a dryer; we hung clothes outside in good weather and on clotheslines in the basement when it was bad. Since I've been living on my own I've never had an outdoor clothesline. I don't judge other people who have them, but because I have this association from childhood that clothesline = "can't afford a dryer," I don't want one.

I live in a three-family house, and we don't have washers because we're on a well -- three washers would strain the water supply. There is a dryer downstairs that we all have access to, but I've never used it. It's just easier to toss the clothes in the laundromat dryer.

However, I do air-dry a lot of stuff that I don't trust to the dryer: bras, hosiery, silk blouses, sweaters, sweatshirts (I melted the design on a sweatshirt I loved in the dryer once, so it's air dry for them now), rubber-backed bathmats, anything with sequins or sparkles or beads. I schlep them home from the laundromat in a plastic bag (the average washday = about a tall kitchen bag's worth of air-dry stuff) and air-dry them on plastic coathangers on the shower door frame, towel racks and/or closet rod.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: JoW on January 22, 2014, 08:19:23 PM
Middle of the US

I dry just about everything on folding racks.  In nice weather they go on the deck on the back of the house.  In cold or wet weather they go in the living room.  The only time I use my dryer is when the temperature is 40-80F ( 4-27C) and the humidity is high.  On days like that nothing will dry without help.  Even then my bras and knit shirts go on racks. 

My area is prone to thunderstorms.  I only put the racks outside when I plan to be home or close to home.  When a storm approaches I bring the loaded racks into the house.  Its much faster than stripping a clothes line. 

I think skipping the dryer makes the clothing last longer.  It also keeps my electricity bill down and helps the environment a little. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Margo on January 23, 2014, 07:35:05 AM
It's interesting - I'd never think of line-drying as being particularly energetic or worthy of admiration  ;) I shall be sure to think of myself s being energetic as I hang up my washing this evening!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Sophia on January 23, 2014, 11:24:35 AM
I think I was the first one that mentioned it being illegal.  I don't live in an HOA.  It is actually the city that has banned it.  I think that this city is a tad bit ... pretentious.   I think it is just one of those local things.  They also have a rule that all new houses have to be at least X% brick exterior.  I would guess around 70%.  Some places, none of the houses are brick and they look fine.  But, in this city, people would think about a new wood house, "Why didn't you save up a little more money and buy a real house?" 

Of course, when our drier died while we were cloth diapering our baby, the law didn't stop us from stringing twine ALL over the backyard.  I actually think the neighbors would not worry if you put a clothes line in your fenced back yard.  Houses are single-story in my neighborhood.   If you did not have a fence (rare), and a clothes line they would probably complain.  But more because the clothes line would give them an excuse to complain since you aren't required to have a fence.  Although, I have figured out that the garbage guys get bonuses for reporting people with too long grass.  We have an alley so the garbage truck goes down it.  They might report a clothes line in a fenced backyard hoping to get a bonus.  Nobody said anything about the twine all over our backyard.  Although, seeing about a 100 old-fashioned white cloth diapers hanging from twine strung from the frame of the bench swing to a tree branch to the fence to another tree branch, etc.  anyone would know that our drier died and that was a temporary fix. 

The drier is such a tiny part of my electric bill, cost is not a consideration.  I hang my clothes on a hanger because it is better for them, and I'll be hanging them eventually anyway, so no extra work.  We are remodeling an old house and when I saw that the laundry room and the master closet shared a wall, I insisted on a hole between them and a clothes rod through the hole.  I can hang up my clothes in the laundry room, and then dry, just shove them into the closet. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on January 23, 2014, 11:27:07 AM
We are remodeling an old house and when I saw that the laundry room and the master closet shared a wall, I insisted on a hole between them and a clothes rod through the hole.  I can hang up my clothes in the laundry room, and then dry, just shove them into the closet.

That, my friend, is genius.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Yvaine on January 23, 2014, 12:29:21 PM
We are remodeling an old house and when I saw that the laundry room and the master closet shared a wall, I insisted on a hole between them and a clothes rod through the hole.  I can hang up my clothes in the laundry room, and then dry, just shove them into the closet.

That, my friend, is genius.

Seconded. I want this setup!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: squeakers on January 23, 2014, 01:52:45 PM
Mid-west US.  I only line dry comforters, blankets, sheets and towels in the summer (takes less time than doing them (comforters/blankets) twice in the drier). At our little house I used both the line and the drier for everything depending on the weather since the line was just outside the door. Now at the big house it involves carrying baskets up the stairs from the basement, going outside the length of the house and into the side yard. I tend to be out of energy just coming back up the stairs.

When I was a little girl we were very poor.  We had a wringer washer (when regular washers were the norm) and line dried either outside or had lines hung in the basement (wood furnace helped with the drying).

We're planning on getting some of those stacking washer and dryer once a boy or two moves out and placing them in the upstairs hallway (linen closet backs into one of the boys' bedroom's closet and we'd knock the wall down for a tab bit more room). Less laundry means smaller appliances. And no more me having to climb the stairs. But that won't be for another 5 years or so. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: CakeEater on January 23, 2014, 05:51:49 PM
It's interesting - I'd never think of line-drying as being particularly energetic or worthy of admiration  ;) I shall be sure to think of myself s being energetic as I hang up my washing this evening!

Yes, I'll feel all virtuous as well.  ;)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Iris on January 24, 2014, 12:50:45 AM
It's interesting - I'd never think of line-drying as being particularly energetic or worthy of admiration  ;) I shall be sure to think of myself s being energetic as I hang up my washing this evening!

Yes, I'll feel all virtuous as well.  ;)

I hung out three loads yesterday. It's like I'm a domestic goddess  ;D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Layla Miller on January 24, 2014, 07:28:22 AM
Hey, compared to standing in one spot and moving clothes from one box to another, I'd say that hauling a full basket of damp clothes through the basement, up the stairs, across the house, out the door, and putting them up one by one is pretty darn energetic in my eyes!  ;D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 24, 2014, 07:49:32 AM
Hey, compared to standing in one spot and moving clothes from one box to another, I'd say that hauling a full basket of damp clothes through the basement, up the stairs, across the house, out the door, and putting them up one by one is pretty darn energetic in my eyes!  ;D

Mine, too.  Which is why I don't do it.   :)  Uses up too many spoons for me.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Ereine on January 24, 2014, 08:26:09 AM
I'm in Finland and mostly dry my clothes on a rack indoors. I'm not sure if I have any clothes that can go into a dryer, apart from maybe socks (like rayon knits) and it doesn't seem worth it. I do my laundry in my buildings laundry room and using the drier would two extra trips up and down four flights of stairs. I do use it for sheets and towels, they're too big that hang in the apartment. I do like the smell of sheets that have been dried outside but don't usually do it because of pollen (sheets get too soft in the dryer and don't feel as clean to me). I might try it now that it's freezing, when the landry freezes it also dries (or at least that's my experience here). My complex has a good drying area outside, including big metal racks for drying rugs.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Sophia on January 24, 2014, 09:11:08 AM
...(sheets get too soft in the dryer and don't feel as clean to me). ...

That is funny.  I guess it is what you are used to.  I tried line drying the sheets and we both hated the stiffness.  It felt scratchy.  We ended up rolling the sheets into a ball, and flicking them and other things to make them not so stiff. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: SCMagnolia on January 24, 2014, 11:00:01 AM
I grew up -- and still live -- in a very rural area and it was not unusual to see clothes hanging on a line.  There isn't a kid around here who didn't love to run between sheets and towels hanging on a clothesline and the smell was just SOOOOOOOO GOOD! 

But....  you never seem to see that around here anymore.  I would love to hang towels and sheets out to dry because it seems they take so long in the dryer, but my issue is allergies and the pollen that would collect on them at certain times of the year would make my life miserable.

That said, I don't use the dryer for much besides towels, sheets, and gutchies and a few other things that I don't worry about shrinking.  I will put clothes in the dryer for just a few minutes to fluff and warm the wrinkles out of them and then I hang them up -- I've found if you hang shirts and pants neatly on hangers, you don't usually have to do too much ironing on them, if any.  Sweaters and things that would stretch out if hung up go over a drying rack.  I have a woodburner in my downstairs (where my laundry room is) and I also run a dehumidifier (which I'd do anyhow, since dampness is an issue) and that helps things to dry quickly. 

The only issue I've found is static.  I don't like the in-washer fabric softeners (they were leaving a buildup that was staining my clothes - apparently the liquid fabric softeners do not mix with our hard water), and my clothes aren't in the dryer long enough for a dryer sheet to be much help.   I go through a LOT of Static-Guard!

I don't think I could ever live in a place where the HOA said you couldn't hang laundry.  Not that I'd put stuff out all the time to dry, but I grew up with that and I think it's a really quaint reminder of those days!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Harriet Jones on January 25, 2014, 09:29:43 AM
Hey, compared to standing in one spot and moving clothes from one box to another, I'd say that hauling a full basket of damp clothes through the basement, up the stairs, across the house, out the door, and putting them up one by one is pretty darn energetic in my eyes!  ;D

Mine, too.  Which is why I don't do it.   :)  Uses up too many spoons for me.

Yes.  Also, I can't imagine hanging wet laundry out when it's so cold out.  It seems to me it would be pretty painful to do so when it's below freezing.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: kherbert05 on January 25, 2014, 09:45:18 AM
Genuine question for those who think drying washing outside makes people look poor - outside clotheslines here are as standard a part of the home as the mailbox.  I've always lived in nice areas and most people hang their washing out to dry. Most people's clotheslines can't be seen from the street, but if for some reason some could be, would you consider those homeowners to be poor?

I've just returned from Asia and it was commonplace to see washing hanging out of windows/balconies, but as housing space there is severely restricted and most live in flats, I just assumed it was standard for people to dry their stuff that way. I'm sure some of those people were poor, but I'd think it a bit judgmental to assume they all were based solely on their clothes drying habits.

Bit OT: When I was pregnant with DS1 my elderly neighbour said she couldn't wait to see my line full of nice clean nappies blowing in the wind. :D
I don't buy into that attitude but I think it started after WWII. As the military came back, got married, and bought new track houses in new suburbs with all the modern conveniences during the post war boom a line was drawn in peoples minds.


Lack of modern conveniences = pre war depression era poverty


Modern conveniences = boom times, escaping poverty boom times.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Jones on January 25, 2014, 01:51:13 PM
Because of this thread I have been hanging my laundry throughout the house on my usually-used-to-cool-house-in-the-summer lines this week. I can't say I enjoy walking through the wet laundry but it's kinda nice to have the extra water in the air.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Sophia on January 25, 2014, 02:47:48 PM
Genuine question for those who think drying washing outside makes people look poor - outside clotheslines here are as standard a part of the home as the mailbox.  I've always lived in nice areas and most people hang their washing out to dry. Most people's clotheslines can't be seen from the street, but if for some reason some could be, would you consider those homeowners to be poor?

I've just returned from Asia and it was commonplace to see washing hanging out of windows/balconies, but as housing space there is severely restricted and most live in flats, I just assumed it was standard for people to dry their stuff that way. I'm sure some of those people were poor, but I'd think it a bit judgmental to assume they all were based solely on their clothes drying habits.

Bit OT: When I was pregnant with DS1 my elderly neighbour said she couldn't wait to see my line full of nice clean nappies blowing in the wind. :D
I don't buy into that attitude but I think it started after WWII. As the military came back, got married, and bought new track houses in new suburbs with all the modern conveniences during the post war boom a line was drawn in peoples minds.


Lack of modern conveniences = pre war depression era poverty


Modern conveniences = boom times, escaping poverty boom times.

Plus, New is Better!  Right? 

Like formula was better for babies and only poor mothers who didn't care breastfed. 

A great-aunt was one of the first people in the area to get a freezer.  Every day she cooked a meal and put it in the freezer, and then thawed the meal she'd made the day before.  They said that it was "Better than fresh".  That phrase became a family joke. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: JoW on January 26, 2014, 11:27:16 AM
Another benefit of drying on portable folding racks -
My area has a high wind advisory starting in about 1/2 hour.  The wind is starting to pick up now.  My racks of laundry are on the back deck but they are very close to the wall so the bulk of the wind doesn't hit them.  The wind won't blow them over.  When they are dry I'll bring the whole racks in and take down the clothing indoors, out of the wind.  I won't have to chase escaping socks all over the yard. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Paper Roses on January 30, 2014, 11:17:12 PM
I really, really wish I had a clothesline.  My parents had one, and I grew up using it.  I miss the smell of line-dried clothes!  When DH and I first met, I was living in an apartment and doing laundry at a laundromat, but once in a while if I went home for a weekend, I'd do my laundry there, and when I came back, my clothes all had that fresh-air smell.

A few years later, after we had been married for quite some time, my father had been up visiting and Dh said to me later "He smelled like you used to when we first met!"  I think that was when it first dawned on me about that smell - and how much I really do miss it.  Sometimes, in the springtime when the weather first starts to get warm enough to spend time outside, but it's still a bit breezy, I notice clothes will pick up that smell after a few hours spent outside.  But of course then they aren't clean. 

Most of my clothes I don't put in the dryer because I don't want them to shrink.  I will drape pants over kitchen or dining room chairs to dry, and shirts and sweaters I hang in the closet in the laundry room. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Fliss on January 31, 2014, 03:33:33 AM

I've used both and a line and sunlight is the better deal.

Aside from the power bill benefits, a tumble dryer destroys clothing by damaging the cloth fibers. You end up having to replace your clothes faster. Besides, nothing beats the smell of sunlight.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Sophia on January 31, 2014, 08:05:40 AM
Y'll should know that I have this thread to thank for having a working dryer at home. 
The drier at home is really old and stopped heating about a year ago, which didn't really bother me.  Then it stopped tumbling, which did bother me.  Then DH figured out that we held the button down long enough it would eventually click into gear and tumble.  Then the time to hold the button down got so long that we propped up things on the dryer that held down the button while we did other stuff and waited for the tone to change, then we would remove the stuff from the button.  Then that didn't even work.  This spring our next house will be ready, and it has gas and our current house doesn't.  Thanks to all the brain time spent thinking about drying clothes while reading this thread, I got fed up and said to husband, "Let's buy a gas dryer.  Install it at the farm house, and when you go out to work on it, you can take a few loads to dry."  We did that.  (I haven't even seen the new dryer yet)  But, I swear, that the dryer in this house learned that we didn't really NEED it, and it started to tumble again.  Yeah!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 31, 2014, 12:56:52 PM
I am in the US, in Florida. There may be a few weeks in the winter where the humidity is low enough to dry laundry outside, but we have no dry season. I live in a townhouse, with no yard and our complex has rules about hanging anything to dry where it is visible to neighbors.

I bought a used high efficiency washer and dryer, they work well.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: demarco on January 31, 2014, 07:12:34 PM
Several posts in this thread mention clothing being damaged by clothes dryers. How much of a problem is this, really? A lot of my clothes  are really old (10 years and more). They are always dried in the machine and they are not damaged. I always use the lowest reasonable setting and dry some things inside out (if the care label recommends it) and never have a problem. On the other hand, I did have clothes damaged by clothes pins and low flying birds (who'd been indulging in red berries) when I hung clothes outside. 

Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Jones on January 31, 2014, 08:11:17 PM
Several posts in this thread mention clothing being damaged by clothes dryers. How much of a problem is this, really? A lot of my clothes  are really old (10 years and more). They are always dried in the machine and they are not damaged. I always use the lowest reasonable setting and dry some things inside out (if the care label recommends it) and never have a problem. On the other hand, I did have clothes damaged by clothes pins and low flying birds (who'd been indulging in red berries) when I hung clothes outside.

I was wondering the same but didn't want to appear ignorant, so I didn't post the question. :)  I have a LOT of shirts from high school, some I didn't wear for 2-4 years of being to large for them but since I did the baggy style thing in HS those are in the minority. I also have 3 pairs of pants I recently began wearing again after 2 year hiatus, again due to weight gain, but they were worn pretty solidly over the 6-7 years (minus a year and a half or so around DD's time) before that. One pair of jeans I recently noticed is becoming very thin in the butt, and I saw a mend in my green sweater today has come lose, but otherwise most of my stuff is still pretty wearable if I still want to wear it. I tend to use the dryer 3/4 of the year, or more if I want to avoid picking out cottonwood seeds and shaking out dust.

I just figured I've been very lucky in my clothing or something. Socks, now, I'd like to replace those annually.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on January 31, 2014, 08:21:03 PM
Several posts in this thread mention clothing being damaged by clothes dryers. How much of a problem is this, really? A lot of my clothes  are really old (10 years and more). They are always dried in the machine and they are not damaged. I always use the lowest reasonable setting and dry some things inside out (if the care label recommends it) and never have a problem. On the other hand, I did have clothes damaged by clothes pins and low flying birds (who'd been indulging in red berries) when I hung clothes outside.

I spent years and years dying my stuff in a dryer. I never had any problems with shrinkage or clothes being ruined in any way.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Fliss on January 31, 2014, 08:30:00 PM

And I've never had a problem with birds or winds damaging line stuff. The worst we've had is forgetting to wind the hoist back up and running the risk of scalping myself on the outer line.

Dryers cost electricity and need to have the lint filter cleaned all the time. A clothesline just wants winding down, pegging out, and taking in a few hours later. Much simpler and cheaper.
 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 31, 2014, 08:34:12 PM
Dryers cost electricity and need to have the lint filter cleaned all the time. A clothesline just wants winding down, pegging out, and taking in a few hours later. Much simpler and cheaper.

I'll agree with cheaper but no way would I agree with simpler.  In order to line dry my laundry, I'd have to unload the washer into my basket, head out through the garage then go through the side alley to behind my house, up onto my deck to a regular type line or get the compact one out of my shed and put it in the ground, hang each piece up one by one, using clothespins, then repeat the process in reverse once everything was dry.  It is MUCH simpler just to throw the load in the dryer and crank it on.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Dindrane on January 31, 2014, 08:39:04 PM
Several posts in this thread mention clothing being damaged by clothes dryers. How much of a problem is this, really? A lot of my clothes  are really old (10 years and more). They are always dried in the machine and they are not damaged. I always use the lowest reasonable setting and dry some things inside out (if the care label recommends it) and never have a problem. On the other hand, I did have clothes damaged by clothes pins and low flying birds (who'd been indulging in red berries) when I hung clothes outside.

The damage that I see most commonly doesn't necessarily break the clothes, in the sense that it doesn't make seams rip or holes appear or anything. But the heat makes many clothes shrink and can make the colors fade faster. It can also sometimes make fabrics less crisp over time and add a bit of extra wear and tear to the hems and finished edges.

So for things like t-shirts or jeans, the dryer isn't going to do anything to them that makes a difference in their wearability, unless they shrink in a way that makes them not fit. But for things like the button down shirts I wear to work, they often wouldn't fit me properly if they shrank, and having the fabric fade and get less crisp makes them look noticeably worn after awhile. If I hang them up to dry, they look like new(ish) shirts for much longer, and I don't have to worry about them getting incrementally shorter every time I wash them.

Basically, whether or not I dry clothing depends upon if I care about it shrinking, fading, or softening. I mostly dry my pants because I don't particularly have a problem with any of those things happening. I never dry the yoga pants I sleep in because they are cotton and just barely long enough now. If I dried them, they'd shrink at least an inch or two and be way too short to be comfortable. But I do dry the cotton yoga pants I wear to exercise, because they're still an inch or so longer than strictly necessary after multiple trips through the dryer.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on January 31, 2014, 08:40:11 PM

And I've never had a problem with birds or winds damaging line stuff.

As well as using a clothes dryer a lot over the years, I've also pegged stuff outside and have never had a problem there either. Our dryer died 2 years ago and we just never got around to replacing it so since then I've had no choice but to line dry.

As doing laundry is not my favourite passtime, I do miss the convenience of being able to throw it all in the dryer, especially later in the day/early evening if something is needed for the next day. In those cases, I just cross my fingers and hope whatever it is manages to dry inside overnight.

In a nutshell, I've never had any issues with whatever method I've used to dry clothes, but I love the convenience of a dryer.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on January 31, 2014, 08:49:38 PM
In order to line dry my laundry, I'd have to unload the washer into my basket, head out through the garage then go through the side alley to behind my house, up onto my deck to a regular type line or get the compact one out of my shed and put it in the ground, hang each piece up one by one, using clothespins, then repeat the process in reverse once everything was dry.  It is MUCH simpler just to throw the load in the dryer and crank it on.

This is what I've found is a major difference between US and Australian/NZ houses. Here, 99% of houses are designed with the laundry opening out onto the garden with the clothesline nearby. I think it takes about 4 steps for me to get from my washing machine to the clothesline. If I had to muck around traipsing through half the house to get outside, I'd probably stick exclusively to the dryer too.

The actual hanging method is the same everywhere though, so that really has nothing to do with the house design.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Peregrine on January 31, 2014, 09:13:49 PM
Western Washington in the United States.....if I tried to exclusively line dry outside I would probably only have dry clothing 1 month out of 12.  That said I live in the suburbs in an old neighborhood (built in the mid 70's) that predates HOA's in our area.  So no worry having a clothesline if I want one, plus we tend to be fairly environmentally conscience around here and city's wouldn't get away with an outright ban.  Most often I just drape bathroom rugs and shower curtains out on sunny days to air out. 

However I do keep an extra shower rod in our larger bathroom running the length of the tub but hanging well above head height.  I hang swim wear, delicates, and fabric that I'm pre-treating for sewing.   Stuff can be dripping wet and any water just drains down the tub.  I have a tiny utility room that is home to washer, dryer, coat room, toilet, utility sink, water heater, kitty box, boot bin, etc.  In my home that would be the logical place for a drying rack, but I don't particularly want kitty litter dust kicked up all over my clean stuff.  My hubby and I are finishing some additional closet space and I'm toying with the idea of an extendable drying rack for other stuff.


Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Harriet Jones on January 31, 2014, 09:16:33 PM
Dryers cost electricity and need to have the lint filter cleaned all the time. A clothesline just wants winding down, pegging out, and taking in a few hours later. Much simpler and cheaper.

I'll agree with cheaper but no way would I agree with simpler.  In order to line dry my laundry, I'd have to unload the washer into my basket, head out through the garage then go through the side alley to behind my house, up onto my deck to a regular type line or get the compact one out of my shed and put it in the ground, hang each piece up one by one, using clothespins, then repeat the process in reverse once everything was dry.  It is MUCH simpler just to throw the load in the dryer and crank it on.

And to reiterate something I said earlier, in sub-zero temperatures I'm especially glad to have a dryer.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: gramma dishes on January 31, 2014, 09:16:37 PM
Several posts in this thread mention clothing being damaged by clothes dryers. How much of a problem is this, really? A lot of my clothes  are really old (10 years and more). They are always dried in the machine and they are not damaged. I always use the lowest reasonable setting and dry some things inside out (if the care label recommends it) and never have a problem. On the other hand, I did have clothes damaged by clothes pins and low flying birds (who'd been indulging in red berries) when I hung clothes outside.

I was wondering the same but didn't want to appear ignorant, so I didn't post the question. :)  I have a LOT of shirts from high school, some I didn't wear for 2-4 years of being to large for them but since I did the baggy style thing in HS those are in the minority. I also have 3 pairs of pants I recently began wearing again after 2 year hiatus, again due to weight gain, but they were worn pretty solidly over the 6-7 years (minus a year and a half or so around DD's time) before that. One pair of jeans I recently noticed is becoming very thin in the butt, and I saw a mend in my green sweater today has come lose, but otherwise most of my stuff is still pretty wearable if I still want to wear it. I tend to use the dryer 3/4 of the year, or more if I want to avoid picking out cottonwood seeds and shaking out dust.

I just figured I've been very lucky in my clothing or something. Socks, now, I'd like to replace those annually.
 

Whew!  I'm relieved to hear I'm not alone.  I've never hung clothes on a clothesline (indoors or out) since I graduated from high school in 1960.  I've been married almost 47 years and we both still have some clothes from our college days! 

I use a top loading washer which spins things very dry.  Most things dry in the dryer in an hour or less.  Some things much less. The only thing I have to "repeat" dry are my down pillows which don't fluff up properly until they've been dried twice.  The dryer senses that the ticking is dry and doesn't realize that the fluffy down inside is all still glomped together, so I just toss them back in and turn it on again.

My dryer is gas although obviously it uses electricity to turn on and to rotate the drum.  Our electric bill is quite reasonable except for summer, but that's because of the air conditioning.

In our city we are "discouraged" from having clotheslines, although I don't think they're illegal.

It is presumed that back yards are living areas where people eat out on their decks and patios, etc. and otherwise entertain, so it's kind of considered a part of the house.  Some houses have fences, some don't, but I would not like having guests over for outside fun and have to look at a rusted car in my neighbors back yard.  Laundry?  Not sure I'd even notice!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Optimoose Prime on January 31, 2014, 10:35:27 PM
Alaska here.  We have two seasons.  Winter and not winter.  Not winter is not particularly warm and it rains a lot.  Winter is freezing.  Except for last week when it was 50F.  Go figure. 

Anyway, we dry almost all of our stuff in the dryer.  Exceptions are bras, swim wear, and some waterproof outer clothing.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Ereine on January 31, 2014, 11:01:43 PM
Several posts in this thread mention clothing being damaged by clothes dryers. How much of a problem is this, really? A lot of my clothes  are really old (10 years and more). They are always dried in the machine and they are not damaged. I always use the lowest reasonable setting and dry some things inside out (if the care label recommends it) and never have a problem. On the other hand, I did have clothes damaged by clothes pins and low flying birds (who'd been indulging in red berries) when I hung clothes outside.

Almost all of my clothes have labels that forbid dryers. It may be that they're just too careful but I'm not willing to take the risk to find out what would happen. I suspect the heat would make them less soft and probably increase pilling. I don't use much cotton so that may be the difference.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: CakeEater on February 01, 2014, 04:33:28 AM
My laundry is pretty close to my line, so not much effort to get there.

We've had dryers in holiday units, and the difficulty I've found with them is that I never know how long the load will take to dry. I guess that gets better with practice. But with the line, I can wash 4 or 5 loads, hang them out and forget about them until it gets dark and I bring the whole lot in.

With a dryer, I do a load in the machine, put them in the dryer, they're not done by the time I'm ready to put the next load in, so i let a wet load sit there while I wait, then I need to get that load out before the next one can go in. It's just a lot of in and out of the laundry juggling baskets.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: 123sandy on February 01, 2014, 08:17:58 AM
It has depended on where I've lived. At home in Scotland everything went out on the line when the weather was good for drying. In winter time it was not unusual to have the radiators draped with clothes.

I've lived in five different places in America, never once had a washing line. Had to buy a washer/dryer or use the launderette.

Two places in Italy. We had lines on our balconies. In winter we washed at home and dried at the base launderette.

Three places in Germany. No washing lines. In summer we use a drying rack and in winter we use the tumble dryer.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: AmethystAnne on February 01, 2014, 09:50:55 PM
I wish I had done a load of sheets and a load of towels in the washer last night. I could have hung them on the clothes line this morning. Our area is having a brief break in the cold weather. It got up to 59degreesF today.

Up until and including Thursday this week it's been no higher than 29.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Vall on February 03, 2014, 05:02:15 PM
When I first went on my own and married XDH, we line-dried our clothes exclusively because we didn't have a dryer for four years.  We lived in the country so HOAs weren't an issue.  It was okay in nice weather but winter was horrible.  My hands would turn bright red and my knuckles would crack.  It isn't unusual for our temperatures to dip down to 0 F.  Our windchills occasionally reach -40F (this year we've hit around -25F so far).  Most often, the winter temps are in the teens which is still cold enough.  My hands would be freezing by the time I got back into the house!  As far as freeze dried clothing, they were like boards and we'd take them into the house and let them thaw before we could fold them.  Sometimes they thawed dry and other times they'd be damp.

I liked the country air smell of the clothes in the summer but only when the country air smelled good.  There are many smells in the country that are not-so-pleasant.  If I lived in the country again, I might hang out clothes in nice weather.  Especially bedding.  But the weather and our city yard is simply not convenient.

We use the dryer on everything except my bras.  It costs us about .50 in electricity for each load--we do about 4 loads a week.  So the dryer costs us about $100 a year.  That's about the same price as one date night for me and DH.  I don't giving that up for the convenience of dry, soft clothes in any weather.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: MurPl1 on February 22, 2014, 01:20:36 AM
american living in israel here.

we have a portable line thing that we use inside the apartment or on the terrace, depending on the weather. (it's just me and DS). I also never understood why people consider laundry hanging outside a sign of poverty - to me it's just a sign that people live there. Many of the newer construction in israel (probably in the last 20 years or more) have the area sort of covered with slats (where air can circulate but he laundry isn't very visible) like this (http://www.bull-deck.com/Pages/ajax_flip_carusel?PageID=16723):

We do have a dryer but i haven't used it in about 8 years (not even sure it still works) - it's just too darned expensive to run. DS is in charge of the laundry - he sorts, washes, hangs - and he has a whole system of getting it all done on Friday and by Saturday afternoon it's usually all dry. (depending on the weather, he either puts ito on the balcony or in the Living Room near the radiator. )

I think you actually just explained why people associate line drying with poverty- the expense of using the dryer would presumably not be an issue to an affluent person.  Or even paying to own a dryer.   Which doesn't cover the aspect of why not line dry if you chose to.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Margo on March 19, 2014, 07:38:46 AM
I think there are also quite big differences in electricity costs in different countries - I think we in the UK pay more for power, so using a dryer would probably be more expensive.

Another factor may be that on average, I think our houses tend to be smaller, so the extra space of a dryer as well as a washer may be a consideration.  There is  no space in my kitchen for a dryer, so if I wanted one I'd have to get rid of my dishwasher.  I don't have a separate utility room.

I love the smell and feel of line-dried sheets - last weekend was the first time this spring it's been warm and dry enough for me to hang my sheets and duvet cover outside, and I was so happy when I put them on the bed and got to snuggle into that lovely clean feeling! My washing line runs over my lavender and rosemary bushes so there's a hint of those scents, too (although I get that a little anyway, as I have bags of dried lavender in my airing cupboard)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: ladyknight1 on March 19, 2014, 08:06:21 AM
Margo's post brings up another question.

Where is your washer?

Ours is in the utility closet on the third floor.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on March 19, 2014, 09:09:32 AM
Any house I've ever lived in has had a laundry room where the washer and dryer and a laundry sink are located.  My current laundry room is also the utility room because that's where the furnace and hot water heater are.  And the cats' food dishes and litter boxes - it's a big room so they are well separated.

All the laundry rooms have been located in the basement because that's where there is a floor drain in case of a mishap, as well as concrete floors that can't be damaged by water.  When I build my dream house, my laundry room will be on the main floor so I don't have to do stairs with full laundry baskets (and cats winding around my feet - great combination).  I'll make sure there is a floor drain and floor covering that is not affected by water.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 09:27:54 AM
In the UK:

Every residence I've ever even been in/seen online has the washer (and dryer, if present) in the kitchen, or in a utility room which is as near as possible to the kitchen. I've never seen a 'laundry room'. The closest thing would be a utility room, but that usually has all the laundry stuff, plus tools, dog food, garden implements, basically 'heavy duty' or dirty things that you don't want in the main house.

 (Utility rooms also don't always have a sink, and the sink is usually a 'dirty sink', for cleaning things like BBQ grills, I've never seen a special sink for laundry. )

To be honest, I've always thought that Americans make a huge pulaver out of doing a bit of washing. It's always depicted as some massive undertaking, with the need for a special room and all these special steps. (Sorting, washing, opening the lid to add rinse stuff, drying, folding...)

Everybody I know (including people with several young children) just chucks the clothes in the washer, takes them out, dries them, and throws them in the ironing basket until they can be bothered to iron them and hang them up (or if you're me, you just put stuff away when it's dry, I don't iron stuff unless I need to be smart).

The concept of 'laundry day', or needing a 'laundry room' is just silly to me, now that you can chuck it in the washer (which takes two minutes), and hang it out to dry (which takes 5 minutes). Even if I had several kids, I'd struggle to spend more than 20 mins a day on laundry, especially as most kids clothes don't need ironing.





 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Harriet Jones on March 19, 2014, 09:33:57 AM
You don't sort by fabric type?  You'd wash blue jeans with delicates (like bras)?  Sorting's not that big of a deal.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 09:41:55 AM
You don't sort by fabric type?  You'd wash blue jeans with delicates (like bras)?  Sorting's not that big of a deal.

Honestly, no. Never met anybody who does, either. I sort by colour if it's the first few times a particular item has been washed, but that's it.

Maybe it's a washing temperature thing? Most people I know wash their clothes at  around 40C (that's the standard, washing powders here boast about how cold you can wash clothes, and also about how you can mix colours). Newer washing machines wash as low as 30C. So, I'd never have the temperature high enough to damage anything.

I also noticed (when I lived abroad) that top loading washing machines are much harder on clothes (seriously, to the point of damaging the fabric over just a few washes), so maybe you have to be more careful because of that?
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: LadyClaire on March 19, 2014, 09:46:50 AM
You don't sort by fabric type?  You'd wash blue jeans with delicates (like bras)?  Sorting's not that big of a deal.

Honestly, no. Never met anybody who does, either. I sort by colour if it's the first few times a particular item has been washed, but that's it.

Maybe it's a washing temperature thing? Most people I know wash their clothes at  around 40C (that's the standard, washing powders here boast about how cold you can wash clothes, and also about how you can mix colours). Newer washing machines wash as low as 30C. So, I'd never have the temperature high enough to damage anything.

I also noticed (when I lived abroad) that top loading washing machines are much harder on clothes (seriously, to the point of damaging the fabric over just a few washes), so maybe you have to be more careful because of that?

Most clothes here have washing instructions on the tags.

So my husband's dress shirts will say "permanent press, cold" which means I shouldn't wash them with the towels, which typically get washed on warm or hot on the "normal" cycle. Especially since the towels will deposit a million little bits of fuzz on the shirts in the dryer. There's no line-drying here because my area tends to have high winds and no one wants to chase their sheets across the neighborhood.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 09:51:52 AM
You don't sort by fabric type?  You'd wash blue jeans with delicates (like bras)?  Sorting's not that big of a deal.

Honestly, no. Never met anybody who does, either. I sort by colour if it's the first few times a particular item has been washed, but that's it.

Maybe it's a washing temperature thing? Most people I know wash their clothes at  around 40C (that's the standard, washing powders here boast about how cold you can wash clothes, and also about how you can mix colours). Newer washing machines wash as low as 30C. So, I'd never have the temperature high enough to damage anything.

I also noticed (when I lived abroad) that top loading washing machines are much harder on clothes (seriously, to the point of damaging the fabric over just a few washes), so maybe you have to be more careful because of that?

Most clothes here have washing instructions on the tags.

So my husband's dress shirts will say "permanent press, cold" which means I shouldn't wash them with the towels, which typically get washed on warm or hot on the "normal" cycle. Especially since the towels will deposit a million little bits of fuzz on the shirts in the dryer. There's no line-drying here because my area tends to have high winds and no one wants to chase their sheets across the neighborhood.

Reading...tags...what is this voodoo of which you speak?  :P

Everybody I know only reads tags to find out if something's dry clean only, or if they paid £££ for something. Normal everyday clothes, sheets, towels, underwear, socks, literally anything at all, all gets chucked in the washing machine together at 40C.

My mum makes an exception for the dog's bed. That goes in by itself.  ;D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: thedudeabides on March 19, 2014, 10:00:42 AM
Most Americans don't really make a big deal out of doing laundry.  In fact, I'd say that the vast majority don't have laundry rooms at all, especially once you take into account the large number of renters.  Hence the prevalence of laundromats in just about every city and town. 

As far as sorting and folding/hanging clothes goes, I do it so they last longer and I don't have to iron them for work, nothing more or less.  It's certainly no "pulaver."
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Perfect Circle on March 19, 2014, 10:01:20 AM
I'm in the UK, wash most things in 30 degrees and definitely separate whites and colours and delicates. I am no domestic goddess, far from it, but to keep the whites white I've found it pretty important. So it does happen here too  ;)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 10:07:57 AM
I'm in the UK, wash most things in 30 degrees and definitely separate whites and colours and delicates. I am no domestic goddess, far from it, but to keep the whites white I've found it pretty important. So it does happen here too  ;)

I admit, if I'm doing two loads I'll separate into light stuff and dark stuff. If I saved up delicates, I'd either have to do the tiniest load of laundry ever, or own wayyyyy more underwear.   ;D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: ladyknight1 on March 19, 2014, 10:15:33 AM
Both houses for my parents and my in-laws have the washing machine and dryer in the garage. When house hunting, we found a few houses with the machines on the covered back porch.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Yvaine on March 19, 2014, 10:23:45 AM
I'm in the UK, wash most things in 30 degrees and definitely separate whites and colours and delicates. I am no domestic goddess, far from it, but to keep the whites white I've found it pretty important. So it does happen here too  ;)

I admit, if I'm doing two loads I'll separate into light stuff and dark stuff. If I saved up delicates, I'd either have to do the tiniest load of laundry ever, or own wayyyyy more underwear.   ;D

And that's sorting! ;) So really, you're doing all the steps you listed for the US, except the folding.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: ladiedeathe on March 19, 2014, 10:24:37 AM
In the UK:

Every residence I've ever even been in/seen online has the washer (and dryer, if present) in the kitchen, or in a utility room which is as near as possible to the kitchen. I've never seen a 'laundry room'. The closest thing would be a utility room, but that usually has all the laundry stuff, plus tools, dog food, garden implements, basically 'heavy duty' or dirty things that you don't want in the main house.

 (Utility rooms also don't always have a sink, and the sink is usually a 'dirty sink', for cleaning things like BBQ grills, I've never seen a special sink for laundry. )

To be honest, I've always thought that Americans make a huge pulaver out of doing a bit of washing. It's always depicted as some massive undertaking, with the need for a special room and all these special steps. (Sorting, washing, opening the lid to add rinse stuff, drying, folding...)

Everybody I know (including people with several young children) just chucks the clothes in the washer, takes them out, dries them, and throws them in the ironing basket until they can be bothered to iron them and hang them up (or if you're me, you just put stuff away when it's dry, I don't iron stuff unless I need to be smart).

The concept of 'laundry day', or needing a 'laundry room' is just silly to me, now that you can chuck it in the washer (which takes two minutes), and hang it out to dry (which takes 5 minutes). Even if I had several kids, I'd struggle to spend more than 20 mins a day on laundry, especially as most kids clothes don't need ironing.

It is a bit offensive to claim that "Americans" make a "huge pulaver" about anything- "America" has so many cultures and subgroups that it isn't possible to say anything much about us as a unified group.

As far as having your washer and dryer in the kitchen, while it may be common for you, where I live isn't done if possible, and would be a sign of poverty, especially because the stereotype of extreme poverty in some areas is that they have a couch and stuffed recliner on the porch and a washer and dryer hooked up in the kitchen (because the laundry alcove or room is being used for a bedroom). Most kitchen don't have the space or hookups available (except for some rentals which add a laundry space or alcove for hookups in the kitchen)

Here in Wisconsin temperatures range from 20  degrees F. to -30 degrees F, with windchills that can drop to -52 degrees F. Hanging clothing outside to dry from November through March or April would range from dangerous to painful for 6 months of the year.

And in order to keep whites white and blacks crisp I do separate clothing. On laundry day I have 2 loads of towels (for 2 people), 8 pairs of jeans, 4 or 5 pairs of pants, and about 14 shirts, plus underwear/socks, and jammies. It takes my husband all day between other things- stain pre-treating and spot removal, 45 minutes for each load to wash, an hour to dry, 20 or 30 minutes to fold/hang-up/put away each load. We're talking about 5 loads or so, so really not just a minute to pop it in and 2 minutes to dry.

I work a professional job- if I don't do laundry well my clothing won't be okay for work.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 10:30:17 AM
I'm in the UK, wash most things in 30 degrees and definitely separate whites and colours and delicates. I am no domestic goddess, far from it, but to keep the whites white I've found it pretty important. So it does happen here too  ;)

I admit, if I'm doing two loads I'll separate into light stuff and dark stuff. If I saved up delicates, I'd either have to do the tiniest load of laundry ever, or own wayyyyy more underwear.   ;D

And that's sorting! ;) So really, you're doing all the steps you listed for the US, except the folding.

Shhhhh, don't tell my brain that! If it seems too much like hard work, I'll stop doing it.  ;)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 10:37:25 AM
In the UK:

Every residence I've ever even been in/seen online has the washer (and dryer, if present) in the kitchen, or in a utility room which is as near as possible to the kitchen. I've never seen a 'laundry room'. The closest thing would be a utility room, but that usually has all the laundry stuff, plus tools, dog food, garden implements, basically 'heavy duty' or dirty things that you don't want in the main house.

 (Utility rooms also don't always have a sink, and the sink is usually a 'dirty sink', for cleaning things like BBQ grills, I've never seen a special sink for laundry. )

To be honest, I've always thought that Americans make a huge pulaver out of doing a bit of washing. It's always depicted as some massive undertaking, with the need for a special room and all these special steps. (Sorting, washing, opening the lid to add rinse stuff, drying, folding...)

Everybody I know (including people with several young children) just chucks the clothes in the washer, takes them out, dries them, and throws them in the ironing basket until they can be bothered to iron them and hang them up (or if you're me, you just put stuff away when it's dry, I don't iron stuff unless I need to be smart).

The concept of 'laundry day', or needing a 'laundry room' is just silly to me, now that you can chuck it in the washer (which takes two minutes), and hang it out to dry (which takes 5 minutes). Even if I had several kids, I'd struggle to spend more than 20 mins a day on laundry, especially as most kids clothes don't need ironing.

It is a bit offensive to claim that "Americans" make a "huge pulaver" about anything- "America" has so many cultures and subgroups that it isn't possible to say anything much about us as a unified group.

As far as having your washer and dryer in the kitchen, while it may be common for you, where I live isn't done if possible, and would be a sign of poverty, especially because the stereotype of extreme poverty in some areas is that they have a couch and stuffed recliner on the porch and a washer and dryer hooked up in the kitchen (because the laundry alcove or room is being used for a bedroom). Most kitchen don't have the space or hookups available (except for some rentals which add a laundry space or alcove for hookups in the kitchen)

Here in Wisconsin temperatures range from 20  degrees F. to -30 degrees F, with windchills that can drop to -52 degrees F. Hanging clothing outside to dry from November through March or April would range from dangerous to painful for 6 months of the year.

And in order to keep whites white and blacks crisp I do separate clothing. On laundry day I have 2 loads of towels (for 2 people), 8 pairs of jeans, 4 or 5 pairs of pants, and about 14 shirts, plus underwear/socks, and jammies. It takes my husband all day between other things- stain pre-treating and spot removal, 45 minutes for each load to wash, an hour to dry, 20 or 30 minutes to fold/hang-up/put away each load. We're talking about 5 loads or so, so really not just a minute to pop it in and 2 minutes to dry.

I work a professional job- if I don't do laundry well my clothing won't be okay for work.

I think that what I'm saying is that UK washing machines (and possibly even powders) might be so different that a more involved process (like you describe) isn't really neccessary.

I work a professional job too-and I'm fairly sure that I don't look like a scruffpot!  :D

I certainly don't assume that American washers are in the kitchen-quite the reverse! I actually assumed that it quite unusual, and that most people either had their own laundry room, a shared laundry facility in their building, or went to the laundrette.

I also forgot that pulaver is probably an unknown term in the US-I don't think you'd find it offensive if you knew the context in which it's used in the UK. It's somewhere between 'daftness' and 'rigmarole'. And you only say something's daft if you're being friendly.

Ah, the nuanced friendly ribbing. Difficult to deliver online.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: gramma dishes on March 19, 2014, 10:39:15 AM


...   I also noticed (when I lived abroad) that top loading washing machines are much harder on clothes (seriously, to the point of damaging the fabric over just a few washes), so maybe you have to be more careful because of that?

I don't know what kind of top loader you used, but I've never owned or used anything but a top loader.  I still have clothes that I wore in college (still in good condition!) and I'm in my seventies now.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 10:40:55 AM


...   I also noticed (when I lived abroad) that top loading washing machines are much harder on clothes (seriously, to the point of damaging the fabric over just a few washes), so maybe you have to be more careful because of that?

I don't know what kind of top loader you used, but I've never owned or used anything but a top loader.  I still have clothes that I wore in college (still in good condition!) and I'm in my seventies now.

Ah, but perhaps that's because I used my somewhat cavalier approach to laundry. That's what I'm saying. I can get away with it in the UK, but I couldn't abroad.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on March 19, 2014, 10:42:01 AM
I sort my laundry as I take it off.  My master bedroom is very large so I have three laundry baskets set up for light, bright and dark and I sort my clothes as I take them off.  I generally do laundry every two weeks and add a 4th load that is sheets and towels.  Delicates are washed in lingerie bags in with the rest of the matching colour loads.  So my black bras go in the dark load and my pale bras in the light load.  If I had red ones, they'd go in the bright load.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Margo on March 19, 2014, 10:43:21 AM
Quote
I also forgot that pulaver is probably an unknown term in the US-I don't think you'd find it offensive if you knew the context in which it's used in the UK. It's somewhere between 'daftness' and 'rigmarole'. And you only say something's daft if you're being friendly.



Don't you mean 'palaver'?

(Ducks)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: perpetua on March 19, 2014, 10:43:57 AM
I don't get it either. Bung it all in the washing machine, separate lights from darks, wash everything at 30 or 40, job done. Our washing machines are different though. I hear those top loaders with the giant agitators in them can tear clothes up. We don't have those in our machines, it's just a drum.

They also take up a lot more room, hence the need for a laundry room, I guess?

And all this bleaching stuff - why is that necessary? Does washing powder not get the clothes clean? Perhaps our detergent is different too. You can buy stuff like Vanish, which you can bung in with the powder to get stains out if something's dried in or whatever, but that's all I've ever done. I've never had to bleach anything in my life.

My tumble drier is in the bedroom, covered by a throw; it makes a rather handy TV stand, actually :)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 10:45:17 AM
Quote
I also forgot that pulaver is probably an unknown term in the US-I don't think you'd find it offensive if you knew the context in which it's used in the UK. It's somewhere between 'daftness' and 'rigmarole'. And you only say something's daft if you're being friendly.



Don't you mean 'palaver'?

(Ducks)

I actually wondered about how to spell it, I don't think I've written it down before. I just went with the closest phonetic (in my accent) spelling.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 10:47:41 AM
I don't get it either. Bung it all in the washing machine, separate lights from darks, wash everything at 30 or 40, job done. Our washing machines are different though. I hear those top loaders with the giant agitators in them can tear clothes up. We don't have those in our machines, it's just a drum.

They also take up a lot more room, hence the need for a laundry room, I guess?

And all this bleaching stuff - why is that necessary? Does washing powder not get the clothes clean? Perhaps our detergent is different too. You can buy stuff like Vanish, which you can bung in with the powder to get stains out if something's dried in or whatever, but that's all I've ever done. I've never had to bleach anything in my life.

My tumble drier is in the bedroom, covered by a throw; it makes a rather handy TV stand, actually :)

Yeah, I miiiiiiiiiiight use vanish if there's a persistent stain. I've never bleached clothes in my life either. Washing powder does the job fine, even for 99% of stains. Maybe UK washing powder is different?
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Harriet Jones on March 19, 2014, 10:54:24 AM
I don't get it either. Bung it all in the washing machine, separate lights from darks, wash everything at 30 or 40, job done. Our washing machines are different though. I hear those top loaders with the giant agitators in them can tear clothes up. We don't have those in our machines, it's just a drum.

They also take up a lot more room, hence the need for a laundry room, I guess?

And all this bleaching stuff - why is that necessary? Does washing powder not get the clothes clean? Perhaps our detergent is different too. You can buy stuff like Vanish, which you can bung in with the powder to get stains out if something's dried in or whatever, but that's all I've ever done. I've never had to bleach anything in my life.

My tumble drier is in the bedroom, covered by a throw; it makes a rather handy TV stand, actually :)

I'd say that's how most laundry's probably done in the US.  If you're going by what you might see on the internet or on TV, that's not representative of the entire US.

Personally, I don't use bleach on much of anything.  There are non-chlorine bleach alternatives that usually work pretty well.  However, my MIL bleaches everything and washes it all on hot, which is probably a holdover from when washing machines weren't all that great many decades ago.

I have a front loader that gets stuff pretty clean with only a few tablespoons of laundry detergent.  The top loader I used to have needed a lot more.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: ladiedeathe on March 19, 2014, 10:59:57 AM
Teenyweeny- my husband is British and we have a home in the UK also. I'm pretty familiar with the language.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: ladyknight1 on March 19, 2014, 11:00:00 AM
I never use bleach or wash on hot. I use a front loader, much more efficient than the older top loaders and uses much less detergent. I only use liquid detergent in it.

I do one or two loads a week, in the evening. I hate using up a weekend day for chores.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Yvaine on March 19, 2014, 11:00:54 AM
I'm in the US and I use bleach about once a year, usually to brighten up some dingy socks or towels. I mostly hate it because I never fail to accidentally spill some on my other laundry or on whatever I'm wearing at that moment, thus ruining it. If I went through a ton of smelly white athletic socks, I might use it more often, but I have way more darks than anything else so it's mostly pointless for me. Even my comfy socks are black.

I agree that TV seems to affect people's perception of the US to a huge degree. Commercials will show people (almost always women, of course  ::) ) doing laundry in a palatial laundry room and using about ten different products, because the commercial is trying to sell the products. They want you to think you need all those things, and they want you to see them in an inviting setting too. Most people's laundry facilities are not bigger than the Taj Mahal and most people, I think, don't use a whole array of potions. I sort, throw them in the washer with detergent, throw them in the dryer with a dryer sheet unless they're line-dry, then hang or fold them if I'm not feeling lazy.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Sophia on March 19, 2014, 11:05:16 AM
I am a forgetful person, so even when I was a poor college student I lived in apartments that had a washer/dryer because otherwise I would forget my laundry and I'd end up with no clothes. 
The washer/dryer was always in its own room which was sometimes just a closet off the kitchen.  But it was still called a laundry room, even though a person couldn't enter.   I think the idea is to suppress the noise, and to be able to close the door to make the rest of the house look neater.  Whenever I have seen the washer and dryer not behind a closed door, it is in the kitchen and then there is an obsession with making it match the kitchen appliances. 
What I don't understand on the topic is the idea that the washer and dryer have to be a matched set.  So, when the washer dies, people buy a washer AND a dryer. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 11:08:01 AM

I agree that TV seems to affect people's perception of the US to a huge degree. Commercials will show people (almost always women, of course  ::) ) doing laundry in a palatial laundry room and using about ten different products, because the commercial is trying to sell the products. They want you to think you need all those things, and they want you to see them in an inviting setting too. Most people's laundry facilities are not bigger than the Taj Mahal and most people, I think, don't use a whole array of potions. I sort, throw them in the washer with detergent, throw them in the dryer with a dryer sheet unless they're line-dry, then hang or fold them if I'm not feeling lazy.

And that is a very good point. I also partially base my views on things I've read online, but I suspect there's a selection effect there because 99% of people who bother to describe their laundry habits online are probably wayyyy more invested in the whole process than I am.  ;D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Yvaine on March 19, 2014, 11:08:52 AM

I agree that TV seems to affect people's perception of the US to a huge degree. Commercials will show people (almost always women, of course  ::) ) doing laundry in a palatial laundry room and using about ten different products, because the commercial is trying to sell the products. They want you to think you need all those things, and they want you to see them in an inviting setting too. Most people's laundry facilities are not bigger than the Taj Mahal and most people, I think, don't use a whole array of potions. I sort, throw them in the washer with detergent, throw them in the dryer with a dryer sheet unless they're line-dry, then hang or fold them if I'm not feeling lazy.

And that is a very good point. I also partially base my views on things I've read online, but I suspect there's a selection effect there because 99% of people who bother to describe their laundry habits online are probably wayyyy more invested in the whole process than I am.  ;D

That's also true. I think this may be the first time I ever described my laundry process online. ;) Because it's BOORRRRRING.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 11:10:12 AM
Teenyweeny- my husband is British and we have a home in the UK also. I'm pretty familiar with the language.

Maybe you know more serious people than I do, then.  ;) I've never heard anybody call anything a pulaver/palaver and mean anything serious by it.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: perpetua on March 19, 2014, 11:14:02 AM

I agree that TV seems to affect people's perception of the US to a huge degree. Commercials will show people (almost always women, of course  ::) ) doing laundry in a palatial laundry room and using about ten different products, because the commercial is trying to sell the products. They want you to think you need all those things, and they want you to see them in an inviting setting too. Most people's laundry facilities are not bigger than the Taj Mahal and most people, I think, don't use a whole array of potions. I sort, throw them in the washer with detergent, throw them in the dryer with a dryer sheet unless they're line-dry, then hang or fold them if I'm not feeling lazy.


Actually I mostly base my perceptions/whatever on what I see on this forum, since a) I don't frequent any other forums mainly inhabited by US folks, like this one, and b) living in the UK, I've never seen a commercial for US washing products in my life  ;D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: magicdomino on March 19, 2014, 11:26:24 AM
My light-colored clothes are food magnets, plus deodorant can build up and turn yellow in the underarms of shirts, so I do have a big stain problem.  (The dark clothes probably have stains too, but I'm not going to worry about what I can't see.)  Most of the food stains can be pre-treated when I take the clothes off, but some stuff like mustard and deodorant stains take more elbow grease.  Sooner or later, things get grungy enough to break out the Oxy Clean or Biz enzyme cleaner.  I try to avoid chlorine bleach for clothing.

Also, the kitchen linen wash (dish towels, dish cloths, cloth napkins) has lots of food stains, grease, probably germs.  That one is soaked in hot water and detergent overnight, then washed with chlorine bleach to kill the germs.  To be honest, the hot water probably sets as many stains as it removes, but it gets the grease out.

Laundry is probably the only household task that I don't mind, so that might be why I'm willing to spend more time on it.   :)

I think American laundries were originally located in a corner of the basement because that reduces visible clutter in the living areas, plus, as a previous poster mentioned, overflowing washers would cause less damage (Finished basements didn't really become common until the 1950's brought the basement recreation room.)  A lot of new construction within the last 10 or 20 years has the washer and dryer on the bedroom level because that is where most of the laundry is created and put away.

Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: magicdomino on March 19, 2014, 11:34:12 AM
The washer/dryer was always in its own room which was sometimes just a closet off the kitchen.  But it was still called a laundry room, even though a person couldn't enter.   I think the idea is to suppress the noise, and to be able to close the door to make the rest of the house look neater.  Whenever I have seen the washer and dryer not behind a closed door, it is in the kitchen and then there is an obsession with making it match the kitchen appliances. 
What I don't understand on the topic is the idea that the washer and dryer have to be a matched set.  So, when the washer dies, people buy a washer AND a dryer.

I never understood that either.  I could maybe understand if the appliances are located in a fairly visible place, and you are switching to a totally different model.  Since mine are tucked in a corner of the not-particularly-finshed basement, I don't care.

By the way, I tend to call it a laundry room, even though the area has no walls, just washer, dryer, and utility sink.  It used to be washer and sink, but I had the dryer moved from the opposite side of the basement.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: zinzin on March 19, 2014, 11:57:33 AM
In the UK:

Every residence I've ever even been in/seen online has the washer (and dryer, if present) in the kitchen, or in a utility room which is as near as possible to the kitchen. I've never seen a 'laundry room'. The closest thing would be a utility room, but that usually has all the laundry stuff, plus tools, dog food, garden implements, basically 'heavy duty' or dirty things that you don't want in the main house.

 (Utility rooms also don't always have a sink, and the sink is usually a 'dirty sink', for cleaning things like BBQ grills, I've never seen a special sink for laundry. )

To be honest, I've always thought that Americans make a huge pulaver out of doing a bit of washing. It's always depicted as some massive undertaking, with the need for a special room and all these special steps. (Sorting, washing, opening the lid to add rinse stuff, drying, folding...)

Everybody I know (including people with several young children) just chucks the clothes in the washer, takes them out, dries them, and throws them in the ironing basket until they can be bothered to iron them and hang them up (or if you're me, you just put stuff away when it's dry, I don't iron stuff unless I need to be smart).

The concept of 'laundry day', or needing a 'laundry room' is just silly to me, now that you can chuck it in the washer (which takes two minutes), and hang it out to dry (which takes 5 minutes). Even if I had several kids, I'd struggle to spend more than 20 mins a day on laundry, especially as most kids clothes don't need ironing.

Interesting, as I was taught to sort my clothing by my Scottish mother, who is also a consistent ironer (whereas I don't bother). I think you're seeing something that is true of people you know, and misattributing it as a UK thing.

And US or Canada, wherever I've lived, no laundry room, just the machines in the basement. Some people have them, but often because they've reno'd the basement and want to separate the new "living area" from the laundry stuff/bathroom/what have you.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: LadyClaire on March 19, 2014, 12:00:15 PM
In the UK:

Every residence I've ever even been in/seen online has the washer (and dryer, if present) in the kitchen, or in a utility room which is as near as possible to the kitchen. I've never seen a 'laundry room'. The closest thing would be a utility room, but that usually has all the laundry stuff, plus tools, dog food, garden implements, basically 'heavy duty' or dirty things that you don't want in the main house.

 (Utility rooms also don't always have a sink, and the sink is usually a 'dirty sink', for cleaning things like BBQ grills, I've never seen a special sink for laundry. )

To be honest, I've always thought that Americans make a huge pulaver out of doing a bit of washing. It's always depicted as some massive undertaking, with the need for a special room and all these special steps. (Sorting, washing, opening the lid to add rinse stuff, drying, folding...)

Everybody I know (including people with several young children) just chucks the clothes in the washer, takes them out, dries them, and throws them in the ironing basket until they can be bothered to iron them and hang them up (or if you're me, you just put stuff away when it's dry, I don't iron stuff unless I need to be smart).

The concept of 'laundry day', or needing a 'laundry room' is just silly to me, now that you can chuck it in the washer (which takes two minutes), and hang it out to dry (which takes 5 minutes). Even if I had several kids, I'd struggle to spend more than 20 mins a day on laundry, especially as most kids clothes don't need ironing.

Interesting, as I was taught to sort my clothing by my Scottish mother, who is also a consistent ironer (whereas I don't bother). I think you're seeing something that is true of people you know, and misattributing it as a UK thing.

My Mom, who is british, taught me how to sort laundry. She is a stickler for properly sorted clothes. When she was sick and I was doing laundry for her, I'd say "Ok, can I at least wash your pajamas and t-shirts together?" and that was a no-go because pajamas and t-shirts MUST be sorted into two separate loads, according to her.

I'm not as fastidious as she is when doing my own laundry, but I do sort my laundry according to material and color.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 12:05:34 PM
What I'm learning is that I know a lot of slobs.  ;D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: ladyknight1 on March 19, 2014, 12:31:33 PM
I'm proud of it too!  :D
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Sterling on March 19, 2014, 01:13:18 PM
My husband wears nice button down shirts to work and I generally wear dresses.  I sort our laundry because I am not about to wash those with towels or jeans and have them torn up, dingy and covered in fuzz.  I generally do loads of work clothes, towels, jeans and work out stuff, and bedding.  I toss socks and undies in with the work clothes.  I wash pretty much everything cold and dry it all with my dryer.  A clothes line isn't practical here because of wind and dust.

My washer and dryer are in the kitchen at our current house but the house we are moving into has a very small entry area coming in from the garage that is a laundry/pantry and then leads into the kitchen.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: menley on March 19, 2014, 01:23:37 PM
Homes in Texas don't have basements, so generally the washer and dryer are in a laundry room. All of the homes I've visited had the laundry room off to the side of the kitchen, and many were a sort of combination mudroom/laundry room off the entrance from the garage. Having a sink in the laundry room was very unusual when I was growing up, but it seems it's becoming more common as my friends renovate houses.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Teenyweeny on March 19, 2014, 01:24:12 PM
My husband wears nice button down shirts to work and I generally wear dresses.  I sort our laundry because I am not about to wash those with towels or jeans and have them torn up, dingy and covered in fuzz.  I generally do loads of work clothes, towels, jeans and work out stuff, and bedding.  I toss socks and undies in with the work clothes.  I wash pretty much everything cold and dry it all with my dryer.  A clothes line isn't practical here because of wind and dust.

My washer and dryer are in the kitchen at our current house but the house we are moving into has a very small entry area coming in from the garage that is a laundry/pantry and then leads into the kitchen.

I find the bolded interesting, and I think this must be the crux of the issue. I don't know how you could possibly tear clothes by washing them with other clothes. I think this must be a top loader vs front loader thing, because I've torn things in a top loader before, but I thought it was the machine's fault. Now I know it was my fault!

Fuzz might come off new things, but I'd never expect it to come off old (i.e. washed before) things, and IME it doesn't.

One or two of my cheaper things go dingy after a year or so, but then it's usually time for new stuff anyway (because the old ones were cheap and generally poorer quality). If I buy a bra for £8, I'm not gonna spend £XX (in my time, or in extra power/water/detergent) to launder it separately when it'll last about a year if I keep doing what I'm doing.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: demarco on March 19, 2014, 01:28:47 PM
I separate laundry into 9 categories: dark sweaters, light sweaters, lint free black, linty darks, linty lights and mediums, bed linens, towels, "gummies" (clothes worn by people who just can't help dripping grease all over themselves and who attract other unbelievable, unidentifiable stains.), and "problems."  "Problems" include clothes that haven't been washed before and might run so are washed separately, clothes with stains that didn't come out in the gummy load and clothes that probably shouldn't be washed but I will wash anyway if I can only figure out how. 

My laundry is in the basement. Everyone sends his or her own clothes down the laundry chute. There are shelves across from the washer with nine baskets on them. A couple of times a week I take the clothes out of the chute and toss them into the appropriate baskets. I wash the contents of a particular basket, except for the problem basket,  when it is filled to overflowing because that's a full load in my washer. 

My system evolved. It sounds complicated but the process is simple. I probably spend less than five minutes a week sorting laundry.

Sorting isn't the problem. Things that bug me about laundry are the sheer volume of it and stowing it once it's done. There are only two of us and we wear most things a couple of times before washing them. I only change sheets every two weeks. It still seems like I do a lot of laundry. I have to carry the wash up two floors. I have some limitations and can't carry a whole basket so it seems like there's always more laundry to carry up.

Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: hobish on March 19, 2014, 02:26:26 PM

 I hate how my clothes feel when they're line dried. I grew up with a laundry room in the dank basement that my mom was afraid to go in because of spiders, so pretty much everything was dried on a clothes line. It went from the deck to a tall tree and had a holder-upper thing in the middle so sheets wouldn't drag on the ground and wet clothes wouldn't hold everything down. Some things did come off of it smelling wonderful. Most of the time my jeans and towels came off of the clothes line crispy and stiff. I know line drying saves electricity/gas but i love my dryer. My laundry room is a wreck to see, but I love it.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Ereine on March 19, 2014, 02:32:06 PM
I'm in Finland and most apartments in my experience have the washer in bathroom, which some people in other countries seem to find strange. I've been thinking of buying a washing machine as they raised the price of using our laundry room but my bathroom is very small so I would have to buy a tiny one and the only electrical outlet is high on the wall across the room so I would have to use an extension cord so the the whole things seems kind of incovenient and possibly dangerous.

I usually only sort be temperature, sheets and towels go to 60 C and clothes to 40 C. I would have to do a lot of loads if I sorted the clothes, it's too expensive and I will only do full loads for environmental reasons. But I don't own any white clothes and most of my clothes are similar colors and materials and I haven't really noticed that jeans harm my other clothes. I do one load a week, two if I wash the sheets too.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: magicdomino on March 19, 2014, 02:57:57 PM
I'm in Finland and most apartments in my experience have the washer in bathroom, which some people in other countries seem to find strange. I've been thinking of buying a washing machine as they raised the price of using our laundry room but my bathroom is very small so I would have to buy a tiny one and the only electrical outlet is high on the wall across the room so I would have to use an extension cord so the the whole things seems kind of incovenient and possibly dangerous.

I usually only sort be temperature, sheets and towels go to 60 C and clothes to 40 C. I would have to do a lot of loads if I sorted the clothes, it's too expensive and I will only do full loads for environmental reasons. But I don't own any white clothes and most of my clothes are similar colors and materials and I haven't really noticed that jeans harm my other clothes. I do one load a week, two if I wash the sheets too.

Actually, that does make sense to me.  Bathrooms are designed to handle water spills to some extent, and the plumbing is conveniently close. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: SouthernBelle on March 19, 2014, 03:36:18 PM
Regarding laundry detergents, in the US phosphates were removed in 1993 for environmental reasons.  Detergents with them were more effective.  I don't know if the removal of phosphates was universal world-wide.  But that may account for the difference in effectiveness from one part of the world to another.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: katycoo on March 19, 2014, 05:51:44 PM
I think you actually just explained why people associate line drying with poverty- the expense of using the dryer would presumably not be an issue to an affluent person.  Or even paying to own a dryer.   Which doesn't cover the aspect of why not line dry if you chose to.

We line dry primarily due to cost.  Its not that we can't afford to, but rather than I choose to spend my money elsewhere.  Why waste money drying clothes when I live in a climate where they will dry themselves for free?  Using the dryer in good weather just seems silly to me.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on March 19, 2014, 06:53:00 PM
I usually don't sort my clothes unless I'm doing a white wash or a cat pee wash. Thankfully haven't had many of the latter for a while.

I've been working the last three weeks and we are overdue for a linen wash.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on March 19, 2014, 07:35:03 PM


...   I also noticed (when I lived abroad) that top loading washing machines are much harder on clothes (seriously, to the point of damaging the fabric over just a few washes), so maybe you have to be more careful because of that?

I don't know what kind of top loader you used, but I've never owned or used anything but a top loader.  I still have clothes that I wore in college (still in good condition!) and I'm in my seventies now.

I've only ever used a top loader as well, and never had a problem with them harming my clothes either.

I've used front loaders a few times when staying at hotels and it always strikes me as a pain having to virtually crouch on my knees to get all the clothes out.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on March 19, 2014, 07:40:09 PM
I would HATE using a front loader right now when I can barely bend.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on March 19, 2014, 07:41:12 PM
You don't sort by fabric type?  You'd wash blue jeans with delicates (like bras)?  Sorting's not that big of a deal.

Honestly, no. Never met anybody who does, either. I sort by colour if it's the first few times a particular item has been washed, but that's it.

Pod. I very rarely sort either. Occasionally if I've got several huge loads, I might sort darks from whites, or just do towels on their own (but that's mainly just make it easier when I hang them out), but other than that everything just gets lumped in together. It doesn't seem to harm or affect the clothes, as they're all in the same good condition no matter what else they're washed with.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Hmmmmm on March 19, 2014, 07:56:16 PM
My husband wears nice button down shirts to work and I generally wear dresses.  I sort our laundry because I am not about to wash those with towels or jeans and have them torn up, dingy and covered in fuzz.  I generally do loads of work clothes, towels, jeans and work out stuff, and bedding.  I toss socks and undies in with the work clothes.  I wash pretty much everything cold and dry it all with my dryer.  A clothes line isn't practical here because of wind and dust.

My washer and dryer are in the kitchen at our current house but the house we are moving into has a very small entry area coming in from the garage that is a laundry/pantry and then leads into the kitchen.

I find the bolded interesting, and I think this must be the crux of the issue. I don't know how you could possibly tear clothes by washing them with other clothes. I think this must be a top loader vs front loader thing, because I've torn things in a top loader before, but I thought it was the machine's fault. Now I know it was my fault!

Fuzz might come off new things, but I'd never expect it to come off old (i.e. washed before) things, and IME it doesn't.

One or two of my cheaper things go dingy after a year or so, but then it's usually time for new stuff anyway (because the old ones were cheap and generally poorer quality). If I buy a bra for £8, I'm not gonna spend £XX (in my time, or in extra power/water/detergent) to launder it separately when it'll last about a year if I keep doing what I'm doing.

I don't think she means a literal tear. But if i wash a lightweight knit shirt with jeans it is more likely to pill.

My sorting is:
Towels and sheets together because I can dry them on hot.
Jeans, my workout clothes and my DHs and my kids underwear together because I dry them on med high.
Most other stuff together because I dry in low.
Then the items that I want to line dry are washed together.

I'll combine loads and just dry on lower setting if I don't have enough for a full load.

I don't worry about colors unless it is the first few times it will be washed.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on March 19, 2014, 08:01:20 PM
Homes in Texas don't have basements, so generally the washer and dryer are in a laundry room. All of the homes I've visited had the laundry room off to the side of the kitchen, and many were a sort of combination mudroom/laundry room off the entrance from the garage. Having a sink in the laundry room was very unusual when I was growing up, but it seems it's becoming more common as my friends renovate houses.

Most Australian houses have a dedicated laundry room, with space for a washing machine and dryer. Some smaller houses/rooms may require the dryer to be wall mounted though. They also contain a sink (or 2), which is larger and deeper than a standard kitchen sink. Depending on size they could also contain a bench and/or cupboards. They are typically located on the back/side yard side of the house and open directly onto the yard within easy access of the clothesline.

Occasionally, there'll be houses where the washing machine will be located in the garage, with or without a sink or bench. Most houses here are single storey, or at least don't have an underground basement, so the laundry is located on ground level 99.99% of the time. In 2 storey houses the laundry will be located on the ground level.

There doesn't seem to be a 'standard' location for the laundry room within the actual house; it just seems to be wherever it will give the easiest access to the yard.  I did visit one display home though where the laundry was in the middle of the house, which would've required the wet laundry to be dragged through the carpeted lounge room and some other internal rooms in order to reach the clothesline that was located on the opposite side of the house.  ::)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on March 19, 2014, 08:01:58 PM
For delicates, I have underwear bags I just out stuff in. Works well for pantyhose too.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Dindrane on March 19, 2014, 09:09:36 PM
I used to never sort my laundry at all, largely because I never use anything except cold water to wash clothes, until I realized that most of my clothes last longer (or at least, look nice without shrinking for longer) if I hang dry them.

Since my husband can't remember which of my clothes get tumble dried and which get hung up, he asked that we sort our laundry into two baskets (one for hang dry, one for tumble dry). It's definitely been useful for us, since you don't have to dig through a single clothes hamper to pull out the clothes you can wash in one way or another, or dig through a pile of wet laundry to pull out what can't be dried (inevitably missing something in the process).

Until recently, that was the extent of our sorting (which basically just means tossing our dirty clothes into the appropriate hamper as we take them off). We always washed sheets and towels separately, in part because they are a load all by themselves, and in part because the towels produce massive quantities of lint always.

I also didn't used to own any white clothing that was meant to be actually seen until a few months ago. My white dress shirt has gotten noticeably dingy, even though I've never actually stained it, just because it gets washed with colored clothing. I broke down and bought some hydrogen peroxide bleach and soaked it and some other whites for just a few hours over the weekend, and it's already noticeably brighter. Because of that, we're going to start washing whites separately so that we can keep them white. Most of what we own that is white will just be filler for that one white dress shirt (since socks and undershirts and washclothes don't really need to be bright white), but it's become necessary.

Given that I now have all this overnight soaking to do, though, I'd really appreciate having a laundry sink to do it in. Too bad I just have a closet in my bathroom with my washer/dryer and clothes hampers. :P
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: sammycat on March 19, 2014, 09:21:57 PM
For delicates, I have underwear bags I just out stuff in. Works well for pantyhose too.

Me too.  :)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: PastryGoddess on March 19, 2014, 10:44:41 PM
I used to never sort my laundry at all, largely because I never use anything except cold water to wash clothes, until I realized that most of my clothes last longer (or at least, look nice without shrinking for longer) if I hang dry them.

Since my husband can't remember which of my clothes get tumble dried and which get hung up, he asked that we sort our laundry into two baskets (one for hang dry, one for tumble dry). It's definitely been useful for us, since you don't have to dig through a single clothes hamper to pull out the clothes you can wash in one way or another, or dig through a pile of wet laundry to pull out what can't be dried (inevitably missing something in the process).

Until recently, that was the extent of our sorting (which basically just means tossing our dirty clothes into the appropriate hamper as we take them off). We always washed sheets and towels separately, in part because they are a load all by themselves, and in part because the towels produce massive quantities of lint always.

I also didn't used to own any white clothing that was meant to be actually seen until a few months ago. My white dress shirt has gotten noticeably dingy, even though I've never actually stained it, just because it gets washed with colored clothing. I broke down and bought some hydrogen peroxide bleach and soaked it and some other whites for just a few hours over the weekend, and it's already noticeably brighter. Because of that, we're going to start washing whites separately so that we can keep them white. Most of what we own that is white will just be filler for that one white dress shirt (since socks and undershirts and washclothes don't really need to be bright white), but it's become necessary.

Given that I now have all this overnight soaking to do, though, I'd really appreciate having a laundry sink to do it in. Too bad I just have a closet in my bathroom with my washer/dryer and clothes hampers. :P

Does your washer have a soak or prewash mode?  That's what I use to soak my whites if needed. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Dindrane on March 19, 2014, 11:14:54 PM
No, it's a front loading one that doesn't appear to have anything like that. I did try a "rinse and hold" setting once, but it basically just does the wash cycle with no spinning until I tell it to. The clothes are still wet at that point, but I don't think it would do anything useful for soaking.

I instead go the low-tech route of using a bucket in my shower. It just limits how much I can soak at one time, and is a bit of a pain.

I'm kind of hoping that if I can just get that one white shirt back to bright white, washing it only with other whites and using the Clorox 2 at least often (if not with every wash) will help all the whites stay that way without my having to exert too much effort.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: PastryGoddess on March 20, 2014, 03:57:18 AM
No, it's a front loading one that doesn't appear to have anything like that. I did try a "rinse and hold" setting once, but it basically just does the wash cycle with no spinning until I tell it to. The clothes are still wet at that point, but I don't think it would do anything useful for soaking.

I instead go the low-tech route of using a bucket in my shower. It just limits how much I can soak at one time, and is a bit of a pain.

I'm kind of hoping that if I can just get that one white shirt back to bright white, washing it only with other whites and using the Clorox 2 at least often (if not with every wash) will help all the whites stay that way without my having to exert too much effort.

My aunt has a front loader and that's what she uses to soak.  She pushes the knob back in or if it is a small load she will open the door slightly and let the clothes sit overnight. 

*She doesn't open the door if the water is above the level of the bottom of the door
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Yvaine on March 20, 2014, 05:59:46 AM
One reason I sort, which I learned in a textiles class years ago and which made a huge light bulb go on over my head, is that nylon in particular soaks up dye colors from the wash water. So if you wash your white nylon bra with your jeans, over the course of many months, you will end up with a bluish-gray bra eventually even if your jeans aren't bleeding enough to damage anything else.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Dindrane on March 20, 2014, 09:29:04 AM
I can stop or pause the wash cycle in my washing machine, but I'm not sure there's ever enough water in the drum to actually allow clothing to soak. Plus, I'm not sure when in the cycle the detergent gets added (since that's where I'd need to put the Clorox 2), so I wouldn't know exactly when to stop the cycle. It's just easier, in the end, to soak things in a bucket because I can more easily control all the factors.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: turtleIScream on March 20, 2014, 10:03:35 AM
I wish we could have an outdoor clothesline! I live in Michigan, so the weather is not very conducive to line drying 7 months out of the year. But, even on nice days, we live in an area that it just would not work well. Our house is on a corner lot, so the backyard abuts street traffic that kicks up dirt and dust. Plus, we have less than 1/4 acre, and have 8 trees in the back, 2 of which are honey locust trees. So we have itty bitty leaves that randomly fall and stick to everything, virtually no sunlight, and lots of squirrels and birds. I think I would have to rewash all my laundry after drying it outside!

We've talked about getting indoor drying racks, but have no idea where they could be practically set up. We don't have a lot of good airflow through the house, and it can get really humid. Maybe someday I will build my dream house with a drying porch or something off the laundry room.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Sophia on March 20, 2014, 11:00:51 AM
Instead of an indoor drying rack, you could install a closet rod really high where the washer is.  I have one that I almost have to get on tiptoes to put the clothes on.  I take the clothes out of the washer, put them on the hanger, and hang them on the rod.  When our dryer died, I even used pants hangers for stuff like my child's blanket. 
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Ms_Cellany on March 20, 2014, 11:08:56 AM
North Texas here: pretty dry most of the time, although there are some muggy, humid days.

On days when we line-dry, we put wet towels in the dryer for just a few minutes to tumble out the stiffness and wrinkles, then hang them out.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Dindrane on March 20, 2014, 12:49:20 PM
I hang up my clothes on hangers and then put them on the shower rod. I do try not to weigh it down too much (mostly because of the PITA factor should it ever fall), but things like shirts typically take less than 24 hours to dry that way if I keep a few inches of airflow space between each one. I live in a pretty humid area (PNW) and have no windows or really any airflow in my bathroom.

I'd love a place to hang up my clothes that didn't require moving them to shower, but it works well enough for now if we plan when we do our laundry a little bit strategically.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: TinyVulgarUnicorn on May 03, 2014, 03:49:58 AM
I would love to hang dry our clothes, but our HOA specifically forbids line drying and my allergies wouldn't be able to handle all the pollen and dust getting caught up in the linens.  Even if those weren't issues we still wouldn't be able to because we don't get any sunlight in our backyard due to large pine trees that drop sap and pine needles everywhere.  I like the idea of line drying though.   
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Dazi on May 03, 2014, 05:58:36 AM
I hang up my clothes on hangers and then put them on the shower rod. I do try not to weigh it down too much (mostly because of the PITA factor should it ever fall), but things like shirts typically take less than 24 hours to dry that way if I keep a few inches of airflow space between each one. I live in a pretty humid area (PNW) and have no windows or really any airflow in my bathroom.

I'd love a place to hang up my clothes that didn't require moving them to shower, but it works well enough for now if we plan when we do our laundry a little bit strategically.

I found getting a cheap little fan can help a lot when you dry stuff like this. Even one of the tiny 6-7" desktop ones.  Just pointing in a corner or at the ceiling to move the air around will usually get your stuff dry overnight.

I live in Florida and can't hang stuff outside due to the pollen, not to mention the humidity,  but found this method does work.  Now I have a similar setup in my laundry room, with a utility pole that is about the same size as a shower curtain. It takes almost 24 hrs if I don't use the fan, but only about 6 if I do.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Octavia on May 03, 2014, 09:38:50 AM
I grew up in a rural area in Midwest USA, and most of my relatives and neighbors line dried their clothes. Most of the places I've lived since then have had rules against clothes lines so I used drying racks and hung clothes on the shower curtain rod in the guest bathroom. Now I have a home with no rules but noticed none of my neighbors hang their clothes out to dry. So I'm still using the sweater racks and shower curtain rod in the bathroom for clothes that cannot go into the clothes dryer.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Cherry91 on May 03, 2014, 09:53:56 AM
We line dry when the weather cooperates, but that's sadly not very often.

I love the smell of fresh air in clean clothing. Nothing can beat it, and nothing can recreate it!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: amandaelizabeth on May 11, 2014, 06:13:16 PM
We managed to line dry almost everything.  I think there were four or five days last year when I had to use the dryer.  Somedays it seems that I get a gym workout, rushing outside to bring the washing in as it starts to rain, and then putting it out again.  As someone posted, there is nothing, but nothing that beats the smell of clean sheets dried out side
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: katycoo on May 11, 2014, 09:00:06 PM
I grew up in a rural area in Midwest USA, and most of my relatives and neighbors line dried their clothes. Most of the places I've lived since then have had rules against clothes lines so I used drying racks and hung clothes on the shower curtain rod in the guest bathroom. Now I have a home with no rules but noticed none of my neighbors hang their clothes out to dry. So I'm still using the sweater racks and shower curtain rod in the bathroom for clothes that cannot go into the clothes dryer.

Why do you care what the neighbours do?
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Ceallach on May 11, 2014, 09:12:03 PM
I grew up in a rural area in Midwest USA, and most of my relatives and neighbors line dried their clothes. Most of the places I've lived since then have had rules against clothes lines so I used drying racks and hung clothes on the shower curtain rod in the guest bathroom. Now I have a home with no rules but noticed none of my neighbors hang their clothes out to dry. So I'm still using the sweater racks and shower curtain rod in the bathroom for clothes that cannot go into the clothes dryer.

Why do you care what the neighbours do?

I thought it was inferred because in the past she lived places with rules against it, so she's used to following the established norm where she's living e.g. where everybody dries their laundry the same way.    Even with no official rules she's following the example set by her neighbours in this regard.   (Not necessary, but understandable).
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: miranova on June 10, 2014, 10:39:13 AM
I really think most of this is just what you grew up doing which becomes your normal.  I really don't know anyone who line dries their clothes, but I'm sure a lot of that has to do with the fact that I live in suburbia, everyone has dryers and I live in a very humid climate.  I would not be opposed to seeing a neighbor's clothes hung to dry; I've just never seen it. 

Personally if I tried to do this, I would never get the laundry done.  I have 7 people in my house.  I'm already doing an average of 15 loads a week.  My backyard is quite far from the laundry room.  It would be an awful lot of work and I don't feel like I'd have nearly enough room to hang everything.  Also where I live we get summer storms just about every afternoon.  It's just not practical.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: TootsNYC on June 10, 2014, 11:54:05 AM
I think I was the first one that mentioned it being illegal.  I don't live in an HOA.  It is actually the city that has banned it.  I think that this city is a tad bit ... pretentious.   I think it is just one of those local things.  They also have a rule that all new houses have to be at least X% brick exterior.  I would guess around 70%.  Some places, none of the houses are brick and they look fine.  But, in this city, people would think about a new wood house, "Why didn't you save up a little more money and buy a real house?" 

Of course, when our drier died while we were cloth diapering our baby, the law didn't stop us from stringing twine ALL over the backyard.  I actually think the neighbors would not worry if you put a clothes line in your fenced back yard.  Houses are single-story in my neighborhood.   If you did not have a fence (rare), and a clothes line they would probably complain.  But more because the clothes line would give them an excuse to complain since you aren't required to have a fence.  Although, I have figured out that the garbage guys get bonuses for reporting people with too long grass.  We have an alley so the garbage truck goes down it.  They might report a clothes line in a fenced backyard hoping to get a bonus.  Nobody said anything about the twine all over our backyard.  Although, seeing about a 100 old-fashioned white cloth diapers hanging from twine strung from the frame of the bench swing to a tree branch to the fence to another tree branch, etc.  anyone would know that our drier died and that was a temporary fix. 

The drier is such a tiny part of my electric bill, cost is not a consideration.  I hang my clothes on a hanger because it is better for them, and I'll be hanging them eventually anyway, so no extra work.  We are remodeling an old house and when I saw that the laundry room and the master closet shared a wall, I insisted on a hole between them and a clothes rod through the hole.  I can hang up my clothes in the laundry room, and then dry, just shove them into the closet.


I would imagine that it's considered to be a bit of a fire hazard. (not that dryers aren't!).

I love your through-the-wall closet rod! How brilliant! You need to put that up on Pinterest.


The gas is out in our building, so the dryers in the laundry area don't work. And won't for a while. So I bought one of these to use int he living room (so that our showers can be operational even while clothes are drying): 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004Z91A88/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It's so much sturdier than I expected! I hung something off one of the lower arms (while it was otherwise empty), and it didn't tip over! And the double-decker part keeps the footprint small.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Margo on June 11, 2014, 10:47:29 AM
I hang up my clothes on hangers and then put them on the shower rod. I do try not to weigh it down too much (mostly because of the PITA factor should it ever fall), but things like shirts typically take less than 24 hours to dry that way if I keep a few inches of airflow space between each one. I live in a pretty humid area (PNW) and have no windows or really any airflow in my bathroom.

I'd love a place to hang up my clothes that didn't require moving them to shower, but it works well enough for now if we plan when we do our laundry a little bit strategically.

I found getting a cheap little fan can help a lot when you dry stuff like this. Even one of the tiny 6-7" desktop ones.  Just pointing in a corner or at the ceiling to move the air around will usually get your stuff dry overnight.

I live in Florida and can't hang stuff outside due to the pollen, not to mention the humidity,  but found this method does work.  Now I have a similar setup in my laundry room, with a utility pole that is about the same size as a shower curtain. It takes almost 24 hrs if I don't use the fan, but only about 6 if I do.

Yes, a small fan speeds up the drying process, and if you can also open a window a little in the relevant room it reduces the problems of condensation you can get with hanging clothes indoors to dry.

Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: cattlekid on June 11, 2014, 11:26:08 AM
I remember 12 years ago when we bought our first home, after looking at the backyard, I casually mentioned to the Realtor that there seemed to be a lot of room and that I might put up a laundry line. 

He was horrified at the thought, even though our home is not in a neighborhood with a homeowner's association or any restrictive covenants of any kind other than city code enforcement.  To this day, I'm not sure if his reaction was due to the fact that we live on a corner lot and our laundry would be visible to everyone coming and going in our neighborhood or just a general dislike of laundry lines.  Based on the fact that he normally sold homes in a much fancier neighborhood than ours, I'm going with the latter.

I grew up in a rural area in Midwest USA, and most of my relatives and neighbors line dried their clothes. Most of the places I've lived since then have had rules against clothes lines so I used drying racks and hung clothes on the shower curtain rod in the guest bathroom. Now I have a home with no rules but noticed none of my neighbors hang their clothes out to dry. So I'm still using the sweater racks and shower curtain rod in the bathroom for clothes that cannot go into the clothes dryer.

Why do you care what the neighbours do?
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Golden Phoenix on September 28, 2014, 10:46:16 AM
We live in a tiny (no really, tiiiiny) house with no room for a washer or drier, at least, not if we ant to be able to fit our bed in here.

As such, i hand-wash our laundry in the bathroom sink and on good days I dry our stuff on a line outside. Unmentionables are dried inside on one of the two radiators we have.

I have to admit though, it's a pain in the rump, i'm seriously at the point where i would sleep across the top of the washer/drier if it meant i could get some washing done easily.

Also, our front door opens into a kind of car park, with no garden or yard of any kind. We had a discussion with our upstairs neigbour and the walkway that connects our two doors is now where the line goes. She uses it too.

The problem with this is our washing is visible to anyone who walks past and any Joe Public could walk right up to our line, grab something off it and be round the corner before we react. I tend to get up early and sit by the window all day as it dries just to be sure. Luckily i can get plenty done from there.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Cherry91 on September 28, 2014, 10:55:54 AM
I wonder if there's a cultural thing at play here, because in my experience in England (having lived in Oxford, London, the Midlands, the South and visited many other parts), everyone here line dries if the weather will cooperate. Houses with gardens, houses with terraces, flats with balconies, anywhere you can hang a line or place a device. I was quite surprised to hear there are places that object to it.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Sharnita on September 28, 2014, 12:53:31 PM
Line drying, particularly bed linens,  is not a great idea if you have certain allergies.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Dazi on September 28, 2014, 12:57:28 PM
Line drying, particularly bed linens,  is not a great idea if you have certain allergies.

That's why I don't line dry outside. I have terrible allergies to a number of tree and grass pollens. I do have a rack in my laundry room, but it's only big enough to hang shirts, a couple of pants, and underwear.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on September 28, 2014, 12:59:34 PM
We managed to line dry almost everything.  I think there were four or five days last year when I had to use the dryer.  Somedays it seems that I get a gym workout, rushing outside to bring the washing in as it starts to rain, and then putting it out again.  As someone posted, there is nothing, but nothing that beats the smell of clean sheets dried out side

I put things out when I can because sunshine is cheaper than electricity, but it's not unusual for sheets to come in smelling of next door's barbecue...
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: XRogue on September 28, 2014, 01:43:37 PM
Barbecue would be a nice smell too! :)

I have a TINY yard, so no real room for a line (Ellie Bumstead is a largeish dog) that wouldn't get pollen/tree sap in my clean laundry, so we use the dryer for a lot of things, and what we can't, we hang on drying racks. we have a flat one, and then we just lately got a telescoping one that looks a bit like a coatrack. (the arms and feet fold out when in use. When not, it looks like a pogo stick with no handles) Hang shirts or pants on hangers, hang the hangers on the arms, put out the fan and voila!
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Free Range Hippy Chick on September 28, 2014, 03:23:40 PM
We put our washing line up when the clocks go forward and take it down when they go back, because they way our house is placed, we get no winter sunshine in the garden, and very little wind, so other than in the summer, nothing will dry outside and the line is a nuisance to anyone going to the shed or mowing the lawn. I have been known, though, when we get a warm day in early spring or late autumn, to put as much as possible on the clothes horse and then carry that outside in a hopeful sort of manner.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on September 28, 2014, 03:47:19 PM
I line dry bed linen , as I like how it's such a good way to air it out.

But we have a washer/dryer now. :) So much easier to get clean, dry clothes for DS now.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Winterlight on September 30, 2014, 08:48:42 AM
I line dry delicates indoors- no outdoor closeline. At home, my mom would dry some stuff outdoors for part of the year, but when temperatures drop to -60F/-51C in winter, it wasn't really practical to go wandering around outside with wet clothing.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Xandraea on September 30, 2014, 12:28:41 PM
When I was away at University and doing my own laundry for the first time, I would run out of clothes to wear, hike down the stairs from my 3rd floor dorm room to the basement (four flights, no lift!), cram as much as could fit into the top-loader unsorted, and wash. It's a wonder I didn't have any disasters, but my clothes weren't new so there was no risk of dye leeching, and I lived in tshirts, jeans and hoodies, so nothing requiring special treatment.

Now that I'm more grown-up and have the space, I still wear mostly tshirts, yoga pants, jeans, hoodies, with some nicer stuff as well. I sort my laundry as I remove it after wearing, into piles on the floor.
Load #1: Blacks/grays/browns/reds
Load #2: bright colours (mostly berry pinks, purples, blues, greens)
Load #3: Jeans
Load #4: Towels
Load #5: Bedding
Load #6: Dog blankets/towels

Delicates and hang-dry stuff goes into netted bags for easy identification. I have a larger black one, a white one, and a smaller one that I used to use for baby socks.

Whenever I see enough for a load, I toss one into my H.E. front-load washer. I wash most clothes in cold, towels, bedding and dog stuff in hot, all on a high-speed spin. I had a bar installed over the sink in my tiny laundry room (seriously, there's no room for a hamper in there, just enough to open the front-loading doors of the machines). I use hangers to hang all bras and several tops that are labeled line-dry, as well as many I just don't want to shrink. Some of my clothes have never seen the inside of the dryer, and are in better shape for it. I don't have an outside line (allergic to the outdoors anyway, sub-zero winters, and an HoA that forbids "permanent structures", as well as just no good place to put one, as the city walking trail goes by about 20 feet from the back of my house, and the main-floor deck doesn't have stairs to get down to the backyard anyway). Bedding, towels, dog stuff go into the dryer on low-heat in 25 minute cycles. If it's mostly dry, I remove it and hang over the hallway railing to finish. I hang as much as I can, sometimes giving a quick spin in the dryer to soften jeans. Since I keep the heat low in the winter to avoid atrocious bills, I have been known to toss my fleece blanket into the dryer for 10 minutes to warm it before wrapping up in it :)

One fun tip: When my father had air conditioning installed in one of our houses, he had a vent put in the bathroom floor under the towel bar, so the towels dried faster, and in the winter the heat would warm the towels, which was quite pleasant. :)
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Mammavan3 on October 25, 2014, 11:53:49 PM
A few years ago we stayed at a villa in Tuscany. When we were being shown around, the agent pointed out the dishwasher and washing machine. When I asked where the dryer was, she looked at me in disdain and said "There are no dryers in Italy!"  I've since read that only a very small number do; the percentage is in the low single digits IIRC.

When I left work to be a SAHM, I began to use the clothesline rather than the dryer. It was a PITA to carry the full load of wash upstairs and across half the house and contort myself to hang out the dining room window to use the line. Our house is on a hillside wooded lot so that was the only place to have a clothesline.

The first thing the allergist told me when my DD was diagnosed as having allergies to pollen, leaf mold, trees, grass, and just about every other component of the air, was to stop hanging laundry outside. He seemed somewhat taken aback when I kissed him.  ;)

By the time DD was off to college, I was working 12-hour days and had no intention of trying to fit line-drying into my schedule. Washer, dryer, done.

When DD came home from college after her freshman year, she brought a winter's worth of sweaters home with her. Since there were so many, to save time I washed them on my hand-wash cycle and spread them on towels on the tables and chairs on the deck to dry. Several the birds decorated, and the sun bleached a couple of others, except for the part covered by the sleeves. That was a costly mistake that I never repeated.

I'm fairly anal about sorting my laundry. Whenever I don't, the results are always disappointing. Light-colored permanent press, darks, sheets and towels (two loads--one of the blue/gray hues, one of the salmon/peach ones), whites.  Delicates and socks are washed in mesh bags; that eliminates the dreaded missing-sick quandary. Anything  that says "line dry," knits, lingerie, and bathing suits are all hung on a rod that in the laundry room. Everything else is popped in the dryer. The things that are hung need to be ironed or steamed smooth.

My clothes never wear out or get old-looking, and shrinkage is only a problem when I gain weight. I get tired of them before they wear out, but the old favorites still look good. I had top-loaders until about 15 years ago, when I got a front-loader. I love the small amount of water it uses, but I never noticed that the top loader damaged my clothes in any way.
Title: Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
Post by: Sophia on October 26, 2014, 02:31:53 PM
...My clothes never wear out or get old-looking, and shrinkage is only a problem when I gain weight. I get tired of them before they wear out, but the old favorites still look good. I had top-loaders until about 15 years ago, when I got a front-loader. I love the small amount of water it uses, but I never noticed that the top loader damaged my clothes in any way.

Yeah, isn't it annoying when clothes do that. 
DD told us quite seriously that every time we wash the dress she was wearing, it gets shorter.  It really is hard to not laugh sometimes.