Etiquette Hell

A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. Guests, register for forum membership to see all the boards. => Time For a Coffee Break! => Topic started by: lowspark on January 30, 2014, 10:26:17 AM

Title: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on January 30, 2014, 10:26:17 AM
This is sort of a spinoff of the "dish you haven't been able to master" thread.

Two things that came up in that thread:

Grating the entire wedge of parmesan cheese which goes against the prevailing advice of grating it only seconds before using it. As long as you use up the grated cheese in a reasonably quick amount of time, it's fine.

Cooking with wine you don't like to drink. I do it. It's not as if when I cook with wine, it is the dominant flavor. Not even close. Cooking with wine I don't like is exactly what I do if I buy a bottle and it's not exactly to my taste. I've never had a problem doing it.

And here's another one. Throw out your spices after a year.
No way!! Sure they might gradually lose flavor/potency as time goes on but then ok, just maybe use a little more if it's not as strong as it should be. Throw it out? Ummm... I'm not in the habit of throwing out perfectly good food just because the spice companies want me to buy more of their product!

So...
what things do you do that "they" say not to?
Note, all my examples have to do with cooking because that's where my mind was but you don't have to stick to that!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 30, 2014, 10:34:31 AM
I agree that some advice is for "optimum" experience like the cheese and herb issue. Sure the bottle of freshly opened dried oregano is going to be fresher and stronger than the year old stuff, but I can probably adjust the amount I use to get the best taste. Same with the frozen parm. If it's the "star" of the show and not being heated in any way, freshly grated will taste better. But if I'm mixing it in with breadcrumbs and butter to sprinkle on top of mac&cheese, very few people will be able to taste the difference.

Mine is washing colors and whites separately. With most clothing dyes today, they are pretty well set after a few washes. So I have no problem washing my white tshirts and socks with my black yoga pants, colored tshirts, and pink undies.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Yvaine on January 30, 2014, 10:42:03 AM
Mine is washing colors and whites separately. With most clothing dyes today, they are pretty well set after a few washes. So I have no problem washing my white tshirts and socks with my black yoga pants, colored tshirts, and pink undies.

I wash all sorts of "dry clean only" stuff on cold and the delicate cycle, and then hang or flat dry it. If it were silk or wool, I'd follow the instructions, but I don't have the budget to own much of that--and I am so not going to the dry cleaner's just for polyester.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dazi on January 30, 2014, 10:54:15 AM
I think the wine advice got misunderstood somewhere.   You shouldn't cook with wine that is not of drinking quality, not wine you wouldn't drink because you just don't like the flavor.   They mean different things. The wine advice is really referring to not using cheap nasty stuff that is labeled as "cooking wine" and since it's usually is shelved with the vinegar, that should tell you something.

I also don't separate my colors either as I just wash everything in cold .  I do separate my  delicate weight items and either do a separate  load or toss them in a lingerie bag. I do wash new brightly colored items alone and with white vinegar to help set the colors.

Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: EMuir on January 30, 2014, 11:00:41 AM
I thaw poultry on the counter. Why? A frozen chicken would take a week to thaw in the fridge, and you're only supposed to keep chicken in the fridge for four days. I do ensure the chicken never thaws all the way to room temp on the counter though.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Thipu1 on January 30, 2014, 11:03:32 AM
Mine is washing colors and whites separately. With most clothing dyes today, they are pretty well set after a few washes. So I have no problem washing my white tshirts and socks with my black yoga pants, colored tshirts, and pink undies.

I wash all sorts of "dry clean only" stuff on cold and the delicate cycle, and then hang or flat dry it. If it were silk or wool, I'd follow the instructions, but I don't have the budget to own much of that--and I am so not going to the dry cleaner's just for polyester.

When I brought in a dress with a 'dry clean only' tag, a local dry cleaner actually told me that the dress was perfectly safe to machine wash.  It was.  May I say that her place has been our dry cleaner of choice ever since.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 30, 2014, 11:05:17 AM
I do the same, EMuir.  I thaw almost everything on the counter.  What I'll sometimes do is take it out when I get home from work the evening before I want to cook it, leave it on the counter until bedtime then stick it in the fride.  And then it is perfectly thawed for the next day when I go to use whatever it is.

They also say that you should immediate remove all stuffing once you are done cooking.  We never do that.  The rest of the stuffing gets removed when the bird is being deconstructed and not before.

Any herbs I grow myself do generally get pitched after a year because I've grown a fresh crop but anything else?  I use it until it is done.  If the flavour has faded a bit, I just use more, to taste.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Thipu1 on January 30, 2014, 11:19:39 AM
We also, at least partially, thaw meat and poultry on the counter.  We have small utility room where our furnace and hot water heater are located.  That's also a place we use for thawing.  Meat certainly goes into the fridge overnight but, when we're home to monitor it, the counter or the utility room works just fine. 

Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: rose red on January 30, 2014, 11:22:28 AM
I don't put leftovers in the fridge right away since I may want to eat again a few hours later.

I have worn new clothes without washing first.

I have shared makeup (not for eyes though).
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: dawbs on January 30, 2014, 11:26:43 AM
We also, at least partially, thaw meat and poultry on the counter.  We have small utility room where our furnace and hot water heater are located.  That's also a place we use for thawing.  Meat certainly goes into the fridge overnight but, when we're home to monitor it, the counter or the utility room works just fine.

Mine gets thawed in the microwave--not in an 'on' microwave, just, in the microwave.
Because it's the only cat-proof 'counter' space in the house. :-[ :P
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Ms_Cellany on January 30, 2014, 11:29:05 AM
Mine gets thawed in the microwave--not in an 'on' microwave, just, in the microwave.
Because it's the only cat-proof 'counter' space in the house. :-[ :P

*raises hand*  We have two wall-mounted ovens, both of which are broken, but which make fine cat-proof thawing areas.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: shhh its me on January 30, 2014, 11:37:27 AM
 I wash a lot of my dry clean only clothes.  Not all at the same time and not most favorite super expensive things but at $3 per item a suit and blouse would be $9 I'll try washing the blouse and dryell the suit a couple of times.

I don't tend to toss spices except rarely used things in baking but I do tend to use up most spices I own now within a year or 2 at the most.  but those few things I only use a teaspoon of a year I'm not going to spend $40 a year on spices I used once or twice a year.

Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 30, 2014, 11:37:40 AM
I wear stuff all the time without pre-washing.

I machine wash 'hand wash only' items on the delicate cycle.

The only wines I use in cooking are dry sherry, Marsala and Vermouth. They all store well on the counter once opened.

I use heat for my back, because ice makes it seize up. I drink coffee at night, and I never have decaf. It doesn't keep me from going to sleep.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: workerbee on January 30, 2014, 11:40:04 AM
Add me to the list of people who thaw meat on the counter (or in the sink!). I grew up with my mom doing this, so I like to think I have built up an immunity to any potential bacteria. I'm just not good at remembering to take things out of the freezer, and I've never mastered microwave thawing...it always gets cooked around the edges!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: TootsNYC on January 30, 2014, 11:42:23 AM
I have worn new clothes without washing first.


I *always* wear new clothes without washing first! I want at least one experience of wearing them while they look and feel exactly the way they did in the store.

I also put sheets on the bed without washing them. My MIL was aghast. My DH and I washed one set first, and then decided, we also want one night of sleeping on them while they're extra crisp. I guess we'll get Alzheimers or something from breathing in the factory fumes overnight for a week.

I do wash towels first, bcs of the fuzz.

My MIL lets meat thaw on the counter, AND she lets it sit for hours on the counter after she's cooked it.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: cattlekid on January 30, 2014, 11:54:43 AM
My ILs do not refrigerate leftovers, unless it's the height of summer.  They have a covered "lean-to" type porch on the back of their house and everything is stored there.  I have had to quit eating anything but fresh food at their house because I have had a kidney transplant and have to be extra-vigilant about food safety.

MIL also would make a pot of coffee the night before, then warm it up on the stove the next morning, even though they had a automatic drip coffeemaker that would make a pot of fresh coffee in a matter of minutes.

For me, I thaw out most items on a "Miracle Thaw".  It is a piece of black metal (unsure of the actual alloy) that sits on the counter.  You can put a piece of meat on the Miracle Thaw and it thaws out in a couple of hours.  The heat is transferred to the metal through what I am sure is magic.   Purchasing the Miracle Thaw was the best 25 cent investment I ever made at Goodwill.   ;D
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 30, 2014, 12:00:48 PM
I put leftovers away immediately.

When my father in law would visit his grandparents on the farm, they never washed a dish, just wiped it off and put it back in the cabinet. Must have had hardier constitutions!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 30, 2014, 12:01:54 PM
I do lots of things perhaps I "shouldn't"

I don't warm up my car, as in the engine, even when its frigid out. I will turn it on, but to defrost and scrape the windows. So it does warm up that way.  But if its cold, and i don't need to do that, i get in, start it up, and drive off. I've never ever had ANY issue becasue I don't.

I routinely eat food that is past the "sell by" date. If it smells and tastes ok, or has no visible mold, or its something like crackers that won't actually "go" bad, I don't care.

I too defrost stuff on my counter, when I'm home to remember to put it back in the fridge.  And I frequently leave my leftovers out for an hour or more. I have yet to poison myself :)

I wash things that say dry clean only, if it seems that they woudl be ok. Either by hand, or sometimes in the washer, in a mesh bag. The only thing I have ruined is a blouse, red with white dots, that SAID machine wash cold, which I did, and it ran. Yet my co-workers who bought the same top (from our store) had no issues whatsoever.  I just don't care for the smell (and I can smell it) of the dry cleaning chemicals on my clothes. Plus I'm cheap.

I do my laundry as follows:  Darks, whites and lights (i don't bleach and frequently don't have enough whites to make a full load), sheets and towels, and undies and socks.  Darks are washed in cold, whites and lights in warm, and sheets and towels and socks and undies in hot. But I've also been known to throw a stray dark in with the lights and vice versa, rather than wait for my next laundry day.

 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 30, 2014, 12:07:03 PM
I very rarely use bleach. I prefer non-toxic cleaners, like Method for cleaning.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 30, 2014, 12:17:03 PM
I have worn new clothes without washing first.


I *always* wear new clothes without washing first! I want at least one experience of wearing them while they look and feel exactly the way they did in the store.

I also put sheets on the bed without washing them. My MIL was aghast. My DH and I washed one set first, and then decided, we also want one night of sleeping on them while they're extra crisp. I guess we'll get Alzheimers or something from breathing in the factory fumes overnight for a week.

This is one rule I do abide by.  I have some skin allergies/sensitivities and quite often react if the article isn't washed first.  I could get away with not washing jeans, maybe, but everything else?  Has to be washed.  My Dad bought a new dress shirt and didn't wash it first.  Something on the shirt reacted with his antiperspirant and he had big red patches on his underarms.  Whereby I stressed that he needed to wash new clothes before he wore them.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 30, 2014, 12:25:12 PM

 
This is one rule I do abide by.  I have some skin allergies/sensitivities and quite often react if the article isn't washed first.  I could get away with not washing jeans, maybe, but everything else?  Has to be washed.  My Dad bought a new dress shirt and didn't wash it first.  Something on the shirt reacted with his antiperspirant and he had big red patches on his underarms.  Whereby I stressed that he needed to wash new clothes before he wore them.

I do as well, for the most part. I've put things on that make me itchy from the get go.  if its something that will go next to my skin, or near my nether regions, such as undies, tshirts, pajamas, it gets washed. Something like jeans, pants, a jacket or sweater I'll wear over something, I may or may not, depending on when I'm doing laundry next, and how badly i want to wear it.

The only real exception is stuff from the store I work in. Maybe becasue I see that most of it comes in plastic, which shouldn't make a difference but in my eyes, it does.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Ms_Cellany on January 30, 2014, 12:32:03 PM

 
This is one rule I do abide by.  I have some skin allergies/sensitivities and quite often react if the article isn't washed first.  I could get away with not washing jeans, maybe, but everything else?  Has to be washed.  My Dad bought a new dress shirt and didn't wash it first.  Something on the shirt reacted with his antiperspirant and he had big red patches on his underarms.  Whereby I stressed that he needed to wash new clothes before he wore them.

I do as well, for the most part. I've put things on that make me itchy from the get go.  if its something that will go next to my skin, or near my nether regions, such as undies, tshirts, pajamas, it gets washed. Something like jeans, pants, a jacket or sweater I'll wear over something, I may or may not, depending on when I'm doing laundry next, and how badly i want to wear it.

The only real exception is stuff from the store I work in. Maybe becasue I see that most of it comes in plastic, which shouldn't make a difference but in my eyes, it does.

I've got an iggie about clothing being contaminated with pesticides, cleaning products, or the like. I always wash them first.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Thipu1 on January 30, 2014, 12:33:03 PM
Once a meal is finished, we usually leave covered leftovers on the counter until they're cool enough to store in the fridge.  Then, we  pack them into freezer safe containers, label them and put them away until we want them again. In 30 years of our marriage nothing has spoiled. 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 30, 2014, 12:56:14 PM

 
This is one rule I do abide by.  I have some skin allergies/sensitivities and quite often react if the article isn't washed first.  I could get away with not washing jeans, maybe, but everything else?  Has to be washed.  My Dad bought a new dress shirt and didn't wash it first.  Something on the shirt reacted with his antiperspirant and he had big red patches on his underarms.  Whereby I stressed that he needed to wash new clothes before he wore them.

I do as well, for the most part. I've put things on that make me itchy from the get go.  if its something that will go next to my skin, or near my nether regions, such as undies, tshirts, pajamas, it gets washed. Something like jeans, pants, a jacket or sweater I'll wear over something, I may or may not, depending on when I'm doing laundry next, and how badly i want to wear it.

The only real exception is stuff from the store I work in. Maybe becasue I see that most of it comes in plastic, which shouldn't make a difference but in my eyes, it does.

I've got an iggie about clothing being contaminated with pesticides, cleaning products, or the like. I always wash them first.

Oh me too, but living in an apt, I don't have my own W/D so i only do my laundry every 10 days to 2 weeks. That's why I don't really like dry cleaning. If I had my own W/D everything woudl be washed before wearing.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on January 30, 2014, 01:00:46 PM
I don't put leftovers in the fridge right away since I may want to eat again a few hours later.

I have worn new clothes without washing first.

I have shared makeup (not for eyes though).

You're supposed to wash new clothes before you wear them?? I've never done that.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on January 30, 2014, 01:02:10 PM
I bring my lunch to work most days and it just sits on my desk all morning without refrigeration. I've never had a problem.
And I've definitely thawed meat on the counter. Sometimes I just don't plan far enough ahead to let it sit in the fridge for a few days.

Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Yvaine on January 30, 2014, 01:02:33 PM
I have worn new clothes without washing first.


I *always* wear new clothes without washing first! I want at least one experience of wearing them while they look and feel exactly the way they did in the store.

I'm always afraid my clothes will get ruined on the first wash and I'll never get to wear them. I think it dates back to that happening maybe once with a terribly low-quality garment back when I was in college.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: LemonZen on January 30, 2014, 01:19:17 PM
Add me to the people who thaw meat on the counter! I can't ever remember to get meat out the 3 days it takes to thaw anything in the fridge.

I also wear clothes without washing (except underwear, I always wash that, and I wash my kids clothes before they wear them.)

I eat cookie dough with raw egg in it. I figure lots of other things have raw/not fully cooked eggs in them that are acceptable to eat so why not cookie dough? :)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Layla Miller on January 30, 2014, 01:20:07 PM
I'm another lazy laundress.  ;D  Black and dark color clothing go in together, whites and lighter color clothing go in together.  That's my nod to sorting.

I also mash potatoes with a hand mixer.  Everywhere I've seen, people say that will ruin the consistency and turn them into wallpaper paste.  That's only happened once, and that time it was because I left them sitting in the water for too long--it wasn't related to the method of mashing.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on January 30, 2014, 01:21:12 PM
Add me to the people who thaw meat on the counter! I can't ever remember to get meat out the 3 days it takes to thaw anything in the fridge.

I also wear clothes without washing (except underwear, I always wash that, and I wash my kids clothes before they wear them.)

I eat cookie dough with raw egg in it. I figure lots of other things have raw/not fully cooked eggs in them that are acceptable to eat so why not cookie dough? :)

Me too.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 30, 2014, 01:34:38 PM
Add me to the people who thaw meat on the counter! I can't ever remember to get meat out the 3 days it takes to thaw anything in the fridge.

I also wear clothes without washing (except underwear, I always wash that, and I wash my kids clothes before they wear them.)

I eat cookie dough with raw egg in it. I figure lots of other things have raw/not fully cooked eggs in them that are acceptable to eat so why not cookie dough? :)

Me too.

Me three. I also lick the beaters when making cake, which also contains raw eggs.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: StarFaerie on January 30, 2014, 02:06:52 PM
I pop my pimples. If I don't they stay painful for weeks and then leave a cyst type bump, if I do they are gone in a day.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Mikayla on January 30, 2014, 02:09:28 PM
Add me to the people who thaw meat on the counter! I can't ever remember to get meat out the 3 days it takes to thaw anything in the fridge.

I also wear clothes without washing (except underwear, I always wash that, and I wash my kids clothes before they wear them.)

I eat cookie dough with raw egg in it. I figure lots of other things have raw/not fully cooked eggs in them that are acceptable to eat so why not cookie dough? :)

I agree and I'd also add corn bread batter.  On more than one occasion, I've eaten so much I had to start over with a new batch!

I'm a little careless about a lot of safety instructions.  Obviously, this applies to cooking for myself, not guests.  The other day, my roomie found an almost full jar of Hellman's that expired in Jan of 2013.  She was about to throw it out and I snagged it.  It's fine. 

Also, I cook a lot of frozen chickens in a crockpot and I've never had a problem with it (the warnings are about how long it stays at a room temperature). 

The only thing I'm adamant about is "use or freeze by" dates on meat.  I'll toss that in a heartbeat if I'm even one day past it. 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: pinkflamingo on January 30, 2014, 02:10:27 PM
I do lots of things perhaps I "shouldn't"

I don't warm up my car, as in the engine, even when its frigid out. I will turn it on, but to defrost and scrape the windows. So it does warm up that way.  But if its cold, and i don't need to do that, i get in, start it up, and drive off. I've never ever had ANY issue becasue I don't.


I read an article just yesterday about cold weather car care tips and the mechanic interviewed for the column said that you don't need to warm up your car at all unless it's really cold and even then it only take a couple of minutes. He said that warming up the car for 10-15 minutes is more for the comfort of the driver (heating up the interior of the car) than taking care of the engine. Actually driving the car does a better job of warming it up than letting it idle for long periods of time. So, it seems that you're doing the right thing!

I don't do that, either, so I felt vindicated when I read this.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 30, 2014, 02:12:13 PM
It is especially true if you use synthetic oil.  The viscosity doesn't change nearly as much as oil when the temperature drops so you only need 10-15 seconds before you start moving if it is really cold.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 30, 2014, 02:15:50 PM
I do lots of things perhaps I "shouldn't"

I don't warm up my car, as in the engine, even when its frigid out. I will turn it on, but to defrost and scrape the windows. So it does warm up that way.  But if its cold, and i don't need to do that, i get in, start it up, and drive off. I've never ever had ANY issue becasue I don't.


I read an article just yesterday about cold weather car care tips and the mechanic interviewed for the column said that you don't need to warm up your car at all unless it's really cold and even then it only take a couple of minutes. He said that warming up the car for 10-15 minutes is more for the comfort of the driver (heating up the interior of the car) than taking care of the engine. Actually driving the car does a better job of warming it up than letting it idle for long periods of time. So, it seems that you're doing the right thing!

I don't do that, either, so I felt vindicated when I read this.

I had read or heard something about this too, but I do it out of laziness. I am not a morning person, so I very rarely have time to sit and let it idle to warm the engine up. 

I bought a new car (new to me anyway) last spring, and wow, I am so thrilled as to how quickly the windows defrost etc. I'm loving it. I can even wash them, when the temp is below freezing, and it won't ice over, while driving. As long as i have the defroster on high, for a few mintues. which is helpful now since there is so much salt and stuff on the road, and my windshield gets dirty pretty fast.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Sirius on January 30, 2014, 02:18:49 PM
We also, at least partially, thaw meat and poultry on the counter.  We have small utility room where our furnace and hot water heater are located.  That's also a place we use for thawing.  Meat certainly goes into the fridge overnight but, when we're home to monitor it, the counter or the utility room works just fine.

Mine gets thawed in the microwave--not in an 'on' microwave, just, in the microwave.
Because it's the only cat-proof 'counter' space in the house. :-[ :P

That's the main reason why I thaw things in the refrigerator, after my little darlings found a package of chicken in a grocery bag I hadn't unloaded yet and had a snack.  Very expensive snack for the cats, I might add.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 30, 2014, 02:19:41 PM
I crack my knuckles.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on January 30, 2014, 02:29:57 PM
I think the wine advice got misunderstood somewhere.   You shouldn't cook with wine that is not of drinking quality, not wine you wouldn't drink because you just don't like the flavor.   They mean different things. The wine advice is really referring to not using cheap nasty stuff that is labeled as "cooking wine" and since it's usually is shelved with the vinegar, that should tell you something.

I also don't separate my colors either as I just wash everything in cold .  I do separate my  delicate weight items and either do a separate  load or toss them in a lingerie bag. I do wash new brightly colored items alone and with white vinegar to help set the colors.

Well, yeah, I know that "cooking wine" is like the nastiest stuff and you should never cook with it. But I really do think that they mean regular wine too.

For example, here's an article from Wine Enthusiast about cooking with wine:
http://www.winemag.com/cooking-with-wine/ (http://www.winemag.com/cooking-with-wine/)

From the article (bolding mine):
Quote
The Quality Consideration: You may be hesitant to cook with your most prized red wine but be careful not to use absolute plonk in your dishes. If you wouldn’t drink it on its own, do not cook with it! Cook with a basic bottle that you might enjoy in a casual setting.

And another site which actually has two separate paragraphs about it, one for "cooking wine" and one for "wine you wouldn't drink".
http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/wine/cooking-with-wine-00400000001386/ (http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/wine/cooking-with-wine-00400000001386/)
Quote
Avoid using cooking wines.
Clearly there are far better choices than so-called "cooking Sherry" or other liquids commonly billed as "cooking wine." These are made of a thin, cheap base wine to which salt and food coloring have been added.

Never cook with a wine you wouldn't drink.
A poor quality wine with sour or bitter flavors will only contribute those flavors to the dish. Julia Child once said, "If you do not have a good wine to use, it is far better to omit it, for a poor one can spoil a simple dish and utterly debase a noble one." It's worth the investment to buy a quality wine. Just don't forget to sip a little as you stir.

So yeah, the conventional wisdom is, if you buy a bottle to drink, take a sip and don't like it, toss it. Whereas in my kitchen, that wine goes into the fridge and I use it within a couple of days for cooking.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: BeagleMommy on January 30, 2014, 02:31:38 PM
I also thaw meat on the counter.  Once it is thawed I put it in the fridge.

I crack my knuckles (and other body parts) regularly.  Years ago, my mother and grandmother insisted that doing so would cause "big" knuckles.  I found an article a few years ago that explained the crack was actually an air bubble/pocket in the joint and that cracking was actually good for you.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on January 30, 2014, 02:34:12 PM
Once a meal is finished, we usually leave covered leftovers on the counter until they're cool enough to store in the fridge.  Then, we  pack them into freezer safe containers, label them and put them away until we want them again. In 30 years of our marriage nothing has spoiled.
I do this too, things are too hot to sit in the fridge sometimes.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on January 30, 2014, 02:36:33 PM
Yeah I crack my knuckles too. It's an old wives' tale about your knuckles getting big. I've been doing it my whole life and all my knuckles are normal size.

This might be TMI but I not only crack my fingers (both joints), but also my elbows, wrists, toes and knees. And sometimes my ankles.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 30, 2014, 02:50:03 PM
My chiropractor cracks everything else, I just crack my knuckles!  ;D
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: shhh its me on January 30, 2014, 02:59:33 PM
Yeah I crack my knuckles too. It's an old wives' tale about your knuckles getting big. I've been doing it my whole life and all my knuckles are normal size.

This might be TMI but I not only crack my fingers (both joints), but also my elbows, wrists, toes and knees. And sometimes my ankles.

Add jaw , hips and shoulders.

I also eat batter , thaw on the counter and wait till food has cold to store it.

I wont even try dairy after the expiration date but thats because I'm sensitive to bad smells and have a really strong "reflex"
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Sirius on January 30, 2014, 03:05:35 PM
Regarding cooking with wine:  I don't drink alcohol, but I have cooked with it, and I usually go for what's cheapest, which works for me.  I know that "cooking wine" has a lot of salt in it, so I don't use it.  I also know that I should use red wine with beef. 

I haven't killed anyone yet, so I must be doing something right.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: AzaleaBloom on January 30, 2014, 03:08:02 PM
I also thaw meat on the counter if I forget to put it in the fridge the night before.  From what I understand, as long you cook it properly, it will be fine.

Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: veryfluffy on January 30, 2014, 03:12:02 PM
I have washed my hair almost every day for the past 40 years. It's shiny, healthy, and down past my waist. (But I don't use a blow dryer or any heating appliance.)

I have never heard of washing new clothes before you wear them.

I am perfectly happy to eat raw eggs in ice cream, cake batter or mayonnaise. One of the best things about baking is licking the cake batter off the beaters.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: magicdomino on January 30, 2014, 03:21:04 PM
A lot of fellow daredevils here.   >:D 

My mother had some interesting notions about food safety.  As a result, I'm pretty immunized against food poisioning.  So, yes, leftovers on the counter until cool; I have a week to eat the leftovers; expiration dates are a recommendation, not a law (I have faith in preservatives.   ;) ); a little raw egg won't hurt me.  Dubious seafood will though, so I am very careful about that.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: metallicafan on January 30, 2014, 04:09:32 PM
Count me in with those who thaw meat on the kitchen counter and who eat raw cookie dough and cake batter.   
I also let things cool a bit before putting in the fridge.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: MrTango on January 30, 2014, 04:28:01 PM
I also thaw meat on the counter if I forget to put it in the fridge the night before.  From what I understand, as long you cook it properly, it will be fine.

An even faster way to thaw meat: put it in a sealed zip-top bag and set it in a bowl in the sink. Fill the bowl with lukewarm water, and then set the water to cool and run it at just a bare trickle.  Water will thaw meat much more quickly than air, and the movement caused by that bare trickle will make it even faster than just sitting in water.

This method does waste some water, so I only do it in urgent situations.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 30, 2014, 04:37:12 PM
I think the wine advice got misunderstood somewhere.   You shouldn't cook with wine that is not of drinking quality, not wine you wouldn't drink because you just don't like the flavor.   They mean different things. The wine advice is really referring to not using cheap nasty stuff that is labeled as "cooking wine" and since it's usually is shelved with the vinegar, that should tell you something.

I also don't separate my colors either as I just wash everything in cold .  I do separate my  delicate weight items and either do a separate  load or toss them in a lingerie bag. I do wash new brightly colored items alone and with white vinegar to help set the colors.

Well, yeah, I know that "cooking wine" is like the nastiest stuff and you should never cook with it. But I really do think that they mean regular wine too.

For example, here's an article from Wine Enthusiast about cooking with wine:
http://www.winemag.com/cooking-with-wine/ (http://www.winemag.com/cooking-with-wine/)

From the article (bolding mine):
Quote
The Quality Consideration: You may be hesitant to cook with your most prized red wine but be careful not to use absolute plonk in your dishes. If you wouldn’t drink it on its own, do not cook with it! Cook with a basic bottle that you might enjoy in a casual setting.

And another site which actually has two separate paragraphs about it, one for "cooking wine" and one for "wine you wouldn't drink".
http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/wine/cooking-with-wine-00400000001386/ (http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/wine/cooking-with-wine-00400000001386/)
Quote
Avoid using cooking wines.
Clearly there are far better choices than so-called "cooking Sherry" or other liquids commonly billed as "cooking wine." These are made of a thin, cheap base wine to which salt and food coloring have been added.

Never cook with a wine you wouldn't drink.
A poor quality wine with sour or bitter flavors will only contribute those flavors to the dish. Julia Child once said, "If you do not have a good wine to use, it is far better to omit it, for a poor one can spoil a simple dish and utterly debase a noble one." It's worth the investment to buy a quality wine. Just don't forget to sip a little as you stir.

So yeah, the conventional wisdom is, if you buy a bottle to drink, take a sip and don't like it, toss it. Whereas in my kitchen, that wine goes into the fridge and I use it within a couple of days for cooking.

I agree that they mean more than just cooking wine. And I agree that I might buy a wine that I open and think, nope, and I end up using later in the week for cooking. But it's usually only when it's a small amount compared to other ingredients.

But I am particular about what wine I'll use for a dish like beef bourguignon because the wine is such a major flavor component. But I'm still not pouring in a $20 bottle of wine. It'll be a "table" wine that I enjoy.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Lynn2000 on January 30, 2014, 04:38:55 PM
I love me some raw cookie dough and cake batter. Except for cookie dough/cake batter I am overly-cautious about food contamination and expiration, which I think just shows that my principles can be bought for the right price...  ;D

I also wash my hair every night--I know my mom only does it every other night, but I didn't know every night was against prevailing advice. We also both shower at night instead of first thing in the morning, which some people seem to think is weird. And I don't own a hair dryer, which my mom thinks is weird--she shudders at the idea of me going to bed with wet hair, but she's always cold and I'm usually warm.

I separate lights and darks when doing laundry, but that's it. I actually don't even look at the washing label on the clothes--I couldn't even tell you what temperature my washer is set to. Medium? I never change it. I also don't even own an iron... either all my clothes are made of wrinkle-free material or people are just too kind to tell me I look rumpled. :)

Also I think there are things you aren't really supposed to put in the dishwasher, like pots and cookie sheets maybe, but I put everything in, because I hate washing dishes. They all come out well enough for me.

Looking over this list I am just a seriously lazy person.  :P That is definitely what drives most of these actions, rather than some kind of philosophical choice...
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: katycoo on January 30, 2014, 04:52:30 PM
I usually thaw meat in the microwave, occasionally in the sink.

I pretty much never pre-wash new clothes before wearing.

I machine wash a heap of things I apparently shouldn't.

Use by dates are a guide.  Smell/taste tests are way more reliable - note there is a limit on this.  Dairy several months old, I trust to be bad.  Phyllo that is supposed to be used in a week - I'll check it out before I throw it away.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: menley on January 30, 2014, 04:59:25 PM
Oy, I'm wincing at all of the people that thaw meat on the counter!

One of the "approved" ways to thaw meat is in water, and I actually tested it versus thawing on the counter and thawing in the fridge (my house growing up was full of science nerds, hah). Thawing in cold water was by far the fastest of the three, although you do need to change out the water every 30 minutes to keep it cold. It usually takes me only an hour and it's by far a better option than letting it thaw on the counter with variable temps.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Bluenomi on January 30, 2014, 05:04:42 PM
Another fan of the cat proof microwave defrost method here. She'll eat still frozen chicken if she can get her paws on it.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: shhh its me on January 30, 2014, 05:13:31 PM
Oy, I'm wincing at all of the people that thaw meat on the counter!

One of the "approved" ways to thaw meat is in water, and I actually tested it versus thawing on the counter and thawing in the fridge (my house growing up was full of science nerds, hah). Thawing in cold water was by far the fastest of the three, although you do need to change out the water every 30 minutes to keep it cold. It usually takes me only an hour and it's by far a better option than letting it thaw on the counter with variable temps.

ITs easier to cut frozen/partial frozen meat so I tend to do the dicing/slicing etc about 20 minutes after I take it out of the freezer.  It thaws pretty fast then. 

OH here is a related one ...I'll toss a frozen roast in for soup or cook ground round for chili still partially frozen by flipping the frozen side to the bottom of the pan and breaking off the cooked bit.  Yeah I sometimes forget to take it out of the freezer until about 15 minutes before I should start cooking.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Mergatroyd on January 30, 2014, 05:21:09 PM
I thaw meat on the counter, if I remember to pull it out. Most times, I just cook from frozen. Roasted chicken, pork, beef, etc all taste exactly the same and take no longer than when I thaw it first. Stuff that has to be cooked on the stovetop gets boiled, it tastes fine too. But then, how hard is it to screw up spaghetti sauce, stew, or sausages??

Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: asb8 on January 30, 2014, 05:26:43 PM
I've been snacking on the cookie dough/cake batter/brownie batter for years without any ill effects

Leftovers cool on the counter before going in the fridge

Pimpled must be popped immediately or they won't leave
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: perpetua on January 30, 2014, 05:30:40 PM
I wash my face with shower gel and water; I haven't cleansed, toned and moisturised since I was a teen. Of course I do have EDS and the velvet-soft skin that goes with it, so I guess I'm cheating a bit  ;D But still - works for me.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Bobbie on January 30, 2014, 05:36:14 PM
I live in the US Northwest and thaw my turkey in the barbeque (it fits).  I also use the back porch like a refrigerator in the winter if I need more room.

I turn a bowl over the thawing meat so the cat doesn't think its died and gone to yummy goodness heaven.

Isn't the part of making cookies the taste testing involved before and after baking  ;)

I will pop blister, a pimple, and a blackhead before its time.

I don't rinse and repeat, once is enough.



Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: nuit93 on January 30, 2014, 05:54:48 PM
I do lots of things perhaps I "shouldn't"

I don't warm up my car, as in the engine, even when its frigid out. I will turn it on, but to defrost and scrape the windows. So it does warm up that way.  But if its cold, and i don't need to do that, i get in, start it up, and drive off. I've never ever had ANY issue becasue I don't.


I read an article just yesterday about cold weather car care tips and the mechanic interviewed for the column said that you don't need to warm up your car at all unless it's really cold and even then it only take a couple of minutes. He said that warming up the car for 10-15 minutes is more for the comfort of the driver (heating up the interior of the car) than taking care of the engine. Actually driving the car does a better job of warming it up than letting it idle for long periods of time. So, it seems that you're doing the right thing!

I don't do that, either, so I felt vindicated when I read this.

I think with much older cars (that use a carburetor instead of a fuel injection system) that used to be the case.  I remember my sister's car stalling once half a block from home because she only warmed it 2-3 minutes.

Newer cars don't require the same warmup time.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on January 30, 2014, 05:58:23 PM
I can't eat raw eggs due to pregnancy, so I can't taste test. I do ask DH to see if things are too sweet, but it's not the same.

And I refuse to use substitutes, eggs are eggs.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: HoneyBee42 on January 30, 2014, 06:36:17 PM
Add me to the people who thaw meat on the counter! I can't ever remember to get meat out the 3 days it takes to thaw anything in the fridge.

I also wear clothes without washing (except underwear, I always wash that, and I wash my kids clothes before they wear them.)

I eat cookie dough with raw egg in it. I figure lots of other things have raw/not fully cooked eggs in them that are acceptable to eat so why not cookie dough? :)

Me too.

Me three. I also lick the beaters when making cake, which also contains raw eggs.
Count me in, too--raw cookie dough, whatever cake batter I can get (there's competition between me and the kids for the beaters and the bowl).  I also come from a family with a family recipe for homemade ice cream that uses raw eggs, and we've never, ever used pasteurized eggs.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ebrochu on January 30, 2014, 06:41:18 PM
I'm in the camp of washing before wearing clothes.

I don't know if it's a sensitivity or an allergy, but whatever the sizing is in clothes, makes me break out in blisters.

Seam lines of blisters. SO much fun.  :-\
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Octavia on January 30, 2014, 06:51:18 PM
I've also used new sheets and clothes before washing them.

I sometimes go to sleep without removing my gas permeable contact lenses. Haven't had any problems. I should probably stop doing that though.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on January 30, 2014, 07:19:14 PM
I know there's the risk of TSS, but I have gone to bed wearing tampons. I just make sure it's fresh when  I go to bed and change when I get up.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Allyson on January 30, 2014, 07:31:33 PM
I use Facebook and have no issues with it even though apparently anyone and everyone is using it to spy on me.  >:D Ok, this isn't so much "prevailing advice" as "lots of my friends" who say this.

I am friends with my ex.

I answer people honestly when they ask me how they look in that dress.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: MommyPenguin on January 30, 2014, 07:38:53 PM
I eat raw cookie dough when I'm not pregnant, but I don't eat it when I'm pregnant.  I figure a little bit of caution is good at that time.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Runningstar on January 30, 2014, 07:52:29 PM
I feed the outdoor wild birds all winter, and put the seeds right on my porch railings (they are 4" wide) so that I can see them from my kitchen window.  This does mean that there will be a mess on my front porch all winter, but it is the easiest for me.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on January 30, 2014, 07:53:51 PM
You don't find feeding them attracts rats?
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: dawbs on January 30, 2014, 08:04:27 PM
You don't find feeding them attracts rats?
I think this has to be very individual to neighborhoods...I know that mice can and have and do make it into my garage for the birdseed, but there's enough snow that I can see tracks of any critter that comes to the birdfeeders and I've never seen rat-tracks (and I'd *probably* recognize them--I see mice tracks on occasion, and deer tracks, and coon tracks and possum tracks and squirrel tracks [and, of course bird tracks], but never rats).

a few miles away where my parents live, though, they refuse to feed the birds because they get tired of dealing w/ deer on their deck
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Yvaine on January 30, 2014, 08:05:35 PM
You don't find feeding them attracts rats?

In my area it's squirrels.  ;D They've gotten quite clever at getting things out of bird feeders. But I pretty much never see a rat.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 30, 2014, 08:26:49 PM
You don't find feeding them attracts rats?

In my area it's squirrels.  ;D They've gotten quite clever at getting things out of bird feeders. But I pretty much never see a rat.

Yup.  I get squirrels, too.  So I have a squirrel proof feeder.  The perches are spring loaded so the weight of a squirrel closes off the ports where the seed comes out.  It is quite amusing to watch them trying to figure out how to get the seed.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Ceallach on January 30, 2014, 08:49:50 PM
Like others I don't wash new clothes before wearing (except in one rare case where a dress had a nasty chemically smell).   I machine wash clothes that say "dry clean only".

I let my baby nap in my arms almost exclusively his first 7 months or so, and rocked him to sleep every night.  I also breastfed in bed at night instead of a chair.  Since he was 5 months and older I let him sleep in our bed if he wanted to eg when teething distress or similar.  People told me off, but all three of us were happy and well rested so I preferred that to spending hours up in the night settling a baby!  Or lying awake listening to him cry.  It didn't spoil him, and he actually learnt to go to sleep by himself without any issue. He now happily sleeps in his cot both day and night.  (And I have happy memories of many hours snuggling my wee bubba before he got so big and independent!)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Ceallach on January 30, 2014, 08:52:03 PM
I pop my pimples. If I don't they stay painful for weeks and then leave a cyst type bump, if I do they are gone in a day.

Me too.   There's a certain point where getting the yuk out straight away prevents them getting worse and allows the skin to heal, rather than waiting weeks for it to grow and get nastier. 

Obviously I do it with clean hands under controlled circumstances - no picking!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 30, 2014, 09:42:33 PM
I wash my hair every other day and I never repeat the shampoo.

I will eat raw egg products, such as batter and dough, and sashimi but not meat thawed on a counter.

My 15 year old hasn't had a parent imposed bed time in over a year. He knows when he is tired and knows when he has to get up, so he's got that covered.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: SiotehCat on January 30, 2014, 10:02:01 PM


My 15 year old hasn't had a parent imposed bed time in over a year. He knows when he is tired and knows when he has to get up, so he's got that covered.

My 13 yr old also doesn't have a bedtime and never had one when he was younger. Last year, for a few months, we gave him a bed time because of his grades. But he fixed that and now it's back to normal. Currently, I fall asleep before everyone else so I have no idea when everyone is falling asleep.



Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on January 30, 2014, 10:24:58 PM
I think the rule for spices really ought to be revised to "only buy what you can use within 6 months to a year, as much as possible."

I don't know how common this is everywhere else, but my grocery store has a large bulk foods section, complete with an aisle of bulk spices. I did the math and determined that, ounce for ounce, the bulk spices are at least 1/4 the cost of bottled (and many of them are way cheaper than that in comparison). It looks scary to buy spices that cost $20+/pound, until you realize that you're buying about a tablespoon and it'll cost you a few cents. It also means that we can buy only what we think we'll need, which is very helpful for both spices we use only occasionally and spices we use in everything. It means we can buy massive quantities of garlic powder at once, but only little bits of things like baking powder that I only ever use once in a blue moon.

As for things I do against prevailing advice...I never wash my clothes in anything but cold water. I grew up doing it for environmental reasons (it saves electricity), and have never noticed my stuff to not get clean. I also seriously downgrade the amount of laundry detergent that is recommended. And I don't separate colors, unless it's something like a brand new pair of dark wash jeans. The only laundry sorting I do is "stuff that can be tumble dried" and "stuff that needs to be hung up." I only even do that much because it means my husband can do laundry without me having to be around, while also avoiding major laundry disasters.

I don't own much that is dry clean only, but I don't necessarily shy away from washing it. I have a silk dress that I very successfully washed using the delicate cycle and Woolite. I didn't spin it dry, but squeezed the water out by rolling it up in a towel, then hung it up in the shower to dry the rest of the way. I think I had a couple of pulled-loose threads (the outer layer is chiffon), but I was able to wiggle those back into place. It also had a ton of lint on it from the towel, but that wasn't hard to get off once it dried.

My mother actually told me that there isn't any reason at all to dry clean silk, and if the dry cleaner doesn't handle it properly, they are more than capable of ruining it. The only thing you have to be careful about with silk is absolutely avoiding all heat when it is even the slightest bit wet, since that makes it shrink. It's also just a delicate fabric that tears easily in general, so you have to handle it carefully. But as long as there's no heat involved, there's no reason you can't get silk wet.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: workingmum on January 31, 2014, 02:04:00 AM
Like others I don't wash new clothes before wearing (except in one rare case where a dress had a nasty chemically smell).   I machine wash clothes that say "dry clean only".

I let my baby nap in my arms almost exclusively his first 7 months or so, and rocked him to sleep every night.  I also breastfed in bed at night instead of a chair.  Since he was 5 months and older I let him sleep in our bed if he wanted to eg when teething distress or similar.  People told me off, but all three of us were happy and well rested so I preferred that to spending hours up in the night settling a baby!  Or lying awake listening to him cry.  It didn't spoil him, and he actually learnt to go to sleep by himself without any issue. He now happily sleeps in his cot both day and night.  (And I have happy memories of many hours snuggling my wee bubba before he got so big and independent!)

I did something similar with DD. She had a harness because of her hips and the angle the harness had her little legs on made her just perfectly fit on my tummy. She slept on my tummy for the first three months of her life, and I can tell you now, I never had any troube with her sleeping. She was a very calm and settled child and hardly ever cried. Everyone told me I was spoiling her.. but when I looked at other new mums who were stressed and sleep deprived, I found it really hard to care what everyine else thought  :D
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Library Dragon on January 31, 2014, 02:04:41 AM
I make Caesar salad with homemade dressing.  Okay, I admit I quickly coddle the eggs, but they are close to raw.

I make beef carpaccio--no searing.  I do rinse and put the plates in the freezer. They maintain the temperature.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Runningstar on January 31, 2014, 04:36:45 AM
You don't find feeding them attracts rats?
Not rats, but we had a bear in the neighborhood!  Squirrels are actually welcome here!  Like I said, it makes a mess and is not what you "should do".  Our local mice (outdoor, not pet) are not out in the winter and they try to come in to our house every spring and fall - but I only feed the birds in the cold.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Ceallach on January 31, 2014, 05:49:50 AM
Like others I don't wash new clothes before wearing (except in one rare case where a dress had a nasty chemically smell).   I machine wash clothes that say "dry clean only".

I let my baby nap in my arms almost exclusively his first 7 months or so, and rocked him to sleep every night.  I also breastfed in bed at night instead of a chair.  Since he was 5 months and older I let him sleep in our bed if he wanted to eg when teething distress or similar.  People told me off, but all three of us were happy and well rested so I preferred that to spending hours up in the night settling a baby!  Or lying awake listening to him cry.  It didn't spoil him, and he actually learnt to go to sleep by himself without any issue. He now happily sleeps in his cot both day and night.  (And I have happy memories of many hours snuggling my wee bubba before he got so big and independent!)

I did something similar with DD. She had a harness because of her hips and the angle the harness had her little legs on made her just perfectly fit on my tummy. She slept on my tummy for the first three months of her life, and I can tell you now, I never had any troube with her sleeping. She was a very calm and settled child and hardly ever cried. Everyone told me I was spoiling her.. but when I looked at other new mums who were stressed and sleep deprived, I found it really hard to care what everyine else thought  :D

Re the bolded - exactly!  And when they'd stare at me amazed and say "how do you always look so rested?"  I'd think "from doing what you just frowned at me disapprovingly for??"   Because my baby wasn't the best sleeper, but when he woke up for a feed I would be out of bed for 30 seconds, whereas they were up for an hour feeding and settling before going back to bed.   

I also didn't change my babies nappy (diaper) at night unless it was number 2.    Not sure what the prevailing advice is around that but I suspect it's to change it!!   He never had rashes, and it meant he wasn't woken up unnecessarily seeing he only half awoke to eat.   Ironically now he's a toddler we often have to change it at night, and he sleeps right through it!  (We whip it off in his cot.  And nope, he's never peed on us or the bed whilst doing so!)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 31, 2014, 06:43:41 AM
Add me to the list of people who thaw meat on the counter (or in the sink!). I grew up with my mom doing this, so I like to think I have built up an immunity to any potential bacteria. I'm just not good at remembering to take things out of the freezer, and I've never mastered microwave thawing...it always gets cooked around the edges!

Me too.  I used to try and thaw it in the fridge but it never did get thawed enough by supper time. A friend asked me why I did that and said "Just toss it on the counter!" So I do and it works and miraculously our cats will leave it alone.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 31, 2014, 07:35:56 AM
I have a silk dress that I very successfully washed using the delicate cycle and Woolite. I didn't spin it dry, but squeezed the water out by rolling it up in a towel, then hung it up in the shower to dry the rest of the way. I think I had a couple of pulled-loose threads (the outer layer is chiffon), but I was able to wiggle those back into place. It also had a ton of lint on it from the towel, but that wasn't hard to get off once it dried.

You could get a microfibre towel for this and you wouldn't have the lint.  Plus, it would probably absorb more water than a regular towel.

I have one that was sold as a camping towel because it rolls up small.  I use it whenever I travel for my hair and I can't believe how much drier my hair gets than with a regular towel.  I'm thinking about buying a couple more to have at home.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: BigBadBetty on January 31, 2014, 08:26:25 AM
I also pop pimples and eat raw cookie dough (but not at the same time). I wash dry clean only and hand wash only clothes in washing machine on the hand wash cycle. I fall asleep in front of the TV. I do all my indoor workouts (including plyometrics) with no shoes on even though I have the flattest feet in the world.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Morty'sCleaningLady on January 31, 2014, 08:35:47 AM
You all are far more rebellious than I am.

99% of the time, I wash everything before I use it.  I wash it in the recommended temperature and separate my laundry.  Sure, I often do four or five loads of laundry per week, but they are small loads.  I<3 bleach.  I do not love concentrated detergents though - it takes way to long to dilute it to the strength I want and I often think I'm wasting detergent.  And, I iron.  I iron my good dishtowels (the ones not used for drying dishes, but rather looking cute on the stove), my sheets, and dress blouses (the ones that say dry clean only, but are 100% cotton.)

I do sometimes put wineglasses (not crystal) and pots and pans in the dishwasher, which my mother says is a no-no.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on January 31, 2014, 08:47:27 AM
DH and I have been told that having separate checking accounts (though with the same credit union) is wrong/strange/unwise but hey it works for us. It's a lot easier to balance a checkbook when you know you're the only one drawing off of it.  We tried when we were first married to do the conventional thing and it was a pain for both of us. 

Because we're with the same CU we can transfer $ from one account to another easily and quickly online.  People are especially confused about it when they know I don't have a job but hell, like I said, it works for us and it's not hurting us, either.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on January 31, 2014, 08:54:04 AM
I have a silk dress that I very successfully washed using the delicate cycle and Woolite. I didn't spin it dry, but squeezed the water out by rolling it up in a towel, then hung it up in the shower to dry the rest of the way. I think I had a couple of pulled-loose threads (the outer layer is chiffon), but I was able to wiggle those back into place. It also had a ton of lint on it from the towel, but that wasn't hard to get off once it dried.

You could get a microfibre towel for this and you wouldn't have the lint.  Plus, it would probably absorb more water than a regular towel.

I have one that was sold as a camping towel because it rolls up small.  I use it whenever I travel for my hair and I can't believe how much drier my hair gets than with a regular towel.  I'm thinking about buying a couple more to have at home.

Definitely. :) I thought of that after I washed it, but I've only ever washed the dress the one time. I don't wear it very often, and wouldn't necessarily wash it just because I'd worn it for an evening, either. Using a regular bath towel and ending up with lint was more a case of not thinking the thing all the way through. Plus, it only collected the lint because it's silk chiffon (rather than shiny, smooth silk that likely wouldn't have gotten as linty).

This reminds me of another thing I'm perhaps less conventional about. Because I have curly hair, I actually work really hard to keep it right at the point where it's dry enough not to drip all over the place, but not one bit drier. Aside from making my hair frizzier, terrycloth towels remove more water from my hair than I want, which ultimately makes it hard to style. So I use a length of jersey knit fabric (i.e. t-shirt material) as much because it absorbs less water as because it's a smooth fabric.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 31, 2014, 08:58:49 AM
I have curly hair, too, but my goal is to get as much water out as I can because I don't ever use a dryer and I have no idea what styling is.   ;)  I'm a wash and go girl.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Hillia on January 31, 2014, 09:00:44 AM
I cosigned a car loan for my DS.  If it had gone wrong it would have been a problem, but he proved himself reliable and responsible and made every payment on time - incidentally helping my credit score along the way.  After 18 months, he traded that car in and was able to get a loan in his own name at a good interest rate.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 31, 2014, 09:05:04 AM
I don't make my bed. Well, very rarely. I grew up having to do it each and every day, complete with bedspread. I hated doing it, so now I rebel and don't. I will if I'm having company, so as not too appear too slovenly, but just for me, nope.

I also only use a smidge of laundry detergent. I do mine about every 2 weeks, anywhere from 6-8 loads, and I buy a 32 oz bottle, which will last me 6 months or more. they say use 1/2  cap for normal loads and almost a full one for larger loads, but i've found that a couple of tablespoons is more than enough. saves me money, and i don't get that icky feel of too much soap in my clothes!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 31, 2014, 09:11:25 AM
I don't make my bed. Well, very rarely. I grew up having to do it each and every day, complete with bedspread. I hated doing it, so now I rebel and don't. I will if I'm having company, so as not too appear too slovenly, but just for me, nope.

My long lost sister!  The only time my bed gets made is when I change the sheets.  I don't even make it for company because I keep the door closed.

I'm with you on the laundry soap thing.  I've actually found a soap where the recommended amount is only a tbsp or two.  It's expensive but it works really well and I don't get itchy skin nearly as bad.  I'm still using up some more commercial style soap but I use the good stuff on my sheets.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 31, 2014, 09:17:21 AM
I don't make my bed. Well, very rarely. I grew up having to do it each and every day, complete with bedspread. I hated doing it, so now I rebel and don't. I will if I'm having company, so as not too appear too slovenly, but just for me, nope.

My long lost sister!  The only time my bed gets made is when I change the sheets.  I don't even make it for company because I keep the door closed.

I'm with you on the laundry soap thing.  I've actually found a soap where the recommended amount is only a tbsp or two.  It's expensive but it works really well and I don't get itchy skin nearly as bad.  I'm still using up some more commercial style soap but I use the good stuff on my sheets.

Hahaha - I know! the worst was at my grandmother's; she had those chenille bedspreads. UGH. what's funny is it relaly isn't that big a deal now to make a bed. But I can't tell you how many people think I'm lazy for not doing it "but it just takes a minute" Well, yes, but I am NOT at all coherent in the am. Its all i can do to make coffee, and get dressed and do my face and hair. I even shower at night since in the am it takes too much time!

I use All Free and Clear. LOVE it. and some vinegar to combat stinky residue in the complex's machines.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 31, 2014, 09:45:41 AM
I only wash in cold and have a front loader, so concentrated detergent is all I can use. I use All Free & Clear (the store brand version) and Oxi-Clean in every load. Linens get fabric softener also.

I don't make my bed unless I am changing bedding or adding more blankets because of a weather change.

I use parchment paper when baking so I don't have to wash the pan.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 31, 2014, 09:52:46 AM
I make Caesar salad with homemade dressing.  Okay, I admit I quickly coddle the eggs, but they are close to raw.

I make beef carpaccio--no searing.  I do rinse and put the plates in the freezer. They maintain the temperature.

I make Caesar dressing with raw un-coddled eggs.

And yummm. Beef carpaccio with arugula, good olive oil and black pepper. Now I want that for lunch.

Didn't even think about the dishwaher. Pots, pans, knives, crystal, china... they all go in. I have very few things in my kitchen I won't put in it...An expensive 10" cimeter knife that doesn't really fit well anyway, my cast iron skillets, and my enameled cast iron dutch ovens. I try not to buy items that I'd not want to put in the dishwasher. That's the reason I use mostly stainless steel pots and not non-stick.

Bed's get made about once a week.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: perpetua on January 31, 2014, 09:57:21 AM
Actually here's one from another thread but it fits here, so throwing it into the ring: I prefer 'Miss'. I don't like being called Ms and if anyone does call me Ms I will correct them because I really dislike it that much. Ms may be technically correct but I can't stand it and I'll never use it. Not accepted wisdom but it works for me :)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Vall on January 31, 2014, 10:03:31 AM
I don't use sunscreen every day.  In fact, I only use it when I know I'll be in the sun all day.  Even then, I only apply it once in the morning.  I may get a bit rosy or pink but nothing painful.

I don't drink the amount of water that they say I should.  I probably only drink about 8 oz a day and then about 24 oz of fruit juice.  I drink coffee but I don't count that as a hydrating liquid.  I don't drink with meals (neither does my dad).  But neither of us has ever been dehydrated or had any issues from lack of fluids.  Maybe it's genetic and our bodies don't need large amounts of water.  Of course I always drink when I'm thirsty but that doesn't happen often.

Like many others, I thaw meat on the counter, don't make my bed, and only lather my hair once.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on January 31, 2014, 10:06:25 AM
You're not supposed to wash your hair every day?
OK, that's another one I've never heard of. Why the heck not? I've been doing it pretty much since I was old enough to take my own shower (without my mother bathing me). And my hair is soft and silky. But yeah, I don't blow dry or treat it in any way. I wash it nightly (after doing my treadmill) and that's it. (Once, no repeat.)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on January 31, 2014, 10:06:43 AM
I use Facebook and have no issues with it even though apparently anyone and everyone is using it to spy on me.  >:D Ok, this isn't so much "prevailing advice" as "lots of my friends" who say this.

I am friends with my ex.

I answer people honestly when they ask me how they look in that dress.

I do too... but only if we're shopping together. In other words, if someone wants my opinion before they buy something, I give it honestly. If they're asking about something they already own, I might not be quite as forthcoming, depending on if I can help by suggesting some change that will improve it.

I recently went shopping with a few friends and we were in a store that wasn't really my style but they were all trying on stuff like crazy. I sat outside the dressing rooms and each one would come out as she tried something on and model it. I told them all which ones looked good and which not. They told me that they appreciated my being there and being honest because, of course, the salesladies thought everything looked perfect!!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on January 31, 2014, 10:10:02 AM
I don't make my bed. Well, very rarely. I grew up having to do it each and every day, complete with bedspread. I hated doing it, so now I rebel and don't. I will if I'm having company, so as not too appear too slovenly, but just for me, nope.

I also only use a smidge of laundry detergent. I do mine about every 2 weeks, anywhere from 6-8 loads, and I buy a 32 oz bottle, which will last me 6 months or more. they say use 1/2  cap for normal loads and almost a full one for larger loads, but i've found that a couple of tablespoons is more than enough. saves me money, and i don't get that icky feel of too much soap in my clothes!

Ha!! I never make my bed either! My housekeeper does when she changes the sheets every other week. And I'll sort of straighten it up - sort of half-make it - if I have guests coming over and there's a chance they'll see my bedroom (which doesn't happen all that often).

I've actually never understood the philosophy behind making up a bed except for if it needs to be presentable for guests. I mean, DH & I are the only ones who ever see it and if we don't care that it's not made, then why bother? It's not like making it refreshes or cleans it somehow. It's still gonna be the same ol' bed & sheets & blankets when we crawl in tonight whether the bed was made this morning or not.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: magicdomino on January 31, 2014, 10:26:28 AM
You don't find feeding them attracts rats?
I think this has to be very individual to neighborhoods...I know that mice can and have and do make it into my garage for the birdseed, but there's enough snow that I can see tracks of any critter that comes to the birdfeeders and I've never seen rat-tracks (and I'd *probably* recognize them--I see mice tracks on occasion, and deer tracks, and coon tracks and possum tracks and squirrel tracks [and, of course bird tracks], but never rats).

a few miles away where my parents live, though, they refuse to feed the birds because they get tired of dealing w/ deer on their deck

My yard gets rats -- I've seen them.  The mixed-seed feeder is quite small -- maybe two cups -- and gets only enough food to last until early afternoon.  That gives the juncos and morning doves time to clean up the spilled seed before the rats come out at night.

On the subject of going against prevailing advice, I feed birds during the summer.  The seed is more of a supplement than a meal; the birds still hunt insects and berries.  I haven't gone on a summer vacation in many years, but if I did, the birds would do the same as when a berry bush or a stand of seeding grasses runs out:  they'd find a new food supply.  The nyger thistle feeder is out all year round, attracting gold finches and not attracting rodents.  I had to stop using the mixed seed feeder though as the rats started coming out in the mornings.   >:(
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on January 31, 2014, 10:31:19 AM
You're not supposed to wash your hair every day?
OK, that's another one I've never heard of. Why the heck not? I've been doing it pretty much since I was old enough to take my own shower (without my mother bathing me). And my hair is soft and silky. But yeah, I don't blow dry or treat it in any way. I wash it nightly (after doing my treadmill) and that's it. (Once, no repeat.)

A lot of people do just fine washing their hair every day, but a lot of them probably don't really need to. There are also a number of people whose hair behaves better and just generally looks nicer if they don't wash it every day. And, for those whose hair looks fine either way, not washing it daily saves money on hair products. I personally "reset" my hair rather than wash it most days (I detangle with conditioner in the shower, but don't actually cleanse it with anything but water and my fingers), and actually cleanse it twice a week or so. I'd do it even less often if I didn't go to the gym and get all sweaty on a regular basis.

It's kind of like the skin on your face. Some people have naturally very oily skin that needs to be washed frequently, because they have way more natural skin oils than their skin actually needs. Others have naturally very dry skin that can only barely tolerate washing (and may require special cleansers) because they don't have enough natural skin oils, so stripping away what they do have can be uncomfortable or even painful. And, of course, there are people at every step in between.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on January 31, 2014, 10:33:07 AM
I have curly hair, too, but my goal is to get as much water out as I can because I don't ever use a dryer and I have no idea what styling is.   ;)  I'm a wash and go girl.

I'm almost wash and go (in that the only product I use is gel when my hair is wet, and I only use a diffuser to get it just a little bit more dry than it would be with air drying). It's just that if I dry my hair too much straight out of the shower, I can never get it to sit right as it dries. It looks better if I let it air dry from almost wet than if I try to do it from damp or almost dry.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: rose red on January 31, 2014, 10:37:31 AM
I adore wearing flip flops even though *they* warn against them every summer because they are bad for your feet. 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Morty'sCleaningLady on January 31, 2014, 10:38:42 AM
Actually here's one from another thread but it fits here, so throwing it into the ring: I prefer 'Miss'. I don't like being called Ms and if anyone does call me Ms I will correct them because I really dislike it that much. Ms may be technically correct but I can't stand it and I'll never use it. Not accepted wisdom but it works for me :)

Me, too!  I hate the Z sound.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Hmmmmm on January 31, 2014, 10:39:16 AM
You're not supposed to wash your hair every day?
OK, that's another one I've never heard of. Why the heck not? I've been doing it pretty much since I was old enough to take my own shower (without my mother bathing me). And my hair is soft and silky. But yeah, I don't blow dry or treat it in any way. I wash it nightly (after doing my treadmill) and that's it. (Once, no repeat.)

Supposedly it easier to style and you don't dry it out.

But I wash my hair just about every morning and I do blow dry it just about every day unless I'm being lazy. I've tried switching to every other day and even attempted the shampooless process. Nope, my head feels greasy half way through the second day and I want to take another shower.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 31, 2014, 10:42:05 AM
I used to be a 6 times a week shampooer, only giving it one day off.  I'm 3 times a week, 4 at the most now.  And it has made a difference in how my hair looks and feels.  I still shower 6 days a week and use conditioner, even if I haven't washed my hair.  Like you, I do feel a bit greasy on that second day but it looks fine so I'm going with it because my hair feels so much better.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: magicdomino on January 31, 2014, 11:09:37 AM
I don't make my bed. Well, very rarely. I grew up having to do it each and every day, complete with bedspread. I hated doing it, so now I rebel and don't. I will if I'm having company, so as not too appear too slovenly, but just for me, nope.

My long lost sister!  The only time my bed gets made is when I change the sheets.  I don't even make it for company because I keep the door closed.

\

My kind of people.   :D  Now, I do straighten the bedclothes in the morning, but that is more to minimize the amount of cat hair left on the pillowcase, and maximize the amount of cat hair left on the old sheet that covers the bed.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on January 31, 2014, 11:28:37 AM
I have not worn pantyhose in over a decade. I wear skirts and keep my legs presentably shaved.

I have never intentionally tanned.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 31, 2014, 11:43:02 AM
I used to be a 6 times a week shampooer, only giving it one day off.  I'm 3 times a week, 4 at the most now.  And it has made a difference in how my hair looks and feels.  I still shower 6 days a week and use conditioner, even if I haven't washed my hair.  Like you, I do feel a bit greasy on that second day but it looks fine so I'm going with it because my hair feels so much better.

I used to wash mine every day, when it was short, because its wavy, and it looked like I stuck my finger in an electrical socket! Mine also is getting dryer, due to weather, and according to my stylist "you're getting more gray" He and I joke around since I'm only about 6 months older than he is.  So I wash it maybe 2-3 times a week now.

I also don't shave my legs. Except in the summer. I am single, and I have very dry sensitive skin, and peach fuzz, so blonde you can't see it. So in the winter I let it go, unless I ahve a dr. appt or something else where someone else will see and touch them!  SUmmer, maybe once a week.But other than that, nope. Saves on the cost of razor blades too!

I hate pantyhose too, and wear pants most of the time. I also almost never wear any kind of "foundation garment' unless I really need too. I know people who wear them every day, but they make me sweat.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Ms_Cellany on January 31, 2014, 11:46:37 AM
I've actually never understood the philosophy behind making up a bed except for if it needs to be presentable for guests. I mean, DH & I are the only ones who ever see it and if we don't care that it's not made, then why bother? It's not like making it refreshes or cleans it somehow. It's still gonna be the same ol' bed & sheets & blankets when we crawl in tonight whether the bed was made this morning or not.

As a follower of FlyLady and UnF-bombYourHabitat, I've become a devoted bed-maker. The principle is that a 60-second bed-straightening:

Sets me up with one successful habit, leading to more success in housekeeping
Makes the bedroom look peaceful, providing me with a refuge
Each night, I get into a made bed, ending my day on a note of success
Stops me from losing socks, phones, and other small items on it.
Is already made if we have company, so it's one less thing to fuss about.

UnF-bombYourHabitat had a riff on dishes recently.
"Why should I do the dishes? They're just going to get dirty again!"
"Because the point is not to own clean dishes. The point is that when you want to eat, clean dishes are at hand."

 Bedmaking is also a bonding experience for The Sweetie and me. She gets up earlier than me, so when she wakes me, she says, "Get up! Let's make the bed pretty!" 
We both think it's funny that former slobs like us now love having the bed made.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on January 31, 2014, 12:11:05 PM
Ah yes. I get that. It makes sense because it makes you and your partner happy. My point is that my DH & I just don't care so it would actually make me less than happy doing a chore which held no meaning for either of us.

It's not like dishes in that I wouldn't want to eat off a dirty plate but I have no problem sleeping in an unmade bed.

But ya, you know, we all do some stuff that works for us but not for others. Whatever makes you happy!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on January 31, 2014, 12:15:00 PM
I do the kitchen thing; I am so much happier when I get up in the am, stumble out to make my coffee, and my sink is empty, and counters clean and neat.

The bed however, doesn't bother me. And I'm glad I'm not the only one!!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on January 31, 2014, 12:18:49 PM
I never toss stuff on the bed so that part isn't really a concern for me.  What I've been doing lately that makes a huge difference is that I put my dingdangity dirty dishes in the dingdangity dishwasher.  For years, I've just put them in the sink or on the counter and not loaded the dishwasher until it looked like there was enough to run it.  Drove myself nuts.  It has been so nice the last couple of weeks to have clear counters in the kitchen!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: rose red on January 31, 2014, 12:21:21 PM
I'm kind of a neat freak, but I don't bother to made my bed.  I also have stacks of books around my bedroom instead of neatly in shelves.  So everything else is neat and clean except for my unmade bed and stacks of books.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Lynn2000 on January 31, 2014, 12:22:20 PM
I do like the way the bed looks when it's made. But not enough to actually make it every day. I used to be more strict about it when the bed was easier to make. But in my current apartment the bedroom furniture is built-in and the sides of the bed are hard to access, so getting things nice and straight is much more of a chore.

I've given up on dusting. Every once in a while I will notice something and feel like dusting off that thing. But I dust and then things get dusty again, even though I haven't used them. Actually, because I haven't used them, I suppose. So I don't dust anymore. I'm not allergic to dust (I have a friend who is, but we don't hang out at my house). Drives my mom crazy. I clean things, like the toilet, bathroom sink, bathtub; but I don't dust things, like the bookshelves, top of the fridge and microwave, window blinds.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Mikayla on January 31, 2014, 12:26:19 PM
I do the kitchen thing; I am so much happier when I get up in the am, stumble out to make my coffee, and my sink is empty, and counters clean and neat.

The bed however, doesn't bother me. And I'm glad I'm not the only one!!

I'm the same way, except the whole bedroom looks like a bomb went off in it.  In fact, I got broken into once and when I called my brother all upset, I remember telling him that they had trashed my bedroom.  He immediately responded "how can you tell"?  I cracked up.

My kitchen, however, is always spotless.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Bobbie on January 31, 2014, 12:31:30 PM
I don't shave my legs anymore.  After I had my kids I lost the hair on my legs and most of my arms.

My babies slept with me because I nursed for 5 years (3 kids, took  two weeks off in between the weaning and the birth of the next baby).

I don't wear or own any make up or nail polish.

I sleep with my glasses on because my eyesight is so bad that when I wake up I can't see my glasses plus when the kids were little and woke up before me they would play with my glasses.  It became habit.

I don't use pjs just old shorts and worn out t-shirts.  I wear my foundation garments  ;) to bed because it more comfortable for me.

I prefer talk to text because  nuances and sarcasm are hard to pick up in texts.









Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: MommyPenguin on January 31, 2014, 01:18:34 PM
I've recently started making my bed right after my shower, because I do like how the bedroom looks with it, but mainly because I can't stand to go to bed with the blankets all tangled.  My husband couldn't care less, and would probably never make the bed if it were up to him.  But I like to sleep with the sheets and blankets all neat.  So I'd always end up basically making it at night before I went to bed.  Which was silly, because if I'm going to have to go to the effort to fix it anyway, why not do it in the morning and enjoy it all day?  So I'm trying to get into the habit.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Ms_Cellany on January 31, 2014, 01:19:58 PM
I've recently started making my bed right after my shower, because I do like how the bedroom looks with it, but mainly because I can't stand to go to bed with the blankets all tangled.  My husband couldn't care less, and would probably never make the bed if it were up to him.  But I like to sleep with the sheets and blankets all neat.  So I'd always end up basically making it at night before I went to bed.  Which was silly, because if I'm going to have to go to the effort to fix it anyway, why not do it in the morning and enjoy it all day?  So I'm trying to get into the habit.

"Get up! Make bed pretty!"
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: MommyPenguin on January 31, 2014, 01:22:36 PM
Oh, and I no longer follow the whole "feed the baby one new food at a time for a week, pureed, so that you can watch for allergies."  We have no food allergies in our family, so after a couple of weeks of homemade baby food so they can get used to eating solids, I just give them whatever seems soft enough of what we're having for dinner.  I have fed a 6-month-old Singapore rice noodles with shrimp, and pizza.  I find that my two youngest kids (who were fed this way) are much more likely to try new things and are generally less picky than my older two, who were fed closer to the "one food at a time" method.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: TootsNYC on January 31, 2014, 01:47:07 PM
I also let things cool a bit before putting in the fridge.

This actually is conventional wisdom. Because putting something warm in the fridge doesn't cool it off faster, but it -does- warm up the rest of your fridge/freezer.


I've recently started making my bed right after my shower, because I do like how the bedroom looks with it, but mainly because I can't stand to go to bed with the blankets all tangled.  My husband couldn't care less, and would probably never make the bed if it were up to him.  But I like to sleep with the sheets and blankets all neat.  So I'd always end up basically making it at night before I went to bed.  Which was silly, because if I'm going to have to go to the effort to fix it anyway, why not do it in the morning and enjoy it all day?  So I'm trying to get into the habit.

This is why I started making the bed after decades and decades of willfully deciding I wasn't going to do it.

I would use the bed to fold clothes, so I'd make it before tackling the task. Then I started to enjoy how it looked, the calmness. And I thought, "Why not do this first thing, and then I'll have that 'working space' available all day, plus I'll have that calm feeling."
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Luci on January 31, 2014, 01:51:23 PM
Oh, and I no longer follow the whole "feed the baby one new food at a time for a week, pureed, so that you can watch for allergies."  We have no food allergies in our family, so after a couple of weeks of homemade baby food so they can get used to eating solids, I just give them whatever seems soft enough of what we're having for dinner.  I have fed a 6-month-old Singapore rice noodles with shrimp, and pizza.  I find that my two youngest kids (who were fed this way) are much more likely to try new things and are generally less picky than my older two, who were fed closer to the "one food at a time" method.

Of course when I had babies ('69, '71), the rules weren't quite so stringent. Just feed the kid, if something weird happens, dial back and do one thing a week. Most kids are fine, so you are going with the idea that the kid is fine - as most are. I'm now afraid of nut allergies - boy! do I have respect for that! Otherwise, just go for it.

I get up and straighten the bed even in the middle of the night if I am sick or restless or otherwise messed up  :), to be more comfortable. An unmade bed is clutter during the day - which I can't stand. Now making the bed is fluffing the pillows and straightening the sheet and spead.  The kids: older child was taught to make the bed, younger just ignored the whole thing, but I think we raised them the same way.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: BeagleMommy on January 31, 2014, 02:19:01 PM
Add me to the list of people who don't make the bed.  I only do that when I change the sheets.

If I didn't wash my hair every day I'd look like someone had coated my head in Vaseline.  That's not a good look on me.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: BigBadBetty on January 31, 2014, 02:24:34 PM
Add me to the list of people who don't make the bed.  I only do that when I change the sheets.

If I didn't wash my hair every day I'd look like someone had coated my head in Vaseline.  That's not a good look on me.

I don't make the bed either. I tried not washing my every day. I stuck it out for a while because I kept reading of all these wonderful things that happened to other people. The advice was just wait...your scalp will realize it isn't getting washed and will stop making so much oil. Instead, my scalp said you aren't washing me so let me make more oil so you will get the hint to wash me. My hair was so disgusting.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: KarenK on January 31, 2014, 02:31:52 PM
I wash my hair every day, but mostly because I am physically and mentally incapable of taking a shower and not washing my hair.  And I have to take a shower every morning, even if for some reason, I had taken one the night before. However, I never rinse and repeat. I'm not sure anyone does.

I make my bed, but I didn't for years. I had to start doing it because our cats started barfing on the bed. So I not only make it, I cover it my pretty comforter with random blankets and afghans. Much easier than washing the bedding all the time.

I eat raw dough and batter. Brownie batter is my favorite.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: magicdomino on January 31, 2014, 02:37:12 PM

I make my bed, but I didn't for years. I had to start doing it because our cats started barfing on the bed. So I not only make it, I cover it my pretty comforter with random blankets and afghans. Much easier than washing the bedding all the time.


I stopped using anything that wasn't easy to wash for precisely that reason.  Currently, the top layer is an old sheet, because when Koa was having major allergy problems, she sometimes bled a bit.  The sheet is easy to wash, I don't care if it stains, and as a bonus, it's very easy to remove cat hair with a pet hair sweeper.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on January 31, 2014, 02:56:45 PM
You're not supposed to wash your hair every day?
OK, that's another one I've never heard of. Why the heck not? I've been doing it pretty much since I was old enough to take my own shower (without my mother bathing me). And my hair is soft and silky. But yeah, I don't blow dry or treat it in any way. I wash it nightly (after doing my treadmill) and that's it. (Once, no repeat.)

Supposedly it easier to style and you don't dry it out.

But I wash my hair just about every morning and I do blow dry it just about every day unless I'm being lazy. I've tried switching to every other day and even attempted the shampooless process. Nope, my head feels greasy half way through the second day and I want to take another shower.

Even for people who can make less frequent hair washing work, there's an adjustment period. I used to wash my hair every day, and switched to every other day in self defense of my skin when I spent a semester abroad in Ireland (it was so much colder and drier than what I was used to that my rather-dry-anyway skin actually couldn't handle daily showers). My hair was a little greasy on day 2 for about a month, and then my scalp stopped producing so much oil and my hair stopped looking and feeling different on day 2. At the time, I'd have stuck with my every other day showers even if my hair had continued to be a hot mess, just because it was better than skin so dry it had lost elasticity.

I had another adjustment when I stopped using shampoo with sulfates, and again when I started stretching how long I could go without washing my hair, although I don't think either was quite as dramatic as that first one.

I've also just learned to be slightly less sensitive to extra oil that I know is there, but that other people don't notice. I've always been hypersensitive about that, because I have blond hair and extra oil makes my hair look darker. Part of my adjustment period was convincing myself that, no, other people did not actually have the ability to notice minute changes to the shade of my hair that even I had to scrutinize my reflection to see. :P

I wash my hair every day, but mostly because I am physically and mentally incapable of taking a shower and not washing my hair.  And I have to take a shower every morning, even if for some reason, I had taken one the night before. However, I never rinse and repeat. I'm not sure anyone does.

I shower every day, because I go to the gym every day. Instead of actually washing my hair, I just scrub my scalp with my fingers under the running water, and put (my equivalent of) conditioner on the ends to detangle. It still feels like washing my hair, there's just no soap involved. I don't like showering while trying to keep my hair dry, and my hair tangles easily and turns into a mess if I just get it wet without doing anything else. But using just manual scrubbing, water, and conditioner gets it clean and nice looking enough that I don't think anyone could tell you which days I actually wash my hair.

* I don't really "wash" or "condition" my hair as such, because I have been using the baking-soda-and-apple-cider-vinegar method for a long time now. Only I thicken both with guar gum these days (and add chamomile and other herbs to the vinegar), so they both function a lot more like standard shampoo and conditioner, in the sense that they are the right consistency to squeeze out of a bottle into my hand and then apply to my hair/scalp.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Hillia on January 31, 2014, 03:02:36 PM
I have to wash my hair everyday; it's a greasebomb after about 12 hours.  My son the cosmetologist tried to get me on the every-other-day bandwagon, but after seeing me after one day, he backed off.

I would love to make the bed every day because I do like the way it looks and the sense of calm and accomplishment it brings, but DH gets up later than I do, and once I'm out of the bedroom I don't seem to get back in to make it up.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: SiotehCat on January 31, 2014, 03:05:17 PM
I wash my hair once a week. Used to do once a day, but slowly started stretching the time between washings. My hair has never looks or felt so good. I love it and I could never go back to daily washing.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on January 31, 2014, 04:13:55 PM
Oh, and I no longer follow the whole "feed the baby one new food at a time for a week, pureed, so that you can watch for allergies."  We have no food allergies in our family, so after a couple of weeks of homemade baby food so they can get used to eating solids, I just give them whatever seems soft enough of what we're having for dinner.  I have fed a 6-month-old Singapore rice noodles with shrimp, and pizza.  I find that my two youngest kids (who were fed this way) are much more likely to try new things and are generally less picky than my older two, who were fed closer to the "one food at a time" method.

When I was a baby my mother was trying to follow all the rules on feeding a baby. Including, one at a time pureed, mostly because she was very young (a teenager), so decided she'd trust the experts. My grandma came from a very different school of thought and took to give me whatever it seemed I could handle. Eventually mom gave up and let me eat whatever we ate that was soft enough. And well...I'll eat anything so long as it isn't still moving.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on January 31, 2014, 04:18:25 PM
I'm told to wash my hair at most, every other day, because I have curly hair and lots of it. If I do that, by day the second day, my hair has that "wet, grunge look" that was popular in the early 90s. Lots of curly hair, yes, but very fine as well. So not wash daily shows the grease.

Partner gets away with every other day (or every three days) and it makes her hair look awesome. Lots of very thick curly hair. I'm a bit jealous because sometimes she'll go get a blow out and it'll last for days and she won't have to fix her hair...on the other hand I do love scrubbing my head...feels good.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on January 31, 2014, 04:21:09 PM
I will eat raw egg products, such as batter and dough, and sashimi but not meat thawed on a counter.

My 15 year old hasn't had a parent imposed bed time in over a year. He knows when he is tired and knows when he has to get up, so he's got that covered.

I eat raw batter all the time, but thawing meat on a counter feels so odd and wrong to me. Partner does in the sink (the meat) and eats raw batter. She's reckless like that.

I don't actually remember when my mom quit with bedtimes....sometime before junior high. Her theory was, if I went to school overtired a few times, I'd eventually learn to go to bed on time. She was right, I'd put myself to bed every night by no later then 10, and I'd be fine all day.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on January 31, 2014, 04:25:14 PM
I wash everything in cold water only. I only use hot water if I'm cleaning up a "doggy accident" or a "sick human accident". And I never add the soap before the clothes, the directions on the bottles say soap first then clothes.

And, my mother yells every time I do it, I eat cooked pasta, without rinsing first. I grew up being told to always rinse, and I do sometimes, but dang it, sometimes I want my pasta now, not after being rinsed! And despite what my mother says, I've never gotten a stomach ache from it.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: KimberlyM on January 31, 2014, 04:30:25 PM
I've given up on dusting. Every once in a while I will notice something and feel like dusting off that thing. But I dust and then things get dusty again, even though I haven't used them. Actually, because I haven't used them, I suppose. So I don't dust anymore. I'm not allergic to dust (I have a friend who is, but we don't hang out at my house). Drives my mom crazy. I clean things, like the toilet, bathroom sink, bathtub; but I don't dust things, like the bookshelves, top of the fridge and microwave, window blinds.

I clean, a lot.  Dusting.  Not so much.  My sister in law leave little post it notes with messages around our house every time she visits.  We generally find them within a day or two.  I had my husband move a couple of bookshelves around for me a month or two ago and when he cleared them off we found a post it from his sister stuck on top, covered in TONS of dust and dated August 2010.  Made it more than 3 years without dusting that shelf!

I wash my hair once a week, though I rinse it every day.  I leave in regular conditioner.  I thaw meat on the counter every day.  Leftovers sit on the counter an hour or more before being put up because we all tend to eat at varying times. I machine wash everything, though I use the handwash cycle for bras, I do sort, but only colored (any), whites (which I bleach the heck out of!) and towels (because I dry them on high). 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: veryfluffy on January 31, 2014, 04:42:52 PM
And, my mother yells every time I do it, I eat cooked pasta, without rinsing first. I grew up being told to always rinse, and I do sometimes, but dang it, sometimes I want my pasta now, not after being rinsed! And despite what my mother says, I've never gotten a stomach ache from it.

That is definitely a new one on me...I have never rinsed pasta after cooking it.

With regards to making the bed, one thing I was always advised is to throw back the covers and let the whole thing air for a couple of hours after you get up, since your body emits about a litre of moisture when you sleep. Unless you expose all this to air and light, the dust mites are going to be very happy campers.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on January 31, 2014, 04:46:42 PM
I ready somewhere on line (something someone posted to Facebook so....factual it might not be) that an unmade bed is healthier because it's a deterrent to bed bugs and other such things. Where as a made bed is much more inviting. Sounded like good sound logic to me. Though I do enjoy a made bed. I don't actually enjoy making the bed (especially with my dogs "helping").

Back when I was a single lady, I'd make the bed, and then sleep on top of the covers so that I didn't have to unmake the bed. Now if I try to do that Partner insists that's a level of weird she isn't ok with, and her threshold is pretty high so I don't push it.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: menley on January 31, 2014, 05:11:19 PM
And, my mother yells every time I do it, I eat cooked pasta, without rinsing first. I grew up being told to always rinse, and I do sometimes, but dang it, sometimes I want my pasta now, not after being rinsed! And despite what my mother says, I've never gotten a stomach ache from it.

I think this is one of those things that a certain generation were taught without ever being taught why. Both my parents and my husband's parents said that it's a rule to rinse off rice and pasta but when we asked, neither one had any idea why. They were shocked when we googled and found that it was to rinse off the excess starch so that it's not as gummy/sticky. They'd been doing it for over 50 years without thinking!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on January 31, 2014, 05:13:59 PM
And, my mother yells every time I do it, I eat cooked pasta, without rinsing first. I grew up being told to always rinse, and I do sometimes, but dang it, sometimes I want my pasta now, not after being rinsed! And despite what my mother says, I've never gotten a stomach ache from it.

I think this is one of those things that a certain generation were taught without ever being taught why. Both my parents and my husband's parents said that it's a rule to rinse off rice and pasta but when we asked, neither one had any idea why. They were shocked when we googled and found that it was to rinse off the excess starch so that it's not as gummy/sticky. They'd been doing it for over 50 years without thinking!

My mom always said it was to rinse of excess starch, though I've never done it with rice (though I usually just cook minute rice so...) and according to her the excess starch is what gives you a stomach ache. My theory is that it's actually the fact that I over eat pasta which gives me the stomach ache.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: MommyPenguin on January 31, 2014, 05:58:40 PM
And, my mother yells every time I do it, I eat cooked pasta, without rinsing first. I grew up being told to always rinse, and I do sometimes, but dang it, sometimes I want my pasta now, not after being rinsed! And despite what my mother says, I've never gotten a stomach ache from it.

I think this is one of those things that a certain generation were taught without ever being taught why. Both my parents and my husband's parents said that it's a rule to rinse off rice and pasta but when we asked, neither one had any idea why. They were shocked when we googled and found that it was to rinse off the excess starch so that it's not as gummy/sticky. They'd been doing it for over 50 years without thinking!

My mom always said it was to rinse of excess starch, though I've never done it with rice (though I usually just cook minute rice so...) and according to her the excess starch is what gives you a stomach ache. My theory is that it's actually the fact that I over eat pasta which gives me the stomach ache.

My husband doesn't like his pasta rinsed, because he feels like it cools it down too much.  I can't stand not rinsing it, because it all sticks together and makes it really difficult to scoop out portions for everybody.  So our compromise is that he scoops his out as soon as I dump it in the colander, and then I rinse the rest of it and scoop it out for everybody else.

With the unmade bed letting things air out, what I do is to make my bed after my shower.  That way, the bed airs out a little bit between when I get out of bed and when I finish my shower (I have to take the baby downstairs and set her up with her breakfast, help the littles with opening cereal boxes, etc., then come upstairs and take my shower, brush hair, etc.), so that means it airs for, I don't know, maybe 30-45 minutes?

With the "no poo" concept, I tried it, briefly.  I have wavy hair that tends to be very dry.  When I tried using the baking soda solution to wash my hair, it made it so insanely dry that it (quite literally) squeaked when I tried to brush it.  If I didn't use anything at all in it, it matted, and I couldn't brush through it.  I tried using just conditioner (supposedly conditioner has enough of a cleanser that you can just use it) occasionally, but generally I find just using a regular shampoo/conditioner routine every other day seems to work well enough.  With my hair, I could do it every day or every other, but I like doing it every other because it saves me some time.  I don't generally use a hair dryer, just towel dry it, put in some "curl scrunch," scrunch, and then get lots of cute curls.  :)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: newbiePA on January 31, 2014, 06:14:18 PM
My Italian family NEVER rinses pasta.  If it gets gummy, it is overcooked.  Also, rinsed pasta (or pasta cooked with Olive oil in the water) won't hold on to the sauce as well.  Cook your pasta with a pinch of salt, stir occasionally while cooking, and no rinsing.  I am a terrible cook, but can make some excellent pasta.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: gramma dishes on January 31, 2014, 07:32:46 PM
Actually here's one from another thread but it fits here, so throwing it into the ring: I prefer 'Miss'. I don't like being called Ms and if anyone does call me Ms I will correct them because I really dislike it that much. Ms may be technically correct but I can't stand it and I'll never use it. Not accepted wisdom but it works for me :)

Me, too!  I hate the Z sound.

Me too.  It's such a hard and annoying sound -- like bees and wasps and mosquitoes!  Very unfeminine!  Much prefer the softer "s".
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Please pass the Calgon on January 31, 2014, 09:10:44 PM
I've recently started making my bed right after my shower, because I do like how the bedroom looks with it, but mainly because I can't stand to go to bed with the blankets all tangled.  My husband couldn't care less, and would probably never make the bed if it were up to him.  But I like to sleep with the sheets and blankets all neat.  So I'd always end up basically making it at night before I went to bed.  Which was silly, because if I'm going to have to go to the effort to fix it anyway, why not do it in the morning and enjoy it all day?  So I'm trying to get into the habit.

The single best way to get in the habit of making your bed? Add a Great Dane to your family :)  Every one I've ever know quickly turns his/her owner's bed into the Dane's bed, and if you don't want fur on the sheets...

Our Willow Jayne trained us well!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Luci on January 31, 2014, 09:11:35 PM
Actually here's one from another thread but it fits here, so throwing it into the ring: I prefer 'Miss'. I don't like being called Ms and if anyone does call me Ms I will correct them because I really dislike it that much. Ms may be technically correct but I can't stand it and I'll never use it. Not accepted wisdom but it works for me :)

Me, too!  I hate the Z sound.

Me too.  It's such a hard and annoying sound -- like bees and wasps and mosquitoes!  Very unfeminine!  Much prefer the softer "s".

I hate it, but felt comfort in the south  when I was called "Mz Luci". I think it is one of those things from my early childhood that I can't really remember.

When I was 20, I was a Miss D..... and called so by my professors. Somehow they knew I married and became Mrs. M....  I now do respond to mail for Ms. M...., even though it hurts me, because eHell has shown that it is really a proper name for me and I shouldn't be offended.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on January 31, 2014, 09:16:02 PM
Actually here's one from another thread but it fits here, so throwing it into the ring: I prefer 'Miss'. I don't like being called Ms and if anyone does call me Ms I will correct them because I really dislike it that much. Ms may be technically correct but I can't stand it and I'll never use it. Not accepted wisdom but it works for me :)

Me, too!  I hate the Z sound.

Me too.  It's such a hard and annoying sound -- like bees and wasps and mosquitoes!  Very unfeminine!  Much prefer the softer "s".

This is perhaps why I have never quite understood the objection to Ms., at least for sound aesthetic reasons. The way I say it, the two titles sound exactly the same, but neither has an actual z sound or an s sound. It's kind of a sound that's halfway in between the two.

Then again, I was also raised in Texas, and I think someone said upthread that most southerners pronounce Miss and Ms. the same way.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on January 31, 2014, 09:22:44 PM
With the "no poo" concept, I tried it, briefly.  I have wavy hair that tends to be very dry.  When I tried using the baking soda solution to wash my hair, it made it so insanely dry that it (quite literally) squeaked when I tried to brush it.  If I didn't use anything at all in it, it matted, and I couldn't brush through it.  I tried using just conditioner (supposedly conditioner has enough of a cleanser that you can just use it) occasionally, but generally I find just using a regular shampoo/conditioner routine every other day seems to work well enough.  With my hair, I could do it every day or every other, but I like doing it every other because it saves me some time.  I don't generally use a hair dryer, just towel dry it, put in some "curl scrunch," scrunch, and then get lots of cute curls.  :)

Obviously, there's no point in fixing something that's not broken, but I had a failed attempt with the baking soda/vinegar hair care routine before I finally figured out how to make it work for me. For one, it's REALLY easy to overdo it on the baking soda. I found success by mixing 1 tablespoon of baking soda with about 1 cup of water, and then using no more than 1/4 of that mixture each time I washed my hair. For another, the vinegar is actually an essential step, although I like that step a whole lot better since I started making a concentrated herbal hair rinse/vinegar mixture thickened with guar gum (since guar gum is "slippery" and makes the mixture behave more like regular conditioner in your hair).

It is a bit of a pain to keep it up, though. It's probably cheaper to make my own hair care products (since I'd otherwise be using sulfate- and silicone-free ones that tend to cost more), but it does take more time!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: MommyPenguin on January 31, 2014, 09:27:15 PM
With the "no poo" concept, I tried it, briefly.  I have wavy hair that tends to be very dry.  When I tried using the baking soda solution to wash my hair, it made it so insanely dry that it (quite literally) squeaked when I tried to brush it.  If I didn't use anything at all in it, it matted, and I couldn't brush through it.  I tried using just conditioner (supposedly conditioner has enough of a cleanser that you can just use it) occasionally, but generally I find just using a regular shampoo/conditioner routine every other day seems to work well enough.  With my hair, I could do it every day or every other, but I like doing it every other because it saves me some time.  I don't generally use a hair dryer, just towel dry it, put in some "curl scrunch," scrunch, and then get lots of cute curls.  :)

Obviously, there's no point in fixing something that's not broken, but I had a failed attempt with the baking soda/vinegar hair care routine before I finally figured out how to make it work for me. For one, it's REALLY easy to overdo it on the baking soda. I found success by mixing 1 tablespoon of baking soda with about 1 cup of water, and then using no more than 1/4 of that mixture each time I washed my hair. For another, the vinegar is actually an essential step, although I like that step a whole lot better since I started making a concentrated herbal hair rinse/vinegar mixture thickened with guar gum (since guar gum is "slippery" and makes the mixture behave more like regular conditioner in your hair).

It is a bit of a pain to keep it up, though. It's probably cheaper to make my own hair care products (since I'd otherwise be using sulfate- and silicone-free ones that tend to cost more), but it does take more time!

Thanks for the tip!  Maybe I'll give it another try.  I buy a certain shampoo/conditioner because they work better on my hair than all the zillions of others I've tried, but I wouldn't mind not having to spend the money.  My hair is crazy thick and has a tendency to frizz.  Ever see "the Princess Diaries," the "before" hair?  That's my hair, if I'm not very careful.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: FoxPaws on February 01, 2014, 09:24:44 AM
After pouring and/or throwing out $$$$ worth of "skin care systems" over the years, I now wash my face with whatever I'm using on the rest of me - or I just rinse it under the shower. I do use face lotion and an occasional apricot scrub, but other than that, my "beauty routine" is non-existent.

I thaw chicken in the fridge and then - shock! horror! - rinse it before I use it. I cannot stand the blood slime that's on it after it thaws. My mom pointed out that she's done this for decades and hasn't killed anyone yet.

Dishes that are only used for measuring, cutting, or storage just get rinsed in hot water - I don't wash them with soap unless they've touched raw meat, raw eggs, or a human mouth.

I wash all of my clothes the same way: warm wash, cold rinse. I sort by dryer temperature. I use those (awesome!) Color Guard sheets when I'm throwing something new into the mix.

I don't fold undies or roll socks unless I'm packing them in a suitcase.

I don't make the bed unless I'm expecting company and I don't tuck in the top sheet unless they're spending the night. I am an active sleeper and I don't rest well when I'm hemmed in.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: TootsNYC on February 01, 2014, 09:27:51 AM
And, my mother yells every time I do it, I eat cooked pasta, without rinsing first. I grew up being told to always rinse, and I do sometimes, but dang it, sometimes I want my pasta now, not after being rinsed! And despite what my mother says, I've never gotten a stomach ache from it.

That is definitely a new one on me...I have never rinsed pasta after cooking it.


In fact, you're supposed to save some of the pasta cooking water (I scoop it out w/ a glass measuring cup) and stir it back into the pasta after you've drained it.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 01, 2014, 10:22:20 AM
I thaw chicken in the fridge and then - shock! horror! - rinse it before I use it. I cannot stand the blood slime that's on it after it thaws. My mom pointed out that she's done this for decades and hasn't killed anyone yet.

The issue with rinsing poultry isn't with the bird itself; it's the fact that you are now spreading the bacteria further due to splashing, etc.  So as long as you are thorough in your clean-up, it isn't really an issue.  I don't rinse because I'm not confident in the thoroughness of my clean-up.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on February 01, 2014, 10:58:02 AM
I've given up on washing my face with soap almost entirely, and I now wash it with oil. This seems to be becoming more common, if the email ads I get from Sephora are any indication. But my skin is dry enough that cleaning it without stripping away more oil than I can afford to lose is hard to manage. Even soaps advertised as gentle or for dry skin go overboard and leave my skin flaky.

Occasionally, I get lazy and use my bar soap to wash my face, but I always regret doing that if I do it more often than once every few weeks.

I've also stopped washing the majority of my skin with soap. I hit up the areas that produce sweat and/or otherwise produce BO, but I don't wash other areas unless they have actual dirt (in some form) on them. It's the only way I've found to shower off the gym sweat daily without my skin deciding that it hates me. And that's with a pretty strict regimen of putting relatively heavy-duty lotion on all of my skin every single time I shower.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Harriet Jones on February 01, 2014, 11:06:08 AM
And, my mother yells every time I do it, I eat cooked pasta, without rinsing first. I grew up being told to always rinse, and I do sometimes, but dang it, sometimes I want my pasta now, not after being rinsed! And despite what my mother says, I've never gotten a stomach ache from it.

That is definitely a new one on me...I have never rinsed pasta after cooking it.


In fact, you're supposed to save some of the pasta cooking water (I scoop it out w/ a glass measuring cup) and stir it back into the pasta after you've drained it.

I've never heard of that.  Doesn't that make the pasta soggy?

I have heard of it for certain sauce recipes, like alfredo, but not just plain pasta.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Mikayla on February 01, 2014, 11:10:23 AM
My Italian family NEVER rinses pasta.  If it gets gummy, it is overcooked.  Also, rinsed pasta (or pasta cooked with Olive oil in the water) won't hold on to the sauce as well. Cook your pasta with a pinch of salt, stir occasionally while cooking, and no rinsing.  I am a terrible cook, but can make some excellent pasta.

I agree, especially the bolded.  Also, I like my pasta very al dente so it never gets gummy.  The consistency of overcooked pasta makes me want to run screaming into the night!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: StarFaerie on February 01, 2014, 03:41:02 PM
Except for my underarms (and hands after going to the loo) I don't wash any part of me with soap. I rinse it all in the shower every morning but that's it. I also don't moisturize. My skin isn't oily or dry and certainly isn't dirty either.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 01, 2014, 04:06:34 PM
Except for my underarms (and hands after going to the loo) I don't wash any part of me with soap. I rinse it all in the shower every morning but that's it. I also don't moisturize. My skin isn't oily or dry and certainly isn't dirty either.

I'm a 'pits and bits' girl, too.  The only time I might use soap elsewhere is if I've been doing something particularly dirty.  Gardening, for example.  I also have this mitt thing that I use that is slightly abrasive and it works well to remove dirt without using soap.

10 months of the year, I don't need moisturizer.  But in really cold, dry weather, I'm starting to need some as I age.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Ceallach on February 01, 2014, 04:18:24 PM
Oh, and I no longer follow the whole "feed the baby one new food at a time for a week, pureed, so that you can watch for allergies."  We have no food allergies in our family, so after a couple of weeks of homemade baby food so they can get used to eating solids, I just give them whatever seems soft enough of what we're having for dinner.  I have fed a 6-month-old Singapore rice noodles with shrimp, and pizza.  I find that my two youngest kids (who were fed this way) are much more likely to try new things and are generally less picky than my older two, who were fed closer to the "one food at a time" method.

I do this too!  Every other mother in my mothers group was carefully preparing special purée recipes for their babies, but I had neither the time nor the inclination.  I occasionally gave store bought purée as a snack, but mainly he eats what we eat.  In fact if we attempt to give him something different to us he gets quite confused and tries to steal ours anyway.

From what I've been told by others I'm raising my son more like a 2nd child than a 1st child - very relaxed and doing what works rather than following the rules.  Apparently most people throw out the rule book for number two anyway!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: squeakers on February 01, 2014, 04:59:36 PM
I don't wear a bra 90% of the time even though they (the girls) are quite large.  Sagging and stretch marks  happens whether you wear one or not (you either do or you don't).  I only wear one so as to not offend people who find headlights ghast-worthy.

I co-slept with all 3 boys.  They all transitioned to their own beds by age 2.  They didn't have real bedtimes until they began school and the bedtimes were like 9 PM.  If they wanted more sleep they were welcome to go to bed earlier  :D The 13 year old's bedtime is 11 pm.. but during vacations/holidays he is such a night owl that 5 or 6 AM is what he prefers.  It only takes one or two days of being back in the daily schedule with maybe one "come home from school, eat and crash" for him to get back to 11PM being in bed.

I let my dogs enter the house door before I come in.  Supposedly it lets them think they are the dominant one(s) but for me it makes sense to get them in and out of the way vs making them heel behind me while trying to hold the door so they can come in.  Whether it was the 45lb lab/shar pei (RIP) or the 3 Chihuahuas ... they know who the boss is: Momma!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 01, 2014, 08:08:02 PM
I don't buy bar soap at all. Liquid soap at every sink, liquid body wash and facial cleanser. I hate the way bar soap leaves residue behind.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: metallicafan on February 01, 2014, 09:26:09 PM
My Italian family NEVER rinses pasta.  If it gets gummy, it is overcooked.  Also, rinsed pasta (or pasta cooked with Olive oil in the water) won't hold on to the sauce as well. Cook your pasta with a pinch of salt, stir occasionally while cooking, and no rinsing.  I am a terrible cook, but can make some excellent pasta.

I agree, especially the bolded.  Also, I like my pasta very al dente so it never gets gummy.  The consistency of overcooked pasta makes me want to run screaming into the night!

Yep,  I never rinse my pasta unless I am using it cold for a pasta salad.   Rinsed pasta won't hold onto the sauce as well. As to the pasta cooking water, some chefs say to save it to stir into the sauce in case it's too thick.  I never do, DH and I both like a thicker sauce.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: TootsNYC on February 01, 2014, 09:33:41 PM
I add the pasta cooking water because it gets re-absorbed by the pasta, which keeps it from sticking to itself and getting sort of dried out and sticky.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Harriet Jones on February 01, 2014, 09:51:32 PM
I add the pasta cooking water because it gets re-absorbed by the pasta, which keeps it from sticking to itself and getting sort of dried out and sticky.

A little olive oil will do the same thing and the pasta won't lose it's al dente texture.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: cicero on February 02, 2014, 06:08:21 AM
i taste raw cookie dough.

I don't wash fruit (for myself; if it's for others I do). i wipe but don't wash. it's just laziness on my part, no deep moral reason.

I sometimes leave dishes in the sink over night. My poor mom is probably turning over in her grave

I use "whatever moisturizer is on sale" and wash my face with whatever body soap i use. I actually buy these kits every now and then of cleanser/toner, use them two or three times, and go back to my bad ways >:D

We don't fold the laundry. It's just DS and I - and he does the laundry - after years of teaching him to fold everything neatly, he just said "why, mom?". he sorts it into piles and puts them away. it works for us. (don't tell anyone but when we have a busy week we just leave it on the [indoor] line and take things off as needed)

I'm sure there's more.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: TootsNYC on February 02, 2014, 08:16:48 AM
I add the pasta cooking water because it gets re-absorbed by the pasta, which keeps it from sticking to itself and getting sort of dried out and sticky.

A little olive oil will do the same thing and the pasta won't lose it's al dente texture.


Hmm. My pasta doesn't lose its al dente texture. It's not like it keeps cooking; it just absorbs a little bit more water.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: katycoo on February 02, 2014, 05:26:53 PM
My husband doesn't like his pasta rinsed, because he feels like it cools it down too much.  I can't stand not rinsing it, because it all sticks together and makes it really difficult to scoop out portions for everybody.  So our compromise is that he scoops his out as soon as I dump it in the colander, and then I rinse the rest of it and scoop it out for everybody else.

When I rinse or refresh pasat (which is very rarely) I rinse it with boiling water from the kettle to avoid this problem.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: katycoo on February 02, 2014, 05:28:36 PM
I don't wear a bra 90% of the time even though they (the girls) are quite large.  Sagging and stretch marks  happens whether you wear one or not (you either do or you don't).  I only wear one so as to not offend people who find headlights ghast-worthy.

I co-slept with all 3 boys.  They all transitioned to their own beds by age 2.  They didn't have real bedtimes until they began school and the bedtimes were like 9 PM.  If they wanted more sleep they were welcome to go to bed earlier  :D The 13 year old's bedtime is 11 pm.. but during vacations/holidays he is such a night owl that 5 or 6 AM is what he prefers.  It only takes one or two days of being back in the daily schedule with maybe one "come home from school, eat and crash" for him to get back to 11PM being in bed.

I let my dogs enter the house door before I come in.  Supposedly it lets them think they are the dominant one(s) but for me it makes sense to get them in and out of the way vs making them heel behind me while trying to hold the door so they can come in.  Whether it was the 45lb lab/shar pei (RIP) or the 3 Chihuahuas ... they know who the boss is: Momma!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Lady Snowdon on February 02, 2014, 06:14:34 PM
I have a kind of off-beat thing to go here.  I make cold process soap (from scratch, from lye and oils and water) and the way I make it flies in the face of almost everything I've read about how to make soap.  The way you're supposed to do it is to make sure that everything is about the same temperature when you mix it together, and in fact everything should be under 120 degrees in temp.  When I do that, the soap doesn't work.  I soap at much higher temperatures (my lye is sometimes as hot as 170 degrees, while my oils might be like 110 or so!) and it works beautifully for me.  Just one of those weird things...

Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: POF on February 02, 2014, 07:08:33 PM
We all go to bed early at my house.... even the teens - its not uncommon to find us all in bed at 9:30. But we are all up at 5:30, full days - boys play sports and darn it we are tired.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: KenveeB on February 02, 2014, 09:12:18 PM
i taste raw cookie dough.

I don't wash fruit (for myself; if it's for others I do). i wipe but don't wash. it's just laziness on my part, no deep moral reason.

I sometimes leave dishes in the sink over night. My poor mom is probably turning over in her grave

I use "whatever moisturizer is on sale" and wash my face with whatever body soap i use. I actually buy these kits every now and then of cleanser/toner, use them two or three times, and go back to my bad ways >:D

We don't fold the laundry. It's just DS and I - and he does the laundry - after years of teaching him to fold everything neatly, he just said "why, mom?". he sorts it into piles and puts them away. it works for us. (don't tell anyone but when we have a busy week we just leave it on the [indoor] line and take things off as needed)

I'm sure there's more.

Ditto for me. I'm rather relaxed about washing stuff when it's just for me. If I'm cooking for others, I'm much more religious about it. :)  I also thaw meat on counters, though it's usually covered with something to keep the cats from it. I wash my hair almost every day just because my scalp sweats a lot, so after I exercise my hair is soaked through. So I absolutely have to wash it after I work out, and I work out 6 days a week. Even if I wasn't working out, though, my hair is pretty oily and wouldn't make it much past two days.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: katycoo on February 02, 2014, 09:34:54 PM
I have a kind of off-beat thing to go here.  I make cold process soap (from scratch, from lye and oils and water) and the way I make it flies in the face of almost everything I've read about how to make soap.  The way you're supposed to do it is to make sure that everything is about the same temperature when you mix it together, and in fact everything should be under 120 degrees in temp.  When I do that, the soap doesn't work.  I soap at much higher temperatures (my lye is sometimes as hot as 170 degrees, while my oils might be like 110 or so!) and it works beautifully for me.  Just one of those weird things...

I wonder if it has something to do with altitude (yours v recipe writer)?
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dazi on February 03, 2014, 05:18:09 AM
I have a kind of off-beat thing to go here.  I make cold process soap (from scratch, from lye and oils and water) and the way I make it flies in the face of almost everything I've read about how to make soap.  The way you're supposed to do it is to make sure that everything is about the same temperature when you mix it together, and in fact everything should be under 120 degrees in temp.  When I do that, the soap doesn't work.  I soap at much higher temperatures (my lye is sometimes as hot as 170 degrees, while my oils might be like 110 or so!) and it works beautifully for me.  Just one of those weird things...

I wonder if it has something to do with altitude (yours v recipe writer)?

Or humidity...There are a lot of variables that can affect any kind of recipe.  I tried to help a friend make soap in the "everything is the same temperature" method and our results were basically foam (well the first two times were a total flop that would not combine at all).  It was lovely foam, but never really combined or hardened as proper bars of soap.   
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dazi on February 03, 2014, 05:25:05 AM
i taste raw cookie dough.

I don't wash fruit (for myself; if it's for others I do). i wipe but don't wash. it's just laziness on my part, no deep moral reason.

I sometimes leave dishes in the sink over night. My poor mom is probably turning over in her grave

I use "whatever moisturizer is on sale" and wash my face with whatever body soap i use. I actually buy these kits every now and then of cleanser/toner, use them two or three times, and go back to my bad ways >:D

We don't fold the laundry. It's just DS and I - and he does the laundry - after years of teaching him to fold everything neatly, he just said "why, mom?". he sorts it into piles and puts them away. it works for us. (don't tell anyone but when we have a busy week we just leave it on the [indoor] line and take things off as needed)

I'm sure there's more.

Ditto for me. I'm rather relaxed about washing stuff when it's just for me. If I'm cooking for others, I'm much more religious about it. :)  I also thaw meat on counters, though it's usually covered with something to keep the cats from it. I wash my hair almost every day just because my scalp sweats a lot, so after I exercise my hair is soaked through. So I absolutely have to wash it after I work out, and I work out 6 days a week. Even if I wasn't working out, though, my hair is pretty oily and wouldn't make it much past two days.

See I HAVE to wash fruit.  I am rather fanatical about it actually.  I guess it's because I've helped harvest fruit and vegetables. Also, I have really bad pollen allergies and there is a very good possibility there is pesticide residue, fertilizer, animal droppings, other people's dirty hands touching it, and if it is not in a bag, the germ-fest that is a grocery store conveyor belt.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: laceandbits on February 03, 2014, 08:15:26 AM
Someone said
"I have worn new clothes without washing first"

it would never occur to me that new clothes need to be/should be washed before you wear them? 

To borrow a well known Ehell phrase "Why would I want to do that?"

Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Yvaine on February 03, 2014, 08:21:23 AM
Someone said
"I have worn new clothes without washing first"

it would never occur to me that new clothes need to be/should be washed before you wear them? 

To borrow a well known Ehell phrase "Why would I want to do that?"

The theory is that (a) someone might have tried them on in the store and (b) sometimes they have, I think, something sprayed on them to make them hang prettier on the rack. I'm not really consistent with this, either way!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: squeakers on February 03, 2014, 08:25:10 AM
Someone said
"I have worn new clothes without washing first"

it would never occur to me that new clothes need to be/should be washed before you wear them? 

To borrow a well known Ehell phrase "Why would I want to do that?"

You wash new clothes to make sure any residue on them is gone before it touches your body.  Residues could be anything from pesticides sprayed in the container shipper the clothes came in to other peoples' body scraps/oils/hairs that come from being tried on.

And the most important reason to wash clothes before wearing them: if there is the slightest chance the dyes in the clothes could run... do you really want to be that shade of blue/red/green etc? And would that dye match whatever else you are wearing? My feet turned a bit black this past Christmas... brand new black house slippers.  I had been wearing socks with them but my feet got too hot.  Checked the socks and they, too, had black smudges.

There was an Law & Order:SVU episode where a someone died because the clothes they were wearing had been recycled from a funeral home and they were soaked in embalming fluid.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: laceandbits on February 03, 2014, 08:33:11 AM
Obviously even inexpensive quality clothes in the UK are better quality than in the USA,  as I've never encountered any of those problems, or heard from friends of any such incidents, or read about it in any tabloid newspapers who just love that sort of thing.

And the only colour run I've ever had was from a pair of red leather shoes, which were no longer new, when my feet got soaked one day.  Not at all surprised.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 03, 2014, 09:23:10 AM
Someone said
"I have worn new clothes without washing first"

it would never occur to me that new clothes need to be/should be washed before you wear them? 

To borrow a well known Ehell phrase "Why would I want to do that?"

The theory is that (a) someone might have tried them on in the store and (b) sometimes they have, I think, something sprayed on them to make them hang prettier on the rack. I'm not really consistent with this, either way!

Since 90% of my clothing comes wrapped in bags individually and purchased from an online store, I don't have this worry.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: gramma dishes on February 03, 2014, 09:25:31 AM
Obviously even inexpensive quality clothes in the UK are better quality than in the USA ...

 ???
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on February 03, 2014, 09:32:55 AM
Obviously even inexpensive quality clothes in the UK are better quality than in the USA,  as I've never encountered any of those problems, or heard from friends of any such incidents, or read about it in any tabloid newspapers who just love that sort of thing.

And the only colour run I've ever had was from a pair of red leather shoes, which were no longer new, when my feet got soaked one day.  Not at all surprised.

Wut?

I've lived in the good ol' US of A my entire life, I've never washed clothes before wearing them and I've never had any issues either. Might want to watch those sweeping statements.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on February 03, 2014, 09:36:55 AM
I never wash my pasta either and never had it stick together. I just immediately mix it up with whatever sauce I'm adding, even if that "sauce" is just olive oil, garlic & parmesan cheese.

My mother always served the pasta & sauce separately and to keep it from sticking she'd toss it with some butter. When I started cooking for myself I thought that whole process could be abbreviated by just tossing with the sauce in the first place, thus not only eliminating the need for the butter but also the need for an extra serving bowl.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 03, 2014, 09:40:45 AM
^Exactly what I do. I hate mushy pasta.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on February 03, 2014, 09:42:10 AM
Obviously even inexpensive quality clothes in the UK are better quality than in the USA,  as I've never encountered any of those problems, or heard from friends of any such incidents, or read about it in any tabloid newspapers who just love that sort of thing.

And the only colour run I've ever had was from a pair of red leather shoes, which were no longer new, when my feet got soaked one day.  Not at all surprised.

Wut?

I've lived in the good ol' US of A my entire life, I've never washed clothes before wearing them and I've never had any issues either. Might want to watch those sweeping statements.

I never wash new clothes either (I also live in the states), I like the new clothes smell. I do wash sheets/bedding before use it though. Usually because it doesn't feel soft enough to me fresh out of the package. Does still have that nice "new" smell though.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 03, 2014, 09:58:44 AM


There was an Law & Order:SVU episode where a someone died because the clothes they were wearing had been recycled from a funeral home and they were soaked in embalming fluid.

I remember reading in a book, something about medical mysteries, a case where jeans for boys were purchased at a salvage auction, and all that wore them, got very ill, aside from one. The reason they were salvaged, was during shipment, a drum of some liquid had spilled on them, so they were ruined, and sold for cheap. turns out it was some nasty pesticide, and the one boy who didn't get sick, his mom had washed them first before he wore them.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Two Ravens on February 03, 2014, 10:02:09 AM


There was an Law & Order:SVU episode where a someone died because the clothes they were wearing had been recycled from a funeral home and they were soaked in embalming fluid.

I remember reading in a book, something about medical mysteries, a case where jeans for boys were purchased at a salvage auction, and all that wore them, got very ill, aside from one. The reason they were salvaged, was during shipment, a drum of some liquid had spilled on them, so they were ruined, and sold for cheap. turns out it was some nasty pesticide, and the one boy who didn't get sick, his mom had washed them first before he wore them.

This was also an episode of House, IIRC.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on February 03, 2014, 10:02:45 AM
I never wash my pasta either and never had it stick together. I just immediately mix it up with whatever sauce I'm adding, even if that "sauce" is just olive oil, garlic & parmesan cheese.

My mother always served the pasta & sauce separately and to keep it from sticking she'd toss it with some butter. When I started cooking for myself I thought that whole process could be abbreviated by just tossing with the sauce in the first place, thus not only eliminating the need for the butter but also the need for an extra serving bowl.

I do that too, when I make pasta. My husband, on the other hand, gets really annoyed when I mix it all up together if there is going to be any pasta left over. He says that the noodles suck up all the sauce while sitting in the fridge, and that they aren't as good after being in there for awhile. So when he makes pasta for himself (usually several days worth all at once), he keeps the noodles separate from the sauce and I guess just lets them stick together in one giant clump.

He also thinks my legitimately-al-dente pasta (when I cook it) is undercooked, though, so I'm not sure he gets to be an authority on this subject. He usually cooks pasta to the point of mushiness unless I intervene.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Seraphia on February 03, 2014, 10:04:23 AM


There was an Law & Order:SVU episode where a someone died because the clothes they were wearing had been recycled from a funeral home and they were soaked in embalming fluid.

I remember reading in a book, something about medical mysteries, a case where jeans for boys were purchased at a salvage auction, and all that wore them, got very ill, aside from one. The reason they were salvaged, was during shipment, a drum of some liquid had spilled on them, so they were ruined, and sold for cheap. turns out it was some nasty pesticide, and the one boy who didn't get sick, his mom had washed them first before he wore them.

This was also an episode of House, IIRC.

Yep! The only episode of House I've ever seen in its entirety was one where the mystery illness was from pesticide-soaked jeans sold off the back of a truck.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: rose red on February 03, 2014, 10:17:09 AM
The clothes soaked in embalming fluid is a really (really!) old urban legend about a girl who can't afford a prom dress and happened upon a dead girl in a coffin wearing a beautiful dress.  She guiltily borrowed the dress and well, you know what happened during prom.  I love that story.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on February 03, 2014, 10:33:32 AM
The clothes soaked in embalming fluid is a really (really!) old urban legend about a girl who can't afford a prom dress and happened upon a dead girl in a coffin wearing a beautiful dress.  She guiltily borrowed the dress and well, you know what happened during prom.  I love that story.

I remember that being in one of those "Scary Stories" books I had as a kid. It was one of my favorite ones. That and the one with the mother and daughter in another country and the mother dies but the hotel staff tries to convince the daughter her mom never came with her.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Thipu1 on February 03, 2014, 10:37:37 AM


There was an Law & Order:SVU episode where a someone died because the clothes they were wearing had been recycled from a funeral home and they were soaked in embalming fluid.

I remember reading in a book, something about medical mysteries, a case where jeans for boys were purchased at a salvage auction, and all that wore them, got very ill, aside from one. The reason they were salvaged, was during shipment, a drum of some liquid had spilled on them, so they were ruined, and sold for cheap. turns out it was some nasty pesticide, and the one boy who didn't get
sick, his mom had washed them first before he wore them.

The book was either volume one or volume two of 'The Medical Detectives'.  These were articles that appeared in the New Yorker magazine between the late 1940s and early 1960s.  Although the medical science involved is way out of date, the stories still make a great read. 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: VorFemme on February 03, 2014, 11:42:29 AM
Someone said
"I have worn new clothes without washing first"

it would never occur to me that new clothes need to be/should be washed before you wear them? 

To borrow a well known Ehell phrase "Why would I want to do that?"



There are fabric finishes from the factory that involve various chemicals - depending on your particular sensitivities - washing them might be required for comfort (makes some people itchy) - other people want the psychological comfort of knowing that the clothes really are CLEAN before they wear them (not just try them on).

And I remember a real case where someone had a drug trip for years because their clothing & suitcase got soaked in some kind of drug concentrate, it dried, and they wore it....and their skin absorbed it.  What I don't remember was if they had any choice in wearing the clothes as they came out of the suit case - hotels forty years ago did not have free guest laundry facilities and dry cleaning takes time & money - if they had a meeting to go to, they may have had to get dressed & GO to it.

And not all chemicals would have left an obvious stain or odor...the only reason it was noticed is that things were slightly damp but dried out overnight....and I remember reading the story in the Readers' Digest - I just don't remember when.  Other than over twenty and probably over thirty years ago.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: MommyPenguin on February 03, 2014, 12:15:27 PM
My husband insists that his clothes and those of the kids be washed before they are worn, because of the possibility of getting a rash from chemicals used to clean them, or the dyes, or something.  His concern with the kids is that if the new clothes made them itchy or gave them a rash, they might not be able to figure out/articulate what is wrong, and so they might be exposed longer (whereas an adult might realize what was going on and take the new socks off).  I personally don't care and have never had a reaction, so I wear my clothes new.  I don't think a reaction is likely, but I don't mind humoring him.  Like somebody else mentioned, I like getting to wear the item when it's perfect, especially as a lot of sweaters don't look quite as nice once they've been washed once.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: TootsNYC on February 03, 2014, 12:16:44 PM
I'll wash undies and socks immediately.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: cicero on February 03, 2014, 12:29:30 PM
Someone said
"I have worn new clothes without washing first"

it would never occur to me that new clothes need to be/should be washed before you wear them? 

To borrow a well known Ehell phrase "Why would I want to do that?"
I do. I never heard about the chemicals and other stuff, but it just squicks me out that someone /someones tried on the clothing - i dunno if those people have some rash or something that may be contagious. I know it's a real long shot, but it is one of hose things that creep me out.

(I guess my not washing fruit that i mentioned a few days ago, cancels out the craziness of my washing new clothing before i wear them)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 03, 2014, 12:58:10 PM
I wash new clothes because I have reacted to them in the past.  And my Dad had a really bad reaction with a new shirt and his deodorant.

I've also had the dye issue and with a fondness for red, I don't like looking like a lobster.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Editeer on February 03, 2014, 01:11:37 PM
Obviously even inexpensive quality clothes in the UK are better quality than in the USA,  as I've never encountered any of those problems, or heard from friends of any such incidents, or read about it in any tabloid newspapers who just love that sort of thing.


I can see the headline now--"Man Wears New Clothes Without Washing--Turns Red in Armpits!"

I wash most (not all) new clothes because often the sizing or finishing on the fabric is stiff and a little irritating to my skin. Also, if the clothes need hemming, I want any shrinkage to happen before I hem them. It's not because I'm squicked by the idea of someone else having tried them on.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: bonyk on February 03, 2014, 01:48:05 PM
On the news awhile back, there was a story about warehouses where they store new clothes being invested with vermin. They were leaving little presents in the clothes.  I still don't wash mine, but I do wash DD's.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on February 03, 2014, 01:51:51 PM
Even without being squicked by others having tried clothing on, or being sensitive to residual chemicals that are a normal part of clothing manufacture/shipping, it's very possible for things I don't much want contact with to linger on clothing I buy because other people have tried it on. Deodorant, for example, or perfume.

I might not be squicked out by the idea of other people wearing clothes I'm wearing, but that still doesn't mean I want their deodorant on me or that I want to smell like Eau de Someone Else.

I generally don't wash clothes before I wear them because I'm lazy, but I would wash anything that was visibly less than pristine.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: alkira6 on February 03, 2014, 01:55:39 PM
I wash all clothes before wearing them after getting a painful rash on the inner thighs from a pair of slacks.

I don't measure when making bread most of the time.  I throw everything together until it looks right.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 03, 2014, 02:08:59 PM


There was an Law & Order:SVU episode where a someone died because the clothes they were wearing had been recycled from a funeral home and they were soaked in embalming fluid.

I remember reading in a book, something about medical mysteries, a case where jeans for boys were purchased at a salvage auction, and all that wore them, got very ill, aside from one. The reason they were salvaged, was during shipment, a drum of some liquid had spilled on them, so they were ruined, and sold for cheap. turns out it was some nasty pesticide, and the one boy who didn't get
sick, his mom had washed them first before he wore them.

The book was either volume one or volume two of 'The Medical Detectives'.  These were articles that appeared in the New Yorker magazine between the late 1940s and early 1960s.  Although the medical science involved is way out of date, the stories still make a great read.

Yup. those are them! I got rid of mine last year in my great book purge.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Cherry91 on February 03, 2014, 02:27:28 PM
It's mainly because I'm lazy, but the sheer amount of clothes I've tumbled dried countless times before discovering the part of the label that says "DON'T!"

And I've got to admit, if it's survived the drier up until that point, it's likely it'll be seeing the inside of a drier again in time.

(I'm a lot more careful with other people's clothes than my own, I do want to point out)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Mel the Redcap on February 03, 2014, 02:38:34 PM
Someone said
"I have worn new clothes without washing first"

it would never occur to me that new clothes need to be/should be washed before you wear them? 

To borrow a well known Ehell phrase "Why would I want to do that?"



There are fabric finishes from the factory that involve various chemicals - depending on your particular sensitivities - washing them might be required for comfort (makes some people itchy) - other people want the psychological comfort of knowing that the clothes really are CLEAN before they wear them (not just try them on).

And I remember a real case where someone had a drug trip for years because their clothing & suitcase got soaked in some kind of drug concentrate, it dried, and they wore it....and their skin absorbed it.  What I don't remember was if they had any choice in wearing the clothes as they came out of the suit case - hotels forty years ago did not have free guest laundry facilities and dry cleaning takes time & money - if they had a meeting to go to, they may have had to get dressed & GO to it.

And not all chemicals would have left an obvious stain or odor...the only reason it was noticed is that things were slightly damp but dried out overnight....and I remember reading the story in the Readers' Digest - I just don't remember when.  Other than over twenty and probably over thirty years ago.

I remember that one, VorFemme! It was PCP, wasn't it? And he nearly got committed for mental problems and/or arrested for drug use. It kept coming back because it wouldn't come out with normal washing.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: TootsNYC on February 03, 2014, 02:50:23 PM
Obviously even inexpensive quality clothes in the UK are better quality than in the USA,  as I've never encountered any of those problems, or heard from friends of any such incidents, or read about it in any tabloid newspapers who just love that sort of thing.


I can see the headline now--"Man Wears New Clothes Without Washing--Turns Red in Armpits!"


God, I love The Onion!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: daen on February 03, 2014, 02:54:09 PM
I rinse my hair daily, but only use shampoo once a week, and I don't bother with conditioner. I can get away with this because my hair is short; when it was long, I had to condition the ends.

I think, though, that my scalp was oilier when I was a teen and young adult. I recall that after 36 hours my hair looked quite oily, back in high school. And when I went backpacking in Europe, I planned ahead by gradually extending my wash time from 24 hours to 36 to 48. That way, I wouldn't have to wash my hair every day - a good thing if the hostel I was staying that night only had coin-op hot water in the showers.  I took about six weeks to get to the two-days-between-washings point, and the transition gave me some definite bad hair days.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Wordgeek on February 03, 2014, 04:13:31 PM
Obviously even inexpensive quality clothes in the UK are better quality than in the USA,  as I've never encountered any of those problems, or heard from friends of any such incidents, or read about it in any tabloid newspapers who just love that sort of thing.

And the only colour run I've ever had was from a pair of red leather shoes, which were no longer new, when my feet got soaked one day.  Not at all surprised.

Obviously, laceandbits is taking a break from the forum.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Lynn2000 on February 03, 2014, 04:45:44 PM
I also wash new clothes, sheets, etc. before use, but my mom doesn't--she likes the "new" feeling. Eh, to each their own. I use a scent- and dye-free detergent in the washer, but I don't use anything in the dryer--I don't even really understand the concept of dryer sheets. I rarely have problems with static electricity--only with one skirt which might be wool or wool blend, and then only on very dry days. And, I don't like the smell of fabric softener/dryer sheets, or the way it makes my towels feel funny and absorb less. My dad (who does the laundry at my parents' house) says authoritatively, "It makes your clothes softer!" and I'm like, "Well, my clothes don't really feel... hard, so..."  ???

A little while ago, for a treat, I bought myself some super-luxurious washcloths. They are 820 grams. I don't really care for them. They absorb a lot of water (and become quite heavy!) but I'm not sure why that's considered a plus--maybe if they were towels, super water absorption powers would make sense, but I get a washcloth wet on purpose, to wash my face with. And they're not particularly soft, either.

One that amazed me was that my friend Amy just pureed regular food to feed her two kids. She did introduce new foods carefully, because they have food allergies in her family, but otherwise it was just what she and her DH were having for dinner, but put in the blender. And it wasn't complex recipes with special supplements or anything like that. I kept looking at the aisles and aisles of commercial baby food going, "Isn't there... stuff in the commercial food that babies need? That's not in regular food? Like... baby vitamins?" and she said no. Obviously for some people the commercial food is fine and more convenient, but she found it worth her while to puree regular food and use that instead.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: gramma dishes on February 03, 2014, 05:06:42 PM

...Obviously for some people the commercial food is fine and more convenient, but she found it worth her while to puree regular food and use that instead.

Commercial baby food has changed a LOT since my kids were babies. It's actually much better now.  Purer with far fewer "filler" material. 

But mothers have a variety of reasons to make their own.  My youngest one did and among her reasons were:  it's cheaper -- by FAR, and if you puree it right after cooking it, it's already warm!   :)

She stored leftovers in little clear colored Tupperware shot glasses.  Just the right size for a baby just beginning to eat solid foods and could be reheated super fast.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 03, 2014, 06:01:20 PM
A friend of mine put her pureed food in ice cube trays and as soon as it was frozen, popped them out into a ziplock for storage.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: squeakers on February 03, 2014, 06:17:52 PM
I fed my first boy baby food.  #2 and 3 just ate regular food. Tiny bits off my finger or letting them suck on a piece of meat that I held firmly.  They were breastfed so really it was more for experimenting with flavor and texture until their teeth came in. And then they ate tiny bits of whatever we were eating.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Tea Drinker on February 03, 2014, 08:33:19 PM
i don't bother washing new clothes, but if something smelled even vaguely of someone else's deodorant or such, i wouldn't buy it. (if i can't smell any residual deodorant, i'll assume that the people around me won't either.) but mostly it seems harmless; the one exception i can think of is a dress i bought for a friend's wedding, which has patterns of glitter on the fabric. it's labeled as dry clean only, but the cleaner warned me that actually cleaning it would mean losing some of the glitter, so suggested i try hanging it to air out. that worked (i haven't worn it much, because i don't have much practical use for a dress that style, pretty though it is--another couple of wearings and i probably will test that theory.)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on February 03, 2014, 09:25:50 PM
We're planning on doing a mixture of both baby food and puréed food, more emphasis on the puréed food than the commercial stuff. DH wants to get this.

http://www.bigw.com.au/baby-kids/feeding/bottle-feeding/bpnBIGW_0000000331925/breville-baby-banquet

But this is more about DH and me, we have very little preprepared food. So why should our baby?
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Library Dragon on February 03, 2014, 09:39:09 PM
A friend of mine put her pureed food in ice cube trays and as soon as it was frozen, popped them out into a ziplock for storage.

I used to do this. Freaked MIL out when I was out of baby food on a visit and blended up a can of salt free carrots.  Okay, maybe just surprised her. She'd already been freaked out by that I breast fed, used cloth diapers, and we had a family bed philosophy. 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: CakeEater on February 03, 2014, 11:25:30 PM
Well, the prevailing advice here is that commercial baby food isn't nearly as good as making your own. Both have their place, I think. There was nothing so convenient as opening a jar of something while we were out. It keeps at room temp until you open it, it comes in little servings, you can just throw out the bottle afterwards instead of carrying a plastic container home and remembering to dig it out of the bag and wash it.

Real food is better for them and tastes better, I think. And the flavours are flavours that your family eats, so bub gets used to them.

Re: defrosting. Where are you supposed to defrost if not on the counter? In the fridge? That would take days, wouldn't it? I often have no idea what we're eating for dinner until I'm ready to start cooking, at which point I defrost in the microwave, but the counter works fine for me.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Psychopoesie on February 04, 2014, 12:43:49 AM
About defrosting - I use the fridge and it doesn't take forever. With something big like a whole chook or a leg of lamb, I'd take it out of the freezer and put it into the fridge on Friday night if I was cooking it for Sunday lunch. For smaller things, like chops, I do it the night before, sometimes even the morning before, if it's for the evening meal.

If I'm in a hurry or forgot to take something I needed out of the freezer, I tend to use the defrost setting on the microwave. Not ideal but it works.

For stuff against prevailing advice:

I'm with those who don't prewash clothes or bed linen. Only exceptions have been dark jeans that looked like they'd stain my skin if I didn't wash them first.

I leave my bed unmade unless I have visitors or if I'm visiting someone else's house.

I don't tend to wash fruit and veg.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: cicero on February 04, 2014, 02:33:31 AM


One that amazed me was that my friend Amy just pureed regular food to feed her two kids. She did introduce new foods carefully, because they have food allergies in her family, but otherwise it was just what she and her DH were having for dinner, but put in the blender. And it wasn't complex recipes with special supplements or anything like that. I kept looking at the aisles and aisles of commercial baby food going, "Isn't there... stuff in the commercial food that babies need? That's not in regular food? Like... baby vitamins?" and she said no. Obviously for some people the commercial food is fine and more convenient, but she found it worth her while to puree regular food and use that instead.
that's what i did! i never really thought about - just assumed that everyone did the same thing. DS nursed for about 5-6 months, and then we started to feed him. we used to make "soup" - lots of veggies and turkey - and puree it, or just feed him off our plates. I bought a few jars of baby food here and there to have if we were leaving the house or something. plus, i love the pureed fruit ;)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: menley on February 04, 2014, 05:02:33 AM
<snip>
Re: defrosting. Where are you supposed to defrost if not on the counter? In the fridge? That would take days, wouldn't it? I often have no idea what we're eating for dinner until I'm ready to start cooking, at which point I defrost in the microwave, but the counter works fine for me.

The three "recognized" ways are:
- in the fridge
- in a large bowl of cold water
- in the microwave

The first two are considered the safest; the third is still considered safe, although you're supposed to be careful with your settings and length of time so that you don't partially cook the meat.

The reason that it's not safe to thaw on the counter is that some parts of it thaw faster than others (generally the outside edges before the center) and the room temperature environment is perfect for massive bacterial growth. By thawing in the fridge or in cold water, you're making it thaw more uniformly and keeping the temperature out of the range for high bacteria growth. By thawing in the microwave, you're taking very little time (generally only a few minutes, versus several hours on the counter) so you're reducing the amount of time that the bacteria could grow.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: CakeEater on February 04, 2014, 05:34:18 AM
And how does cooking well kill the bacteria?
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Yvaine on February 04, 2014, 05:40:12 AM
And how does cooking well kill the bacteria?

The way a food service class explained it once so it finally made sense to me is, some bacteria produce toxins that stick around even if you've killed the bacteria itself. Botulism is an example, I think. So you kill all the botulism bacteria with heat, but if you let them grow too long in the first place, they've produced a toxin that's still hanging around in the food. It's not always the actual living organism that makes you sick.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: menley on February 04, 2014, 06:46:47 AM
This blog explains it pretty well (especially the top comment): http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/12992/why-is-it-dangerous-to-eat-meat-which-has-been-left-out-and-then-cooked (http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/12992/why-is-it-dangerous-to-eat-meat-which-has-been-left-out-and-then-cooked)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: o_gal on February 04, 2014, 07:26:32 AM
For smaller cuts of meat, like chicken legs, steaks, chops - use hot water: http://www.splendidtable.org/story/thaw-your-steaks-quickly-and-safely-in-100-degree-water and http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/dining/a-hot-water-bath-for-thawing-meats-the-curious-cook.html?_r=0

I've been doing that for years and was glad to finally see it verified as safe.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: VorFemme on February 04, 2014, 07:42:30 AM
Obviously even inexpensive quality clothes in the UK are better quality than in the USA,  as I've never encountered any of those problems, or heard from friends of any such incidents, or read about it in any tabloid newspapers who just love that sort of thing.


I can see the headline now--"Man Wears New Clothes Without Washing--Turns Red in Armpits!"

I wash most (not all) new clothes because often the sizing or finishing on the fabric is stiff and a little irritating to my skin. Also, if the clothes need hemming, I want any shrinkage to happen before I hem them. It's not because I'm squicked by the idea of someone else having tried them on.

What is really bad is when the dye is black...or green...green can actually look stranger.

Ambrosia Hino (DD) is sensitive to dyes & scents - Paternal Grandma used to insist on her wearing outfits while they were NEW so they looked "perfect" and would not wash fabric if she sewed something because Grandma liked the "crisp" feel of the fabric. 

One of the chemicals used in treating some fabrics is formaldehyde.  But other chemicals can cause issues with someone who is sensitive to chemicals in general, not just dyes, perfumes, and fabric finishes.

This is one of those situations where an individual's preferences may supercede other considerations - unless they are medical in nature.

I don't MIND buying used clothes from a thrift store - but I tend to have them cleaned before wearing them (washed & dried - I rarely buy dry clean only clothes that HAVE to be dry cleaned). 

Although I have one lovely glittery evening outfit that will be much less glittery if it ever gets washed in the sink.  I know this because the skirt is already less glittery from where I sat on it while eating dinner & driving (I can see the missing glitter in my car to this day).....
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on February 04, 2014, 07:46:00 AM
I made my own baby food when my kids were babies. It was pretty easy. Just bought veggies, boiled them and then puréed them in the food processor. Froze them in ice cube trays as mentioned above. Yes, it was way cheaper, plus everything was fresh and there was nothing added that I didn't add.

There's a lot to be said for convenience so I can see using jarred baby food but I like to cook so boiling some squash or carrots or whatever while I was already in the kitchen making dinner wasn't much extra trouble.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: VorFemme on February 04, 2014, 07:47:24 AM
Someone said
"I have worn new clothes without washing first"

it would never occur to me that new clothes need to be/should be washed before you wear them? 

To borrow a well known Ehell phrase "Why would I want to do that?"



There are fabric finishes from the factory that involve various chemicals - depending on your particular sensitivities - washing them might be required for comfort (makes some people itchy) - other people want the psychological comfort of knowing that the clothes really are CLEAN before they wear them (not just try them on).

And I remember a real case where someone had a drug trip for years because their clothing & suitcase got soaked in some kind of drug concentrate, it dried, and they wore it....and their skin absorbed it.  What I don't remember was if they had any choice in wearing the clothes as they came out of the suit case - hotels forty years ago did not have free guest laundry facilities and dry cleaning takes time & money - if they had a meeting to go to, they may have had to get dressed & GO to it.

And not all chemicals would have left an obvious stain or odor...the only reason it was noticed is that things were slightly damp but dried out overnight....and I remember reading the story in the Readers' Digest - I just don't remember when.  Other than over twenty and probably over thirty years ago.

I remember that one, VorFemme! It was PCP, wasn't it? And he nearly got committed for mental problems and/or arrested for drug use. It kept coming back because it wouldn't come out with normal washing.

I seem remember that he had been a pilot & lost his job & pilot's license due to the hallucinations that he was getting.  I think that he was also a reservist in the military and was going to be court martialed for drug use because nobody had ever heard of someone getting drugged through absorption through the skin from something spilled on their clothing....I don't remember if he had been the pilot on the trip where the stuff spilled on his clothing or if he was a passenger at the time.

I sometimes wonder if drug patches in common use NOW stem from research after that incident by someone who wondered if it would work for controlling dosage of other drugs....or was it just coincidence & nothing to do with some researcher reading about the case?
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 04, 2014, 10:01:09 AM
On the fabric softener subject, I use fabric softener on towels, sheets and blankets because we have hard water and it makes them feel like cardboard without it. My in-laws use powdered detergent and no fabric softener and it hurts to use their towels. We take our own if going over there for some reason.

I never use fabric softener on clothing, since most of DH and DS's clothing and some of mine are tech fabrics and the wicking fabric has to breathe in order to work properly. Fabric softener clogs the pores of the fabric.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Lynn2000 on February 04, 2014, 10:07:08 AM
One that amazed me was that my friend Amy just pureed regular food to feed her two kids. She did introduce new foods carefully, because they have food allergies in her family, but otherwise it was just what she and her DH were having for dinner, but put in the blender. And it wasn't complex recipes with special supplements or anything like that. I kept looking at the aisles and aisles of commercial baby food going, "Isn't there... stuff in the commercial food that babies need? That's not in regular food? Like... baby vitamins?" and she said no. Obviously for some people the commercial food is fine and more convenient, but she found it worth her while to puree regular food and use that instead.
that's what i did! i never really thought about - just assumed that everyone did the same thing. DS nursed for about 5-6 months, and then we started to feed him. we used to make "soup" - lots of veggies and turkey - and puree it, or just feed him off our plates. I bought a few jars of baby food here and there to have if we were leaving the house or something. plus, i love the pureed fruit ;)

Yeah, for me, since I don't have kids or think about kids much, my only exposure to baby food was seeing all the different kinds available at the store, and occasionally glimpsing books that claimed to teach you how to make your own. I guess looking back it's more about marketing to different audiences and lifestyles, but at the time I assumed it was because commercial baby food is "best" inherently, and that if you're going to take on the Herculean task of making it yourself, you're gonna need a lot of instructions! I honestly never thought about it being just... pureed regular food. Like what people fed babies a hundred years ago.

Not that I think it's a racket or anything, the convenience is very appealing to some people, and probably also the variety--for example, my mom hates most vegetables, but she always fed me lots of baby food squash, lima beans, carrots, etc. because that was healthier for me as a baby. But I can see where she wouldn't have wanted to buy a lot of squash or lima beans fresh, just to puree a little for me, because the rest would've gone to waste.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on February 04, 2014, 10:22:38 AM
One of the things that I think is pretty nifty are baby food pouches. My brother and SIL have been feeding those to their kids for awhile, although they do severely taper them off as the kids get older. They're basically pureed fruits/vegetables in a plastic pouch that has a spout thing you can suck on, or that the puree can be squeezed out of. So when the kids were little, they'd sometimes squeeze a bit of the pouch out and use a spoon for feeding, but eventually just started handing the pouch to the kids to suck the food out of directly.

It's kind of a neat concept, since they're much easier to travel with than little jars, and because they're sort of a self-limiting thing. My brother and SIL determined that once the child was old enough to eat out of the pouch efficiently they no longer needed to be eating from them at all on a regular basis. So my niece (who is 3) will suck the puree out really quickly and even use her hands to flatten the pouch and get as much of it as possible. Thus, she only gets those for like emergency we-are-on-a-plane food, but otherwise is expected to eat more or less adult food. Plus, she can totally handle not-very-cut-up raw fruit and vegetables at this point, so she really doesn't need to be eating them in pureed form.

My nephew (who is 1) is way less coordinated, and takes way longer to finish one, because he only sort of grasps the concept. They still don't give him the pouches when they can make him other food (because they cost more than just cutting up adult food or bananas or making him peanut butter sandwiches), but he does eat them more regularly when they're out and about or just need to give him something quick.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: dawbs on February 04, 2014, 10:28:28 AM
One of the things that I think is pretty nifty are baby food pouches. My brother and SIL have been feeding those to their kids for awhile, although they do severely taper them off as the kids get older. They're basically pureed fruits/vegetables in a plastic pouch that has a spout thing you can suck on, or that the puree can be squeezed out of. So when the kids were little, they'd sometimes squeeze a bit of the pouch out and use a spoon for feeding, but eventually just started handing the pouch to the kids to suck the food out of directly.
*snip*

YOu can also buy refillable pouches.
I don't use them all the time (because the whole POINT, to me, of the pouches is something shelf-stable that's stashed in the bottom of the bag as 'emergency food'), but for road trips and the like, it's still very useful.  (applesauce or yogurt in these:  http://squishysnakpak.com/home .  The bottom is ziploc like.  We haven't had her open the bottom--yet :) )

Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 04, 2014, 10:37:32 AM
. I use a scent- and dye-free detergent in the washer, but I don't use anything in the dryer--I don't even really understand the concept of dryer sheets. I rarely have problems with static electricity--only with one skirt which might be wool or wool blend, and then only on very dry days. And, I don't like the smell of fabric softener/dryer sheets, or the way it makes my towels feel funny and absorb less. 

A little while ago, for a treat, I bought myself some super-luxurious washcloths. They are 820 grams. I don't really care for them.   

I'm the same way! I use that type of detergent and even the unscented dryer sheets leave some odor that I can detect. The smell really bothers me. I prefer just the smell of clean on my clothes.

I only use washcloths for my face, so I buy the cheap, thin ones you can buy in packs of 5-10. I use them, wash them, and chuck them when they get threadbare. SOme of the nicer ones are also too thick for me to wring out properly too, which is why I prefer the thinner "cheaper" variety.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: lowspark on February 04, 2014, 10:43:24 AM
I quit using dryer sheets a few years ago. I didn't notice any difference without them. I do have things cling, oh, once in about 50 washes, but not enough that I feel I need sheets anymore.

Back when I did use them, I would use a sheet 2-3 times before throwing it away. I think that's what convinced me to quit using them altogether. Regardless of how many times I'd use a sheet, the results were the same.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: mbbored on February 04, 2014, 10:50:12 AM
On the fabric softener subject, I use fabric softener on towels, sheets and blankets because we have hard water and it makes them feel like cardboard without it. My in-laws use powdered detergent and no fabric softener and it hurts to use their towels. We take our own if going over there for some reason.

I never use fabric softener on clothing, since most of DH and DS's clothing and some of mine are tech fabrics and the wicking fabric has to breathe in order to work properly. Fabric softener clogs the pores of the fabric.

Interesting. I have incredibly hard water and never use fabric softener, but my towels are fine. However, I use either homemade detergent or an all natural one that's designed to completely dissolve and wash off. I read that most commercial detergents call for using more than you really need and leave residues that build up, which leaves towels stiff.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 04, 2014, 10:58:32 AM
They use Tide powdered that comes in a giant box and takes over 6 months for them to use. I wonder if they use too much or it is just the formulation. I would have never believed a fluffy towel washed 100 times in detergent would end up as sandpaper/cardboard. They don't absorb water at all, so don't work well for that whole drying purpose.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Harriet Jones on February 04, 2014, 11:02:24 AM
Maybe if they used white vinegar in the rinse cycle it would help. 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: magicdomino on February 04, 2014, 11:22:14 AM
I quit using dryer sheets a few years ago. I didn't notice any difference without them. I do have things cling, oh, once in about 50 washes, but not enough that I feel I need sheets anymore.

Back when I did use them, I would use a sheet 2-3 times before throwing it away. I think that's what convinced me to quit using them altogether. Regardless of how many times I'd use a sheet, the results were the same.

Interesting. Some kinds of my clothing -- mostly the synthetic fabrics -- can get some static even in humid summers so I use a dryer sheet cut in half in those loads.  Towels and sheets don't get fabric softener of any kind.  The towels usually aren't too bad, but at this time of year the sheets can get pretty electrified.  Making the bed is loads of fun when you have a wrought iron bed and are putting out sparks like tinfoil in a microwave.   :)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: MommyPenguin on February 04, 2014, 11:58:19 AM
For smaller cuts of meat, like chicken legs, steaks, chops - use hot water: http://www.splendidtable.org/story/thaw-your-steaks-quickly-and-safely-in-100-degree-water and http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/dining/a-hot-water-bath-for-thawing-meats-the-curious-cook.html?_r=0

I've been doing that for years and was glad to finally see it verified as safe.

I do this as well.  In my case, I keep changing the hot water every time it cools down (usually several times in the first few minutes, then just a few additional times).  It thaws still really quickly, which is great when you aren't so good at remembering to plan ahead, like me.  Even the cold water bath or sitting the food out on the counter doesn't do much when it's already 4pm.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Ms_Cellany on February 04, 2014, 12:05:59 PM
For smaller cuts of meat, like chicken legs, steaks, chops - use hot water: http://www.splendidtable.org/story/thaw-your-steaks-quickly-and-safely-in-100-degree-water and http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/dining/a-hot-water-bath-for-thawing-meats-the-curious-cook.html?_r=0

I've been doing that for years and was glad to finally see it verified as safe.

I do this as well.  In my case, I keep changing the hot water every time it cools down (usually several times in the first few minutes, then just a few additional times).  It thaws still really quickly, which is great when you aren't so good at remembering to plan ahead, like me.  Even the cold water bath or sitting the food out on the counter doesn't do much when it's already 4pm.

I put the (bagged) frozen item in a mixing bowl or large tupperware, fill with hot water, and put under a faucet just trickling hot water.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: alkira6 on February 04, 2014, 02:00:23 PM
One of the things that I think is pretty nifty are baby food pouches. My brother and SIL have been feeding those to their kids for awhile, although they do severely taper them off as the kids get older. They're basically pureed fruits/vegetables in a plastic pouch that has a spout thing you can suck on, or that the puree can be squeezed out of. So when the kids were little, they'd sometimes squeeze a bit of the pouch out and use a spoon for feeding, but eventually just started handing the pouch to the kids to suck the food out of directly.
*snip*

YOu can also buy refillable pouches.
I don't use them all the time (because the whole POINT, to me, of the pouches is something shelf-stable that's stashed in the bottom of the bag as 'emergency food'), but for road trips and the like, it's still very useful.  (applesauce or yogurt in these:  http://squishysnakpak.com/home .  The bottom is ziploc like.  We haven't had her open the bottom--yet :) )


I actually buy the fruit purees for myself in the pouch.  Very convenient and with coupons the baby food pouches are cheaper that the grownup versions and come in more flavor combinations.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Ceallach on February 04, 2014, 07:39:08 PM
One that amazed me was that my friend Amy just pureed regular food to feed her two kids. She did introduce new foods carefully, because they have food allergies in her family, but otherwise it was just what she and her DH were having for dinner, but put in the blender. And it wasn't complex recipes with special supplements or anything like that. I kept looking at the aisles and aisles of commercial baby food going, "Isn't there... stuff in the commercial food that babies need? That's not in regular food? Like... baby vitamins?" and she said no. Obviously for some people the commercial food is fine and more convenient, but she found it worth her while to puree regular food and use that instead.

I didn't even bother puree'ing it most of the time, I just let the kid suck on it or mushed it with a fork before feeding it to him.   But since he was 6 months old (and started grabbing) he has just eaten exactly what we eat, and still does.  I don't have time to prepare a kids meal and an adults meal, I can barely manage one!

Store baby food is really just convenience food like anything else.  I used shop bought baby food because I'm time poor, not for any other reason.  It's very pure here, not even preservatives etc in it.   Just veges/fruit maybe some pasta or meat.    But supposedly making your own is still better because it's fresher.    The "prevailing advice" is actually to make your own baby food.  (Here at least, it may differ elsewhere). 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: mbbored on February 05, 2014, 02:32:44 PM
They use Tide powdered that comes in a giant box and takes over 6 months for them to use. I wonder if they use too much or it is just the formulation. I would have never believed a fluffy towel washed 100 times in detergent would end up as sandpaper/cardboard. They don't absorb water at all, so don't work well for that whole drying purpose.

It's probably a mixture of both. When I switched from commercial products (All Free & Clear), I read to try washing your towels without adding detergent a few times. There was so much detergent built up on my towels, it took 5 loads before the water stopped getting soapy.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Marga on February 05, 2014, 06:59:06 PM


There was an Law & Order:SVU episode where a someone died because the clothes they were wearing had been recycled from a funeral home and they were soaked in embalming fluid.

I remember reading in a book, something about medical mysteries, a case where jeans for boys were purchased at a salvage auction, and all that wore them, got very ill, aside from one. The reason they were salvaged, was during shipment, a drum of some liquid had spilled on them, so they were ruined, and sold for cheap. turns out it was some nasty pesticide, and the one boy who didn't get sick, his mom had washed them first before he wore them.

This was also an episode of House, IIRC.
There was an episode in Strong Medicine, but they were women's jeans.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Marga on February 05, 2014, 07:14:22 PM
I also wash new clothes, sheets, etc. before use, but my mom doesn't--she likes the "new" feeling. Eh, to each their own.

I always wash new clothes before I wear them, because I don't like the feel and smell of them otherwise. This used to be much worse in the (far, far) past, when they positively reeked, but the habit has remained.

One that amazed me was that my friend Amy just pureed regular food to feed her two kids. She did introduce new foods carefully, because they have food allergies in her family, but otherwise it was just what she and her DH were having for dinner, but put in the blender. And it wasn't complex recipes with special supplements or anything like that. I kept looking at the aisles and aisles of commercial baby food going, "Isn't there... stuff in the commercial food that babies need? That's not in regular food? Like... baby vitamins?" and she said no. Obviously for some people the commercial food is fine and more convenient, but she found it worth her while to puree regular food and use that instead.

I never bought any baby food for my kids and my daughter never did for hers either. It's just as easy to feed them what you're eating anyway, and way cheaper. Plus you know exactly what's in it. And you're friend is right: commercial baby food is not about what's better for the baby, it's just about convenience.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Slartibartfast on February 06, 2014, 08:54:13 AM
We let Bittybartfast stay up as late as she wants.  Babybartfast has a bedtime because she has to be off to kindergarten in the morning, but Bittybartfast stays up until she gets sleepy (which she communicates by rattling the baby gate to go upstairs to her room) or she starts fussing.  Sometimes that's nine or ten o'clock.  The nice thing, though, is that she sleeps in until mid-morning.  I do my best writing after midnight - not sure why, but that seems to be how I'm wired - so I stay up late to work most nights.  DH gets Babybartfast off to school early, then leaves for work, then Bittybartfast and I get up a few hours later.  It kind of feels like I'm working second shift, but I'm really glad both my girls are night owls like me!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: magicdomino on February 06, 2014, 11:17:37 AM
We let Bittybartfast stay up as late as she wants.  Babybartfast has a bedtime because she has to be off to kindergarten in the morning, but Bittybartfast stays up until she gets sleepy (which she communicates by rattling the baby gate to go upstairs to her room) or she starts fussing.  Sometimes that's nine or ten o'clock.  The nice thing, though, is that she sleeps in until mid-morning.  I do my best writing after midnight - not sure why, but that seems to be how I'm wired - so I stay up late to work most nights.  DH gets Babybartfast off to school early, then leaves for work, then Bittybartfast and I get up a few hours later.  It kind of feels like I'm working second shift, but I'm really glad both my girls are night owls like me!

Switch the parents around, and you have the situation when I was little.  My father worked evening shift.  So, Mom would get up early to get herself and my brothers out of the house.  Just before they left, Dad would get up, get dressed, then take care of me with the house quiet and the single bathroom available. :)   I can remember the TV station signing off for the night, so some nights I was up as late as midnight.   
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 06, 2014, 12:17:45 PM
We let Bittybartfast stay up as late as she wants.  Babybartfast has a bedtime because she has to be off to kindergarten in the morning, but Bittybartfast stays up until she gets sleepy (which she communicates by rattling the baby gate to go upstairs to her room) or she starts fussing.  Sometimes that's nine or ten o'clock.  The nice thing, though, is that she sleeps in until mid-morning.  I do my best writing after midnight - not sure why, but that seems to be how I'm wired - so I stay up late to work most nights.  DH gets Babybartfast off to school early, then leaves for work, then Bittybartfast and I get up a few hours later.  It kind of feels like I'm working second shift, but I'm really glad both my girls are night owls like me!

I don't go to bed early if I'm tired. I know my body well enough to know that I am a night owl, always have been, and constantly fight the desire to stay up until 2 every night. I will get home around 4:20, and anywhere betweeen then and 8-8:30 have a period of being really exhausted. But i get my second wind, and sometimes, as it draws close to my 11-11:30 bedtime, I don't feel tired. But if i read for a bit and relax, I'm usually feeling sleepy enough to go to sleep then.

Every now and then I get into a cycle of staying up until 12-12:30, and while I'm tired the next day, I'm not dead tired, and usually after a few days of that, I'm back to normal.  I hate it when people say "well, if you're tired, why not go to bed?" Beacuse if I do say around 8, I will sleep for a couple or few hours, then we wide awake, and not able to fall back to sleep.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Library Dragon on February 07, 2014, 01:40:39 AM
We let Bittybartfast stay up as late as she wants.  Babybartfast has a bedtime because she has to be off to kindergarten in the morning, but Bittybartfast stays up until she gets sleepy (which she communicates by rattling the baby gate to go upstairs to her room) or she starts fussing.  Sometimes that's nine or ten o'clock.  The nice thing, though, is that she sleeps in until mid-morning.  I do my best writing after midnight - not sure why, but that seems to be how I'm wired - so I stay up late to work most nights.  DH gets Babybartfast off to school early, then leaves for work, then Bittybartfast and I get up a few hours later.  It kind of feels like I'm working second shift, but I'm really glad both my girls are night owls like me!

I don't go to bed early if I'm tired. I know my body well enough to know that I am a night owl, always have been, and constantly fight the desire to stay up until 2 every night. I will get home around 4:20, and anywhere betweeen then and 8-8:30 have a period of being really exhausted. But i get my second wind, and sometimes, as it draws close to my 11-11:30 bedtime, I don't feel tired. But if i read for a bit and relax, I'm usually feeling sleepy enough to go to sleep then.

Every now and then I get into a cycle of staying up until 12-12:30, and while I'm tired the next day, I'm not dead tired, and usually after a few days of that, I'm back to normal.  I hate it when people say "well, if you're tired, why not go to bed?" Beacuse if I do say around 8, I will sleep for a couple or few hours, then we wide awake, and not able to fall back to sleep.

POD to both comments. DSs didn't have bedtimes until they started school.

I will easily be awake until 3am if I'm not careful. A couple days a week I sleep in an extra hour and shift my work schedule. It's actually not bad because I'm around for part of the library's late hours.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 07, 2014, 10:23:43 AM
We let Bittybartfast stay up as late as she wants.  Babybartfast has a bedtime because she has to be off to kindergarten in the morning, but Bittybartfast stays up until she gets sleepy (which she communicates by rattling the baby gate to go upstairs to her room) or she starts fussing.  Sometimes that's nine or ten o'clock.  The nice thing, though, is that she sleeps in until mid-morning.  I do my best writing after midnight - not sure why, but that seems to be how I'm wired - so I stay up late to work most nights.  DH gets Babybartfast off to school early, then leaves for work, then Bittybartfast and I get up a few hours later.  It kind of feels like I'm working second shift, but I'm really glad both my girls are night owls like me!

I don't go to bed early if I'm tired. I know my body well enough to know that I am a night owl, always have been, and constantly fight the desire to stay up until 2 every night. I will get home around 4:20, and anywhere betweeen then and 8-8:30 have a period of being really exhausted. But i get my second wind, and sometimes, as it draws close to my 11-11:30 bedtime, I don't feel tired. But if i read for a bit and relax, I'm usually feeling sleepy enough to go to sleep then.

Every now and then I get into a cycle of staying up until 12-12:30, and while I'm tired the next day, I'm not dead tired, and usually after a few days of that, I'm back to normal.  I hate it when people say "well, if you're tired, why not go to bed?" Beacuse if I do say around 8, I will sleep for a couple or few hours, then we wide awake, and not able to fall back to sleep.

POD to both comments. DSs didn't have bedtimes until they started school.

I will easily be awake until 3am if I'm not careful. A couple days a week I sleep in an extra hour and shift my work schedule. It's actually not bad because I'm around for part of the library's late hours.

I'm also not one to sleep in that late. I need a good couple of hours (if not working or have to be anywhere on weekends or holidays) and actually prefer getting up early, and puttering aroudn with my coffee, playing some candy crush, checking email, etc. in the morning. If I sleep in, i still need a minimum of an hour to get going on all cylinders, and if i sleep until 10, that blows half the day. And since i only get one day off a week, i try not to waste tht much of it.

Lately however, maybe since its winter and dark, I've vound myself "sleeping in" until 8. Which annoys me. But, i figure if I'm that tired that I roll back over and sleep some more, I need it. I'm hoping once we turn the clocks ahead next month, I will go back to getting up around 7ish. 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 07, 2014, 10:33:04 AM
I have always heard people talk about keeping a regular schedule, but I don't and never have in my adult life.
I have worked midnights for several years, I don't any more, but I would sleep when I could and it always worked for me.
Now that I have a 8-5 Monday through Friday job, I stay up late on Friday and Saturday nights and sleep in to 10-11 on Saturday and 9 on Sunday. My sleep needs seem to be aggregate, as one short night a week doesn't throw me off. Two nights of less than 6 hours will make me a crabby person though.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dindrane on February 07, 2014, 12:08:24 PM
That's one of those prevailing advice things that is absolutely true for me. I don't keep as regular a sleep schedule as I should, but I pay for it every Sunday night that I don't.

I can get by on a little bit less than 8 hours of sleep a night, but if it's less than 7 for more than one night (or after a few nights of less than 8), I have a horrible time functioning at full capacity. I also sleep much better if I stay at least reasonably close to my normal bedtime and wake up time on weekends. I can fudge it a little (i.e. bedtime at 10:00 instead of 8:30 or 9:00, wake up at 7:00 or 8:00 instead of 5:00), but at some point, it just messes me up.

Naps kind of do the same thing, although I often end up taking them anyway.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: GlitterIsMyDrug on February 07, 2014, 12:15:37 PM
I can't function on 8hrs of sleep. It sounds weird, but it's too much sleep for me. My sweet spot is 6.5-7 hours of sleep a night. 6 hours will work for me to, but I need a "power rest" in the afternoon. Less then 6 and I'm a loopy mess. I mean it's kind of fun, but it's not gonna be productive. Partner compares it to a small child on a sugar rush, exciting at first, then kind of wearing, and then you're just praying for the crash.

I call naps "rests" because I don't always fall asleep. But just laying down for a bit seems to help me wake up and get going. I also cannot nap in bed. I must do so on the couch. Dunno why, I'm weird I guess. My mother says I was a terrible napper as a child too. I slept pretty well from the go get, but naps? Good luck. But she could get me to just lay down quietly for a bit if she put on some soft music (Dwight Yokum always worked), but I probably wouldn't sleep.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 07, 2014, 12:17:38 PM
That's one of those prevailing advice things that is absolutely true for me. I don't keep as regular a sleep schedule as I should, but I pay for it every Sunday night that I don't.

I can get by on a little bit less than 8 hours of sleep a night, but if it's less than 7 for more than one night (or after a few nights of less than 8), I have a horrible time functioning at full capacity. I also sleep much better if I stay at least reasonably close to my normal bedtime and wake up time on weekends. I can fudge it a little (i.e. bedtime at 10:00 instead of 8:30 or 9:00, wake up at 7:00 or 8:00 instead of 5:00), but at some point, it just messes me up.

Naps kind of do the same thing, although I often end up taking them anyway.

I try and do the same. A couple weekeneds ago, I was up until 1am friday, and 1:30 sat. I still got up about 8ish one day, and 9 the other, but that is unusual for me.

I love me a good nap, but...I only take them if I'm really really really tired. Or I'll set my alarm for 45 mins, and take a short one. That works too. last month I took a half day one friday since work was slow, but it snowed. thwarting my plans to get things done (errands). i went home, thinking oh, i'll just do stuff around the hosue, but was absolutely exhausted, so I took a 1.5 hour nap. It was just waht I needed, and oh so lovely.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 07, 2014, 12:33:02 PM
I call naps "rests" because I don't always fall asleep. But just laying down for a bit seems to help me wake up and get going. I also cannot nap in bed. I must do so on the couch. Dunno why, I'm weird I guess. My mother says I was a terrible napper as a child too. I slept pretty well from the go get, but naps? Good luck. But she could get me to just lay down quietly for a bit if she put on some soft music (Dwight Yokum always worked), but I probably wouldn't sleep.

If you're weird, so am I.  I don't nap during the week but I will nap on weekends and on vacation, especially if I've been really active.  Usually 30 minutes, tops, just enough to refresh me and get me through the evening.

But if I nap during the week, it keeps me up at night, which makes me tired the next day, which starts this vicious cycle.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Lynn2000 on February 07, 2014, 01:17:51 PM
Oh, I'm one of those regular sleep schedule people, especially as I've gotten older.  ;D It's kind of disappointing actually, because I'll think, yay, it's Friday/Saturday night! I can stay... up... late... oh, no I can't, I'll get a migraine. Into bed at the regular time.  >:( If I'm feeling really daring I'll stay up an extra half-hour. ::) I'm in bed for at least 9 hours every night. I'm not necessarily asleep that whole time, because sometimes it takes me a bit to fall asleep or I wake up in the middle of the night, but I'm lying in bed with the lights off.

Sometimes I think "prevailing advice" comes across as "You must do this or there's something wrong with you." When in reality it should be, "Does something seem to be wrong with you? Try this, if you aren't already doing it, it helps lots of people."
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: siamesecat2965 on February 07, 2014, 02:28:34 PM
I debated about posting this, since it deals with bodily functions, but here we go. Mods, feel free to remove if you don't think its appropriate.

Personal bathroom habits. Specifically #2. I had a former BF tell me there was something wrong with me, unless mine was limited to one per day, first thing in the am, like him. Um, ok, but that may work for you, but hey, I do what works for me, and that isn't it, so drop it already!

A second funny story deals with my grandmother. Who was 93 when she fell and broke her hip, and had it surgically replaced. And was on pain meds, which, for lack of a better term, can stop you up. My grandmother was of the school where you had to go once a day, or something was wrong. She was so agitated at the fact her meds wouldn't allow her to follow this, she gave the orthopedic surgeon what for when he came in to check on her hip. Poor man didn't know waht to do!
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Katana_Geldar on February 07, 2014, 02:57:20 PM
Since my pregnancy I've found I need naps or rests, but the sleep part I keep deliberately short by having the tv on so I don't fall completely asleep and can still sleep at night.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Elfmama on February 14, 2014, 09:56:33 PM
You don't find feeding them attracts rats?

In my area it's squirrels.  ;D They've gotten quite clever at getting things out of bird feeders. But I pretty much never see a rat.

Yup.  I get squirrels, too.  So I have a squirrel proof feeder.  The perches are spring loaded so the weight of a squirrel closes off the ports where the seed comes out.  It is quite amusing to watch them trying to figure out how to get the seed.
I have one of those, and over the years, the springs stretched out so much that even the weight of the tiny birds was closing off the ports.  DH put a screw into the base so that they don't move anymore, and the squirrels have discovered that they can now get into it.  The perches are still too small, so they hang head down from the top of the feeder, holding on with the hind paws and eating with both of their 'hands'. 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dazi on February 15, 2014, 10:48:20 AM
I don't eat grains  (refined or whole). I also don't eat low fat (with the exception of Dannon fit and light Greek yogurt and that's only because I really like it ) .  I have one doctor who thinks this is great and one who freaks out and insist I must eat at minimum six servings a day and both tell me I need to switch to low fat products. Grains make me bloated, uncomfortable, and at the very least,  cause major acid reflux. Low fat foods do not satisfy me,  I eat WAY more calories when I try to do low fat.

I get plenty of fiber from fresh fruits and vegetables.  My total cholesterol is hovering just above 100 and I have blood pressure at the very lowest end of normal,  my mineral absorption is also up some. Everyone agrees my health has much improved and I'm doing very well .   I'm not sure what this crazy obsession is with whole grains.  While technically I am not allergic or have celiac disease (I was tested), there was obviously something going on in my body that was BAD while consuming them.

The only time I ever had an issue with my cholesterol is when I was  eating the recommended grains per day,  my total was fine,  but at one point my triG spiked to over  300. My doctor at the time suspected it was stress related,  but no cause was actually found. My allergies, asthma, psoriasis, hidrandenitis suppurativa , weight, and joint pain problems were also at an all-time high and now that that I'm not eating grains they are at an all time low symptom wise.


Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Mikayla on February 15, 2014, 12:20:44 PM
It sounds strange, but I have always been jealous of people who can nap.   I've only tried a few times in my life, and if I manage to sleep at all,  I wake up feeling (and acting) drugged.  It also messes bigtime with my circadian rhythms.  I'm better off staying awake, even if this requires caffeine, and then just going to bed at regular time.

It's sad.  Naps are cool.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: mw8242 on February 15, 2014, 02:53:40 PM
^^ me too! People talk about naps all the time but I can't do it. I don't sleep easily or for long most nights and naps don't come easy.  If I do end up napping I wake up extremely cranky and even more tired than before. I have friends that can power nap and be ready to go, I wish I could instead of just going home earlier to get some sleep.

I also only sleep about 6 hours at a time, doesn't matter what time I go to bed 11pm - 5am or 1am - 7am, it's usually 6 hours exactly which I find very weird but it's a family thing, most of the women in my family are this way.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 15, 2014, 04:18:55 PM
I heard this on npr, but here is the story behind it. The study showed people who ate low fat dairy ended up weighing more than people who used the full fat versions. There may be a metabolic reaction to the low fat dairy.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2356806/Could-SKIMMED-MILK-contributing-obesity-epidemic-Low-fat-dairy-encourage-weight-gain-say-experts.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2356806/Could-SKIMMED-MILK-contributing-obesity-epidemic-Low-fat-dairy-encourage-weight-gain-say-experts.html)
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 15, 2014, 04:21:26 PM
My chiropractor is into "detox", juicing, meal replacement smoothies and eats no bread or dairy, ever.

He doesn't comprehend that DH and I, who are more than a decade older, know what works for us. Real food only, just healthy real food. No meal replacements. Everything in moderation. I will continue to make it clear we aren't interested in the pseudoscience nutrition part of his practice.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Outdoor Girl on February 15, 2014, 04:42:09 PM
Something naturally low fat?  No problem.  But something that is made to be low fat usually uses sugar and/or sugar substitutes to compensate for the missing fat.  It isn't surprising that eating low fat foods can cause weight gain.  When you factor in that you are less satiated by the lower fat and you end up eating more?  Even worse.

I'm not a big fan of juicing.  Some of the people at work are doing this, along with smoothies and stuff.  I'd rather eat the piece of fruit or the vegetable than drink the juice.  I'll be fuller, longer, since I'm getting all the fibre.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: ladyknight1 on February 15, 2014, 11:09:11 PM
Since I was diagnosed with diabetes, I can feel the spike in my blood sugar if I drink a beverage that contains calories, and it reflects in my testing numbers as well. Not for me.

I have a lot of fad dieters around me at work. One has done cabbage soup, Paleo, WW, and is now doing MedSpa. I don't say a word, but each time, she falls off the plan during a busy time and jumps to the next thing. I guess there will always be a next thing.    :-\
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Runningstar on February 16, 2014, 07:59:31 AM
The dieting talk made me realize that something I do goes against prevailing advice.  I won't eat if I'm not hungry, and if I'm not hungry in the morning, or at lunchtime, or dinnertime, I just won't eat.  I've learned not to mention this, as people are horrified if they hear that it might have been half the day since I've eaten last.  I'm not skinny, or overweight.  Sometimes I'm out with friends for lunch, and I order whatever and basically just sample the food and box it up to eat when I am hungry.  I've done this basically my entire life, my mom just accepted my appetite and didn't force me to eat (which I've always been grateful for).  I had a very dear babysitter when I was young that was told not to force me to eat, and she didn't, but she would save my lunch everyday and show my mother what all I didn't eat that day.  We loved her, and understood it, but it didn't change my eating habits. 
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: kherbert05 on February 16, 2014, 09:20:26 AM
I always wash clothes before wearing them. A while back Bad principal decided that we would be given our convocation shirts the day of convocation. We also couldn't wear something under them. I picked up my shirt, laid it over my arm, while I explained this would not work for me.


Bad Principal and bad AP told me I was a hypochondriac. I handed them back the shirt and showed them the red blistery rash from where the fabric was touching my arm. Explained I would be sending photos to HR before I talked to them about this issue. He handed out the shirts so we could wash them if we wanted. (Was still mad because they wouldn't be "Crisp" from the sizing)


People wonder why I HATE going clothes shopping and insist on going straight home to a bath. (I do the leotard and tights under my clothes when I shop for anything other than bras. Still I itch)


Reading about defrosting raw meat made me realize - I don't deal with frozen meat. I buy fresh cook a bunch on Sundays and on school breaks. Then I vacuum pack the cooked meals and put in the freezer. On Saturday I pick from my homemade frozen meals and put in my frig for the week. If something is still frozen when I want it, I do the water in the bowl and it defrosts fast. 


Runningstar what you are doing sounds healthy. The only time I "force" myself to eat is when I know I'm not hungry because of allergies. My body needs fuel - but nothing smell/tastes/sounds good because of the allergies.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: cicero on February 16, 2014, 09:34:44 AM
I don't eat grains  (refined or whole). I also don't eat low fat (with the exception of Dannon fit and light Greek yogurt and that's only because I really like it ) .  I have one doctor who thinks this is great and one who freaks out and insist I must eat at minimum six servings a day and both tell me I need to switch to low fat products. Grains make me bloated, uncomfortable, and at the very least,  cause major acid reflux. Low fat foods do not satisfy me,  I eat WAY more calories when I try to do low fat.

I get plenty of fiber from fresh fruits and vegetables.  My total cholesterol is hovering just above 100 and I have blood pressure at the very lowest end of normal,  my mineral absorption is also up some. Everyone agrees my health has much improved and I'm doing very well .   I'm not sure what this crazy obsession is with whole grains.  While technically I am not allergic or have celiac disease (I was tested), there was obviously something going on in my body that was BAD while consuming them.

The only time I ever had an issue with my cholesterol is when I was  eating the recommended grains per day,  my total was fine,  but at one point my triG spiked to over  300. My doctor at the time suspected it was stress related,  but no cause was actually found. My allergies, asthma, psoriasis, hidrandenitis suppurativa , weight, and joint pain problems were also at an all-time high and now that that I'm not eating grains they are at an all time low symptom wise.
one of my nephews was going crazy - he was having terrible time with stomach ailments, gettings sick all the time, acne, etc when he went to a college and was eating "their" food. he did a bunch of tests, he did a bunch of self-experiments and found that even though the tests said he doesn't have a gluten problem, he does much much better on an almost grain free diet. he doesn't eat any wheat products(i think only rice/corn). he eats veg, fruit, eggs, lean proteins (can't eat dairy anyway). he said he doesn't care "what" the problem actually *is* but he is happy with his solution.
Title: Re: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?
Post by: Dazi on February 16, 2014, 10:24:49 AM
I don't eat grains  (refined or whole). I also don't eat low fat (with the exception of Dannon fit and light Greek yogurt and that's only because I really like it ) .  I have one doctor who thinks this is great and one who freaks out and insist I must eat at minimum six servings a day and both tell me I need to switch to low fat products. Grains make me bloated, uncomfortable, and at the very least,  cause major acid reflux. Low fat foods do not satisfy me,  I eat WAY more calories when I try to do low fat.

I get plenty of fiber from fresh fruits and vegetables.  My total cholesterol is hovering just above 100 and I have blood pressure at the very lowest end of normal,  my mineral absorption is also up some. Everyone agrees my health has much improved and I'm doing very well .   I'm not sure what this crazy obsession is with whole grains.  While technically I am not allergic or have celiac disease (I was tested), there was obviously something going on in my body that was BAD while consuming them.

The only time I ever had an issue with my cholesterol is when I was  eating the recommended grains per day,  my total was fine,  but at one point my triG spiked to over  300. My doctor at the time suspected it was stress related,  but no cause was actually found. My allergies, asthma, psoriasis, hidrandenitis suppurativa , weight, and joint pain problems were also at an all-time high and now that that I'm not eating grains they are at an all time low symptom wise.
one of my nephews was going crazy - he was having terrible time with stomach ailments, gettings sick all the time, acne, etc when he went to a college and was eating "their" food. he did a bunch of tests, he did a bunch of self-experiments and found that even though the tests said he doesn't have a gluten problem, he does much much better on an almost grain free diet. he doesn't eat any wheat products(i think only rice/corn). he eats veg, fruit, eggs, lean proteins (can't eat dairy anyway). he said he doesn't care "what" the problem actually *is* but he is happy with his solution.

Exactly.   I ate a one inch square of cake sans frosting the other day,  I have been miserable all weekend. My face broke out with a few pimples, my joints ache,  and I've been spending a lot of extra time in the bathroom. I don't know what I was  thinking eating it. Stupid me.

Rice doesn't seem to bother me as much as wheat,  barley, and rye,  but it still can make me quite uncomfortable if I eat more than a few bites. Corn makes me super gassy to the point my gut is visibly distended. I actually don't have any issues with lentils, beans and nuts (except for soy,  but I'm allergic to soy).