Etiquette Hell

General Etiquette => All In A Day's Work => Topic started by: camlan on August 24, 2014, 04:17:45 PM

Title: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: camlan on August 24, 2014, 04:17:45 PM
Ah, office pizza.

A bunch of us had to work on Saturday, as a project has had several problems--the project director went into labor 2 months early and is now hospitalized, the assistant director was hit by a car while out on his bicycle and is out for two weeks, the printer printed the wrong files, the client changed some specs last minute--it's been a nightmare.

And, instead of having Big Boss supervise us as expected, we ended up with Uber Boss, because Big Boss's children are sick with a stomach virus that has been going around.

Uber Boss kindly ordered pizza for the whole gang. The boxes were put in the break room. There looked to be plenty of pizza for everyone.

But people who went to get pizza 15 minutes after it arrived came back commenting that they had only been able to get a single slice. I ran to the break room and got the second to last slice of pizza.

At a rough guess, there was one pizza for every three people working on Saturday, and it seemed . . . odd that it would have disappeared so quickly. But I figured people were hungry and tired (we've all been working lots of overtime) and maybe I was just too slow.

Then about an hour later, I saw people coming back from the break room with multiple slices of pizza. They explained that someone had put most of the pizza in the refrigerator, so they had just nuked some to warm it up.

On investigation, there were 5 plates of pizza in the fridge, all with about 6-7 slices on them, all wrapped up in paper towels. It did indeed look as if someone had been worried about leaving the food out, and put it in the fridge to keep it safe.

Cue 5 pm when we all started for home. A manager, someone who had spent most of the day complaining about having to work, stormed out of the kitchen, demanding to know where his pizza was. After a few minutes of kerfuffle, it transpired that he had taken most of the pizza and put it in the fridge to take home to feed his family that evening. He considered it his "payment" for having to work on a Saturday. He was not happy that the hourly employees, who also gave up their Saturday, had eaten the pizza he wanted.

Seriously, there was so much pizza in the fridge that I don't think anyone thought, "Oh, someone is taking this home." Or if they did, they decided no one had the right to that much pizza. When I saw the plates full of pizza, I just assumed someone didn't want to leave the food out at room temperature for very long.

A slice or two of pizza? I would have figured someone was saving it. And we have a lot of temp employees--I would have figured one of them was taking the pizza home for dinner--a lot of the temps are hurting for money. Either way, I wouldn't have touched it. But plate after plate stacked high with pizza? It looked as if it were up for grabs.

Uber Boss was not amused.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: menley on August 24, 2014, 04:33:15 PM
We had a manager that would do something quite similar. In my line of work, there was a certain time of year where we pulled very long hours, including Saturday and Sunday work. This particular manager would always decide that on Saturday afternoons, we should order in pizza (despite most of us not liking pizza or being sick of eating it after 8 Saturdays in a row!) And regardless of what we actually wanted to order, he would always add in 4-5 extra pepperoni pizzas.

We didn't catch on at first, as the pizza always seemed to get eaten, but it was really strange that for a group of 15 people, we would order 15 pizzas (especially as there were several girls who would only eat one slice) and have no leftovers. But once, the fridge in our closest breakroom was on the fritz, so we went down to the fridge in the downstairs breakroom and found five pizza boxes sitting there, with a large duffel bag next to the fridge. And that afternoon, as our manager left for the day, he had the duffel bag slung over his shoulder. He finally admitted to his co-manager that he was taking it home for his kids because "since they couldn't have Daddy because he was working so much, they at least deserve some free pizza."

The co-manager made sure that this guy was no longer in charge of ordering the pizzas, but all that meant is that when we did get pizza, he would go around and gather up the excess pizza once everyone had first grabbed their food. He'd then take it aside and do the same thing - bring it home to his kids. When I privately brought up the idea that perhaps some of the guys on our team would want seconds, and that should take precedence over bringing his kids leftovers, he said "Oh, they should be watching their weight anyway. I'm doing them a favor."  :o
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Curly Wurly Doggie Breath on August 24, 2014, 05:09:21 PM
 :o
I am always shocked by these, can't help it. I just can't understand the thought/ behaviour of some.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: JenJay on August 24, 2014, 06:07:53 PM
What a jerk!! It's beautiful that he had the gall to complain, thereby outing himself to Uber Boss. Little bit of Professional Darwinism there.  ::)

I will never, ever understand the people who assume it's okay for them to load up plates for their spouses and children before the other employees have had a chance to eat. Hello, did your kid come work? No? Then why would he get 5 slices of pizza?! Drives me batty!!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Hmmmmm on August 24, 2014, 08:08:13 PM
:o
I am always shocked by these, can't help it. I just can't understand the thought/ behaviour of some.
Me too. I feel odd taking a left over cupcake home.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Reika on August 24, 2014, 08:24:38 PM
What gets me with a lot of these food thief stories is that the thief is usually (not always, but a good majority) seem to be a management/boss type. The ones who make more than the hourly workers.

Like other posters, I'm glad the thief showed their true colors to the Uber Boss.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: JenJay on August 24, 2014, 08:57:14 PM
What gets me with a lot of these food thief stories is that the thief is usually (not always, but a good majority) seem to be a management/boss type. The ones who make more than the hourly workers.

Like other posters, I'm glad the thief showed their true colors to the Uber Boss.

I encountered this a lot at my old job. Not with food, but several corporate bosses with that attitude of "I deserve it because I'm a Top Dog. If you want some you should become a Top Dog, too. If you don't, well I guess you didn't want it or you couldn't hack it so you don't deserve (whatever)." It never occurs to them that some of us don't want to be the Top Dog, we genuinely enjoy our position and do it very well, thanks. Or we would if we didn't have crap bosses.  ::)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Bales on August 24, 2014, 10:29:50 PM
I noticed the OP said the manager considered it "payment" for working that Saturday - perhaps because he doesn't get overtime pay?  Not saying that makes it right, but I'm wondering if he felt that since he wasn't getting any extra compensation, he was entitled to the pizza.  I disagree with that thought pattern, but I can see how someone may get there.  Of course, that assumes others WERE getting overtime pay.

Now if it was cake, I say any reason is a good reason to hog all the cake!   >:D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: cicero on August 25, 2014, 01:38:01 AM
I noticed the OP said the manager considered it "payment" for working that Saturday - perhaps because he doesn't get overtime pay?  Not saying that makes it right, but I'm wondering if he felt that since he wasn't getting any extra compensation, he was entitled to the pizza.  I disagree with that thought pattern, but I can see how someone may get there.  Of course, that assumes others WERE getting overtime pay.

Now if it was cake, I say any reason is a good reason to hog all the cake!   >:D
isn't working non traditional hours part of being a manager? Many jobs don't offer overtime (in my job nobody gets overtime - not us lowly admins and not managers), and that's not a reason to steal. besides, he wasn't stealing from the company, he was taking his coworker's food.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Raintree on August 25, 2014, 01:50:36 AM
Unbelievable. I hope Uber boss explained to him that the pizza had been ordered for "the whole gang" and not just one person to cover their family dinner that evening. Who does this?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: camlan on August 25, 2014, 05:36:14 AM
I noticed the OP said the manager considered it "payment" for working that Saturday - perhaps because he doesn't get overtime pay?  Not saying that makes it right, but I'm wondering if he felt that since he wasn't getting any extra compensation, he was entitled to the pizza.  I disagree with that thought pattern, but I can see how someone may get there.  Of course, that assumes others WERE getting overtime pay.

Now if it was cake, I say any reason is a good reason to hog all the cake!   >:D

Those of us on salary don't get overtime pay, but we do get comp time. If you work 1-4 hours on a Saturday, you get 4 hours that you can take off later, with pay. If you work 4-8 hours on a Saturday, you get a day off that you can take later, with pay. Hourly employees and temps get 1.5 times their usual pay. It's a very employee-friendly, generous company. (We also had free doughnuts that morning.)

And the guy who stashed all the pizza is a couple of steps above me. I don't know how much he makes, but based on the salary for my position, it's at or above $100,000 a year. While the temps who were doing the actual work (we were just doing spot-checking and quality control and answering questions) make $10-$11 an hour base pay.

The temps' job isn't hard, but it does require a great deal of thought, attention to detail, speed and accuracy. I've done it while being trained and if we are short-handed. It isn't physically demanding, but it is mentally exhausting. If anyone "deserved" that pizza, it was the temps.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Cali.in.UK on August 25, 2014, 06:08:04 AM
This reminded me so much of my old job! I worked at an affluent kindergarten in Asia and the parents would periodically bring food gifts for the teachers, which was very sweet but our penny pinching boss would regularly intercept these gifts and usually take some/most or all of it for herself.
One day one of the moms bought about six pizzas for the six teachers and some expensive salads and 2L of cokes. Well, our boss took 5 of the pizzas, all the salads to feed her family and left us with one pizza to split! People are so ridiculous sometimes.
Another time one mom gave us costco size amounts of these drinks we liked and boss decided that instead of just giving it to us as the mom had intended, it would be a perfect opportunity for her to open our presents are give them as gifts to all of her other employees. She was "very generous" when she didn't have to pay for the gifts herself.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: siamesecat2965 on August 25, 2014, 09:17:36 AM
I'm also salaried, so even though I'm a low level manager, I don't get OT. Or comp time. But my job very rarely requires OT or weekends. And they are so flexible, that if i do end up staying a little late it evens out when I have to leave early or come in late sometimes.

I'm laughing at the thief and his getting caught. That is one of my pet peeves; people who take huge amounts home for their family. Really? I know here, if we've had a lot of leftovers, and put them out for others, and at the end of the day there is still some, people will be encouraged to take some home for their spouse, kids, etc. but that's only after everyone here has had a chance to get some.

Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 25, 2014, 10:21:22 AM
Wow. Great that he outed himself in front of the Uber Boss, who was not amused.

People can be so weird about free stuff, especially food. I know at work conferences I have witnessed highly-educated, established people behaving so rudely about free stuff. Once I was talking to a vendor about her products, and this guy walked up to the booth, swept all the free candy and pens into his bag, and walked off without a word. The vendor and I were just kind of like,  :o.

I think the only time people have taken home leftovers at my office is when they have really been urged to by others, because it was just going to sit around over the weekend or something. Of course sometimes there are kerfuffles--Anne tells Betty she can take the leftover cake home, so Betty does so when she leaves at 2pm. But at 2:30pm Carla comes in and Donna's like, "Have some cake, Carla!" and then they find out there isn't any, because Betty took it all home, because Anne (who's above her) told her to. So that's really more of a mix-up than anything greedy.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: laughtermed on August 25, 2014, 10:27:03 AM
This reminded me so much of my old job! I worked at an affluent kindergarten in Asia and the parents would periodically bring food gifts for the teachers, which was very sweet but our penny pinching boss would regularly intercept these gifts and usually take some/most or all of it for herself.
One day one of the moms bought about six pizzas for the six teachers and some expensive salads and 2L of cokes. Well, our boss took 5 of the pizzas, all the salads to feed her family and left us with one pizza to split! People are so ridiculous sometimes.
Another time one mom gave us costco size amounts of these drinks we liked and boss decided that instead of just giving it to us as the mom had intended, it would be a perfect opportunity for her to open our presents are give them as gifts to all of her other employees. She was "very generous" when she didn't have to pay for the gifts herself.

On another note, years ago, the PTA asked parents at my child's school to please bring dishes for lunch for the teachers at an in-service day for the teachers. We were on a budget, but Dh made gourmet chicken salad sandwiches as a contribution. I brought them in the morning. While passing thru the room at the end of the day, I saw them out on a table with a lot of other food. I asked an assistant how long they had been there and was told they had been there the entire day. I informed here that I did not appreciate that they left them out there all day, that we were on a budget, and could have used the money ourselves if we had known they would just sit out all day.  I then picked them up and took them home. The look of shock  on her face as I did this was priceless.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 25, 2014, 10:41:32 AM
This reminded me so much of my old job! I worked at an affluent kindergarten in Asia and the parents would periodically bring food gifts for the teachers, which was very sweet but our penny pinching boss would regularly intercept these gifts and usually take some/most or all of it for herself.
One day one of the moms bought about six pizzas for the six teachers and some expensive salads and 2L of cokes. Well, our boss took 5 of the pizzas, all the salads to feed her family and left us with one pizza to split! People are so ridiculous sometimes.
Another time one mom gave us costco size amounts of these drinks we liked and boss decided that instead of just giving it to us as the mom had intended, it would be a perfect opportunity for her to open our presents are give them as gifts to all of her other employees. She was "very generous" when she didn't have to pay for the gifts herself.

On another note, years ago, the PTA asked parents at my child's school to please bring dishes for lunch for the teachers at an in-service day for the teachers. We were on a budget, but Dh made gourmet chicken salad sandwiches as a contribution. I brought them in the morning. While passing thru the room at the end of the day, I saw them out on a table with a lot of other food. I asked an assistant how long they had been there and was told they had been there the entire day. I informed here that I did not appreciate that they left them out there all day, that we were on a budget, and could have used the money ourselves if we had known they would just sit out all day.  I then picked them up and took them home. The look of shock  on her face as I did this was priceless.

I guess I am not following.  Did you think the sandwiches had gone bad so you took them to dispose of them so no one got sick?  Or did you take the sandwiches home to eat yourselves because they were still good?  Were you just angry that they had not yet been eaten?  I don't understand the rationale here.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: laughtermed on August 25, 2014, 10:53:19 AM

[/quote]

I guess I am not following.  Did you think the sandwiches had gone bad so you took them to dispose of them so no one got sick?  Or did you take the sandwiches home to eat yourselves because they were still good?  Were you just angry that they had not yet been eaten?  I don't understand the rationale here.
[/quote]

All 3 - nobody bothered to put them in the refrigerator the whole day so they were probably bad by then. I threw them out at home rather than doing it at the school. I was angry nobody put them away or acknowledged them nicely in anyway. I was angry because they were wasted despite our efforts making them and paying for the ingredients. if they did not appreciate the donation enough to serve it properly, then they did not deserve it.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Xandraea on August 25, 2014, 10:54:17 AM

On another note, years ago, the PTA asked parents at my child's school to please bring dishes for lunch for the teachers at an in-service day for the teachers. We were on a budget, but Dh made gourmet chicken salad sandwiches as a contribution. I brought them in the morning. While passing thru the room at the end of the day, I saw them out on a table with a lot of other food. I asked an assistant how long they had been there and was told they had been there the entire day. I informed here that I did not appreciate that they left them out there all day, that we were on a budget, and could have used the money ourselves if we had known they would just sit out all day.  I then picked them up and took them home. The look of shock  on her face as I did this was priceless.

I guess I am not following.  Did you think the sandwiches had gone bad so you took them to dispose of them so no one got sick?  Or did you take the sandwiches home to eat yourselves because they were still good?  Were you just angry that they had not yet been eaten?  I don't understand the rationale here.

Chicken Salad sandwiches left to sit out all day _would_ have gone bad. That nobody thought to put them on ice at the least, or in the refrigerator for a longer period to preserve them so they'd remain edible shows no appreciation for OP's DH's generous contribution to the lunch. In OP's shoes, I too would have been upset that our limited resources were donated for naught, DH's efforts were wasted and the food they could have fed their own family with had been left to waste. I would not feel inspired to donate to the school like that again.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 25, 2014, 10:58:05 AM
To me it is still strange to take the sandwiches home. I can see being upset, but apparently people chose other food - it's not a personal insult. I would have been confused had I seen the OP take food from a table intended for others. I am not sure the message she intended to send is the one that was received.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: laughtermed on August 25, 2014, 11:06:19 AM
The assistant had stammered in reply to my comment "Well the teachers will eat them tomorrow for lunch with the rest of the leftovers." I thought throwing them out in public at the school would have been even more rude. I was so upset by her response that I quietly picked up the plate and left the area with no further comments.

These sandwiches have been eaten rather quickly and enjoyed at other events. if there had been too much food for the teachers that day, they should have been stored.

Dh was pretty upset too and would have probably reacted more strongly if he had been there.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: SeptGurl on August 25, 2014, 11:19:33 AM
In response to the OP ... Wow, it was way out of line for him to take that much pizza to compensate himself for his time. And then to complain that "his" pizza was taken? Just wow.

DH has ordered pizza for weekend trainings held at his office. He expenses pizza for one of the meals and sandwiches for another. None of the staff who attend are being compensated for their weekend time. They're expected to be there as part of their jobs. I can't imagine anyone he works with picking up a bunch of pizza like that and feeling entitled to take it home as compensation. They will divide leftovers among anyone who wants them. But commandeering a bunch of pizza before everyone gets some? No way.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: MamaMootz on August 25, 2014, 11:54:12 AM
I was laughing when I saw this thread, as I just had my pizza stolen from the office fridge. See, the cafeteria makes these humongous flatbread pizzas and I saved 1/2 to have for lunch today. I put the box in there this morning and I just went to go nuke my lunch.

Gone.

What is it with people and pizza that makes them crazed lunatics that steal from others?

I just don't get it. I hope the idiot that felt entitled to mine likes the vegetable confetti on whole wheat flatbread with roasted chicken. >:(
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: ITSJUSTME on August 25, 2014, 12:13:00 PM
I worked in a place that had a division between clerical & support staff and those known as "Administrative & Professional" staff.  I was an AP.

Well there used to be a "holiday" called Secretary's day when bosses would gift their secretaries with flowers, lunch or time off.  After some time this was changed to "Administrative Professionals" day.  Our workplace would hold a reception to honor Administrative Professionals on this day with ice cream and appetizers.

So my boss, who was also AP somehow got the idea this reception was to honor HER and always encouraged me to attend with her.  I refused and would only attend if any of the support staff asked me to accompany them.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 25, 2014, 12:31:36 PM
I worked in a place that had a division between clerical & support staff and those known as "Administrative & Professional" staff.  I was an AP.

Well there used to be a "holiday" called Secretary's day when bosses would gift their secretaries with flowers, lunch or time off.  After some time this was changed to "Administrative Professionals" day.  Our workplace would hold a reception to honor Administrative Professionals on this day with ice cream and appetizers.

So my boss, who was also AP somehow got the idea this reception was to honor HER and always encouraged me to attend with her.  I refused and would only attend if any of the support staff asked me to accompany them.
I am so confused.  If you were both AP, wasn't the reception to honor both of you?  Why would it be weird to attend with your boss?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: ITSJUSTME on August 25, 2014, 12:42:54 PM
To clarify - Administrative & Professional staff were VP's, Department Heads, Managers, Directors etc.

Administrative Professionals is a term applied to clerical staff like secretaries, clerks, assistants and other support staff.

Huge difference but meant to illustrate what other posters had said about the top dogs thinking they were entitled to everything.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: LadyClaire on August 25, 2014, 12:46:54 PM
People seem to get very weird about free food, especially pizza.

We would have issues at events with people loading up plates with 5-6 slices of pizza just for the purpose of taking it home later. The faculty were especially bad about doing that, and often times, those of us who worked so hard to set up the event wouldn't get any of the food ourselves. So they started ordering a pizza or two for us assistants to keep back and have for ourselves, while the designated "event pizza" was set out as usual.

One day, someone saw us with our box of pizza that had been ordered especially for us, and went and told the Dean that we had "stolen" pizza from the event. Which resulted in a big fuss and the Dean telling us assistants that we had to eat last of all. After all of the students, and faculty, and guests. Even if we'd been working to set up the event and hadn't been able to actually take our lunch break. It didn't matter that the pizza we had had been ordered specifically for us..the faculty had seen us with a pizza and they got upset about it.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: SamiHami on August 25, 2014, 12:47:38 PM
Well, I guess it's better than the boss I used to work for that just picked off the pepperoni on pizzas meant for everyone. He didn't get it, even when I explained that no one wanted to eat his picked over leftovers. So, every piece he did that to, I put on a plate and gave to him. He kept saying he didn't want them, so I threw them away...then he tried to get mad at me for not leaving them out for others to eat.

I did break him of doing that, but I don't think he ever really got what was wrong with it.  ::)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Harriet Jones on August 25, 2014, 12:58:32 PM
The assistant had stammered in reply to my comment "Well the teachers will eat them tomorrow for lunch with the rest of the leftovers." I thought throwing them out in public at the school would have been even more rude. I was so upset by her response that I quietly picked up the plate and left the area with no further comments.

These sandwiches have been eaten rather quickly and enjoyed at other events. if there had been too much food for the teachers that day, they should have been stored.

Dh was pretty upset too and would have probably reacted more strongly if he had been there.

Did they know the sandwiches needed to be kept cool?  If they were with a whole bunch of other items, maybe they didn't realize it.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 25, 2014, 12:59:07 PM
To clarify - Administrative & Professional staff were VP's, Department Heads, Managers, Directors etc.

Administrative Professionals is a term applied to clerical staff like secretaries, clerks, assistants and other support staff.

Huge difference but meant to illustrate what other posters had said about the top dogs thinking they were entitled to everything.

Ah - I have never heard of "Professionals" (this makes me think lawyers, doctors, engineers, accountants, etc.) also being referred to as "Administrative."  That's a bizarre title to me! Administrative *is* support staff in my experience!  Out of curiousity, what line of work are you in? 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 25, 2014, 01:17:43 PM
To clarify - Administrative & Professional staff were VP's, Department Heads, Managers, Directors etc.

Administrative Professionals is a term applied to clerical staff like secretaries, clerks, assistants and other support staff.

Huge difference but meant to illustrate what other posters had said about the top dogs thinking they were entitled to everything.

So the reception was for people in Group A, but somehow Boss got it in her head that it was for people in her group, Group B? The names are quite similar, yes, but you would think those in the industry would know the difference, and that the flyer would additionally say something like, "A reception to honor our hard-working clerical and support staff." I don't know, it might have been interesting going with her, just to see if she made a fool of herself. On the other hand, if it was a large enough event, she might have been able to fill a plate with free food (that wasn't for her) without anyone really noticing, and thus wouldn't suffer any consequences. Don't you think she wondered why none of her colleagues were there, though? And why the place was filled with secretaries? So strange!

Re: the chicken salad sandwiches. I get being angry about the money and effort going to waste--to me it seems a bit odd that the school would ask parents to bring in food for the teachers in the first place. IME with public US schools, teachers do get a fair amount of food/treats at the holidays, but as a totally voluntary thing from the students/their parents--I've not heard of a school specifically putting out a request to feed the teachers. Anyway, if this request had resulted in so much food that the teachers couldn't eat it all that day, yeah, someone should have been in charge of dividing stuff and packing it up safely for later--I'm sure there were a number of other things that went bad, if they sat out all day, and that's just a waste all around.

Honestly I would have been tempted to just leave it there--let someone else realize the problem and throw it out, but at least now I know what's really going on--but I probably would have been concerned that some unsuspecting person would get sick. I think throwing it out at the school would have been fine, if you could have played it like, "What?! These sat out all day?! Oh no, they're ruined now, no one should eat them! We need to dispose of them right away before anyone tries to eat one!" Then dump the plate in their trash, let them deal with the disposal. Doubt I would have given them anymore food in the future, or at least not spent much time/money on it--to me it's not about, I'm insulted that people didn't like my food, it's more like, Wow, they totally and completely wasted that resource I donated to them, that shows a real lack of appreciation and organizational ability. Not sure I want to invest much more in that again.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: magicdomino on August 25, 2014, 01:28:33 PM
The assistant had stammered in reply to my comment "Well the teachers will eat them tomorrow for lunch with the rest of the leftovers." I thought throwing them out in public at the school would have been even more rude. I was so upset by her response that I quietly picked up the plate and left the area with no further comments.


Did they know the sandwiches needed to be kept cool?  If they were with a whole bunch of other items, maybe they didn't realize it.

That's what I was wondering:  if anyone there realized that the sandwiches were chicken salad and  knew that kind of chicken salad is perishable, like egg and tuna salads. Mind you, I'd be a little suspicious of even ham sandwiches despite of the salt and preservatives.  I would have mentioned the food poisoning issue, if only because there may have been some other perishable foods somewhere on that table.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Harriet Jones on August 25, 2014, 01:44:49 PM

Re: the chicken salad sandwiches. I get being angry about the money and effort going to waste--to me it seems a bit odd that the school would ask parents to bring in food for the teachers in the first place. IME with public US schools, teachers do get a fair amount of food/treats at the holidays, but as a totally voluntary thing from the students/their parents--I've not heard of a school specifically putting out a request to feed the teachers. Anyway, if this request had resulted in so much food that the teachers couldn't eat it all that day, yeah, someone should have been in charge of dividing stuff and packing it up safely for later--I'm sure there were a number of other things that went bad, if they sat out all day, and that's just a waste all around.

 

Our schools (or rather, the PTOs/PTAs) do this during Teacher Appreciation Week.  It's not something that happens often and it's strictly voluntary.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: DanaJ on August 25, 2014, 02:34:22 PM
Before our office moved, we had a great kitchen/lunchroom (in our new location we just have a litchen, but no place to have lunch except a boardroom). A group of us started "Salad Club". We would each bring in an ingredient, and one person would volunteer to bring in lettuce. So we would always end up with a great variety of ingredients and fun salads every day (no two days ended up being alike). It was cheap, cheerful, and social.

Occasionally we would have ingredients that didn't go so great together or duplicates, so we'd keep it for the following days. We had vast kitchen cupbaords that were mostly empty, so the Salad Club had a little shelf set aside for canned goods.

Eventually we realized that someone was pilfering our food. At first we were sympathetic, because it meant someone was hungry. We assumed it was a student hire or someone else in need. But in time, it got ridiculous! We were practically being cleaned out! Finally another co-worker, "Bob", overheard someone on the phone (open concept office) making plans with her hubby to have hot fudge sundaes for dessert that evening, and referred to the chocolate sauce in the office fridge. Bob's chocolate sauce. Sure enough, Bob's chocolate sauce went missing.

Bob knew who the thief was but couldn't prove it. So without identifying the culprate, he did tell us that someone who was not "in need" was likely the one taking our salad supplies.

To end the thieving, we peeled the labels off all our canned goods. We used a marker to write a number on the bottom of each can, so we knew what the cans contained, but the thief never touched them again.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: ITSJUSTME on August 25, 2014, 02:57:12 PM
genius
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: mimi_cat on August 25, 2014, 05:37:40 PM
Yes, people get weird around free food.

I once worked in a call center that had monthly goals, and staff that worked in shifts starting at 7 am until 11 pm at night.  The first day of the month we would have donuts in the morning, and then cookies for the afternoon and evening shifts.  We had an onsite cafeteria that would make them fresh, and they were really good and not terribly expensive.

It ended after a couple of months because our VP came through one day and saw people grabbing several - in some cases a dozen - claiming they were going to take them home for their kids. 

Another time I was in charge of a sign up table for a local charity walk.  Our employer was a large corporation and every year makes a huge donation to this walk and invites employees to walk.  We gave walkers a t-shirt that had the walk logo and our corporate logo so we'd all stand out.  I had one guy ask me a couple of times about the "free t-shirts" and seemed kind of disappointed that you were supposed to participate to get them.  Finally he came and signed up himself and his entire family (6 in all).  I'm pretty sure they did not participate.

The worst though - at Christmas we would set up "Giving Trees" on each floor.  One was a hat & mitten tree, another was a pet supplies tree, and I forget what the others were.  The idea was that you'd bring in items related to the theme and place them around the tree, and then they would be donated to various charities.  I was walking by the hat & mitten tree, and two women were "browsing".  One woman said "I don't think you are supposed to take things" and the other replied "well my kids need hats and mittens too". 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: HorseFreak on August 25, 2014, 06:29:20 PM
My office once received a gift basket of various foods addressed to everyone (about 10-12 people). Boss was off that day so I opened it and took a package of cookies and some others took other items. Boss came in the next day furious that we had opened the gift basket as she was planning to re-gift it to a client whose relative had died! She still brings it up half-jokingly about the gift basket meant for her that I "stole." Boss makes easily twice what I do and 4-5x what the other employees do. Gifts are never shared if she gets her hands on them first despite who they're addressed to.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: JustEstelle on August 25, 2014, 07:35:10 PM
The assistant had stammered in reply to my comment "Well the teachers will eat them tomorrow for lunch with the rest of the leftovers." I thought throwing them out in public at the school would have been even more rude. I was so upset by her response that I quietly picked up the plate and left the area with no further comments.

These sandwiches have been eaten rather quickly and enjoyed at other events. if there had been too much food for the teachers that day, they should have been stored.

Dh was pretty upset too and would have probably reacted more strongly if he had been there.

In all likelihood, those sandwiches were left untouched simply because they'd been sitting out all day.  I wouldn't want a chicken salad sandwich at that kind of luncheon unless it had just been removed from the refrigerator and served.  I'm guessing that the person who had been in charge of putting out the food really didn't understand about proper serving (and keeping) temperatures for perishables.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: kudeebee on August 25, 2014, 08:16:01 PM
We had a food thief at a school I taught at.  The thief would go into lunches and just take part of the lunch.  We though we knew who it was, but noone had caught the thief.  So, one week we all made two lunches for a few days.  One we kept with us and the other--with an extra little bit of an added ingredient--went in the fridge.
Sure enough we were able to figure out for sure who the thief was as he had to make several extra bathroom trips during the day. 
Nothing was ever said by us or thieft but we never had a food thief again.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Xandraea on August 25, 2014, 08:21:02 PM
The assistant had stammered in reply to my comment "Well the teachers will eat them tomorrow for lunch with the rest of the leftovers." I thought throwing them out in public at the school would have been even more rude. I was so upset by her response that I quietly picked up the plate and left the area with no further comments.

These sandwiches have been eaten rather quickly and enjoyed at other events. if there had been too much food for the teachers that day, they should have been stored.

Dh was pretty upset too and would have probably reacted more strongly if he had been there.

In all likelihood, those sandwiches were left untouched simply because they'd been sitting out all day.  I wouldn't want a chicken salad sandwich at that kind of luncheon unless it had just been removed from the refrigerator and served.  I'm guessing that the person who had been in charge of putting out the food really didn't understand about proper serving (and keeping) temperatures for perishables.

This, very much. I also wouldn't chance eating a chicken salad sandwich that had been sitting out all day. Someone really dropped the ball there when it came to serving.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: AnnaJ on August 25, 2014, 09:17:24 PM
The assistant had stammered in reply to my comment "Well the teachers will eat them tomorrow for lunch with the rest of the leftovers." I thought throwing them out in public at the school would have been even more rude. I was so upset by her response that I quietly picked up the plate and left the area with no further comments.

These sandwiches have been eaten rather quickly and enjoyed at other events. if there had been too much food for the teachers that day, they should have been stored.

Dh was pretty upset too and would have probably reacted more strongly if he had been there.

In all likelihood, those sandwiches were left untouched simply because they'd been sitting out all day.  I wouldn't want a chicken salad sandwich at that kind of luncheon unless it had just been removed from the refrigerator and served.  I'm guessing that the person who had been in charge of putting out the food really didn't understand about proper serving (and keeping) temperatures for perishables.

This, very much. I also wouldn't chance eating a chicken salad sandwich that had been sitting out all day. Someone really dropped the ball there when it came to serving.

If I were one of the teachers I wouldn't eat one - no matter how good they looked - if I thought they had been sitting out without refrigeration.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: laughtermed on August 25, 2014, 09:27:18 PM
The sequel - I did speak to someone in the PTA the next week about what happened. When I dropped the food off in the AM, I had labelled  chicken salad on the plate cover and placed it on a big table in front of a refrigerator with all the other food. I said I don't think any of the food had been refrigerated between servings and that I had to take my food home so nobody would get sick. She said she would speak to the front office staff. She did agree that removing it was the best thing to do and apologized.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TabathasGran on August 25, 2014, 09:34:15 PM
To clarify - Administrative & Professional staff were VP's, Department Heads, Managers, Directors etc.

Administrative Professionals is a term applied to clerical staff like secretaries, clerks, assistants and other support staff.

Huge difference but meant to illustrate what other posters had said about the top dogs thinking they were entitled to everything.

Ah - I have never heard of "Professionals" (this makes me think lawyers, doctors, engineers, accountants, etc.) also being referred to as "Administrative."  That's a bizarre title to me! Administrative *is* support staff in my experience!  Out of curiousity, what line of work are you in?
I have commonly seen in industries where the bulk of the staff is labor.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 26, 2014, 12:27:33 AM
To clarify - Administrative & Professional staff were VP's, Department Heads, Managers, Directors etc.

Administrative Professionals is a term applied to clerical staff like secretaries, clerks, assistants and other support staff.

Huge difference but meant to illustrate what other posters had said about the top dogs thinking they were entitled to everything.

Ah - I have never heard of "Professionals" (this makes me think lawyers, doctors, engineers, accountants, etc.) also being referred to as "Administrative."  That's a bizarre title to me! Administrative *is* support staff in my experience!  Out of curiousity, what line of work are you in?
I have commonly seen in industries where the bulk of the staff is labor.
What is an example of this? I guess I haven't ever heard of "labor" being "professional" either. I can't think of a position that would be both "administrative" and "professional"!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: greencat on August 26, 2014, 12:36:53 AM
To clarify - Administrative & Professional staff were VP's, Department Heads, Managers, Directors etc.

Administrative Professionals is a term applied to clerical staff like secretaries, clerks, assistants and other support staff.

Huge difference but meant to illustrate what other posters had said about the top dogs thinking they were entitled to everything.

Ah - I have never heard of "Professionals" (this makes me think lawyers, doctors, engineers, accountants, etc.) also being referred to as "Administrative."  That's a bizarre title to me! Administrative *is* support staff in my experience!  Out of curiousity, what line of work are you in?
I have commonly seen in industries where the bulk of the staff is labor.
What is an example of this? I guess I haven't ever heard of "labor" being "professional" either. I can't think of a position that would be both "administrative" and "professional"!

It's a job category to distinguish the laborers or other employees from those that perform administrative (i.e. management) or professional (e.g. accounting) services.  It's common in government employment as well - for example, my job is a different class, which is "support personnel", but my boss is A&P, because she supervises people, and my friend in accounting is A&P, because she's an accountant.  A&P personnel are subject to slightly different HR regulations regarding leave time and things like that.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: English1 on August 26, 2014, 04:19:50 AM
Nice to hear the pizza nabber outed himself to uber boss.

I see this sometimes from the other side. I own a small business. We runs events that are catered. On the whole leftovers from these events are shared out/left for people to take but I get annoyed if people just assume and don't ask. Perishables - fine, non-perishables are supposed to come back to the office. I had to stop someone loading up whole trays of soft drink cans into their car once and say I was taking them back to the office (where we'll all share them) and they had the nerve to look at me like  :o.

Also I once froze a load of perishables in the office freezer and sent round an email telling everyone they were there so if you haven't got lunch or need a snack - help yourselves. I went to get some just over a week later and the freezer was empty. Surprised, but ok. More surprised when someone working near there told me one employee had had the lot - eaten it for lunch every day. I didn't mind them being eaten up, that's why they were there, but really it didn't cross his mind that he shouldn't eat ALL of them and other people might want some?

Some people just go very peculiar over free food.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Margo on August 26, 2014, 07:01:49 AM
people are weird over free food.

We had one a few years ago: Our firm was rebranding and we held a little event and invited people from other local businesses round for champagne and cupcakes. We had two offices in 2 separate towns, and we decided to hold the events in different days n order that the business owners could attend both events. Other staff were expected to attend part of the event in their office (in working time)

We had caterers make cupcakes decorated in the company's new colours, and other canape type finger foods.

At the first event, one of  the owners 'Sharon', who worked in that office, was present, and was policing the food and discouraging staff from taking any in case there wasn't enough for visitors. (there was plenty, and she was still doing this 10 minutes before the event was due to end, when it was clear that no one else was likely to come.) 2 days later, the second event took place at the other office. 'Sharon' came over, stayed a while and then left, about 90 minutes before the event was due to end, and when we knew that there were a group of people still to come (they had accepted our invitation and told us what time they were likely to be there) 'Sharon' was getting ready to leave to go back to her own office, and started packing up boxes of cupcakes, apparently to take home for her kids. This was despite the fact that the event wasn't over, there was less spare food as more guests had attended, and many staff members had held back to make sure we didn't run short.

Sharon did stop when she was asked by another of the owners to leave the cupcakes for the guests, but she was still making comments about how 'mean' they were, two weeks later.

To me, the weirdest thing was that she didn't try to take anything from the event in the office she worked in, only in the other office, and she would be the first to criticise if someone else acted that way!

Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: wolfie on August 26, 2014, 08:21:10 AM

Also I once froze a load of perishables in the office freezer and sent round an email telling everyone they were there so if you haven't got lunch or need a snack - help yourselves. I went to get some just over a week later and the freezer was empty. Surprised, but ok. More surprised when someone working near there told me one employee had had the lot - eaten it for lunch every day. I didn't mind them being eaten up, that's why they were there, but really it didn't cross his mind that he shouldn't eat ALL of them and other people might want some?


I would give that guy a pass. As long as he didn't eat them all the first day other people did have access to them and if they wanted some they would have taken some. Sounds like he was the only person who wanted any.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: martin8 on August 26, 2014, 08:22:09 AM
What gets me with a lot of these food thief stories is that the thief is usually (not always, but a good majority) seem to be a management/boss type. The ones who make more than the hourly workers.

I would just be so tempted to put on a look of concern and say something along the lines of:
"I'm so sorry. It can't be easy to be so short of money that the only way you can feed your family is by taking home free food".

Probably not a good idea, though.    >:D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 26, 2014, 09:52:05 AM
A weird thing I often encounter is the opposite of the food thief, where no one will take the food. There's the standard "it's impolite to take the last piece" mentality, for example. Or "it will look greedy if I get these leftovers out and eat some." Both of these usually result in the leftover food going bad and having to be thrown out, when people genuinely wanted it!

Once I left a bag of non-perishable food on the break room table, with a note saying to please take it if you wanted it. After a week, it didn't look like anyone had even touched it, and as it was kind of big, I decided to just throw it away. (It was protein powder that I had opened and tried one scoop of, so I couldn't donate it anywhere.) Later that same day, someone came up to me asking if they could have it. ::) Of course, but now you have to dig it out of the trash. You've been here all week, why didn't you take it earlier? I get (sort of) not snatching it up first thing, but surely a couple days would have been sufficient for everyone else to see it. Of course digging it out of the trash wasn't very appealing so in the end it went to waste.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: ITSJUSTME on August 26, 2014, 10:19:57 AM
Greencat, thank you for the clarification - I was wracking my brain trying to figure out how to explain.  This was a Univ. in the US and the Administrative AND Professional (one or the other, not both) are exactly as you said - management or professionals.

The Administrative Professional is a term that replaces terms like secretary or Administrative Assistant.  For some reason the title "secretary" seems to have acquired a stigma in recent years (I have no idea why) and is rarely used.  "Administrative Professionals are clerical, assistant, support staff" - I guess what you termed "labor" and yes, are unionized and have different HR guidelines than the Administrative And Professional.

The amusing part (for lack of a better word) was that my boss, a Director and therefore A&P, decided that AP day, a day historically devoted to honoring support staff in the US, was an excuse for her to get free food intended for others.

As so many other posters have noted, free food (or easily accessible food) makes some people do crazy things.  Said Director was also known to blatantly help herself to food from the department fridge, even when clearly noted with owners name.  If she got hungry she was not above rummaging through the fridge, opening containers and helping herself to leftover lunches or food brought from home.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: amylouky on August 26, 2014, 10:55:05 AM

Also I once froze a load of perishables in the office freezer and sent round an email telling everyone they were there so if you haven't got lunch or need a snack - help yourselves. I went to get some just over a week later and the freezer was empty. Surprised, but ok. More surprised when someone working near there told me one employee had had the lot - eaten it for lunch every day. I didn't mind them being eaten up, that's why they were there, but really it didn't cross his mind that he shouldn't eat ALL of them and other people might want some?


I would give that guy a pass. As long as he didn't eat them all the first day other people did have access to them and if they wanted some they would have taken some. Sounds like he was the only person who wanted any.

I agree with this. If they were there for a week, I think that's more than enough time for others who want some to get a share. No way would shared food last a week in my office.. leftovers are generally a free-for-all.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 26, 2014, 11:21:28 AM
I find it odd that so many people hog free food, but equally odd that so many people notice and care. No one is entitled to free food - not the people who hog it or the people who didn't.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: cass2591 on August 26, 2014, 11:36:43 AM
Kudubee, you've been a member on this forum for years, so I'm surprised you would think posting that you and your colleagues put "an extra little bit of an added ingredient" in your food is acceptable here. It is not. And while it may have amused you and your coworkers, we're not even smiling.
 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Goosey on August 26, 2014, 11:57:27 AM
I find it odd that so many people hog free food, but equally odd that so many people notice and care. No one is entitled to free food - not the people who hog it or the people who didn't.
So you don't think there's a social convention that says, when someone offers, you take a fair share for yourself and leave the rest for others?

Or that when you're sharing food with others, you need to make sure that everyone gets their portion? You bet your rear people will notice when they're going hungry and someone has taken all the food for an outside party. Or when they've been offered a treat and it's been selfishly hoarded by one person.

I know you have issues with food and people liking food, but this is such an odd and judgmental statement.

Edited because commas matter.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Hillia on August 26, 2014, 11:59:05 AM
I find it odd that so many people hog free food, but equally odd that so many people notice and care. No one is entitled to free food - not the people who hog it or the people who didn't.
So you don't think there's a social convention that says when someone offers you take a fair share for yourself and leave the rest for others?

Or that when you're sharing food with others, you need to make sure that everyone gets their portion? You bet your rear people will notice when they're going hungry and someone has taken all the food for an outside party. Or when they've been offered a treat and it's been selfishly hoarded by one person.

I know you have issues with food and people liking food, but this is such an odd and judgmental statement.

Actually, once someone has offered food as a gift to me, I am entitled to my share of the food.  I'm not entitled to expect that people provide food, no, but once it's given then yes, I am entitled to my share, and to be annoyed if someone steals my share.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 26, 2014, 12:03:36 PM
I find it odd that so many people hog free food, but equally odd that so many people notice and care. No one is entitled to free food - not the people who hog it or the people who didn't.
So you don't think there's a social convention that says when someone offers you take a fair share for yourself and leave the rest for others?

Or that when you're sharing food with others, you need to make sure that everyone gets their portion? You bet your rear people will notice when they're going hungry and someone has taken all the food for an outside party. Or when they've been offered a treat and it's been selfishly hoarded by one person.

I know you have issues with food and people liking food, but this is such an odd and judgmental statement.

Re your last comment I have no idea what you are talking about. I love food and consume 2500-3000 calories every day to fuel my training. So your comment in quite strange.

Re social conventions, I am envisioning a situation like what happens in my office. A group email goes out: "there are cookies in the break room!" I either go then, or wait until I may want a cookie, and if there are cookies then great. If not, great. I am not entitled to a cookie. Is it weird to take cookies for kids to save for later? I guess so. But I would never notice or care.

If everyone is all together when food is presented I would say something if I thought another person was taking more than their share, but only if I noticed and only if I were going to take the food right then and there myself. Unless I am guarding the food I don't see how I would notice.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Goosey on August 26, 2014, 12:09:14 PM
Because it's right in front of you? Because you see that other people are going to get some and none are available. I mean, considering the tales here, it would be baffling if you were so, shall we say, introspective that you didn't notice the issues people around you were having accessing an offered meal. And you are also being rather insulting to people who DO notice. It's great that you wouldn't notice or care that people are hoarding cookies. But I do - because it's rude. And I want a cookie.

Yes, I know about your extensive exercise routine and calorie intake. You also tend to jump into threads about people being disappointed by some aspect of a meal or lack thereof by saying you don't understand why food is so important to people. It's really not helpful or productive to constantly point out you think people have an unhealthy relationship with food because they would like to eat some and are disappointed when they don't.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Delete My Account on August 26, 2014, 12:11:30 PM
I find it odd that so many people hog free food, but equally odd that so many people notice and care. No one is entitled to free food - not the people who hog it or the people who didn't.
So you don't think there's a social convention that says when someone offers you take a fair share for yourself and leave the rest for others?

Or that when you're sharing food with others, you need to make sure that everyone gets their portion? You bet your rear people will notice when they're going hungry and someone has taken all the food for an outside party. Or when they've been offered a treat and it's been selfishly hoarded by one person.

I know you have issues with food and people liking food, but this is such an odd and judgmental statement.

Re your last comment I have no idea what you are talking about. I love food and consume 2500-3000 calories every day to fuel my training. So your comment in quite strange.

Re social conventions, I am envisioning a situation like what happens in my office. A group email goes out: "there are cookies in the break room!" I either go then, or wait until I may want a cookie, and if there are cookies then great. If not, great. I am not entitled to a cookie. Is it weird to take cookies for kids to save for later? I guess so. But I would never notice or care.

If everyone is all together when food is presented I would say something if I thought another person was taking more than their share, but only if I noticed and only if I were going to take the food right then and there myself. Unless I am guarding the food I don't see how I would notice.

You don't consider it poor etiquette to take more than your share? To take home food meant for employees for your family? Especially when you're in a position that pays more than the employees from whom it's being taken?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Mental Magpie on August 26, 2014, 12:15:28 PM
Would I notice no cookies when I showed up later than everyone else? Probabaly, and I'd note that I didn't get there early enough; but a snack is a far cry from an entire meal (pizza). That I would notice because that is a substantial amount of food. I see nothing off about noticing that someone has taken my share of a substantial gift and is giving it to someone for whom it was not meant.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: laughtermed on August 26, 2014, 12:18:47 PM
One company I worked at handled this situation very well-if there were parties for clients, etc, it was always announced "Guests are served first, and then staff". People were very cooperative all around concerning food.

Back to Pizza Thief's kids - I wonder what they thought about getting leftovers from work-Gee, Dad/Mom just brought us leftover pizza for dinner?

Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Delete My Account on August 26, 2014, 12:20:17 PM
Would I notice no cookies when I showed up later than everyone else? Probabaly, and I'd note that I didn't get there early enough; but a snack is a far cry from an entire meal (pizza). That I would notice because that is a substantial amount of food. I see nothing off about noticing that someone has taken my share of a substantial gift and is giving it to someone for whom it was not meant.

Especially when it's several boxes. That's kinda hard to miss.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Goosey on August 26, 2014, 12:23:13 PM
You don't consider it poor etiquette to take more than your share? To take home food meant for employees for your family? Especially when you're in a position that pays more than the employees from whom it's being taken?

Especially if the food is bought on the company dime. Unless it's the owner taking a greater share of the food (then he's being a bad host), that's stealing.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 26, 2014, 12:23:52 PM
Because it's right in front of you? Because you see that other people are going to get some and none are available. I mean, considering the tales here, it would be baffling if you were so, shall we say, introspective that you didn't notice the issues people around you were having accessing an offered meal. And you are also being rather insulting to people who DO notice. It's great that you wouldn't notice or care that people are hoarding cookies. But I do - because it's rude. And I want a cookie.

Yes, I know about your extensive exercise routine and calorie intake. You also tend to jump into threads about people being disappointed by some aspect of a meal or lack thereof by saying you don't understand why food is so important to people. It's really not helpful or productive to constantly point out you think people have an unhealthy relationship with food because they would like to eat some and are disappointed when they don't.

I would appreciate it if you tone down your comments toward me.  That said, at what point is does it go from impolite to notice and comment on what other people are or are not eating to bafflingly introspective to not notice what other people are or are not putting onto their plates and into their mouths? You are free to notice and comment on what other people are or are not eating.  It is not something I choose to do.  As I said upthread, if I noticed someone taking more than their share at the exact same time I wanted my share I would say something - for myself.  I would not presume to otherwise notice or comment on what people are or are not eating.  And if I want a cookie, or a piece of pizza (or 5), and the free offerings are gone, I will buy it myself.  :)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 26, 2014, 12:26:58 PM
I do know that observations differ about meals. For example, I had a pizza thread a long time ago, where I was mad at people in the office loading up their plates with more than their share of pizza when others had yet to get a chance at it. For me, it's not difficult to look at the available food and mentally divide it by the number of people present, so I know what my share is or at least where I should start.

Two pizzas x 8 pieces each = 16 pieces, with 8 people I should take no more than 2 slices unless there are substantial leftovers, and I'm going to start with just 1 slice at a time. To me that seems pretty basic. But, your brain has to work that way, and you have to stop and think about it. It could be one of those things like how some people always know which way is west and I have no clue about that, so if anyone gives me directions involving compass points I'm completely lost.

Would I go around the office counting up how many cookies each person was stockpiling at their desk? No. But if we're all gathered there when the food is presented, I figure out how much I think *I* should take, to police myself, and then it's easy to notice if someone else is taking a lot more than that. 7 cookies instead of 2, for example, grabbed all at once before other people have even gotten to the cookies (we have to do a single-file line because our break room is small). Sometimes people even announce what they're doing: "I'm going to be a little piggy and take more!" Ooookay then. But I have to admit that I don't usually say or do anything about it at the time, I just remember it for the future (and EHell).
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Yvaine on August 26, 2014, 12:29:55 PM
I do know that observations differ about meals. For example, I had a pizza thread a long time ago, where I was mad at people in the office loading up their plates with more than their share of pizza when others had yet to get a chance at it. For me, it's not difficult to look at the available food and mentally divide it by the number of people present, so I know what my share is or at least where I should start.

Two pizzas x 8 pieces each = 16 pieces, with 8 people I should take no more than 2 slices unless there are substantial leftovers, and I'm going to start with just 1 slice at a time. To me that seems pretty basic. But, your brain has to work that way, and you have to stop and think about it. It could be one of those things like how some people always know which way is west and I have no clue about that, so if anyone gives me directions involving compass points I'm completely lost.

I always chalk it up from being from a big family.  ;D I'm not actually great at regular math, but I can mentally divide food in a flash!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Goosey on August 26, 2014, 12:30:05 PM
Because it's right in front of you? Because you see that other people are going to get some and none are available. I mean, considering the tales here, it would be baffling if you were so, shall we say, introspective that you didn't notice the issues people around you were having accessing an offered meal. And you are also being rather insulting to people who DO notice. It's great that you wouldn't notice or care that people are hoarding cookies. But I do - because it's rude. And I want a cookie.

Yes, I know about your extensive exercise routine and calorie intake. You also tend to jump into threads about people being disappointed by some aspect of a meal or lack thereof by saying you don't understand why food is so important to people. It's really not helpful or productive to constantly point out you think people have an unhealthy relationship with food because they would like to eat some and are disappointed when they don't.

I would appreciate it if you tone down your comments toward me.  That said, at what point is does it go from impolite to notice and comment on what other people are or are not eating to bafflingly introspective to not notice what other people are or are not putting onto their plates and into their mouths? You are free to notice and comment on what other people are or are not eating.  It is not something I choose to do.  As I said upthread, if I noticed someone taking more than their share at the exact same time I wanted my share I would say something - for myself.  I would not presume to otherwise notice or comment on what people are or are not eating.  And if I want a cookie, or a piece of pizza (or 5), and the free offerings are gone, I will buy it myself.  :)

I'm not angry, just making an observation about your tone towards people's relationship with food. Often we don't notice trends in our own posting and I think a review of your would display many such comments in many similar threads and many such refuting statements leading to an unproductive conversation about whether or not it's okay to be emotional about something relating to food.

As to the rest of your statement, I tend to notice more when other people are disappointed in not being able to eat. I think that's natural to notice. I think concern for others and, yes, myself and disappointed is natural and healthy and good. I also think it's natural and healthy and good to stand up for others when their fair share is being pilfered. You're making a point of "not noticing." Fine. But that doesn't mean that taking more than your share is not rude to others who would like to partake. And that's what this thread is really about. YMMV.

edited: partake/part take - it bothered me lol
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: amylouky on August 26, 2014, 12:31:15 PM
I think there's a difference between "realtime" food hogging, and leftover food hogging.
If we have a company lunch and someone takes way more than their share, then yes, I think it is rude, as it would leave others without enough food. Leftovers, at least the way they are at my office, are fair game for anyone. Generally there will be a message sent out that they are available. If you get some, great, if not..  too bad.
That being said, I do think it's horribly rude to take any kind of food, whether realtime or leftover, home to feed your family. That is not who it is meant for. And also, food that has been sitting there for 15 minutes (or an hour, even) is not leftover, as it's entirely possible someone else hasn't gotten any yet.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: EMuir on August 26, 2014, 12:37:08 PM
Because it's right in front of you? Because you see that other people are going to get some and none are available. I mean, considering the tales here, it would be baffling if you were so, shall we say, introspective that you didn't notice the issues people around you were having accessing an offered meal. And you are also being rather insulting to people who DO notice. It's great that you wouldn't notice or care that people are hoarding cookies. But I do - because it's rude. And I want a cookie.

Yes, I know about your extensive exercise routine and calorie intake. You also tend to jump into threads about people being disappointed by some aspect of a meal or lack thereof by saying you don't understand why food is so important to people. It's really not helpful or productive to constantly point out you think people have an unhealthy relationship with food because they would like to eat some and are disappointed when they don't.

I would appreciate it if you tone down your comments toward me.  That said, at what point is does it go from impolite to notice and comment on what other people are or are not eating to bafflingly introspective to not notice what other people are or are not putting onto their plates and into their mouths? You are free to notice and comment on what other people are or are not eating.  It is not something I choose to do.  As I said upthread, if I noticed someone taking more than their share at the exact same time I wanted my share I would say something - for myself.  I would not presume to otherwise notice or comment on what people are or are not eating.  And if I want a cookie, or a piece of pizza (or 5), and the free offerings are gone, I will buy it myself.  :)

I think you are speaking from a place of privilege and perhaps don't realize it.

What if you were depending on the pizza to be your lunch? You get there on time and no pizza. You have a half hour lunch, or even an hour. How do you get lunch? Maybe there's no cafe nearby. If you want pizza, you now have to order one yourself, which includes delivery time and tip and probably costs more because you can't order just two slices. And will it get there in time for you to eat it? If so, do you have the money to afford it? After all that, you have to put the remainder in the fridge, where people might assume it's left over from the free lunch and eat it. So now you've paid $20+ for a free pizza lunch. It's easier and cheaper to just buy a snack from a machine, if those are even available... but it doesn't make you feel better about having missed pizza.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Delete My Account on August 26, 2014, 12:41:18 PM
Because it's right in front of you? Because you see that other people are going to get some and none are available. I mean, considering the tales here, it would be baffling if you were so, shall we say, introspective that you didn't notice the issues people around you were having accessing an offered meal. And you are also being rather insulting to people who DO notice. It's great that you wouldn't notice or care that people are hoarding cookies. But I do - because it's rude. And I want a cookie.

Yes, I know about your extensive exercise routine and calorie intake. You also tend to jump into threads about people being disappointed by some aspect of a meal or lack thereof by saying you don't understand why food is so important to people. It's really not helpful or productive to constantly point out you think people have an unhealthy relationship with food because they would like to eat some and are disappointed when they don't.

I would appreciate it if you tone down your comments toward me.  That said, at what point is does it go from impolite to notice and comment on what other people are or are not eating to bafflingly introspective to not notice what other people are or are not putting onto their plates and into their mouths? You are free to notice and comment on what other people are or are not eating.  It is not something I choose to do.  As I said upthread, if I noticed someone taking more than their share at the exact same time I wanted my share I would say something - for myself.  I would not presume to otherwise notice or comment on what people are or are not eating.  And if I want a cookie, or a piece of pizza (or 5), and the free offerings are gone, I will buy it myself.  :)

So you think it's acceptable etiquette to take advantage of free food before considering that maybe not everyone else has gotten their fair share?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Yvaine on August 26, 2014, 12:43:17 PM
Fine. But that doesn't mean that taking more than your share is not rude to others who would like to part take. And that's what this thread is really about. YMMV.

This. And a large percentage of the time, you can substitute something else for food and still have the same etiquette principle at work. We have a lot of questions about food because it's something all of us deal with every day, and often share with other people, and so you run into people's different behaviors and assumptions about it. But a lot of etiquette applies to food the same way it would apply to other items.

As an example, a few years ago, we had a thread where somebody cut up and gave away someone else's gift cake before the giftee had even had a bite. The giftee was upset, and a few posters chalked that up to an "unhealthy relationship with food," but IMO, you could make it a new sweater instead and have the same question. Should the other woman destroy and give away her friend's gift sweater before she's ever even worn it? Of course not, and I think almost everyone would understand why she was sad, and it doesn't require her to have an unhealthy relationship with sweaters.

And when it is food, EMuir is correct, a lot of times--and in a lot of jobs--you don't have time to get a different lunch. No, nobody's "entitled" to free food, but once the company has promised it, I think it's fair to assume it will be there and factor it into your day. Especially if it's meant to be a "working lunch."
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: wolfie on August 26, 2014, 12:45:36 PM
And in this case it was meant as a thank you for working hard over a weekend. SO you get the blues from not getting to enjoy the weekend with the added insult that someone else took your thank you from you too. Doesn't exactly boost morale.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Delete My Account on August 26, 2014, 12:47:27 PM
Fine. But that doesn't mean that taking more than your share is not rude to others who would like to part take. And that's what this thread is really about. YMMV.
And when it is food, EMuir is correct, a lot of times--and in a lot of jobs--you don't have time to get a different lunch. No, nobody's "entitled" to free food, but once the company has promised it, I think it's fair to assume it will be there and factor it into your day. Especially if it's meant to be a "working lunch."

And it's funny that there's the sentiment that "no one is entitled to free food" when the complainant is asking for their fair share, but perfectly okay when a higher up takes enough for their entire family.  ::)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 26, 2014, 12:47:45 PM
Because it's right in front of you? Because you see that other people are going to get some and none are available. I mean, considering the tales here, it would be baffling if you were so, shall we say, introspective that you didn't notice the issues people around you were having accessing an offered meal. And you are also being rather insulting to people who DO notice. It's great that you wouldn't notice or care that people are hoarding cookies. But I do - because it's rude. And I want a cookie.

Yes, I know about your extensive exercise routine and calorie intake. You also tend to jump into threads about people being disappointed by some aspect of a meal or lack thereof by saying you don't understand why food is so important to people. It's really not helpful or productive to constantly point out you think people have an unhealthy relationship with food because they would like to eat some and are disappointed when they don't.

I would appreciate it if you tone down your comments toward me.  That said, at what point is does it go from impolite to notice and comment on what other people are or are not eating to bafflingly introspective to not notice what other people are or are not putting onto their plates and into their mouths? You are free to notice and comment on what other people are or are not eating.  It is not something I choose to do.  As I said upthread, if I noticed someone taking more than their share at the exact same time I wanted my share I would say something - for myself.  I would not presume to otherwise notice or comment on what people are or are not eating.  And if I want a cookie, or a piece of pizza (or 5), and the free offerings are gone, I will buy it myself.  :)

So you think it's acceptable etiquette to take advantage of free food before considering that maybe not everyone else has gotten their fair share?

Nope - not at all, and not at all what I said.  I said I would not personally notice what other people did or did not eat unless I were right there and they were preventing me from taking my share, at which point I would say something.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 26, 2014, 12:49:44 PM
Fine. But that doesn't mean that taking more than your share is not rude to others who would like to part take. And that's what this thread is really about. YMMV.
And when it is food, EMuir is correct, a lot of times--and in a lot of jobs--you don't have time to get a different lunch. No, nobody's "entitled" to free food, but once the company has promised it, I think it's fair to assume it will be there and factor it into your day. Especially if it's meant to be a "working lunch."

And it's funny that there's the sentiment that "no one is entitled to free food" when the complainant is asking for their fair share, but perfectly okay when a higher up takes enough for their entire family.  ::)

Of course that is weird and rude.  I simply would not likely ever notice.  And I wouldn't be upset about not getting something for free.  Clearly not everyone agrees and that is fine. 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Delete My Account on August 26, 2014, 12:53:31 PM
Fine. But that doesn't mean that taking more than your share is not rude to others who would like to part take. And that's what this thread is really about. YMMV.
And when it is food, EMuir is correct, a lot of times--and in a lot of jobs--you don't have time to get a different lunch. No, nobody's "entitled" to free food, but once the company has promised it, I think it's fair to assume it will be there and factor it into your day. Especially if it's meant to be a "working lunch."

And it's funny that there's the sentiment that "no one is entitled to free food" when the complainant is asking for their fair share, but perfectly okay when a higher up takes enough for their entire family.  ::)

Of course that is weird and rude.  I simply would not likely ever notice.  And I wouldn't be upset about not getting something for free.  Clearly not everyone agrees and that is fine.

I think the reason why a few posters are upset with what you are saying because you're coming off as though the people who have an issue with it are being petty and trivial. Maybe you don't intend to, and if not, I apologize for assuming as much, but that's the vibe I'm personally getting. Is it not a valid etiquette issue?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Goosey on August 26, 2014, 12:57:48 PM
Nope - not at all, and not at all what I said.  I said I would not personally notice what other people did or did not eat unless I were right there and they were preventing me from taking my share, at which point I would say something.

So, (and again, not angry, just curious) why would you come into a thread about people noticing this type of thing and caring and declare that you'd neither notice nor care because its not important to you? Just seems very contrary and judgmental to those who do notice and care. Not to mention rather goading.

It's rather like going into a fan club just to say you do not like the subject of their gathering and other people shouldn't care so much about it either. Leaves everyone going  ??? and a little  >:( that you went out of your way just to poop on their discussion.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: chi2kcldy on August 26, 2014, 12:59:53 PM
This reminds me of the temp admin we had previously. We assumed something was up with the Thank You gifts from clients. Whenever she signed for a gift the basket was unwrapped before the rest of us could look at it. Eventually we caught on to what she was doing. The admin would open up the gift and take out the "good stuff."

Our director told her to not open anything and give him all the gifts from vendors going forward. She did not listen and opened a gift from a vendor to a coworker. It was a lovely Godiva Chocolate tower. Although the gift came from a common vendor, the vendor was the coworkers husband. Yep, genius opened our Senior Manager's present. Then ate a good portion of it. Needless to say, our director requested a new temp the following week.

It's a shame because he was going to hire her after the 90 days were up. ::)

Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: amylouky on August 26, 2014, 01:01:48 PM
Fine. But that doesn't mean that taking more than your share is not rude to others who would like to part take. And that's what this thread is really about. YMMV.
And when it is food, EMuir is correct, a lot of times--and in a lot of jobs--you don't have time to get a different lunch. No, nobody's "entitled" to free food, but once the company has promised it, I think it's fair to assume it will be there and factor it into your day. Especially if it's meant to be a "working lunch."

And it's funny that there's the sentiment that "no one is entitled to free food" when the complainant is asking for their fair share, but perfectly okay when a higher up takes enough for their entire family.  ::)

Of course that is weird and rude.  I simply would not likely ever notice.  And I wouldn't be upset about not getting something for free.  Clearly not everyone agrees and that is fine.

I think that, in the OP case, it's not really "free food". Leftovers set out in a first come first serve area is free food. This was intended to provide lunch for everyone, as a thank you for working long hours/outside normal schedule. Taking the food issue out of it, say the boss came in with a stack of $tarbucks gift certs, and set them out for everyone. Would it be piggy/rude for someone to scoop most/all of them up? Of course. 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 26, 2014, 01:16:30 PM
Yes, the first round of the pizza is not really "free" in this case--the employees didn't have to pay cash for it, but they're giving up their weekend to be at the office, and providing them with food at the office not only boosts morale but also keeps them from going out to lunch (possibly taking longer to get back to work). So I would say everyone working at the office that day was entitled to a fair share of that lunch. Companies have different policies, but I think a safe assumption is that the food is meant to be eaten at the office, by employees, working that day, with all employees in the group getting roughly equal amounts.

So, taking any home would violate that, whether it was for yourself (living alone) or your family. Taking it for your family would also violate the rule that only employees can eat it. As would taking substantially more than the others in the group are getting, even if you intend to eat it yourself right then. Also, an employee who wasn't working that day, coming in specifically to get food, would violate the rule.

Which is not to say all of those behaviors are automatically rude--my boss would rather send a four-day-old pizza home with someone on Friday, than have it sit at the office untouched all weekend and be thrown out on Monday. But she gets to make that call because she's the boss. And taking home a pizza that others have had several days to eat on, is very different from taking home a fresh pizza the day it was delivered.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: DanaJ on August 26, 2014, 01:20:52 PM
We had a food thief at a school I taught at.  The thief would go into lunches and just take part of the lunch.  We though we knew who it was, but noone had caught the thief.  So, one week we all made two lunches for a few days.  One we kept with us and the other--with an extra little bit of an added ingredient--went in the fridge.
Sure enough we were able to figure out for sure who the thief was as he had to make several extra bathroom trips during the day. 
Nothing was ever said by us or thieft but we never had a food thief again.

When I see posts like this I feel I need to remind people that — even though the thief wouldn't suffer if not for his/her own criminal activity — in many, many juristictions if you tamper with food that you know someone will consume you can be charged with a criminal offense. Where I live, a similar office prank resulted in charges of "administering a noxious substance" and assault against the person who spiked their lunch with a laxative to punish a lunch thief.

Similarly, in many (if not most) North American locations you can not booby trap a car with the intent of injuring a would-be thief.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: lowspark on August 26, 2014, 01:22:45 PM
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: AfleetAlex on August 26, 2014, 01:33:23 PM
I think I've told this story in another thread, but I used to work in a media office and we always got free food delivered from new restaurants or regular advertisers so that the on-air staff would talk about it. Our receptionist used to regularly take home a stack of food for her extended family (her children were grown but I think she lived with at least one of them) and the management didn't seem to care. For example, we got three trays of muffins sent over; she took a whole one home before some of us had a chance to even see them. (We worked odd shifts, not just 8-5, so there was a chance a couple on-air staff members wouldn't even know they were in the building.) That always rankled me.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Goosey on August 26, 2014, 01:38:57 PM
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
Even if it weren't compensation and just a random treat, though, I think common descency says you shouldn't take all of it or a significant portion of it yourself and deny others the chance
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: lowspark on August 26, 2014, 01:40:51 PM
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
Even if it weren't compensation and just a random treat, though, I think common descency says you shouldn't take all of it or a significant portion of it yourself and deny others the chance

I agree. I was just referring to the OP.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Goosey on August 26, 2014, 01:43:20 PM
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
Even if it weren't compensation and just a random treat, though, I think common decency says you shouldn't take all of it or a significant portion of it yourself and deny others the chance

I agree. I was just referring to the OP.
Oh, sorry!

I do think it's definitely MORE egregious when it's part of compensation!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 26, 2014, 01:49:51 PM
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: lowspark on August 26, 2014, 01:52:41 PM
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
Even if it weren't compensation and just a random treat, though, I think common decency says you shouldn't take all of it or a significant portion of it yourself and deny others the chance

I agree. I was just referring to the OP.
Oh, sorry!

I do think it's definitely MORE egregious when it's part of compensation!

No apology necessary. I had to go back and read the OP to see what the actual story was again because I began posting additional comments but realized they didn't apply at all.  ;D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Yvaine on August 26, 2014, 01:53:58 PM
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.

And then you get into situations where you don't know if more is coming! A wedding buffet might be a good example. If you look around and there are about 50 guests, and you only see 25 chicken breasts, does that mean only half of you can get chicken, or will the caterer bring out more when the dish is empty? It's not always easy to guess.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: lowspark on August 26, 2014, 01:56:18 PM
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.

This is probably a learn-by-experience thing for most people. When I'm hosting something, I tend to provide way too much food. The horrors of running out! So even if I were in charge of ordering on someone else's dime, as you were, I'd probably over order. But in that case, I'd just check in with the person who was footing the bill.

"There are going to be seven people eating, I'm thinking three large pizzas plus a couple orders of breadsticks. Does that sound about right to you?"

They can then chime in to say it's too much or not enough or whatever. I'd just way rather have leftovers than have someone looking for more food and not finding it.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: siamesecat2965 on August 26, 2014, 02:25:24 PM
One company I worked at handled this situation very well-if there were parties for clients, etc, it was always announced "Guests are served first, and then staff". People were very cooperative all around concerning food.

 

Several jobs ago, we did this as well. I worked for a large pharma company, on the executive floor, so we got a lot of higher ups from our home office, overseas. And they would go all out for meals and such for meetings. I still recall one, wehre they put out such a spread,

Hot food, salads, sandwiches, desserts, what have you, and it was barely touched. After it was over, we could go in and grab some food, but were amazed at just how much was left!   We all took some for lunch, and our boss kept encouraging us to take the rest home for us and our families, as it would go to waste, but like I said, small floor, not a lot of staff, but wow.  But I know that isn't the norm.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: AzaleaBloom on August 26, 2014, 02:37:27 PM
At my work, it used to be they would do things like get pizza or food from a local restaurant delivered for everyone - office staff and line workers included.

Those of us who were part of the office staff (4 of us) knew that if we wanted to eat, we had to get there before line workers did.  Otherwise, they would load up multiple plates and those who were later in line would not get anything.  I think they took the bosses very literally when they said "Help yourselves!  Take as much as you want!"

 I learned to bring lunch with me on those days just in case - I get thirty minutes for lunch and traffic is terrible where I work.  It's almost impossible to get somewhere, get lunch, and get back in thirty minutes.

They resolved this issue by doing things like having one of the bosses grill and hand the food to the employees, or by having someone come in to prepare made-to-order omelets. 




Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: DanaJ on August 26, 2014, 04:07:11 PM
This is probably a learn-by-experience thing for most people. When I'm hosting something, I tend to provide way too much food. The horrors of running out! So even if I were in charge of ordering on someone else's dime, as you were, I'd probably over order. But in that case, I'd just check in with the person who was footing the bill.

Our events co-ordinator says she budgets for a minimum 10% over-run. If 50 people are coming, she makes sure there are plated meals for 55.

Reading this thread makes me really appreciate my co-workers. When we have pizza, people take one slice at a time. Sure, some may end up eating three or four slices, but everyone only takes a single slice at a time, so everyone gets a chance to get something.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: VorFemme on August 26, 2014, 05:10:36 PM
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.

And then you get into situations where you don't know if more is coming! A wedding buffet might be a good example. If you look around and there are about 50 guests, and you only see 25 chicken breasts, does that mean only half of you can get chicken, or will the caterer bring out more when the dish is empty? It's not always easy to guess.

My last job, for several years, the practice had been getting a buffet set up with 300 hamburgers and 300 hot dogs for a set price from the basement cafeteria - for years.  When the manager ordered food for 300 - that was what was meant, understood, and delivered.

Some people got one of each, some got two of one, some got two of the other, and a very few got one of only one.  There would be a call for the leftovers, if there were any, after the staff and then the managers went through the line.  The very few leftovers might be set aside in the break room fridge - in case someone got hungry before the evening shift got served their "lunch".

First lunch in a new building, the manager ordered food for 300 from the new manager of the new cafeteria (same company) in the basement and the price was very, very close to the same amount as it had been three months earlier in the old building.

But what was set up for the 300 people was 150 hamburgers and 150 hot dogs, while everyone was continuing to use the old "get two of something" habit.  A manager asked when they were going to restock and was told about 1/3 of the way through 300 people that only 300 total meals had been prepared...not 600 pieces for 300 meals.

A lot of pizza was immediately ordered with instructions to limit people to no more than 3 slices on the first time through the line with an announcement for people to come back for seconds after everyone had been served.  Managers & supervisors checked their people to make sure that everyone had some food at their desk (this was a perk for working without breaks due to an emergency in our calling area or when another region had lost power/phone service and we were having to cover two regions temporarily - it didn't happen often, but this was the established procedure).

After the fiasco with only half the food expected being delivered and the extra money to cover the emergency order of pizza coming out of the manager's pockets (or so scuttlebutt said) - they no longer ordered hamburgers & hot dogs from the basement cafeteria - but went straight through to ordering a great many pizzas....it was easier to *remind* people to start with three slices of pizza and then come through after everyone had been served.

And those people who had preferred hot dogs or hamburgers to pizza still had the option to grab something downstairs in the cafeteria, just not at company/senior management's expense. 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TootsNYC on August 26, 2014, 07:38:17 PM
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.
[/quote

I buy lunch for my people when we are busy and they can't leave their desks.

It's not really compensation, in my mind. It's definitely not a perk. (It actually makes me kind of angry to have it defined that way--when you are working through your lunch period, feeding you is the -least- your boss can do. I get a little "huh?" when my team -thanks- me for ordering lunch. I'm making you work at your desk instead of letting you take a break--why are you thanking me?)

It's a tool for them to do their jobs--just as their computer is a tool, and their desk chair.

I'd be reaming someone out if they took it for themselves, or if they took enough that other people didn't get some. Once it's all leftovers, and everyone on staff has had a full lunch, then I don't care what happens to it.

But up until that point, it's *my* food. And I am giving it to the people who need it to do their jobs.


(I posted about a problem we were having--four departments worked through lunch, and food was ordered, but the email went out to the whole staff. And people from other departments, who weren't on deadline, got all the food, and those of us who were working didn't get there in time. The guy in charge said, "You can't just invite some people." My answer was: "Yes, you can--this isn't a social occasion, this is work.")
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Curly Wurly Doggie Breath on August 26, 2014, 10:57:44 PM
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.

And then you get into situations where you don't know if more is coming! A wedding buffet might be a good example. If you look around and there are about 50 guests, and you only see 25 chicken breasts, does that mean only half of you can get chicken, or will the caterer bring out more when the dish is empty? It's not always easy to guess.

My last job, for several years, the practice had been getting a buffet set up with 300 hamburgers and 300 hot dogs for a set price from the basement cafeteria - for years.  When the manager ordered food for 300 - that was what was meant, understood, and delivered.

Some people got one of each, some got two of one, some got two of the other, and a very few got one of only one.  There would be a call for the leftovers, if there were any, after the staff and then the managers went through the line.  The very few leftovers might be set aside in the break room fridge - in case someone got hungry before the evening shift got served their "lunch".

First lunch in a new building, the manager ordered food for 300 from the new manager of the new cafeteria (same company) in the basement and the price was very, very close to the same amount as it had been three months earlier in the old building.

But what was set up for the 300 people was 150 hamburgers and 150 hot dogs, while everyone was continuing to use the old "get two of something" habit.  A manager asked when they were going to restock and was told about 1/3 of the way through 300 people that only 300 total meals had been prepared...not 600 pieces for 300 meals.

A lot of pizza was immediately ordered with instructions to limit people to no more than 3 slices on the first time through the line with an announcement for people to come back for seconds after everyone had been served.  Managers & supervisors checked their people to make sure that everyone had some food at their desk (this was a perk for working without breaks due to an emergency in our calling area or when another region had lost power/phone service and we were having to cover two regions temporarily - it didn't happen often, but this was the established procedure).

After the fiasco with only half the food expected being delivered and the extra money to cover the emergency order of pizza coming out of the manager's pockets (or so scuttlebutt said) - they no longer ordered hamburgers & hot dogs from the basement cafeteria - but went straight through to ordering a great many pizzas....it was easier to *remind* people to start with three slices of pizza and then come through after everyone had been served.

And those people who had preferred hot dogs or hamburgers to pizza still had the option to grab something downstairs in the cafeteria, just not at company/senior management's expense.

Was the basement cafe spoken too about the lack of food ?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: eltf177 on August 27, 2014, 05:43:34 AM
(I posted about a problem we were having--four departments worked through lunch, and food was ordered, but the email went out to the whole staff. And people from other departments, who weren't on deadline, got all the food, and those of us who were working didn't get there in time. The guy in charge said, "You can't just invite some people." My answer was: "Yes, you can--this isn't a social occasion, this is work.")

I would have left for the day at that point if I was treated like that. And no more working through lunch under any circumstances.

Whoever sent the e-mail to everyone should be hit with a clue-by-four, and the uninvited departments should have been told "no food for you!". >:(
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: lowspark on August 27, 2014, 08:01:33 AM
I agree. I don't see this as "free food" at all. I see it as part of the compensation that the company is offering in exchange for the work I'm providing. If one of the employees takes so much that it precludes other employees from having any, he is actually dipping into their compensation.

I buy lunch for my people when we are busy and they can't leave their desks.

It's not really compensation, in my mind. It's definitely not a perk. (It actually makes me kind of angry to have it defined that way--when you are working through your lunch period, feeding you is the -least- your boss can do. I get a little "huh?" when my team -thanks- me for ordering lunch. I'm making you work at your desk instead of letting you take a break--why are you thanking me?)

It's a tool for them to do their jobs--just as their computer is a tool, and their desk chair.

I'd be reaming someone out if they took it for themselves, or if they took enough that other people didn't get some. Once it's all leftovers, and everyone on staff has had a full lunch, then I don't care what happens to it.

But up until that point, it's *my* food. And I am giving it to the people who need it to do their jobs.


(I posted about a problem we were having--four departments worked through lunch, and food was ordered, but the email went out to the whole staff. And people from other departments, who weren't on deadline, got all the food, and those of us who were working didn't get there in time. The guy in charge said, "You can't just invite some people." My answer was: "Yes, you can--this isn't a social occasion, this is work.")

I define compensation as something given or received as an equivalent for services. You gave your staff lunch in return for their work during the lunch hour. So to me, that is compensation.

As to them thanking you, this goes back to the discussion on whether it's necessary or desirable to thank people for doing things which are or can be perceived as an obligation. And again, I fall on the side of, yes, a thank you is appropriate.

I get paid for being here and doing my job every day. But people almost always say thank you to me when I provide the service I've been hired to do. It's common courtesy. By the same token, I thank people who help me do my job by answering questions or providing necessary information.

Thank you does not only apply to when someone goes above and beyond. It's nice to hear a thank you -- a note of appreciation -- even for things that are expected or routine.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: jaxsue on August 27, 2014, 09:02:13 AM
I once had a boss, a vice-president of the dept, who took home the holiday baskets that companies had sent (the card was to the entire dept). Most of us were making minimum wage, and this guy made very good money. Ironically, we had to send a TY note to the companies on behalf of everyone in the department!  :-\
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: jaxsue on August 27, 2014, 09:07:24 AM
My office once received a gift basket of various foods addressed to everyone (about 10-12 people). Boss was off that day so I opened it and took a package of cookies and some others took other items. Boss came in the next day furious that we had opened the gift basket as she was planning to re-gift it to a client whose relative had died! She still brings it up half-jokingly about the gift basket meant for her that I "stole." Boss makes easily twice what I do and 4-5x what the other employees do. Gifts are never shared if she gets her hands on them first despite who they're addressed to.

I had bosses like that! I already posted about this, but to be short: one boss, a VP who had a high income, would take gift baskets that were intended for the entire dept home to his family.  >:(
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: jaxsue on August 27, 2014, 09:10:09 AM
I find it odd that so many people hog free food, but equally odd that so many people notice and care. No one is entitled to free food - not the people who hog it or the people who didn't.

Sorry, I disagree with this. There is a social contract, and people who are greedy are in the wrong.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: VorFemme on August 27, 2014, 09:53:28 AM
To follow up what I said about mentally dividing the amount of food by the amount of people, so I know what my share is--I know some people, generally reasonable and polite, who don't do that, because when they see "a lot" of food, they assume that whoever provided it knew what they were doing and thus there's enough for everyone to have a "normal" amount. I actually think that's quite reasonable and not at all rude, it's just that unfortunately, those assumptions are not always true.

For example, I was tasked with ordering pizza for the office, which I had little experience with. The boss was paying for it out of her own pocket and had an unrealistic idea of what pizza cost these days, so I was very conscious of not appearing, to her, to be frivolously spending her money. I figured 2 slices/person, because that's what I eat, and I think it was 7 people so I ordered 2 pizzas (16 slices, so a 2-slice margin of error). At the last minute my boss added several extra people to the lunch ::) and of course I was nervous about what I had ordered so I was watching everyone closely. I was pretty surprised to see so many people take 3 slices--couldn't they see there wasn't enough even at 2 slices/person?

And then when I came here to post about it I realized that for a lot of people, 3 slices is normal, so I was wrong in that assumption. And I didn't know what I was doing, and also was constrained by things outside of my control, so there really wasn't enough for everyone to take their "normal" amount. Ideally there should have been, but from my perspective it would have been better if people did a quick count, realized something was wrong, and tried to be part of the solution (taking only 1 slice at a time) instead of part of the problem. But, I can see how that would be well outside the normal thought process for a lot of people. Obviously in this case I was highly invested in seeing how much people ate.

And then you get into situations where you don't know if more is coming! A wedding buffet might be a good example. If you look around and there are about 50 guests, and you only see 25 chicken breasts, does that mean only half of you can get chicken, or will the caterer bring out more when the dish is empty? It's not always easy to guess.

My last job, for several years, the practice had been getting a buffet set up with 300 hamburgers and 300 hot dogs for a set price from the basement cafeteria - for years.  When the manager ordered food for 300 - that was what was meant, understood, and delivered.

Some people got one of each, some got two of one, some got two of the other, and a very few got one of only one.  There would be a call for the leftovers, if there were any, after the staff and then the managers went through the line.  The very few leftovers might be set aside in the break room fridge - in case someone got hungry before the evening shift got served their "lunch".

First lunch in a new building, the manager ordered food for 300 from the new manager of the new cafeteria (same company) in the basement and the price was very, very close to the same amount as it had been three months earlier in the old building.

But what was set up for the 300 people was 150 hamburgers and 150 hot dogs, while everyone was continuing to use the old "get two of something" habit.  A manager asked when they were going to restock and was told about 1/3 of the way through 300 people that only 300 total meals had been prepared...not 600 pieces for 300 meals.

A lot of pizza was immediately ordered with instructions to limit people to no more than 3 slices on the first time through the line with an announcement for people to come back for seconds after everyone had been served.  Managers & supervisors checked their people to make sure that everyone had some food at their desk (this was a perk for working without breaks due to an emergency in our calling area or when another region had lost power/phone service and we were having to cover two regions temporarily - it didn't happen often, but this was the established procedure).

After the fiasco with only half the food expected being delivered and the extra money to cover the emergency order of pizza coming out of the manager's pockets (or so scuttlebutt said) - they no longer ordered hamburgers & hot dogs from the basement cafeteria - but went straight through to ordering a great many pizzas....it was easier to *remind* people to start with three slices of pizza and then come through after everyone had been served.

And those people who had preferred hot dogs or hamburgers to pizza still had the option to grab something downstairs in the cafeteria, just not at company/senior management's expense.

Was the basement cafe spoken too about the lack of food ?

Scuttlebutt said that there was a talk to the manager of the new cafeteria - but what I remember is that after that fiasco, food was ordered in from other locations (such as the pizza place) instead of from the basement cafeteria.  Apparently the price hadn't changed but the amount of food was cut in half - without any comment as to what was going on with the changes.

Not being a manager, I did not go to any "catered" meetings that might have been set up.  I didn't end up eating in the new cafeteria as I was part time and no longer got a distinct "lunch break" unless I combined my morning break and my afternoon break to get a chance to eat more than a snack.  I do seem to remember that there were comments about it being a bit more expensive but not quite as good (either in the taste of the food or the quantity of food for the money). 

I didn't have much time to listen to scuttlebutt in the break room, as my combined breaks were shorter than the official "lunch break" that full time workers had - I tended to hurry in and eat my food quickly, as if I got there later, there would be more people and it was considered "rude" to ask to heat your food earlier as you had only 30 minutes to eat instead of 45 minutes to an hour...you were supposed to "wait your turn" even if that left you five minutes to eat after your food heated....low power microwave took a little longer to heat things - but it wasn't being replaced until it wore out.  Since everything had been bought brand new when they built the building, that was going to take a while.....
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 27, 2014, 10:01:06 AM
Another thing about noticing how much food other people take, is that it isn't always about trying to catch someone out who's being bad and judge them. A lot of the time I'm watching other people for cues on what *I* should do, or if what I've already done is within the (very) local norms.

Like, if I decide to take just 2 cookies, and every other person takes 5, that doesn't mean they're all greedy pigs because they took more than I did. I would say it means that I was conservative in my estimate of what a fair share was, and quite likely it would be totally fine for me to take another 3 cookies at some point.

Similarly, if I take 5 cookies because math-wise, that's my share, but everyone else has just one, I'm going to feel like *I* was being a little greedy, because everyone else's perception of the situation was that only 1 cookie was the appropriate amount to take, for whatever reason. (Possibly they know the cookies aren't very good!) This is the same phenomenon that leads to no one wanting to be the first to cut into the cake or pie, to take roughly the same amount that the person before them took, etc.. I see that a lot in our office.

Of course as with anything there are bound to be mistakes and miscalculations--like the wedding buffet where you don't know if the caterer will be bringing out more food or not. The first people going through could be assuming there's plenty more food in the back, so they're taking their full "normal" portion, but then the later group sees only empty pans that aren't being replenished, so they have to cut back on their portions. It's not necessarily that the first group was rude or greedy, they were just acting under a misapprehension.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Yvaine on August 27, 2014, 10:10:45 AM
Another thing about noticing how much food other people take, is that it isn't always about trying to catch someone out who's being bad and judge them. A lot of the time I'm watching other people for cues on what *I* should do, or if what I've already done is within the (very) local norms.

Like, if I decide to take just 2 cookies, and every other person takes 5, that doesn't mean they're all greedy pigs because they took more than I did. I would say it means that I was conservative in my estimate of what a fair share was, and quite likely it would be totally fine for me to take another 3 cookies at some point.

Similarly, if I take 5 cookies because math-wise, that's my share, but everyone else has just one, I'm going to feel like *I* was being a little greedy, because everyone else's perception of the situation was that only 1 cookie was the appropriate amount to take, for whatever reason. (Possibly they know the cookies aren't very good!) This is the same phenomenon that leads to no one wanting to be the first to cut into the cake or pie, to take roughly the same amount that the person before them took, etc.. I see that a lot in our office.

This. I think observing other people is actually a big part of etiquette, because it's how you get an idea of the norms in the specific setting you're in. It's like the thread we had a few months ago about a shouty person in exercise class. If you're in a class where that's the norm, shout away, but if you realize you're the only one shouting, turn it down.  ;D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: greencat on August 27, 2014, 10:31:36 AM
It is, generally, rude, and frequently extremely noticeable, when one person takes an excessive amount of food or other items that was meant for a group to share.

I had a guest at my home do it once, and although he was welcome to partake of my hospitality, he consumed approximately 75% of the food I had prepared.  I had made enough food to feed about twenty people even though there were only about 6 guests and myself.  We realized it was him because he'd made repeated trips back into the kitchen and had apparently been stuffing his face while standing in the kitchen.

I got a little bug-eyed but didn't say anything.  The other guests, who for the most part had known him a bit longer than I had, laid into him on my behalf.  It ended up being kind of an intervention for him - he learned from the experience and was much more polite about the quantities of food he took from shared dishes in the future.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Klein Bottle on August 27, 2014, 11:23:50 AM
It is, generally, rude, and frequently extremely noticeable, when one person takes an excessive amount of food or other items that was meant for a group to share.

I had a guest at my home do it once, and although he was welcome to partake of my hospitality, he consumed approximately 75% of the food I had prepared.  I had made enough food to feed about twenty people even though there were only about 6 guests and myself.  We realized it was him because he'd made repeated trips back into the kitchen and had apparently been stuffing his face while standing in the kitchen.

I got a little bug-eyed but didn't say anything.  The other guests, who for the most part had known him a bit longer than I had, laid into him on my behalf.  It ended up being kind of an intervention for him - he learned from the experience and was much more polite about the quantities of food he took from shared dishes in the future.

This happened at a dinner to which I was invited back in my teenaged years, and even at my young age, I knew what a certain guest did was very rude.  I learned from it.

I was out west visiting an aunt and uncle, who lived in the California desert, and one night, the skies opened up and poured rain, which caused a major flood in their town and neighborhood.  (Some people living near them actually lost their lives, it was that horrible.)  Their house was completely filled with water, which we spent the day trying to dry out/clean up as best we could.

Neighbors of theirs down the street lived on slightly higher ground, and had suffered no flood damage at all.  They invited us all down for a meal and a rest later on, which was kind-hearted and very welcome.

In the midst of this chaos, a family friend, Clueless Magoo, shows up.  He lived near the beach in L.A., and had just moseyed on down for a weekend visit without any notice, and without calling first.  He basically sat there and *watched* us suck mud and water from the house with a shop vac and brooms and mops, all the while complaining that the pool was full of mud so he could not use it.   ::)

My aunt called the neighbors and told them there was an additional person at the house, and was told, of course, bring him, too.  The neighbor wife was of Indian descent and had prepared a delicious ethnic meal, chicken and rice and some veggie dish.  We sat down, and Clueless Magoo helped himself to easily *half* of the chicken and rice dish.  The look on the neighbor wife's face was priceless, and one I will never forget.  She was too nice a lady to say anything, but my uncle was not one to hold back emotions or thoughts, ever.  He said something along the lines of," hey Clueless, what in the ehell are the rest of us supposed to eat?  You weren't even supposed to be here and you are helping yourself to all the food, you ignorant so-and-so."  Clueless just shrugged and said he was extra hungry from his drive to the desert, (about 2 hours, maybe 3 in heavy traffic), and scarfed down his meal.  (I realize my uncle was rude, also, but I think Clueless wins the grand prize.)

There would have been plenty for everyone had Clueless not basically emptied the serving bowl onto his plate.  I was very young and inexperienced in etiquette intricacies at the stage of my life, but from that night on, I always made it a point to take very little food on the first pass, so that nobody would ever have to feel as uncomfortable as we all did at the dinner table.    ;D

 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Ginger G on August 27, 2014, 12:40:34 PM
I work in a department of 12 people, and everyone is perfectly polite about food except one person (I'll call her C), I know I've told a few stories about her before on this site.  I actually like C okay, but she is pretty etiquette-challenged on a regular basis. 

Last year I got married (my one year anniversary is Friday!), and my department decided to have a little congratulations luncheon for me, with catering from a barbeque restaurant and a cake.  After lunch there was a lot leftover, so a couple of people encouraged me to take it home to DH since it was technically a party for to honor both of us.  I declined to take the food because my DH has to watch his sodium intake, but I did take him a small piece of cake.  We were all in the kitchen discussing this, and I suggested that we put it in the fridge and those that wanted to could eat it for lunch the next day.  C was right next to me when I said this.

The next day I went to our department fridge to get my lunch, and another coworker quietly informed me that C had taken everything home to her family when she left the day before.  By everything, I'm talking about at least a pound of pulled pork, 8 or so pieces of fried chicken, and multiple side dishes.  There was nothing left, even the rest of the cake was gone.  I asked my coworker why no one had said anything, and basically it was because only one person saw her do it, and this person is extremely shy and quiet.  I wasn't mad exactly, just kind of exasperated at the entitlement.  It wasn't her party and she knew that we were planning on having some the next day.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Zizi-K on August 27, 2014, 12:43:57 PM
I work in a department of 12 people, and everyone is perfectly polite about food except one person (I'll call her C), I know I've told a few stories about her before on this site.  I actually like C okay, but she is pretty etiquette-challenged on a regular basis. 

Last year I got married (my one year anniversary is Friday!), and my department decided to have a little congratulations luncheon for me, with catering from a barbeque restaurant and a cake.  After lunch there was a lot leftover, so a couple of people encouraged me to take it home to DH since it was technically a party for to honor both of us.  I declined to take the food because my DH has to watch his sodium intake, but I did take him a small piece of cake.  We were all in the kitchen discussing this, and I suggested that we put it in the fridge and those that wanted to could eat it for lunch the next day.  C was right next to me when I said this.

The next day I went to our department fridge to get my lunch, and another coworker quietly informed me that C had taken everything home to her family when she left the day before.  By everything, I'm talking about at least a pound of pulled pork, 8 or so pieces of fried chicken, and multiple side dishes.  There was nothing left, even the rest of the cake was gone.  I asked my coworker why no one had said anything, and basically it was because only one person saw her do it, and this person is extremely shy and quiet.  I wasn't mad exactly, just kind of exasperated at the entitlement.  It wasn't her party and she knew that we were planning on having some the next day.

Did you consider confronting her the following day, or at least making a big production out of saying loudly, "where did all the leftovers go? Does anyone know? I was really looking forward to some for lunch today! etc"
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: DanaJ on August 27, 2014, 02:30:53 PM
My aunt called the neighbors and told them there was an additional person at the house, and was told, of course, bring him, too.  The neighbor wife was of Indian descent and had prepared a delicious ethnic meal, chicken and rice and some veggie dish.  We sat down, and Clueless Magoo helped himself to easily *half* of the chicken and rice dish.  The look on the neighbor wife's face was priceless, and one I will never forget.  She was too nice a lady to say anything, but my uncle was not one to hold back emotions or thoughts, ever.  He said something along the lines of," hey Clueless, what in the ehell are the rest of us supposed to eat?  You weren't even supposed to be here and you are helping yourself to all the food, you ignorant so-and-so."  Clueless just shrugged and said he was extra hungry from his drive to the desert, (about 2 hours, maybe 3 in heavy traffic), and scarfed down his meal.  (I realize my uncle was rude, also, but I think Clueless wins the grand prize.)

You unlce can be forgiven, since he was exhausted from de-flooding his house and all stressed from dealing with the property damage caused by the storm. That would understandably cause most poeple to be on their last nerve.

Clueless Magoo deserved a "don't call us, we'll call you" farewell, when he left.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: eltf177 on August 27, 2014, 02:44:33 PM
Clueless Magoo deserved a "don't call us, we'll call you" farewell, when he left.

Clueless Magoo deserved a clue-by-four before being told to leave and never return under _any_ circumstances...
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Ginger G on August 27, 2014, 02:50:36 PM
Quote
Did you consider confronting her the following day, or at least making a big production out of saying loudly, "where did all the leftovers go? Does anyone know? I was really looking forward to some for lunch today! etc"

LOL, yes actually I did do that!  After my coworker told me what happened, I walked into the kitchen area and said "Oh no, all the barbecue is gone! I was going to have some for lunch today!  How disappointing!"  Everyone who sits near the kitchen area (C included) heard me.  I found out later that the other employees were trying hard not to laugh out loud because everyone knew what had really happened.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: ITSJUSTME on August 27, 2014, 03:17:54 PM
At another job I had a boss who would scout out which departments had brought in food that day, usually for a birthday of someone in THAT department or something similar.  He would pig out on their food then come back to OUR department to tell us where the "free" food was.  Luckily I quickly caught on to two very important facts:  1, I had not been invited to partake of that food (even though the department staff was usually very generous about sharing) and 2, if I actually went to get the food and boss found out about it he became annoyed that someone was cashing in on his find.

I decided the "free" food was just not worth it.  (He was a VP).
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Twik on August 27, 2014, 03:59:04 PM
I find it odd that so many people hog free food, but equally odd that so many people notice and care. No one is entitled to free food - not the people who hog it or the people who didn't.

Well, if the food is being provided to enable people to work longer hours, it seems pretty cold to expect them to still work the longer hours without eating.

It's a little like saying "the boss bought me a laptop to work on an important project that has to be done right away, but a thief stole it. Oh, well, I'm not entitled to a laptop anyway, so who cares?"
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: shhh its me on August 27, 2014, 06:18:30 PM
I find it odd that so many people hog free food, but equally odd that so many people notice and care. No one is entitled to free food - not the people who hog it or the people who didn't.

But they were entitled to pizza once the Uber Boss bought pizza for everyone and said "There is pizza " at that moment it became their pizza. It's the exact same if my boss provided vouchers for cab fair for people to get home after working late not as a matter of policy just to be nice , one person taking 70% of the vouchers so his/her family could take cabs everyone tomorrow is incredible rude and a form of theft.

And of course they noticed he complained when the pizza was eaten by the people it was meant for.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: weeblewobble on August 27, 2014, 07:29:57 PM
We had a manager that would do something quite similar. In my line of work, there was a certain time of year where we pulled very long hours, including Saturday and Sunday work. This particular manager would always decide that on Saturday afternoons, we should order in pizza (despite most of us not liking pizza or being sick of eating it after 8 Saturdays in a row!) And regardless of what we actually wanted to order, he would always add in 4-5 extra pepperoni pizzas.

We didn't catch on at first, as the pizza always seemed to get eaten, but it was really strange that for a group of 15 people, we would order 15 pizzas (especially as there were several girls who would only eat one slice) and have no leftovers. But once, the fridge in our closest breakroom was on the fritz, so we went down to the fridge in the downstairs breakroom and found five pizza boxes sitting there, with a large duffel bag next to the fridge. And that afternoon, as our manager left for the day, he had the duffel bag slung over his shoulder. He finally admitted to his co-manager that he was taking it home for his kids because "since they couldn't have Daddy because he was working so much, they at least deserve some free pizza."

The co-manager made sure that this guy was no longer in charge of ordering the pizzas, but all that meant is that when we did get pizza, he would go around and gather up the excess pizza once everyone had first grabbed their food. He'd then take it aside and do the same thing - bring it home to his kids. When I privately brought up the idea that perhaps some of the guys on our team would want seconds, and that should take precedence over bringing his kids leftovers, he said "Oh, they should be watching their weight anyway. I'm doing them a favor."  :o


Good night. The co-manager should have done more than take over ordering. This guy should have been disciplined for stealing!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: MommyPenguin on August 27, 2014, 07:52:19 PM
We had a manager that would do something quite similar. In my line of work, there was a certain time of year where we pulled very long hours, including Saturday and Sunday work. This particular manager would always decide that on Saturday afternoons, we should order in pizza (despite most of us not liking pizza or being sick of eating it after 8 Saturdays in a row!) And regardless of what we actually wanted to order, he would always add in 4-5 extra pepperoni pizzas.

We didn't catch on at first, as the pizza always seemed to get eaten, but it was really strange that for a group of 15 people, we would order 15 pizzas (especially as there were several girls who would only eat one slice) and have no leftovers. But once, the fridge in our closest breakroom was on the fritz, so we went down to the fridge in the downstairs breakroom and found five pizza boxes sitting there, with a large duffel bag next to the fridge. And that afternoon, as our manager left for the day, he had the duffel bag slung over his shoulder. He finally admitted to his co-manager that he was taking it home for his kids because "since they couldn't have Daddy because he was working so much, they at least deserve some free pizza."

The co-manager made sure that this guy was no longer in charge of ordering the pizzas, but all that meant is that when we did get pizza, he would go around and gather up the excess pizza once everyone had first grabbed their food. He'd then take it aside and do the same thing - bring it home to his kids. When I privately brought up the idea that perhaps some of the guys on our team would want seconds, and that should take precedence over bringing his kids leftovers, he said "Oh, they should be watching their weight anyway. I'm doing them a favor."  :o


Good night. The co-manager should have done more than take over ordering. This guy should have been disciplined for stealing!

To me, part of what's funny is that the kids "deserve some free pizza."  All pizza is basically free to kids.  I doubt there are many parents who expect their kids to fork over allowance money for a family pizza night.  So what he really means is, "they deserve some pizza, and I deserve not to have to pay for it."
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: camlan on August 27, 2014, 07:58:22 PM
OP here with a mini, not exciting update.

First, for the record, let me state that I took a piece of pizza when the stash was discovered in the fridge. There was so much of it--7 or 8 plates each with 7 or 8 slices of pizza--that I never thought it was anything other than someone being afraid of the pizza going bad if it sat out too long. Never crossed my mind that someone would plan to take that much pizza home with them.

But to the update.

Pizza guy spent Monday being grumpy. I heard him in the break room complaining about having to work on Saturday, and Uber Boss being a real pain, stuff like that.

Tuesday. I'm not exactly sure what happened Tuesday, but my suspicion is that Pizza Guy was Talked To by someone. Okay, I know he was talked to, because he spent quite a while in the break room complaining about it. I'm just not positive *who* did the talking--Pizza Guy's immediate supervisor, the guy over him or Uber Boss, or some combination of the three. Those are pretty much the only choices.

I'm pretty sure the talk was about more than just the pizza. I received a grudging apology from Pizza Guy, in the hearing of his immediate supervisor. On Saturday, Pizza Guy yelled at me, about something that was not my responsibility and completely not under my control. (Since the top two people on this project are in the hospital, I've been doing my job and the job of the Project Director for Pizza Guy. Another person from my department is doing his own job and the job of the assistant Project Director.)

Pizza Guy is not happy. And he is, in my opinion unwisely, being very vocal about it.

On the other hand, I got a very nice email from Uber Boss on Monday, thanking me for my hard work on this project. I didn't even realize he knew who I was.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Library Dragon on August 27, 2014, 08:39:35 PM
OP I will gently disagree. I think it is an exciting update. Über Boss, or some other senior person, talked to PG instead of ignoring it. PG's other rude behavior seems to have been addressed. Your hard work has been recognized.  A trifecta!

Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: weeblewobble on August 27, 2014, 09:05:10 PM
I don't think you're going to have to worry about Pizza Guy for very long. He's going to run his mouth until he's out of a job.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Delete My Account on August 27, 2014, 09:12:59 PM
Geez, I can't believe he's that sore over not being able to get away with this. He sounds like a petulant child.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Mergatroyd on August 27, 2014, 09:13:12 PM
Great mini-update!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: JenJay on August 27, 2014, 09:28:40 PM
I don't think you're going to have to worry about Pizza Guy for very long. He's going to run his mouth until he's out of a job.

Yep!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Reika on August 27, 2014, 09:37:59 PM
I have to agree, it sounds like Pizza Guy is working his way towards a case of Professional Darwinism.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Black Delphinium on August 27, 2014, 10:29:29 PM
I wish someone would Talk To our food hoarder. Heaven forbid we get treated to something on his day off, we'll here about it for days..."how could we?",  "It's so unfair!", "We're so mean!"...you get the picture.

Glad to hear your higher ups have a good perspective on the offense.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Peppergirl on August 27, 2014, 11:49:04 PM
It really does seem like every office has a food hoarder.  I just don't get it.

I'm fascinated by it (and glad I now work at home) and would love to understand the psychology behind it.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Winterlight on August 28, 2014, 09:02:53 AM
It sounds like Pizza Guy is going to be Fired Guy at this rate.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Twik on August 28, 2014, 09:10:52 AM
It really does seem like every office has a food hoarder.  I just don't get it.

I'm fascinated by it (and glad I now work at home) and would love to understand the psychology behind it.

I think in many cases it really has something in common with hoarding. I mean, it's great to save a little on food, but not at the cost of your job, right?

But the food must, in some people, trigger some sort of survival instinct. "I have food, and the others don't. Therefore, I will survive the coming Apocalypse, and they won't. Muhahaha!!!!"
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 28, 2014, 09:23:32 AM
We don't have a fresh food hoarder in my office, but we have a stale food hoarder. Once a month I have the interns clean out the food fridge, tossing out unlabeled, expired food (like yogurt from 2013). My co-worker Grace will actually get into the trash can and pull it back out, and put it back in the fridge. Last time I was like, "Grace, is this yogurt yours?"
"No."
"Do you know whose it is?"
"No."
"Are you going to eat it?"
"Well, maybe. I'm sure it's still good."

::) I finally claimed the yogurt was mine and *I* wanted to throw it away, to get her to leave it alone. The boss had to intervene, and throw stuff out a second time. Grace is one of those people who scrapes every last molecule of peanut butter out of the jar, and cuts the moldy parts off of bread to eat the rest. Which, if it's her own food that only she is eating, fine, I don't care. But I refuse to let her hoard year-old food that wasn't hers originally, that she doesn't even claim now, and that she has no clear plans for consuming or taking home. Our mini-fridge would fill up with that kind of thing if she had her way.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: magicdomino on August 28, 2014, 09:32:01 AM
Geez, I can't believe he's that sore over not being able to get away with this. He sounds like a petulant child.

It sounds like the pizza hoarding was just one symptom of a major attitude problem.  He was angry about working Saturday, never mind that the others probably had better things to do too.  Part of that was to hoard the pizza as a "I'll show them!" kind of thing.  Petulent child, indeed.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: bloo on August 28, 2014, 12:21:16 PM
We don't have a fresh food hoarder in my office, but we have a stale food hoarder. Once a month I have the interns clean out the food fridge, tossing out unlabeled, expired food (like yogurt from 2013). My co-worker Grace will actually get into the trash can and pull it back out, and put it back in the fridge. Last time I was like, "Grace, is this yogurt yours?"
"No."
"Do you know whose it is?"
"No."
"Are you going to eat it?"
"Well, maybe. I'm sure it's still good."

::) I finally claimed the yogurt was mine and *I* wanted to throw it away, to get her to leave it alone. The boss had to intervene, and throw stuff out a second time. Grace is one of those people who scrapes every last molecule of peanut butter out of the jar, and cuts the moldy parts off of bread to eat the rest. Which, if it's her own food that only she is eating, fine, I don't care. But I refuse to let her hoard year-old food that wasn't hers originally, that she doesn't even claim now, and that she has no clear plans for consuming or taking home. Our mini-fridge would fill up with that kind of thing if she had her way.

Although it's not the office, this is how I sort of deal with my mom. We live out-of-state, but when I visit, Mom has a standing request that I will clean out her fridge and re-organize her pantry. Maybe even her cabinets if I have time. She'll have flavored cream cheeses that are over a year old (why don't they mold? I'm suspicious of food that won't - eventually - go bad) and all kinds of food that needs to be chucked. She simply can't throw food out herself. So she *asks* me to clean her fridge. I clean it thoroughly and junk everything that is spoiled or hopelessly outdated. She gets mad about why I threw away perfectly good food. I ignore her anger. She asks me to do it again the next time I visit. Lather, rinse, repeat. For the last, roughly, 20 years.

I really believe she wants it done. It's just easier to let me do it and get peevish with me than for her to do it herself and feel guilty about throwing food away. 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Syfygeek on August 28, 2014, 02:09:11 PM
It is, generally, rude, and frequently extremely noticeable, when one person takes an excessive amount of food or other items that was meant for a group to share.

I had a guest at my home do it once, and although he was welcome to partake of my hospitality, he consumed approximately 75% of the food I had prepared.  I had made enough food to feed about twenty people even though there were only about 6 guests and myself.  We realized it was him because he'd made repeated trips back into the kitchen and had apparently been stuffing his face while standing in the kitchen.

I got a little bug-eyed but didn't say anything.  The other guests, who for the most part had known him a bit longer than I had, laid into him on my behalf.  It ended up being kind of an intervention for him - he learned from the experience and was much more polite about the quantities of food he took from shared dishes in the future.

After my wedding reception, the food was packed and my then DH took it home. His brother came in from out of state to perform our ceremony, was staying with us, so we thought we'd be able to eat and relax. When we unpacked the food, we realized more had been eaten than we thought, and it was odd, because I had way over estimated how much food to order. The photographer had set up his video camera in a corner after the ceremony and just left it running. Since he was a longtime family friend on DH's side, he gave us the unedited tape to watch with the BIL. Watching the video, we found out where the food went. The video caught my 2nd cousin's husband make (and I kid you not) 8 trips through the buffet line, each time with a heaping plate. It became legend in our household!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: CrazyDaffodilLady on August 28, 2014, 02:43:21 PM
We don't have a fresh food hoarder in my office, but we have a stale food hoarder. Once a month I have the interns clean out the food fridge, tossing out unlabeled, expired food (like yogurt from 2013). My co-worker Grace will actually get into the trash can and pull it back out, and put it back in the fridge. Last time I was like, "Grace, is this yogurt yours?"
"No."
"Do you know whose it is?"
"No."
"Are you going to eat it?"
"Well, maybe. I'm sure it's still good."

::) I finally claimed the yogurt was mine and *I* wanted to throw it away, to get her to leave it alone. The boss had to intervene, and throw stuff out a second time. Grace is one of those people who scrapes every last molecule of peanut butter out of the jar, and cuts the moldy parts off of bread to eat the rest. Which, if it's her own food that only she is eating, fine, I don't care. But I refuse to let her hoard year-old food that wasn't hers originally, that she doesn't even claim now, and that she has no clear plans for consuming or taking home. Our mini-fridge would fill up with that kind of thing if she had her way.
You could offer the job of cleaning out the fridge to Grace, with the understanding that she can do what she wants with the old food, as long as it doesn't stay in the fridge. 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: MommyPenguin on August 28, 2014, 03:46:10 PM
Where I worked, we didn't have any food hoarders.  And we did have a sign on the fridge warning people that unlabeled food would be thrown out every Friday at 4pm (it was considered a janitorial assignment) and labeled food would be tossed if it had obviously gone bad.  So our fridge stayed pretty clean.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TurtleDove on August 28, 2014, 03:54:46 PM
Where I worked, we didn't have any food hoarders.  And we did have a sign on the fridge warning people that unlabeled food would be thrown out every Friday at 4pm (it was considered a janitorial assignment) and labeled food would be tossed if it had obviously gone bad.  So our fridge stayed pretty clean.

Yep.  That is the way it works at my office too.  To my knowledge we don't have any problems with hoarding or taking more than one's share or anything else.  Then again we work in a downtown setting, are all salaried employees aside from support staff, can generally come and go as we please (including support staff, within reason), and have easy access to whatever we want at any time (so no time constraints on "I only get 20 minutes for lunch!").  Generally there is more than enough of whatever is ordered in for whatever group, and the leftovers are offered to everyone else on a first come first served basis.  But I have never heard of people getting upset that they "missed out" or alternatively taking more than their share. 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 28, 2014, 05:03:23 PM
You could offer the job of cleaning out the fridge to Grace, with the understanding that she can do what she wants with the old food, as long as it doesn't stay in the fridge.

If any solution involves getting Grace to do something different, I don't think it's going to work. ;) She actually keeps extra food at work in the science fridges because it won't fit in the food fridge, and the boss allows it. I think she thinks we're her extra cold storage place.

Where I worked, we didn't have any food hoarders.  And we did have a sign on the fridge warning people that unlabeled food would be thrown out every Friday at 4pm (it was considered a janitorial assignment) and labeled food would be tossed if it had obviously gone bad.  So our fridge stayed pretty clean.

I wish! The janitors don't throw out the food here though, we have the hourly interns do it, and I can barely prod them into doing it once a month. I think the problem is that I am a fanatic about throwing the suspect food away, whereas Grace is a fanatic about keeping it, and everyone else is somewhere in the middle or doesn't want to get involved. We basically do have those rules about labeling the food though, it's more the enforcement of them.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Mel the Redcap on August 28, 2014, 05:14:22 PM
You could offer the job of cleaning out the fridge to Grace, with the understanding that she can do what she wants with the old food, as long as it doesn't stay in the fridge.

If any solution involves getting Grace to do something different, I don't think it's going to work. ;) She actually keeps extra food at work in the science fridges because it won't fit in the food fridge, and the boss allows it. I think she thinks we're her extra cold storage place.

Where I worked, we didn't have any food hoarders.  And we did have a sign on the fridge warning people that unlabeled food would be thrown out every Friday at 4pm (it was considered a janitorial assignment) and labeled food would be tossed if it had obviously gone bad.  So our fridge stayed pretty clean.

I wish! The janitors don't throw out the food here though, we have the hourly interns do it, and I can barely prod them into doing it once a month. I think the problem is that I am a fanatic about throwing the suspect food away, whereas Grace is a fanatic about keeping it, and everyone else is somewhere in the middle or doesn't want to get involved. We basically do have those rules about labeling the food though, it's more the enforcement of them.

Next time you do a clean out, 'ruin' the food you throw out. Rip wrappers, open things, pour liquids down the sink. She can't get anything out of the bin if the ancient-but-hopefully-not-stinky-yet yoghurt has been opened and poured all over the stuff that looked too suspect to poke into. ;)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: MrTango on August 28, 2014, 06:28:30 PM
I remember a time when I would frequently order a pizza to have as my dinner when working overnight shifts in college.  I'd pick the pizza up on my way to work and store it in the refrigerator in the break room until it was about "dinner" time (usually 3:00 in the morning).

Without fail for several shifts in a row, I'd go to retrieve my pizza only to find two or three slices missing.

I got fed up with it and decided to order the pizza with ingredients that I happen to like but that most people don't.  I went to retrieve my dinner that night, and was very pleased to find that no one had stolen a piece of my pineapple, banana pepper, and green olive pizza.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: miranova on August 28, 2014, 08:28:18 PM
On the "no one is entitled to free stuff" discussion.  Very true.  However, once someone gives me something, it's mine.  I'm not entitled to it before it's given, but after it's been purchased and paid for by someone and their intention is that I get some and they make that intention clear, then yes I am in fact entitled to some of it.  Would it ruin my year if someone ate my food?  Of course not.  It's not the only food in existence and it's not even about my immediate survival.  That's not the point.  It's the principle of it.  It would tell me something important about someone's character if they took food not intended for their family and hid it before all of the intended recipients got some.  I would not be impressed and I would know who I was dealing with from that point forward.

At my first "real" job after college, someone kept stealing sodas that a coworker brought in for his own lunch.  He finally just left a note to the effect of:  "To whoever is stealing my sodas:  I can afford to buy you a soda if you need one that badly.  I will just bring more from now on. So feel free to take one, at least now you are not a thief!"  I laughed so hard.  It had the desired effect of shaming the thief.  He had no issues after that.  I decided that's how I would handle it if it ever happened to me (if it was something I could afford of course).
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Yvaine on August 28, 2014, 08:35:31 PM
You could offer the job of cleaning out the fridge to Grace, with the understanding that she can do what she wants with the old food, as long as it doesn't stay in the fridge.

If any solution involves getting Grace to do something different, I don't think it's going to work. ;) She actually keeps extra food at work in the science fridges because it won't fit in the food fridge, and the boss allows it. I think she thinks we're her extra cold storage place.

Where I worked, we didn't have any food hoarders.  And we did have a sign on the fridge warning people that unlabeled food would be thrown out every Friday at 4pm (it was considered a janitorial assignment) and labeled food would be tossed if it had obviously gone bad.  So our fridge stayed pretty clean.

I wish! The janitors don't throw out the food here though, we have the hourly interns do it, and I can barely prod them into doing it once a month. I think the problem is that I am a fanatic about throwing the suspect food away, whereas Grace is a fanatic about keeping it, and everyone else is somewhere in the middle or doesn't want to get involved. We basically do have those rules about labeling the food though, it's more the enforcement of them.

Next time you do a clean out, 'ruin' the food you throw out. Rip wrappers, open things, pour liquids down the sink. She can't get anything out of the bin if the ancient-but-hopefully-not-stinky-yet yoghurt has been opened and poured all over the stuff that looked too suspect to poke into. ;)

That requires you to be willing to open ancient yogurt though.  ;D That stuff is staying SEALED!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 29, 2014, 10:27:25 AM
You could offer the job of cleaning out the fridge to Grace, with the understanding that she can do what she wants with the old food, as long as it doesn't stay in the fridge.

If any solution involves getting Grace to do something different, I don't think it's going to work. ;) She actually keeps extra food at work in the science fridges because it won't fit in the food fridge, and the boss allows it. I think she thinks we're her extra cold storage place.

Where I worked, we didn't have any food hoarders.  And we did have a sign on the fridge warning people that unlabeled food would be thrown out every Friday at 4pm (it was considered a janitorial assignment) and labeled food would be tossed if it had obviously gone bad.  So our fridge stayed pretty clean.

I wish! The janitors don't throw out the food here though, we have the hourly interns do it, and I can barely prod them into doing it once a month. I think the problem is that I am a fanatic about throwing the suspect food away, whereas Grace is a fanatic about keeping it, and everyone else is somewhere in the middle or doesn't want to get involved. We basically do have those rules about labeling the food though, it's more the enforcement of them.

Next time you do a clean out, 'ruin' the food you throw out. Rip wrappers, open things, pour liquids down the sink. She can't get anything out of the bin if the ancient-but-hopefully-not-stinky-yet yoghurt has been opened and poured all over the stuff that looked too suspect to poke into. ;)

That requires you to be willing to open ancient yogurt though.  ;D That stuff is staying SEALED!

I think that is what has prevented me from opening things in the past. But I work in a lab, we have latex gloves and a variety of cleaning products. I just need to buck up and do it! :)

Actually, I think I will have the intern clean out the fridge today, while Grace is gone...
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Black Delphinium on August 29, 2014, 03:46:49 PM
Actually, I think I will have the intern clean out the fridge today, while Grace is gone...

Might be a too late for this cleaning, but don't have them put it right in the bin. Have them put it in a different trash bag, seal that bag, then put it in the bin.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on August 29, 2014, 04:44:42 PM
Actually, I think I will have the intern clean out the fridge today, while Grace is gone...

Might be a too late for this cleaning, but don't have them put it right in the bin. Have them put it in a different trash bag, seal that bag, then put it in the bin.

Next week, will there be a thread, "Someone stole my two-year-old yogurt from the work fridge!!!!"  ;D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Black Delphinium on August 29, 2014, 04:48:17 PM
Actually, I think I will have the intern clean out the fridge today, while Grace is gone...

Might be a too late for this cleaning, but don't have them put it right in the bin. Have them put it in a different trash bag, seal that bag, then put it in the bin.

Next week, will there be a thread, "Someone stole my two-year-old yogurt from the work fridge!!!!"  ;D
No sympathy here, unless it was an active, approved experiment.  ;D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: VorFemme on August 29, 2014, 07:21:32 PM
I remember a time when I would frequently order a pizza to have as my dinner when working overnight shifts in college.  I'd pick the pizza up on my way to work and store it in the refrigerator in the break room until it was about "dinner" time (usually 3:00 in the morning).

Without fail for several shifts in a row, I'd go to retrieve my pizza only to find two or three slices missing.

I got fed up with it and decided to order the pizza with ingredients that I happen to like but that most people don't.  I went to retrieve my dinner that night, and was very pleased to find that no one had stolen a piece of my pineapple, banana pepper, and green olive pizza.

Perfect solution - you liked the pizza and you got to eat the whole thing!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: learningtofly on September 05, 2014, 12:17:19 PM
This has to be the most polite place I have ever worked.  I leave sodas in the fridge, and no one takes one.  I bring in baked goods and everyone takes a portion.  We have company lunch-even if the food runs out I've never heard anyone complain.  And it doesn't run out from people taking too much (occasionally they just don't order enough).  Everyone takes some and then goes back. 

The downside is our fridge cleaner outer is too nice.  We have a clean out every 2 months and you need to label what should stay.  After the last clean out I approached HR and told them that I was throwing out the foil thing in the fridge.  When she cautioned me about throwing out someone's food I told her that the foil had split, the food had multiple colors now, and it was oozing onto the shelf below.  Still have no idea how that survived the fridge clean out.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Ms_Cellany on September 05, 2014, 12:18:46 PM
I remember a time when I would frequently order a pizza to have as my dinner when working overnight shifts in college.  I'd pick the pizza up on my way to work and store it in the refrigerator in the break room until it was about "dinner" time (usually 3:00 in the morning).

Without fail for several shifts in a row, I'd go to retrieve my pizza only to find two or three slices missing.

I got fed up with it and decided to order the pizza with ingredients that I happen to like but that most people don't.  I went to retrieve my dinner that night, and was very pleased to find that no one had stolen a piece of my pineapple, banana pepper, and green olive pizza.

We used to order the "Bill Special" (named after the postdoc whose genius idea it was). Black olives and anchovies. We never had to share.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: cheyne on September 06, 2014, 07:06:16 PM
I remember a time when I would frequently order a pizza to have as my dinner when working overnight shifts in college.  I'd pick the pizza up on my way to work and store it in the refrigerator in the break room until it was about "dinner" time (usually 3:00 in the morning).

Without fail for several shifts in a row, I'd go to retrieve my pizza only to find two or three slices missing.

I got fed up with it and decided to order the pizza with ingredients that I happen to like but that most people don't.  I went to retrieve my dinner that night, and was very pleased to find that no one had stolen a piece of my pineapple, banana pepper, and green olive pizza.

We used to order the "Bill Special" (named after the postdoc whose genius idea it was). Black olives and anchovies. We never had to share.

Mine is the "Cheyne special"; green olives, pepperoni and anchovies.  For some reason I can't get anyone else to take a piece!  ;)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: blarg314 on September 06, 2014, 07:57:34 PM

You could try octopus, onion, mayonnaise and fish flakes.

(actual pizza at my local Pizza Hut - takoyaki pizza.)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TeamBhakta on September 06, 2014, 08:04:54 PM
I'd spell out "Hi (name of lunch thief)" in pizza toppings  >:D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Xandraea on September 06, 2014, 08:27:21 PM
I'd spell out "Hi (name of lunch thief)" in pizza toppings  >:D

Thief may think the pizza's for him, in that case!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: laughtermed on September 06, 2014, 08:36:51 PM
We need a spin off from Pizza Thief's kids about their reaction to being served leftover pizza from the office.

Just sayin.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Library Dragon on September 06, 2014, 09:46:52 PM
This has to be the most polite place I have ever worked.  I leave sodas in the fridge, and no one takes one.  I bring in baked goods and everyone takes a portion.  We have company lunch-even if the food runs out I've never heard anyone complain.  And it doesn't run out from people taking too much (occasionally they just don't order enough).  Everyone takes some and then goes back. 

The downside is our fridge cleaner outer is too nice.  We have a clean out every 2 months and you need to label what should stay.  After the last clean out I approached HR and told them that I was throwing out the foil thing in the fridge.  When she cautioned me about throwing out someone's food I told her that the foil had split, the food had multiple colors now, and it was oozing onto the shelf below.  Still have no idea how that survived the fridge clean out.

Fortunately this the atmosphere at our library. Last week we had "Weird Snack Day" and everyone brought not just one favorite, but multiples. We've decided to have a themed food day every other month.

When one person had run out of diet Pepsi she "borrowed" one from someone who was off that day and replaced it with two.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TeamBhakta on September 06, 2014, 09:53:17 PM
We need a spin off from Pizza Thief's kids about their reaction to being served leftover pizza from the office.

Just sayin.

They probably try to sneak broccoli, like the Engvall kids of Kid Farm (2:00-2:19)
*NSFW, because the cashier uses the p-word for female parts later in the skit
http://youtu.be/xnSBIMfmv7I
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Softly Spoken on September 06, 2014, 10:15:45 PM
So after reading about pizza for about 11 pages...

I have now ordered (to paraphrase Kevin McAllister (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RISQc8mptK4)), a lovely pizza all for myself. >:D

I also just realized that this entire thread is an example of an unsung benefit of un/self-employment - even if food does go missing you know where the thief lives! ;D


Seriously though people need to stop being so greedy when it comes to food - or anything really - being offered.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: lowspark on September 08, 2014, 08:36:59 AM
We need a spin off from Pizza Thief's kids about their reaction to being served leftover pizza from the office.

Just sayin.

Who knows... it might be the only time they ever get pizza, in which case they are probably thrilled.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: LadyClaire on September 08, 2014, 08:53:45 AM
We need a spin off from Pizza Thief's kids about their reaction to being served leftover pizza from the office.

Just sayin.

I'm guessing it's nothing out of the ordinary, for them. We have people at work who will take home huge amounts of leftovers to give to their children. I've seen their kids..they just accept the leftovers without a word.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chip2 on September 08, 2014, 01:03:02 PM
Actually, I think I will have the intern clean out the fridge today, while Grace is gone...

Might be a too late for this cleaning, but don't have them put it right in the bin. Have them put it in a different trash bag, seal that bag, then put it in the bin.

Next week, will there be a thread, "Someone stole my two-year-old yogurt from the work fridge!!!!"  ;D

I cleaned out the office fridge once. The week before I put up a sign saying "Fridge Cleaning Day - [date]! Everything must go! This includes the milk that's now yogurt, the yogurt that's now cheese, and whatever it is the cheese has turned into!" I got no complaints when I wholeheartedly dumped everything out wholesale.

And since we're on the subject here's Weird Al's take on the topic:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_ZcH0Ol5kg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_ZcH0Ol5kg)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Otterpop on September 12, 2014, 09:27:13 AM
Wow after reading all 11 entertaining pages it's interesting that food issues are VERY popular here.  It is to me too.  On a psychological level it's about survival, on a physical level it's about productivity.

If I were trapped in the office, working over the weekend and unable to get lunch, then someone offered a courtesy lunch to help the department get through the day I'd be grateful.  If someone hoarded most of the pizza to take home and I didn't get lunch, not only would I be miffed, I'd eventually be sick with nausea, have raging headache and be unable to work shortly after.  And I'm a moderately fit 45+ y/o with a few food issues (hypoglycemia induced by menopause - don't recommend it).

This guy sabotaged the productivity and harmony of the department and, indeed, the story went around the department.  Glad he was spoken too.  Hope he gets a clue.  Signs could be posted as to how much each person should take on a first pass.  This is how we do it at a science camp I work where we cater lunch every day:

"Please take only 2 sandwiches per person, sides and salads to fill out your plate for one pass.  Leftovers will be available in the break room after 2 pm, when lunch shifts have ended.  Thank you."

We had to do this because people were taking 5-6 sandwiches and going through the line multiple times.  Second lunch shift had nothing to eat unless we made a mad dash to the grocery store nearby and grabbed whatever they had at the deli.  Teachers and aides would get their improvised lunch late and had to eat it in class as they had to be back.  It was a mess.  Our signs and lunch staff vigilance fixed that.

(Of course we still have the food hogs but they're kept at bay until after 2.  After that they're doing us a favor by taking away food that would have to be stored in our limited fridge space. ;))
 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: shhh its me on September 12, 2014, 12:29:20 PM
Wow after reading all 11 entertaining pages it's interesting that food issues are VERY popular here.  It is to me too.  On a psychological level it's about survival, on a physical level it's about productivity.


This is a good point.  and I think it gets brushed off sometimes because its food.  If my boss wants me to work 8 hours straight with a very very short break and provides food so I don't have to leave to eat and/or don't demand my legal breaks and you take all of the food home.  You're taking a tool the company provided for me to get my work done , if you took all the scissors in the office home for your kids it wouldn't be any different.  The second effect is now I've been giving the tools to do the job and I'm not doing it as efficiency as the company has provided for(ie if I have to take 45 mins to get lunch I'd produce 45 minutes less work ) now I look bad.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Amanita on September 12, 2014, 01:57:23 PM
Yeah, another poster here seemed positively mystified as to why anyone would notice or care that somebody else was being a hog and taking more than their fair share. I think she missed the part about how this wasn't just a treat that somebody put out, it was supposed to be everybody's lunch. People were told that lunch would be provided and planned around that- not bringing their own food because they were led to believe that they wouldn't need to. So somebody being a hog under these circumstances is being more than just an annoyance, they're causing their coworkers to miss a meal. And for some people, that's not a trifling inconvenience.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: C0mputerGeek on September 12, 2014, 02:15:57 PM
Yeah, another poster here seemed positively mystified as to why anyone would notice or care that somebody else was being a hog and taking more than their fair share. I think she missed the part about how this wasn't just a treat that somebody put out, it was supposed to be everybody's lunch. People were told that lunch would be provided and planned around that- not bringing their own food because they were led to believe that they wouldn't need to. So somebody being a hog under these circumstances is being more than just an annoyance, they're causing their coworkers to miss a meal. And for some people, that's not a trifling inconvenience.
When I provide food for my team, especially when it's because they've had to work through lunch or work late, then the food belongs to me. It's something that I am providing for my team. I would be highly unamused by other random staff members trying to take what belongs to my team for themselves. Fortunately, I am not shy. I will absolutely speak up and tell people the food is not for them and to leave it alone.

What blows my mind is when people justify trying to steal food because they want it for their family. I am responsible for feeding my team. They, and other staff members, who want treats for their family should do so by going to the store and spending their own money to purchase treats.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on September 12, 2014, 04:59:53 PM
I like the comparison to taking scissors for work home "for the kids," or pens or desk chairs or copy paper... Of course, some people do that, too.  :-\ Food seems to bring out a special frenzy, though.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Jocelyn on September 13, 2014, 11:05:39 AM
I like the comparison to taking scissors for work home "for the kids," or pens or desk chairs or copy paper... Of course, some people do that, too.  :-\ Food seems to bring out a special frenzy, though.
Quite naturally, because we don't have a biological need for scissors, but when we go to get the promised lunch and there is none there, we have to deal with a body that's saying 'feed me'. Which is enough, in and of itself, but food also has cultural connections to caregiving. If I've been working hard all morning, warmed with the notion that my appreciative boss is going to be giving me a nice lunch, and someone steals it, then I'm going to feel ripped off. Add in the people who have emotional issues about food, ranging from having grown up in food insecurity, or in a family where food was manipulated as a reward. And let's not forget that lower-paid employees may have been counting on the lunch to help them stretch their food budgets-they may have not eaten breakfast or been planning not to eat much for supper, knowing that the boss was going to provide a big lunch. All of which bring up emotions in a way that not being able to find a pair of scissors doesn't.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: gmatoy on September 13, 2014, 11:23:28 PM
I like the comparison to taking scissors for work home "for the kids," or pens or desk chairs or copy paper... Of course, some people do that, too.  :-\ Food seems to bring out a special frenzy, though.
Quite naturally, because we don't have a biological need for scissors, but when we go to get the promised lunch and there is none there, we have to deal with a body that's saying 'feed me'. Which is enough, in and of itself, but food also has cultural connections to caregiving. If I've been working hard all morning, warmed with the notion that my appreciative boss is going to be giving me a nice lunch, and someone steals it, then I'm going to feel ripped off. Add in the people who have emotional issues about food, ranging from having grown up in food insecurity, or in a family where food was manipulated as a reward. And let's not forget that lower-paid employees may have been counting on the lunch to help them stretch their food budgets-they may have not eaten breakfast or been planning not to eat much for supper, knowing that the boss was going to provide a big lunch. All of which bring up emotions in a way that not being able to find a pair of scissors doesn't.

Well put!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: camlan on September 14, 2014, 07:47:38 AM
OP here.

Just to be clear, no one knew about the pizza until after we all arrived at work. There were doughnuts and coffee provided, but everyone expected those. Everyone brought their lunch, because there really isn't any place close enough to leave and buy lunch, unless you want to be stuffing the food into your mouth as you drive back to work. The temps get 30 minutes for lunch, and they are not allowed to eat while they work--hard candy and non-sticky, non-greasy, non-crumby  cracker-type food excepted.

However, knowing the temp population that works for us, once the pizza had been announced, most of them likely thought, "Great! I can save my lunch for dinner/tomorrow! A free meal!" That free meal would make a real difference to the budgets of many of the temp employees.

As an aside, the company provides free coffee, tea and hot chocolate all day long to the temps. The first year I worked there, I was a bit surprised to see how many of them drank so much of the hot chocolate--not the sugar-free option, but the kind with sugar. And others would pour a whole packet of the hot chocolate into their coffee as "sweetener." An older, more experienced employee quietly pointed out to me that those employees were probably using that hot chocolate as breakfast, and drinking the kind with sugar to get the calories.

Some of our temps are retirees who just want to keep busy and earn a little money for presents for the grandkids. But many are struggling, on food stamps, going to food pantries. So I will admit that my feelings about the pizza thief are colored by the fact that he tried to take food away from people who might have *needed* that food. Not that he would have had a clue about that.

The reason he was yelling at me? By state law, the temps get three breaks a day--15 paid minutes in the morning and afternoon and a half hour lunch break, unpaid. He had, for some reason, assumed that if the temps were in the building for an 8-hour day, they would be working 8 full hours, not 7 hours. How he has worked in that building for years and not noticed that the temps swarm into the break rooms three times a day, at the same times every day, is completely beyond me.

But he was upset that they were taking their morning break and wanted them back to work immediately. The project was on a deadline, and they needed to get back to work. I was getting yelled at because I refused to tell everyone to get back to work, and I was trying to explain why I was refusing, but he wasn't listening. It was not a fun moment.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Venus193 on September 14, 2014, 08:17:32 AM
Sadly the thread is gone, but the one I started a few years ago about catching office food thieves had a few good stories about situations where the rightful owners couldn't go out, get food, and come back within the half-hour allotted time in addition to victims whose budgets didn't allow for purchasing food near work.

I therefore regard office food theft as not only an act of entitlement but of hostility.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: shhh its me on September 14, 2014, 09:42:52 AM
I like the comparison to taking scissors for work home "for the kids," or pens or desk chairs or copy paper... Of course, some people do that, too.  :-\ Food seems to bring out a special frenzy, though.
Quite naturally, because we don't have a biological need for scissors, but when we go to get the promised lunch and there is none there, we have to deal with a body that's saying 'feed me'. Which is enough, in and of itself, but food also has cultural connections to caregiving. If I've been working hard all morning, warmed with the notion that my appreciative boss is going to be giving me a nice lunch, and someone steals it, then I'm going to feel ripped off. Add in the people who have emotional issues about food, ranging from having grown up in food insecurity, or in a family where food was manipulated as a reward. And let's not forget that lower-paid employees may have been counting on the lunch to help them stretch their food budgets-they may have not eaten breakfast or been planning not to eat much for supper, knowing that the boss was going to provide a big lunch. All of which bring up emotions in a way that not being able to find a pair of scissors doesn't.

Well put!

My point was actually...If a superior at work told me "I took 75% of the scissors home for my kids to take to school" I might* fire them on the spot. If I had put$5 of everyone desk for lunch and someone took 75% of that money I absolutely would have fired them in the spot. For some reason when its food no one gets fired (at least that I've heard of) and someone always says "It's just pizza."

*I said might because there are conceivable one or two excuses I might listen to and that mostly because every place I've worked office supplies became a grey area of....... company provided , employee purchased but reimbursed, partial reimbursement,  multiple employee chipped in for un-reimbursed and just employee provided.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Jocelyn on September 14, 2014, 02:28:25 PM
RE: free stuff for offices
One of my co-workers went in and let the boss have it for him ordering that brand-name coffee be purchased, but generic tea-bags. She said that it wasn't fair that he got to drink his brand of choice and the tea drinkers had to drink twigs and stems.
Why, it had never occurred to him that there were differences in quality of tea! Or so he said. But he knew that there was a difference in quality between his brand of coffee and the generic kind...
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Kiwipinball on September 14, 2014, 08:36:15 PM
We need a spin off from Pizza Thief's kids about their reaction to being served leftover pizza from the office.

Just sayin.

Who knows... it might be the only time they ever get pizza, in which case they are probably thrilled.

As a child (or an adult) I would have had no problems with leftover pizza.  I would have been mortified to learn my parents had taken the leftovers before everyone had their share (but of course, I'd be mortified because my parents raised me well, so they would never do that).  But I have worked many places where at the end of the day we'd be trying to convince people to take home the leftovers (you have kids, they'll eat this right?) and in those cases see no problem with feeding kids the leftovers (assuming the food is still good).
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TeamBhakta on September 14, 2014, 09:26:36 PM
RE: free stuff for offices
One of my co-workers went in and let the boss have it for him ordering that brand-name coffee be purchased, but generic tea-bags. She said that it wasn't fair that he got to drink his brand of choice and the tea drinkers had to drink twigs and stems.
Why, it had never occurred to him that there were differences in quality of tea! Or so he said. But he knew that there was a difference in quality between his brand of coffee and the generic kind...

Your co-worker sounds like a special snowflake, tbh. There are more effective ways to inform one's boss the free tea will go to waste, besides ranting and calling him up on the carpet. Heck, I drink tea and I don't know what the difference in quality between Maxwell House coffee vs Sam's Choice vs Cafe Bustelo. I drink generic tea and name brand tea based on trial and error
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Jocelyn on September 14, 2014, 10:14:36 PM
RE: free stuff for offices
One of my co-workers went in and let the boss have it for him ordering that brand-name coffee be purchased, but generic tea-bags. She said that it wasn't fair that he got to drink his brand of choice and the tea drinkers had to drink twigs and stems.
Why, it had never occurred to him that there were differences in quality of tea! Or so he said. But he knew that there was a difference in quality between his brand of coffee and the generic kind...

Your co-worker sounds like a special snowflake, tbh. There are more effective ways to inform one's boss the free tea will go to waste, besides ranting and calling him up on the carpet. Heck, I drink tea and I don't know what the difference in quality between Maxwell House coffee vs Sam's Choice vs Cafe Bustelo. I drink generic tea and name brand tea based on trial and error
I guess you would have had to have known our boss. His attitude was that if it affected him, of COURSE it had to be top quality, but if didn't, any old trash would do. So it was a little hard to be grateful for his 'generosity', when he went around saying things like 'buy the cheap stuff for THEM, but the top of the line for ME'.  He would say stuff like that, and then be mystified why anyone would be bothered by it...after all, HE could tell the difference between good stuff and cheap stuff (the implication being that of course his employees wouldn't know the difference).
This is the same boss who ate employee's lunches from time to time.
And brushed his teeth using my toothbrush, then put it back in the cabinet (apparently for me to use in the future).
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: blarg314 on September 15, 2014, 12:48:29 AM
And brushed his teeth using my toothbrush, then put it back in the cabinet (apparently for me to use in the future).

I think you just won the thread.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: greencat on September 15, 2014, 01:05:51 PM
And brushed his teeth using my toothbrush, then put it back in the cabinet (apparently for me to use in the future).

I think you just won the thread.

This is not, I think, a thread anyone wants to win!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on September 15, 2014, 04:36:32 PM
My point was actually...If a superior at work told me "I took 75% of the scissors home for my kids to take to school" I might* fire them on the spot. If I had put$5 of everyone desk for lunch and someone took 75% of that money I absolutely would have fired them in the spot. For some reason when its food no one gets fired (at least that I've heard of) and someone always says "It's just pizza."

*I said might because there are conceivable one or two excuses I might listen to and that mostly because every place I've worked office supplies became a grey area of....... company provided , employee purchased but reimbursed, partial reimbursement,  multiple employee chipped in for un-reimbursed and just employee provided.

Right, that's more what I was getting at, that some people who would blithely take "extra" food and not think a thing of it, would never take home scissors or chairs from the office--they would see that as stealing. But somehow when it's food they don't see it that way. And then of course there are the people who will take food, scissors, chairs, and everything else!

Maybe it's also the perishable nature of food? I can't think of many office supplies where if it just sat there unused for a few days, it would no longer be good, so perhaps some people justify taking food in their minds because it will soon go bad if no one takes it. Why they should get more to take home, when others haven't yet had any, is really beyond my capacity to imagine, though.

My favorite work "pilfering" story is about my former co-worker Mike, who liked to play video games, and was also very cheap/bad with money. He had a computer at home that he'd bought, which he played video games on. Then at work, our boss let him use a computer purchased with work funds, for work projects, which was a better computer than his personal one. So he sold his personal computer and installed all his video games on the work machine, to be played after hours. And otherwise gunked up the work computer such that it had to be wiped twice to clean it up. Some personal stuff is fine on work machines ::cough:: EHell ::cough:: but come on...
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: DanaJ on September 16, 2014, 08:44:13 AM
This is not, I think, a thread anyone wants to win!

Still, she definitely deserves a prize. There's some leftover pizza in the office fridge, will that do?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Jocelyn on September 16, 2014, 07:52:38 PM
And brushed his teeth using my toothbrush, then put it back in the cabinet (apparently for me to use in the future).

I think you just won the thread.
Heh, I think I've won more than one 'bad boss' event with this one. Oddly enough, it's the one thing he did that I really believe was an accident. But if there's a cabinet and half-a-dozen people have toothbrushes in it, you'd think that you'd be careful to select your own brush...
Anyway, it's just context about why someone would get irritated with him, and feel like they needed to speak strongly to get him to actually listen.
I had to speak sharply once to get him to stop telling me an 'amusing' story about an abused animal. Yes, he knew I was into animal welfare advocacy, that was why he was telling me the story. I said, 'I don't want to hear it' twice, and he insisted on continuing. So I said it more loudly.

And about 8 years later, he brought it up again, at my going-away party. I'd actually forgotten the incident, but the idea that he was still ruminating over it sort of branded it into my memory at that time.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Ginger G on September 17, 2014, 02:40:20 PM
LOL, the person I posted about earlier in this thread has struck again this week, twice actually!

Incident 1 - On Monday, a coworker brought in a tray of grapes to share with the department.  It was quite a lot of grapes, so there were still some left at the end of the day.  The food hoarder went to the lady who had brought them in and told her she was going to take the rest of them home to her family.  The lady who brought them (this was the same shy person who had spotted her stealing all the leftover barbecue), actually stood up to her and said no, they would still be good the next day and she and others might want some for breakfast or lunch.

Incident 2 - Almost identical except it was cookies and a different coworker brought them.  This was the very next day after the grapes.  Once again, the food hoarder informed the cookie-bringer that she was taking the leftovers home.  Was once again told no.

I'm glad my coworkers are standing up for themselves, but this will probably just make her stop asking and do it anyway.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Cherry91 on September 18, 2014, 04:25:48 AM
LOL, the person I posted about earlier in this thread has struck again this week, twice actually!

Incident 1 - On Monday, a coworker brought in a tray of grapes to share with the department.  It was quite a lot of grapes, so there were still some left at the end of the day.  The food hoarder went to the lady who had brought them in and told her she was going to take the rest of them home to her family.  The lady who brought them (this was the same shy person who had spotted her stealing all the leftover barbecue), actually stood up to her and said no, they would still be good the next day and she and others might want some for breakfast or lunch.

Incident 2 - Almost identical except it was cookies and a different coworker brought them.  This was the very next day after the grapes.  Once again, the food hoarder informed the cookie-bringer that she was taking the leftovers home.  Was once again told no.

I'm glad my coworkers are standing up for themselves, but this will probably just make her stop asking and do it anyway.

She's not asking now...
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: kategillian on September 18, 2014, 05:23:57 AM
LOL, the person I posted about earlier in this thread has struck again this week, twice actually!

Incident 1 - On Monday, a coworker brought in a tray of grapes to share with the department.  It was quite a lot of grapes, so there were still some left at the end of the day.  The food hoarder went to the lady who had brought them in and told her she was going to take the rest of them home to her family.  The lady who brought them (this was the same shy person who had spotted her stealing all the leftover barbecue), actually stood up to her and said no, they would still be good the next day and she and others might want some for breakfast or lunch.

Incident 2 - Almost identical except it was cookies and a different coworker brought them.  This was the very next day after the grapes.  Once again, the food hoarder informed the cookie-bringer that she was taking the leftovers home.  Was once again told no.

I'm glad my coworkers are standing up for themselves, but this will probably just make her stop asking and do it anyway.

She's not asking now...

Haha, good point.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Margo on September 18, 2014, 06:57:29 AM
I'm another thinking how fortunate I am to work with people who are, on the whole, polite and considerate about food.

We provide free tea and coffee for staff, and milk to go in it. We also now provide coke, and recently had to remind people that the coke is *also* available to anyone who wants it (most people prefer tea or coffee, and as there is only one person who drinks the coke day in, day out, people had assumed it was his personal supply) I buy my own tea bags because I prefer darjeeling and I've never had anyone touch them (except one time when a colleague accidentally threw them out, but she was very apologetic and insisted on buying me a new box.

We do have one staff member who will complain if we have treats when she is out - she doesn't work on a Friday, and will comment about it if she sees that there were treats on Friday (it's normal for there to be an 'all staff' e-mail to let people know there are treats in the kitchen)  The thing is, Friday tends to be a very busy day and often the treats have been bought because there has been a particularly fraught morning, or because people have worked part of the their lunch break. We have other staff who work part time none of whom complain.

Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Ginger G on September 18, 2014, 12:01:40 PM
Quote
She's not asking now...

Haha, good point.

That is true  ;D!  I had to hear about another incredibly rude thing she did this morning, but it's not food-related, so I'll save it for a different thread.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: rain on September 20, 2014, 02:45:27 PM
aside: what thread and where
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: VorFemme on September 20, 2014, 06:12:55 PM
If you're going to tease us about another post - please include a link, once you've posted!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Shalamar on October 09, 2014, 09:55:00 AM
I once had a different kind of issue with pizza.  I'm on my company's Social Committee, and our tradition is to have a pizza lunch paid for by the company at the end of the year.  Last year I couldn't attend the lunch due to a prior commitment.  The committee president, who's a friend of mine, said "Not to worry - I'll make sure we save some food for you."

Later on that afternoon, he came by my desk and said "Oh, I forgot to tell you - I put all the pizza leftovers by the microwave."  With a sinking heart, I asked "How long ago did you do that?"  "About an hour."    Oh dear.  Sure enough, when I got to the microwave, all of the leftovers had been eaten.

I don't blame the people who ate it, since they didn't know that some of it was supposed to be saved for me.   I don't know why my friend didn't think to offer it to me first before putting it by the microwave, though.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chipmunky on October 16, 2014, 07:59:16 AM
I've several stories of food thiefs/mooches! Bad thing for the office(s) but good for EHell stories!

I was an intern at a government agency. Basically, I did the work of an attorney while in law school, but was supervised closely by another attorney. I regularly contributed to the weekly "binges" where people would bring donuts or cookies- I often made brownies or cupcakes for the office, think about 35 people. I made at least 60 cupcakes. But there was always THE MOOCH who would take 5 cupcakes on top of all his other goodies.

Whatever, I'm just an intern....but then I discovered my home cooked meals were occasionally going missing.

Not the simple turkey sandwich, but the good stuff, baked chicken and rice, steam veggies, pasta, occasionally some steak (I bought the four packs of big ones at Costco, cooked on at a time, cut it in half, had half of dinner half for lunch). This peeved me, as I was a student, and was there for free labor in exchange for training and experience. I couldn't prove it was THE MOOCH, but I had a hunch....

I received proof of my beliefs one day when THE MOOCH came to berate me. You see, I'd made meatballs the night before, and brought some with a bit of pasta and sauce. Went to have my lunch, and it was gone, so granola bar for me. THE MOOCH ate my food, and found, much to his dismay, that it didn't agree with him.

I did not add anything to make him go to the bathroom, I swear. However, my meatball recipe happens to be a family one, and it's very,very spicy. It's been known to clear sinus infections in the unitiated. I was experimenting with ways to cook them with less olive oil, and had experimented with a touch of chili oil in the cooking process, making them even spicier.  Turns out, THE MOOCH had bowel issues with very spicy food, but didn't realize the level of spice in my food, as our recipe uses subtle spicing to make it flavorful without burning your tongue in the desert hot.

My supervisor, who was THE MOOCH's boss, stuck her head out her office, and asked what was going on. Upon hearing how THE MOOCH had been stealing my lunch for some time, and finally I'd brought something that had him practically sprinting for the bathroom with his rear end on fire, she laughed at him, told him he'd gotten what he deserved for stealing from the intern, and if she caught him yelling at me again, she'd be recommending disciplinary actions for suspension. (hard to get suspended, much less fired in a govt office). He backed off, and my boss took me out to lunch to make up for my missed meals. I also got high fives from half of the staff- turns out I wasn't the only person he stole from.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: kategillian on October 16, 2014, 08:21:43 AM
Wow. Just.... Wow! This person was stealing from you, and then had the audacity to tell you that what he had stole from you didn't agree with him? What the what.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: VorFemme on October 16, 2014, 08:40:00 AM
There are people who really are that entitled - because everyone in the world is supposed to be taking care of *them* - because they are such very special snowflakes that must be preserved and coddled...or some such nonsense...no telling what is going on between their ears.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: IWish on October 16, 2014, 09:01:05 AM
if she caught him yelling at me again, she'd be recommending disciplinary actions for suspension.

So she was willing to discipline him for yelling at you but not for actually stealing all your lunches?!  :o
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chipmunky on October 16, 2014, 10:48:09 AM
IWish,

She figured the "fire pants" reaction was punishment enough for that inicident, but up til that point, she wasn't aware of his precise level of food thievery.

Plus, it was a government office...the policy handbook on disciplinary actions had "stealing from the agency" as a disciplinary/fireable offense, but not "stealing food from colleagues."

Currently, I'm one of the few people in my office who has a mini fridge. (I have the space to have it in my office). I allow any who wants to use the fridge to borrow it. One colleague and I have an arrangement where I occasionally "charge" him a "fridge" tax- he stores about 10-15 bottles of water per week in there, I occasionally forget my reusable water bottle and grab one from the fridge. I NEVER take one if there's 3 or less in the fridge.

I have two rules for the fridge: 1) home made foods (ie, stuff in tupperware) gets 7 days max. If its still in there after 7 days, I toss it and the tupperware. Prepackaged stuff is fine, as are condiments, though if there's stuff well outside expiration, I'll contact the person it belongs to and ask how badly they still want it.  Rule number 2) DO NOT STEAL other people's food. Stealing/borrowing food, without their calling me first results in an instant ban from fridge use. A repeated attempt results in my informing my boss lady of the unethical conduct (we're all lawyers, so ethics and professionalism is considered important). Not a fireable offense, to be sure, but it goes on the "mental note" in case there's a later, much more egregious violation of trust and ethics.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: BarensMom on October 16, 2014, 11:02:41 AM
IWish,

She figured the "fire pants" reaction was punishment enough for that inicident, but up til that point, she wasn't aware of his precise level of food thievery.

Plus, it was a government office...the policy handbook on disciplinary actions had "stealing from the agency" as a disciplinary/fireable offense, but not "stealing food from colleagues."

Currently, I'm one of the few people in my office who has a mini fridge. (I have the space to have it in my office). I allow any who wants to use the fridge to borrow it. One colleague and I have an arrangement where I occasionally "charge" him a "fridge" tax- he stores about 10-15 bottles of water per week in there, I occasionally forget my reusable water bottle and grab one from the fridge. I NEVER take one if there's 3 or less in the fridge.

I have two rules for the fridge: 1) home made foods (ie, stuff in tupperware) gets 7 days max. If its still in there after 7 days, I toss it and the tupperware. Prepackaged stuff is fine, as are condiments, though if there's stuff well outside expiration, I'll contact the person it belongs to and ask how badly they still want it.  Rule number 2) DO NOT STEAL other people's food. Stealing/borrowing food, without their calling me first results in an instant ban from fridge use. A repeated attempt results in my informing my boss lady of the unethical conduct (we're all lawyers, so ethics and professionalism is considered important). Not a fireable offense, to be sure, but it goes on the "mental note" in case there's a later, much more egregious violation of trust and ethics.

I, too, had a personal fridge and microwave (my own and I kept the receipts) in my office, because someone amongst my coworkers would not only take food from the shared fridge, but sometimes even from the shared microwave.  You did not leave your meal unattended for a second in our break room, because food theft was so prevalent.  I let one or two others use my fridge (and microwave) for their food, but oftentimes it was packed with a 24-case of Diet Coke and perhaps my lunch.  Anyone else who went into my fridge was met with a loud "What are you doing in my personal refrigerator?" or "Hey, that's my Diet Coke - get your own!"

My rules were posted on the fridge and were very simple:  (1) Don't take the last Diet Coke and (2) See #1.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chipmunky on October 16, 2014, 11:22:23 AM
We do have a super level food mooch who's also a special snowflake around here.

My section, and my boss's office, is all on Floor X. My boss's boss occupies an executive suite on Floor Y. There are about 5 other peoeple in the executive suite, including boss's boss's assistant lady (AL). AL has a very high opinion of herself and her capabilities, though it's not clear what exactly she does. She is, however, more or less a gate keeper to boss's boss, and regularly interacts with him, allowing her the opportunity to complain to him if she doesn't like something/someone.

We recently had a moratorium on celebrating birthdays. Why? Because AL wasn't specifically sent an email inviting her to one of them. Never mind that she's never interacting with us, and treats us like crap (even attorneys if they aren't Boss lady or her two top go-to persons). If we have a party, she must be invited. She threw a complete snit fit over the failure to invite her.

When she shows up, she never contributes a darn thing other than her loud cackle. This includes on Admin Professionals Day, when she showed up to our breakfast spread, and took an extra heaping plate back downstairs for herself. She was supposed to do something for all the Admin Profs in the executive section, but didn't, aside from them having to watch her eat more of our food.

She's been known to take a good quarter of the cake back downstairs, obstensibly to share with others or the boss's boss. Nope, she keeps it to herself.

We're planning to have something for Halloween since it's on Friday and one of the number 2 ppl for the boss has a birthday that weekend. I'm sure AL will be first in line to get herself some food, and will cut for seconds. I'm debating whether I'll need to bring a second crock pot of buffalo chicken dip, as no one will want any after she licks the serving spoon and plunges her face into the pot.  She did attempt to voluntell me to make some for her to have for a football party at her home once. I'd circulated the recipe, but it was apparently "too hard" for her to make it herself. I politely told her I would not be available to make it for her, as my husband was using the crock pot for his award winning chili, and I had plans that would take me out of town that weekend. She wasn't happy, but too bad.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Venus193 on October 16, 2014, 11:31:54 AM
These stories really blow my mind.  I was a food theft victim a couple of times at my second-largest company and while I wasn't the lowest-paid person there the situation seriously inconvenienced me on both occasions.

People who do this sort of thing should be terminated upon discovery.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Twik on October 16, 2014, 11:42:38 AM
Wow. Just.... Wow! This person was stealing from you, and then had the audacity to tell you that what he had stole from you didn't agree with him? What the what.

What could he possibly find to yell about? He was brazen enough to complain the stolen food wasn't too his liking? I can't imagine how even a thief could phrase that without realizing how idiotic he sounded.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: rose red on October 16, 2014, 02:14:29 PM
Here are more food thief stories in case anyone missed it the first time around. Food theft is so bad yet so entertaining :-[.
http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=134980.0
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Jocelyn on October 16, 2014, 08:57:53 PM
Wow. Just.... Wow! This person was stealing from you, and then had the audacity to tell you that what he had stole from you didn't agree with him? What the what.

What could he possibly find to yell about? He was brazen enough to complain the stolen food wasn't too his liking? I can't imagine how even a thief could phrase that without realizing how idiotic he sounded.
I think he was accusing her of having made the food deliberately to destroy his digestive tract...sort of like Ex-Lax brownies. Apparently he hadn't considered that people might season the food they were preparing for themselves, to their own taste.  >:D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: oz diva on October 16, 2014, 09:13:10 PM
Wow. Just.... Wow! This person was stealing from you, and then had the audacity to tell you that what he had stole from you didn't agree with him? What the what.

What could he possibly find to yell about? He was brazen enough to complain the stolen food wasn't too his liking? I can't imagine how even a thief could phrase that without realizing how idiotic he sounded.
If that had happened to me, I would have had a long loud laugh at the thief. Karma's a Female Dog.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: ladyknight1 on October 17, 2014, 09:59:22 AM
We had a man that worked at our office for a very short time. He would bring 8+ items to eat over the day (regular 8-5 job) and would never put them in the refrigerator, but had them sitting on his desk in a line. So, we would see him in the refrigerator or looking in the cabinets, and later realize our food was gone. I had the biggest rapport with him at the time, and it was left to me to talk to him as his supervisor was on leave. I mentioned to him that communal items were put out on the counter or table in the break room, but that items in the cabinets and refrigerator belonged to other employees. It didn't help.

While he was here, less than a year, I ended up have nearly half my meals I brought in disappear for the first few months. I then brought in canned soup, since I could keep that at my desk.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chipmunky on October 17, 2014, 10:37:11 AM
I've a new thief!!

She's particularly sneaky, and has specific preferences. For example, she's stolen my ice cream, my chicken(doesnt matter the form, baked, sliced, or fried, she'll steal it given half the chance), half a turkey sandwich, some really good gouda cheese, iced tea, part of a burger, and recently, my special treat to myself, my milkshake.

She's a bloody ninja, and it takes me at least 5 minutes to realize what's happened.

I can't yell at her though- she's such a pretty tabby, though quite the diva, and she loves to snuggle and sleep with her front paws and head on my stomach or hip. I'm jealous of her though, all that food thievery and she's still not that fat one- that honor goes to her sister who has no interest in hoomin foods.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Phoebelion on October 17, 2014, 10:37:49 AM
First aid supplies.

First aid box is way back in the warehouse.  Had tossed a box of band aids in my desk drawer.

Just got major paper cut (cube monkey here).  Empty box - no bank aids.  Errrrr!

Have to find a new hiding place.

Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: magicdomino on October 17, 2014, 10:47:14 AM
I've a new thief!!

She's particularly sneaky, and has specific preferences. For example, she's stolen my ice cream, my chicken(doesnt matter the form, baked, sliced, or fried, she'll steal it given half the chance), half a turkey sandwich, some really good gouda cheese, iced tea, part of a burger, and recently, my special treat to myself, my milkshake.

She's a bloody ninja, and it takes me at least 5 minutes to realize what's happened.

I can't yell at her though- she's such a pretty tabby, though quite the diva, and she loves to snuggle and sleep with her front paws and head on my stomach or hip. I'm jealous of her though, all that food thievery and she's still not that fat one- that honor goes to her sister who has no interest in hoomin foods.

 :D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: kategillian on October 17, 2014, 11:10:07 AM
I once has a bowl of creamy tomato pasta, that I had JUST made! I sat down to eat it, and had an emergency (I'm an EMT). When I got home again every piece of pasta was thoroughly licked clean. Especially impressive, considering it was spiral noodles! My fault for leaving it on the ottoman. Another sneaky tabby.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Ginger G on October 17, 2014, 01:55:50 PM
I have to confess, I allowed my sneaky tabby to steal a piece of DH's dinner the other night.  DH had committed one of my major pet peeves - just as I put the plates on the table, his phone rang and he took the call and left the room.  He knows this annoys me.  I got up to get something else from the kitchen, and just as I started back to the table, Ginger jumped up on his chair and nabbed a small chicken tender and ran off with it.  She did not touch any of the other food on his plate, just her prize so I didn't tell DH.  My other two male cats couldn't care less about human food, but we often lock Ginger in another room while we're eating, she's a terrible food thief and a begger.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Hillia on October 17, 2014, 03:16:02 PM
One night DH was eating his dinner while on the computer.  I was in the kitchen and heard a furious roar, and looked up to see one of our dogs hotfooting it through the house to the (open) back door, with DH in hot pursuit.  Rowdy had grabbed the quesadilla off DH's plate and bolted before he could be caught.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: SingActDance on October 17, 2014, 03:42:33 PM
One night DH was eating his dinner while on the computer.  I was in the kitchen and heard a furious roar, and looked up to see one of our dogs hotfooting it through the house to the (open) back door, with DH in hot pursuit.  Rowdy had grabbed the quesadilla off DH's plate and bolted before he could be caught.

Just have to comment that you picked a great name for your dog. That's our pup's name as well!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: PastryGoddess on October 17, 2014, 04:49:10 PM
One night DH was eating his dinner while on the computer.  I was in the kitchen and heard a furious roar, and looked up to see one of our dogs hotfooting it through the house to the (open) back door, with DH in hot pursuit.  Rowdy had grabbed the quesadilla off DH's plate and bolted before he could be caught.

Ok I laughed out loud at that one
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Yarnspinner on October 17, 2014, 07:09:40 PM
Snork.  Kitty Such had been my room mate for approximately two weeks when she decided the Margherita Pizza purchased for my guests was hers..and climbed onto the table and into the box to apprise me of this important change in the menu.  Fortunately most of the pizza was on a pizza stone in the oven, but still, those other four pieces would have been good.....

Going back to human thieves, not quite the same as work...

I used to belong to a story telling club where we would have a pot luck meal and then everyone would tell stories (folk lore, ghost stories, family stories).  Poppy Bright was not the least interested in the story telling.  If she had heard the story before, she would say so and even tell the end of the story before the person telling the tale could finish.  And thought it was a big joke.  In fact, she complained that we spent too much time formally telling stories because "talking is telling stories and we're already talking so why do we have to do this boring story telling thing?"  This was a woman in her mid sixties, mind, not a fifteen year old girl. 

In fact, we had two fifteen year old girls in the club who had better manners.  But I digress.

Poppy was all about the food and if you brought more than enough for the group (usually ten to fifteen people) you had to keep an eye on it, because Poppy had no problems at all about off loading the extras into whatever container she had brought with her...and I do mean she brought containers.  Her contribution to the meal would be a bag of chips and a dip.  She would later pull out a platter and load it up with lasagna, chicken or whatever someone else had brought.  It was at my house once and there was still half a chocolate cake in my fridge when we started to tell stories.  When everyone was getting ready to leave, I discovered more than half the cake was now gone and I watched it walking down the stairs with Poppy. 

I didn't call her on it because everyone else seemed to think it was perfectly fine for her to do this and I was a fairly new member....but after that, I limited my contributions to store bought items or wine that would be consumed fairly quickly...and so did a lot of other people, too. 

I hadn't seen her in years, then ran into her about six months ago...she hasn't changed.  She was at a festival meal where you paid ten dollars for one of several options and was arguing with each and every person that she had paid for her food and therefore should get one of everything.  It was spectacular.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: purplerainbow on October 18, 2014, 06:20:55 AM
If I'm having lunch at work (I usually don't, but my hours are changing so I may start), I generally bring my own food in, even on days when lunch is provided. I find the canteen to be sensory overload - too many people, too noisy, so if I'm eating at work, I go to the staff room with most other people. I always prefer bringing my own food, as a) it guarantees I actually have something  b)I'm kind of a picky eater ("provided" lunches aren't always to my taste), and c) I don't have to worry about how much/little I eat, because if I eat half a sausage roll I don't have to worry that I'm wasting company-provided food that a colleague would otherwise have eaten.
I've never dared risk the staff fridge, I just keep my lunch in my bag.

I did have a small issue last year, though.
My desk used to be in the office next door to the room where some students are isolated. The manager of that office (I wasn't specifically a member of her team, as I was hot-desking, but I often helped out if she needed me to), kept a stash of tea/coffee on a surface in the office for staff to help themselves if they were working in there. (It was a kind of remote part of the building, and some of the staff who worked in that office, particularly the manager, very rarely got a chance to have a proper break, or get to the staff room where tea and coffee were provided.) This corner included a sign saying that staff working in this office were welcome to help themselves to tea/coffee, so long as they washed up after themselves. All well and good.  :)
Now, I don't drink hot drinks (I can't have milk, and I don't like black tea/coffee etc), so at one point, I brought in a bottle of fruit squash to add to the stash for staff in our office. I didn't intend for it to just be for me - I was perfectly happy for other staff to help themselves, too. We had a fair number of visitors/supply staff who might work in our office, so I figured they might enjoy the choice too.
I came to realise soon enough, though, that the students who were being kept in the room next door to be isolated, were having the fruit squash too. One of them did stop and ask me, "Oh - is that yours, Miss?" one day when I came in, but by that point at least half of it had gone and I didn't see the point in making a fuss. But, I just felt kind of  ::) ::) ::) Like, um, you're in here to be punished for bad behaviour, you're told in advance to bring your own food/drink for the day (unless receiving free school meals or something), and the bottle is on the tray with the STAFF supplies. Why don't you just go ahead and help yourself to tea and coffee, too?  ::)
I didn't make a fuss, but that was the only bottle of squash I bought. I drank water from the cooler in the staffroom from then on.
I think that because the squash didn't automatically appear to people as being an "adult" drink, like tea or coffee, people assumed that the students were allowed it. Especially since most adults I've met do like tea or coffee, I think it doesn't occur to most people that there are some of us who don't like it, or may have other reasons for wanting a seemingly "childish" drink. Nowadays, I just bring bottled water, and top it up at work if necessary.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: rosiegirl on October 18, 2014, 11:58:35 PM
I've a new thief!!

She's particularly sneaky, and has specific preferences. For example, she's stolen my ice cream, my chicken(doesnt matter the form, baked, sliced, or fried, she'll steal it given half the chance), half a turkey sandwich, some really good gouda cheese, iced tea, part of a burger, and recently, my special treat to myself, my milkshake.

She's a bloody ninja, and it takes me at least 5 minutes to realize what's happened.

I can't yell at her though- she's such a pretty tabby, though quite the diva, and she loves to snuggle and sleep with her front paws and head on my stomach or hip. I'm jealous of her though, all that food thievery and she's still not that fat one- that honor goes to her sister who has no interest in hoomin foods.

Those are the worst- too cute to yell at. My kitty ninja likes yogurt! Purrs as she does it- awwwwww
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: weeblewobble on October 19, 2014, 08:19:00 AM

I used to belong to a story telling club where we would have a pot luck meal and then everyone would tell stories (folk lore, ghost stories, family stories).  Poppy Bright was not the least interested in the story telling.  If she had heard the story before, she would say so and even tell the end of the story before the person telling the tale could finish.  And thought it was a big joke.  In fact, she complained that we spent too much time formally telling stories because "talking is telling stories and we're already talking so why do we have to do this boring story telling thing?" This was a woman in her mid sixties, mind, not a fifteen year old girl. 

How about, "Because you're attending a meeting of a STORY TELLING CLUB?" 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Yarnspinner on October 19, 2014, 09:56:27 AM

I used to belong to a story telling club where we would have a pot luck meal and then everyone would tell stories (folk lore, ghost stories, family stories).  Poppy Bright was not the least interested in the story telling.  If she had heard the story before, she would say so and even tell the end of the story before the person telling the tale could finish.  And thought it was a big joke.  In fact, she complained that we spent too much time formally telling stories because "talking is telling stories and we're already talking so why do we have to do this boring story telling thing?" This was a woman in her mid sixties, mind, not a fifteen year old girl. 

How about, "Because you're attending a meeting of a STORY TELLING CLUB?" 

Yeah, she never quite got her head wrapped around that fact. 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Curly Wurly Doggie Breath on October 20, 2014, 02:55:46 AM
I just hand fed my old man tabby cat tuna in a little cup.

Ohh yes, he knows he is loved :D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: AzaleaBloom on October 20, 2014, 08:53:59 AM
My office is isolated from the rest of the building.  As a result, I have a small refrigerator in here.  Generally, it is only used by my immediate supervisor, a few mechanics, and myself.

I love flavored coffee creamer, and always keep it in the fridge for my morning cup.

I started noticing that I was having to replace the creamer far more often than I seemed to be using it.  However, I had no proof that it was being stolen.  Then, I came in one morning and noticed that the brand new, unopened container had its safety seal removed - which I had not done.

I told my supervisor, and he flipped out.  I had never seen him so angry on my behalf.  He started ranting that these mechanics get paid more than I do and they then have the nerve to steal from me.  He promptly ran down to the closest grocery store and bought me more creamer, and promised he would speak to every member of the maintenance staff.

One by one mechanics came and reassured me that it hadn't been them stealing the creamer.  I knew it had to be someone on night shift.

Sure enough, a few days later, a large container of creamer appeared in the fridge, and a note was left on my desk:

"Feel free to use any of my creamer whenever you want."  It was signed with the name of the night shift guy I had suspected.

I haven't had a problem since.   ;D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chipmunky on October 20, 2014, 10:27:38 AM
I've a new thief!!

She's particularly sneaky, and has specific preferences. For example, she's stolen my ice cream, my chicken(doesnt matter the form, baked, sliced, or fried, she'll steal it given half the chance), half a turkey sandwich, some really good gouda cheese, iced tea, part of a burger, and recently, my special treat to myself, my milkshake.

She's a bloody ninja, and it takes me at least 5 minutes to realize what's happened.

I can't yell at her though- she's such a pretty tabby, though quite the diva, and she loves to snuggle and sleep with her front paws and head on my stomach or hip. I'm jealous of her though, all that food thievery and she's still not that fat one- that honor goes to her sister who has no interest in hoomin foods.

The thief attempted a different tactic yesterday- pawing and swatting the bejeezus out of my hands because she wanted to try what I had (chips and guacamole). I finally put a tiny bit of guac on my finger- after sniffing, she determined that it had onions in it (which she doesn't like) and turned her nose up at it. She's lucky I gave her a tiny tiny bite of steak on Saturday. I'm not one for sharing steak. Period.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Twik on October 20, 2014, 11:47:21 AM

I used to belong to a story telling club where we would have a pot luck meal and then everyone would tell stories (folk lore, ghost stories, family stories).  Poppy Bright was not the least interested in the story telling.  If she had heard the story before, she would say so and even tell the end of the story before the person telling the tale could finish.  And thought it was a big joke.  In fact, she complained that we spent too much time formally telling stories because "talking is telling stories and we're already talking so why do we have to do this boring story telling thing?" This was a woman in her mid sixties, mind, not a fifteen year old girl. 

How about, "Because you're attending a meeting of a STORY TELLING CLUB?" 

Yeah, she never quite got her head wrapped around that fact.

Does she attend Bridge Club and complain "why are we just sitting around playing cards? I hate cards!"
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Arila on October 20, 2014, 11:50:47 AM
it had onions in it (which she doesn't like) and turned her nose up at it.

Good thing, because onions are poisonous to cats.
https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/cat-behavior/foods-are-hazardous-cats
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: DanaJ on October 20, 2014, 02:06:58 PM
it had onions in it (which she doesn't like) and turned her nose up at it.

Good thing, because onions are poisonous to cats.
https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/cat-behavior/foods-are-hazardous-cats

Our idiot dog and two cats combined their efforts to break into a vat of soup that included onions as a main ingredient (onions are similarly bad for dogs). Needless to say we were really, really peeved to pay for all three to checked out by a vet.  >:(
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chipmunky on October 20, 2014, 02:21:05 PM
Upthread, I've described the Super Supreme Mooch who throws a fit if she's not invited to every event/party/shindig in the upstairs office, never mind that she only contributes her cackle, no food or plates or anything.  Well come to find out, she's apparently working half days due to a recent (2 month old) back surgery (ie, she's in the office 7 to 11 each morning, on leave the rest of the day).  Not my business, but we're having a belated Boss's day celebration on Wednesday and it's basically an ice cream party. It's from 3-5 pm. I will be very interested to see (and promise a full report here) on whether this food mooch/thief shows up for the "free" ice cream (members of the staff are providing ice cream, bowls, spoons, and toppings), whether she brings a contribution, or whether she loses it if she doesn't feel she was invited thoroughly enough.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: weeblewobble on October 20, 2014, 02:35:22 PM

I used to belong to a story telling club where we would have a pot luck meal and then everyone would tell stories (folk lore, ghost stories, family stories).  Poppy Bright was not the least interested in the story telling.  If she had heard the story before, she would say so and even tell the end of the story before the person telling the tale could finish.  And thought it was a big joke.  In fact, she complained that we spent too much time formally telling stories because "talking is telling stories and we're already talking so why do we have to do this boring story telling thing?" This was a woman in her mid sixties, mind, not a fifteen year old girl. 

How about, "Because you're attending a meeting of a STORY TELLING CLUB?" 

Yeah, she never quite got her head wrapped around that fact.

Does she attend Bridge Club and complain "why are we just sitting around playing cards? I hate cards!"

Why are we wasting our time at Book Club talking about books?! TV is so much better!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TootsNYC on October 20, 2014, 02:45:19 PM
My office is isolated from the rest of the building.  As a result, I have a small refrigerator in here.  Generally, it is only used by my immediate supervisor, a few mechanics, and myself.

I love flavored coffee creamer, and always keep it in the fridge for my morning cup.

I started noticing that I was having to replace the creamer far more often than I seemed to be using it.  . . .

Just today I went to make a cup of coffee, planning to put some of the Bailey's Irish Cream french vanilla-flavored creamed I'd stashed in the fridge.

I walked in just as the mail guy (who serves our floor but doesn't work on our floor) was taking his cup out of the coffee maker. As I was putting mine in, he opened the fridge and pulled out a dark bottle of creamer. I looked around him to make sure it was coming from the same spot, and said, "That's my creamer."

He was very apologetic, he thought it was the company's. He thought it had been sent to us as a sample (some had been, many months ago, that's how I decided to buy it). I said, just very factually, without any heat or blame, "I wrote my name on it. I'll have to write it bigger next time." (I wrote it only on one side, and relatively discreetly.)

He said something like, "do you want me to pay you," or something, and I said, "No, just don't do it again. It adds up."


But I'm also thinking, "Even if it was a sample sent to the staff, it was clearly not sent to -you.- The person it was sent to is entitled to consider it to be hers, and not yours."
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Idlewildstudios on October 20, 2014, 04:20:19 PM

The thief attempted a different tactic yesterday- pawing and swatting the bejeezus out of my hands because she wanted to try what I had (chips and guacamole). I finally put a tiny bit of guac on my finger- after sniffing, she determined that it had onions in it (which she doesn't like) and turned her nose up at it. She's lucky I gave her a tiny tiny bite of steak on Saturday. I'm not one for sharing steak. Period.

So sorry, but I was going all "whhhaaaa??"  at first when I read this.  I just glanced over it and missed the part about the CAT.  I trying to wrap my head around a coworker sniffing guac off your finger :)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Tsaiko on October 20, 2014, 07:24:11 PM

The thief attempted a different tactic yesterday- pawing and swatting the bejeezus out of my hands because she wanted to try what I had (chips and guacamole). I finally put a tiny bit of guac on my finger- after sniffing, she determined that it had onions in it (which she doesn't like) and turned her nose up at it. She's lucky I gave her a tiny tiny bite of steak on Saturday. I'm not one for sharing steak. Period.

So sorry, but I was going all "whhhaaaa??"  at first when I read this.  I just glanced over it and missed the part about the CAT.  I trying to wrap my head around a coworker sniffing guac off your finger :)

Oh good. I wasn't the only one. I had some weird mental images for a few moments until I realize the post was also talking about a cat.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: AfleetAlex on October 21, 2014, 09:30:19 AM
Upthread, I've described the Super Supreme Mooch who throws a fit if she's not invited to every event/party/shindig in the upstairs office, never mind that she only contributes her cackle, no food or plates or anything.  Well come to find out, she's apparently working half days due to a recent (2 month old) back surgery (ie, she's in the office 7 to 11 each morning, on leave the rest of the day).  Not my business, but we're having a belated Boss's day celebration on Wednesday and it's basically an ice cream party. It's from 3-5 pm. I will be very interested to see (and promise a full report here) on whether this food mooch/thief shows up for the "free" ice cream (members of the staff are providing ice cream, bowls, spoons, and toppings), whether she brings a contribution, or whether she loses it if she doesn't feel she was invited thoroughly enough.

The previous post included pets so I started to read this as the Super Supreme POOCH. I got to the cackle and realized what I'd misread.  ;D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lorelei_Evil on October 21, 2014, 10:15:11 AM
Waiting for the update on that one! 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chipmunky on October 21, 2014, 12:46:29 PM
Brief update on Super Supreme Mooch- I've described how my office is a bit weird. The majority of the workers in my section/department work on Floor A, while Mooch and the Executive Staff are all on Floor B.  E Staff comprises maybe 5 people, plus Mooch and UberBoss; there's about 20 of us up here in Main Unit.

Found out from the paralegals (diety bless them and all they do for me), Mooch HAD a Boss's day celebration for UberBoss and DEMANDED my boss (Boss Lady) and her equal on the Criminal side (we're civil division, gov't agency, but the entire unit on Floor A is comprised of both crim and civil divisions) attend this shindig for UberBoss.

Mooch also told people in the EStaff office on Floor B to keep their mouths shut and not tell any of us on Floor A about this celebration, to exclude us completely, yet diety help us if we don't invite Mooch.  Paralegal I learned of this from is basically the assistant to Boss Lady, so she hears/sees/knows everything.

I'm now watching to see if Mooch joins, along with rest of E Staff, show up to our ice cream party tomorrow without contributing a darn thing. They never contribute, just take.

Also taking bets on whether Mooch shows, whines that the ice cream isn't in a flavor she likes (I'm bringing vanilla and strawberry, other contributions will include chocolate, mint, and butter pecan. Toppings being contributed include whipped cream, chocolate and caramel sauce, hot fudge, nuts, sprinkles, cookies, and the like. There will also be an ice cream cake.) Depending on how this goes down, I may cross post about Mooch in the SS thread, even though I'm not done reading the whole thing (started in August, on page 1260 now).
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Jelly Bean on October 21, 2014, 08:56:26 PM
I had a manager like this several years ago. At Christmas, one of our clients ordered Italian food for the office for lunch, including several pizzas.  He put aside a whole pizza to take home himself before everyone had even eaten. I've since learned that he was making $250k per year. Boggles the mind.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chipmunky on October 22, 2014, 03:31:53 PM
I've an update!! The Super Supreme Mooch sadly did not make an appearance for the ice cream today.

However, several others from the downstairs unit, including a guy who never speaks to anyone, did show.  Non talker got himself a HUGE portion (I.e., half of a 1/2 gallon carton plus toppings), and then left. So much for fellowship in the ranks.

UberBoss showed, and thanked us for putting everything together. I did get to scold him gently (3 times) before we started- we were still getting set up, and he wanted to reach into the bowls of toppings with his bare hands (we were still putting out the spoons in the containers) and grab some to snack on (no hand smacking by me, more of the mother to child "uh uh uh" tsking).

I have full faith that the Mooch will appear next week at Halloween, particularly if it's a lunch type party.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: BabyMama on October 23, 2014, 01:51:04 PM
My favorite animal-is-a-thief story happened when I brought a container of mini cupcakes home. They were sitting on a side table next to the sofa because that's where I'd set them when I brought them inside. DD was 3-4 at the time, and she took one but didn't close the clamshell container completely. I came in a little later and the container was wide open. There were two cupcakes gone--one from the corner, which had been the one DD had taken, and one from the center in the farthest away row. I asked DD if she had helped herself to seconds without asking, and she swears she didn't.

I look behind the couch only to find DD's tubby dachshund's very guilty face next to a licked clean cupcake wrapper. Yes, our fat dog had very carefully removed a cupcake from the back of the package, carefully carried it off the couch (leaving no frosting or crumbs on the couch or floor), removed the cupcake from the wrapper, and left the wrapper behind. I couldn't even be mad at him...he'd left the rest of the cupcakes completely undisturbed!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: jackie jormp jomp on October 25, 2014, 07:09:15 AM
We do have one staff member who will complain if we have treats when she is out - she doesn't work on a Friday, and will comment about it if she sees that there were treats on Friday
Holy Dinah, what a brat.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Margo on October 25, 2014, 08:32:20 AM
We do have one staff member who will complain if we have treats when she is out - she doesn't work on a Friday, and will comment about it if she sees that there were treats on Friday
Holy Dinah, what a brat.
Particularly as there are reasons why Fridays are often particularly stressful. Treats on a Friday are usually to off-set the Friday stresses.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Kiwipinball on October 25, 2014, 09:56:10 AM
We do have one staff member who will complain if we have treats when she is out - she doesn't work on a Friday, and will comment about it if she sees that there were treats on Friday
Holy Dinah, what a brat.
Particularly as there are reasons why Fridays are often particularly stressful. Treats on a Friday are usually to off-set the Friday stresses.

I might be annoyed if there were constantly company sponsored treats on Fridays and no other days, especially if a lot of people didn't work on Fridays.  But I wouldn't complain about it. Also, I would love a job I didn't have to work on Fridays for, and would be super excited about that so it might offset my annoyance.  But if was occasional or the treats were sometimes on other days, I probably wouldn't care much.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Shalamar on October 25, 2014, 09:57:47 AM
That reminds me of my coworker.  He was taken out for lunch, paid for by his boss, to celebrate Coworker's 10th anniversary with the company.    When he got back, he found that someone had bought too much pizza for a meeting and left the leftovers for anyone to help themselves.   Coworker was mad, because he was too full from his free lunch to partake of the free pizza.   :o
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chipmunky on October 25, 2014, 01:43:27 PM
A year ago last spring, one of the admin assistants (who's also the receptionist for our section) set out a little easter basket with easter candies. Now I say little, but there was probably at least 4 bags of candy in this basket, and not the cheap, gross kind- it was the good hersheys and mars candies. Idea was everyone was welcome to grab a little, and it's poor form amongst the 20 of us on the upper floor to grab a huge handful- you take 2-3 pieces, max, at a time.

(Side note of background- this area is a restricted/secured area. Door is shut at all times, must have the code for the key pad to enter. Only our section and the cleaning staff have the code).

Friday afternoon, Admin leaves, and basket is 3/4 full. Monday morning, bright and early, she comes in, and ALL the candy is gone. No one was in over the weekend, so it can only be assumed the cleaning staff came in, saw the basket of candy, and ate/took it.

Admin was steamed. She bought more (and several of us contributed to), but this time she put a note at the bottom. It stated "If you're going to be a little piggy, you should save some for others or contribute!" The shaming isn't necessarily Ehell approved, but since then, we've never had a problem with the candy dishes people put out being completely emptied from one night/weekend to the next day/week.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: jackie jormp jomp on October 25, 2014, 05:46:12 PM
We had a man that worked at our office for a very short time. He would bring 8+ items to eat over the day (regular 8-5 job) and would never put them in the refrigerator, but had them sitting on his desk in a line. So, we would see him in the refrigerator or looking in the cabinets, and later realize our food was gone. I had the biggest rapport with him at the time, and it was left to me to talk to him as his supervisor was on leave. I mentioned to him that communal items were put out on the counter or table in the break room, but that items in the cabinets and refrigerator belonged to other employees. It didn't help.

While he was here, less than a year, I ended up have nearly half my meals I brought in disappear for the first few months. I then brought in canned soup, since I could keep that at my desk.
I'm glad you went through your employer to address that one though.  As annoying as it is, that could be a sign of an eating disorder.  I used to know a friend who was anorexic/bulemic, and she would go through phases where she admits to compusively stealing coworkers food--things she didn't even particularly want-- "beause it was there" and "because if I didn't buy it it was like I didn't do it." (eat it)
She really hated the fact that she did it and admitted a senior coworker had to tell her people noticed for her to actually start coming to terms with the fact that it was noticeable and abnormal. 
I know that is usually not the case with the average lunch thief, but her story always stuck with me, and I thought I'd share. 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Margo on October 26, 2014, 11:39:52 AM
We do have one staff member who will complain if we have treats when she is out - she doesn't work on a Friday, and will comment about it if she sees that there were treats on Friday
Holy Dinah, what a brat.
Particularly as there are reasons why Fridays are often particularly stressful. Treats on a Friday are usually to off-set the Friday stresses.

I might be annoyed if there were constantly company sponsored treats on Fridays and no other days, especially if a lot of people didn't work on Fridays.  But I wouldn't complain about it. Also, I would love a job I didn't have to work on Fridays for, and would be super excited about that so it might offset my annoyance.  But if was occasional or the treats were sometimes on other days, I probably wouldn't care much.

There are often treats on other days. And they are not company sponsored, they're usually bought by a senior member of staff personally.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: CrazyDaffodilLady on October 26, 2014, 03:45:47 PM
I have a slight spin on this.

Coworker Mike brought in a box of doughnuts every Friday.  (I didn't work Fridays, so wasn't involved.) Mike complained to me that no one ever reimbursed him when they took a doughnut.  He never told anyone that he expected reimbursement, nor did he put a sign on the box.  Other coworkers often brought in food for the group, and no one expected to be reimbursed. 

I gently tried to explain the situation to Mike, but I don't think he ever got it.  Especially the idea that if it makes you mad not to get reimbursed, stop bringing in doughnuts.  ::)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Peppergirl on October 28, 2014, 07:37:05 PM
^^ Wow.  I actually blinked and had to read that again.   :o
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Lynn2000 on October 29, 2014, 09:51:29 AM
Yes, I had a co-worker who also started bringing in nice treats completely of her own volition, and then started hinting that it wasn't fair that only she was bringing in treats, other people should, too. Then when I brought some in you could tell she didn't think they were up to the standard she had set. ::) If you're feeling resentful, stop bringing stuff in!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: siamesecat2965 on October 29, 2014, 12:05:38 PM
I have a slight spin on this.

Coworker Mike brought in a box of doughnuts every Friday.  (I didn't work Fridays, so wasn't involved.) Mike complained to me that no one ever reimbursed him when they took a doughnut.  He never told anyone that he expected reimbursement, nor did he put a sign on the box.  Other coworkers often brought in food for the group, and no one expected to be reimbursed. 

I gently tried to explain the situation to Mike, but I don't think he ever got it.  Especially the idea that if it makes you mad not to get reimbursed, stop bringing in doughnuts.  ::)

Wow, he is special, isn't he? We have a candy bowl in my area. Myself, and two others primarily are the candy stockers, although others will sometimes contribute. there are, however, a couple who never do, yet always take. Whatever, not a huge deal, but it doesn't go unnoticed. One is my boss. He made a comment one day about the poor selection (we needed to refill) and I just looked at him and said feel free to bring some in that's to your liking! 

But in the case of the donuts; we also bring in treats every now and then, and unless its agreed upon in advance that we will all chip in, no one does, and the bringer never expects anyone too! Why didn't he just stop bringing them in if it bugged him so much?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: onikenbai on October 30, 2014, 02:00:06 AM
I've a new thief!!

She's particularly sneaky, and has specific preferences. For example, she's stolen my ice cream, my chicken(doesnt matter the form, baked, sliced, or fried, she'll steal it given half the chance), half a turkey sandwich, some really good gouda cheese, iced tea, part of a burger, and recently, my special treat to myself, my milkshake.

She's a bloody ninja, and it takes me at least 5 minutes to realize what's happened.

I can't yell at her though- she's such a pretty tabby, though quite the diva, and she loves to snuggle and sleep with her front paws and head on my stomach or hip. I'm jealous of her though, all that food thievery and she's still not that fat one- that honor goes to her sister who has no interest in hoomin foods.

The thief attempted a different tactic yesterday- pawing and swatting the bejeezus out of my hands because she wanted to try what I had (chips and guacamole).

Ah man, my fuzzbutt LOVES guac.  He loves avocado all by itself, but is foiled by its slippery texture and just ends up chasing it all over the floor in a vain attempt to eat it.  He also has a fondness for chili, marinara sauce and potato chips.  He will not, however, eat tuna unless it's sashimi.  And no matter what, he will not eat more than three bites of anything because moderation is key.  The only cat I know that will walk away from a pile of bacon because he's finished his three bites.  Maybe I can rent him out to companies and send him out in a tiny T-shirt reading "Watch Me Leave Food for Others"!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Valentines Mommy on October 30, 2014, 06:57:31 AM
My little food thieves are not subtle at all. Spencer once stole all the naan from our dinner table (serves us right for eating in the living room).

Hogan used to steal bread loaves from the counters before he was officially adopted.

The funny ones belong to Saber though. Anytime she feels we have not paid proper tribute to her majesty, she will select her "offering", lick it (and only the one she selected) and then sit back, tail wagging. It's almost as if she is saying to us: Since no one is going to eat that one, may I have it please?

Well, yes, Saber, you licked it! No one but you will want it now! She has done this with sushi, a Salumi tray and a piece of Star Pizza my brother in law left out. (It was the Starburst with breakfast aka streaky bacon on it.)

Clever little thing and so darn cute, we fall for it every time. At 16, we decided to indulge her a bit.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: greencat on October 30, 2014, 01:05:11 PM
I believe I may have told the tale elsewhere of the cat who made off with a leg of Peking duck right under my nose, and subsequently, was found to have burgled the leg off the Thanksgiving turkey.  He was a very sneaky kitty!

Several members of the housekeeping staff got fired at some point before I started working where I work - they didn't realize that we had finally installed security cameras in the hallways around the break room, and were able to establish that it was in fact the housekeeping staff stealing food out of the break room fridge!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--interesting update p. 17
Post by: camlan on October 31, 2014, 10:24:53 PM
A bit of background: Our company has a treat or treat thing for the children of employees. This year it was yesterday, Oct. 30. The kids come in costume, people decorate their cubicles and offices and anyone who wants to hands out candy. Also, the city that the company's offices are in has ToT on the day before Halloween.

There's a *lot* of candy. And that means there's a lot leftover. And this morning, lots of people brought in their extra ToT candy from home. In the break room, there were two very large bowls, one for candy to share with co-workers and the 75 temps we currently have working, and the other was for candy that will be redeemed for cash (at a dentist's office), and the money given to a food bank sort of thing.

I saw the candy bowls at 8:30 this morning and both were full to overflowing. At lunch, both were empty. I was a bit disappointed, as I'd been looking forward to a piece or two of chocolate.

This afternoon, I found out why the bowls were empty.

Seems Big Boss came to our building for a meeting at 9:30, saw the candy bowls, commented favorably on the charitable aspect of the food bank one and went into his meeting. After the meeting was over, he went into the break room and both bowls were empty.

I'm not sure exactly what happened next, as there are at least three different versions going around, but the final result was that Big Boss ended up in Pizza Thief's office. And Pizza Thief had all the candy. They were able to identify it as the candy from the break room because Big Boss slipped a $20 bill into the bowl for the charity, and the bill was in one of the trash bags full of candy in Pizza Thief's office.

One eyewitness, whom I trust, says that he has never seen Big Boss so stern and so silent. Big Boss apparently returned to his own building without saying anything to Pizza Thief. The candy was returned to the break room. Pizza Thief kept a low profile the rest of the day. Rumors are flying like mad.

I would not want to be Pizza Thief next week. I don't see any good for him coming out of this.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: nayberry on October 31, 2014, 10:37:31 PM
O_o   Pt couldn't have screwed up worse if they'd gone into the bosses office and taken the sweets from bosses desk.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--interesting update p. 17
Post by: CocoCamm on October 31, 2014, 10:38:51 PM
A bit of background: Our company has a treat or treat thing for the children of employees. This year it was yesterday, Oct. 30. The kids come in costume, people decorate their cubicles and offices and anyone who wants to hands out candy. Also, the city that the company's offices are in has ToT on the day before Halloween.

There's a *lot* of candy. And that means there's a lot leftover. And this morning, lots of people brought in their extra ToT candy from home. In the break room, there were two very large bowls, one for candy to share with co-workers and the 75 temps we currently have working, and the other was for candy that will be redeemed for cash (at a dentist's office), and the money given to a food bank sort of thing.

I saw the candy bowls at 8:30 this morning and both were full to overflowing. At lunch, both were empty. I was a bit disappointed, as I'd been looking forward to a piece or two of chocolate.

This afternoon, I found out why the bowls were empty.

Seems Big Boss came to our building for a meeting at 9:30, saw the candy bowls, commented favorably on the charitable aspect of the food bank one and went into his meeting. After the meeting was over, he went into the break room and both bowls were empty.

I'm not sure exactly what happened next, as there are at least three different versions going around, but the final result was that Big Boss ended up in Pizza Thief's office. And Pizza Thief had all the candy. They were able to identify it as the candy from the break room because Big Boss slipped a $20 bill into the bowl for the charity, and the bill was in one of the trash bags full of candy in Pizza Thief's office.

One eyewitness, whom I trust, says that he has never seen Big Boss so stern and so silent. Big Boss apparently returned to his own building without saying anything to Pizza Thief. The candy was returned to the break room. Pizza Thief kept a low profile the rest of the day. Rumors are flying like mad.

I would not want to be Pizza Thief next week. I don't see any good for him coming out of this.

 :o Holy moley! Can't wait to see how this all plays out.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Mergatroyd on October 31, 2014, 10:48:19 PM
Pizza theif finally went too far, looks like.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Minmom3 on October 31, 2014, 11:31:09 PM
And he did it with JUST the right person!   >:D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Venus193 on November 01, 2014, 12:24:31 AM
Camlan, we're all anxiously awaiting the update.  That's worth looking forward to Monday for.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: wheeitsme on November 01, 2014, 08:12:50 AM
He took candy that was going to be donated to a food bank.
That's sleazy.  The fact that he took cash, and a higher-up's cash, as well, hopefully will slam the door on his backside.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: KenveeB on November 01, 2014, 09:01:01 AM
Wooooooow. It's one of those things that you kind of love to see in action. I think this thread just intersected with the Professional Darwinism one.  >:D
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Reika on November 01, 2014, 09:29:33 AM
Wow, this guy is a bigger piece of work than I thought.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Vall on November 01, 2014, 09:44:22 AM
Wooooooow. It's one of those things that you kind of love to see in action. I think this thread just intersected with the Professional Darwinism one.  >:D

And hopefully the (almost) Instant Justice thread.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: rose red on November 01, 2014, 10:13:53 AM
Wow. Never expected there'd be an update much less *that* one. Yikes!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: weeblewobble on November 01, 2014, 10:34:31 AM
I wish there was a smilie to effectively communicate the expression of pole-axed astonishment on my face right now.

What the H was he THINKING?!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Twik on November 01, 2014, 05:12:24 PM
I wish there was a smilie to effectively communicate the expression of pole-axed astonishment on my face right now.

What the H was he THINKING?!

"Free candy, oh boy!"
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Library Dragon on November 01, 2014, 08:30:34 PM
(https://d2npbuaakacvlz.cloudfront.net/images/uploaded/large-present/schadenfreude-always-good-for-laugh/schadenfreudeMug.PNG)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Otterpop on November 01, 2014, 09:31:43 PM
Ho boy!  Pretty please, please, please keep us updated.  >:D

Pizza Thief stole a charitable donation AND the bosses cash in one fell swoop.  His behind should be swooped out the door in the next few days.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Goog on November 01, 2014, 09:38:55 PM
Absolutely amazing how PT is so incredibly greedy (or entitled) that he's oblivious to how his behavior looks to the rest of the world.  I mean, if he'd taken half of the candy, then likely people would have wondered silently, in passing, but it wouldn't be so blatant that it would cause people to start looking for a culprit.  But he didn't care.  And look where it got him.  Hope that $20 in candy was worth it for him.

Wow.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: jedikaiti on November 01, 2014, 10:02:32 PM
I can't wait to hear the fallout on this one!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: oz diva on November 01, 2014, 10:04:25 PM
It's one of those rare occasions where you hate the weekend. We need an update.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Coralreef on November 03, 2014, 07:38:47 AM
I guess some people need to learn the hard way.  Just how stupid can you get? Then again, you can't cure stupid.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: ladyknight1 on November 03, 2014, 08:01:42 AM
Waiting impatiently for the update.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Doll Fiend on November 03, 2014, 08:12:12 AM
Waiting for the update too!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: z_squared82 on November 03, 2014, 09:00:32 AM
Waiting for the update too!

Ditto. Oh, wow, ditto.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Celany on November 03, 2014, 09:33:38 AM
I *just* finished reading this thread and man, I didn't see that coming! PT really shot himself in the foot!

The way that people can get about food (and hoarding/stealing work food) really amazes me. We get a lot of extra food at work during certain times of the year and people can get...soooo nasty. I remember one time (when I was an assistant-level person), I grabbed a sandwich (it was 2 halves, all wrapped in paper wrap and I ate 1/2 with part of my lunch & saved the other 1/2 to eat with the other part of my lunch the next day. As I was putting it away in the fridge, someone took me to task about how RUDE it was to save food that I'd gotten for free at work. Which confused the heck out of me, as well as freaked me out, as she was a much higher-level person than me. Said person then went and took TWO sandwiches from the tray, sternly informing me that you're only supposed to take what you'll eat that day.

Luckily, as she was rounding up her stern talk, someone even higher level came in, overheard the tail end, & asked her what she was talking about. When higher-level woman heard the story, she then dressed down high-level woman for 1) butting in to my reasonable saving of half the sandwich I'd taken and 2) taking 2 sandwiches for herself. After that, there would be little notes next to left-over food trays, letting us know how much we could take before 5PM (after 5, take as much as you want, but before 5, take 1 serving, so more people get some).
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: VorFemme on November 03, 2014, 09:41:59 AM
Food = Survival - in Nature, at least.  I'm not so sure about in the modern world, where Food comes increasingly out of bags, boxes, cans, and the like to the point that some people make comments about produce  being inedible because it has dirt on it - never mind that it was just picked from a garden & the grower is washing it off in their sink...

But two months or less before Christmas and a month before Thanksgiving (at least if this happened in the USA, and based on trick or treating candy being involved, it really feels like it is really unlikely to have happened elsewhere) - this guy is likely to find himself without a job and with a major blot on his future employment prospects - all over two bowls of candy (and a $20 that he might not even have noticed in his haste to dump the bowls of candy into bags to take home with him).

Professional Darwinism, it's that, all right.

Instant Justice, probably a text book example, even.

I have slightly altered the original meaning of "Schadenfreude" in my own mind - to me, it means taking pleasure in watching someone else's pain & suffering - but *only* when it is as a result of their own actions turning around and biting them in the backside - the type of event that is also called karma, karmic justice, just desserts, or similar terms.

I do feel sorry for his family and spouse. 

Being embarrassed and having to replace what he's taken (even replacing it two or three times over - to make a point of "this is costing you a lot more than you thought you were saving by taking the 'free' candy for your own use") is one thing - loosing his job...is probably something that he never thought about as being a consequence of his "frugality" - probably because he's never been told that he is *stealing* - he has probably never in his life framed it that way in his mind, so he doesn't think of his actions as what they are...to other people that he's taken from.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: wolfie on November 03, 2014, 09:45:42 AM
Food = Survival - in Nature, at least.  I'm not so sure about in the modern world, where Food comes increasingly out of bags, boxes, cans, and the like to the point that some people make comments about produce  being inedible because it has dirt on it - never mind that it was just picked from a garden & the grower is washing it off in their sink...

But two months or less before Christmas and a month before Thanksgiving (at least if this happened in the USA, and based on trick or treating candy being involved, it really feels like it is really unlikely to have happened elsewhere) - this guy is likely to find himself without a job and with a major blot on his future employment prospects - all over two bowls of candy (and a $20 that he might not even have noticed in his haste to dump the bowls of candy into bags to take home with him).

Professional Darwinism, all right.

Wheels of justice move slowly - I would doubt he will be fired by Christmas. He might not even get written up because technically if it was in the break room up for grabs there isn't anything that says you can't take it all besides common decency. But I am sure that repressions will come anyway in other forms the OP might not even be aware of.  I forgot one bowl was a donation bowl - I would say that is the only one that could come up and officially bite him but it would be hard to know what happens - any good discipline should not be known by the entire office - that is private.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chipmunky on November 03, 2014, 10:20:09 AM
While we wait for the Pizza Thief update....I've a Halloween Update on the Super Supreme Mooch!

The Mooch made an appearance at our Halloween/colleague's birthday celebration. Her boss did not- he was out of town.  She was the only person from the downstairs office to come up. She was also the only person who did not contribute food, drink, paper or plastic products. She also did not contribute as others did by assisting in the carrying up of huge pizzas (literally slices as big as your head, that's their slogan), setting up the room, or running interference so the birthday person would not see the cake and would not know what was happening. Her contribution, if it could be considered such, was to stand in the way and make suggestions on where things should go.

She did, however, have no problem consuming about a 2L bottle of soda by herself, 2 slices of giant pizza, a big slice of cake, and a huge portion of my buffalo chicken skinny dip. She cackled and basically was a self absorbed jerk the whole time. Not a single "thank you" was uttered- I don't think she knows that phrase and what it means.

Birthday person, who has appeared in my Professional Darwinism posts as The Queen, however, did exhibit gracious manners and thanked everyone for putting everything together, as well as thanking me for setting aside an extra portion of dip, chips, and celery for her to take home to her husband- she took home some of my left over chicken dip to him when I made it 6 months ago, and he's been talking about it ever since.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: weeblewobble on November 03, 2014, 11:40:27 AM
I *just* finished reading this thread and man, I didn't see that coming! PT really shot himself in the foot!

The way that people can get about food (and hoarding/stealing work food) really amazes me. We get a lot of extra food at work during certain times of the year and people can get...soooo nasty. I remember one time (when I was an assistant-level person), I grabbed a sandwich (it was 2 halves, all wrapped in paper wrap and I ate 1/2 with part of my lunch & saved the other 1/2 to eat with the other part of my lunch the next day. As I was putting it away in the fridge, someone took me to task about how RUDE it was to save food that I'd gotten for free at work. Which confused the heck out of me, as well as freaked me out, as she was a much higher-level person than me. Said person then went and took TWO sandwiches from the tray, sternly informing me that you're only supposed to take what you'll eat that day.

Luckily, as she was rounding up her stern talk, someone even higher level came in, overheard the tail end, & asked her what she was talking about. When higher-level woman heard the story, she then dressed down high-level woman for 1) butting in to my reasonable saving of half the sandwich I'd taken and 2) taking 2 sandwiches for herself. After that, there would be little notes next to left-over food trays, letting us know how much we could take before 5PM (after 5, take as much as you want, but before 5, take 1 serving, so more people get some).

Methinks the sandwich monitor was just trying to intimidate you so you wouldn't question her taking two sandwiches.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Celany on November 03, 2014, 12:02:50 PM
I *just* finished reading this thread and man, I didn't see that coming! PT really shot himself in the foot!

The way that people can get about food (and hoarding/stealing work food) really amazes me. We get a lot of extra food at work during certain times of the year and people can get...soooo nasty. I remember one time (when I was an assistant-level person), I grabbed a sandwich (it was 2 halves, all wrapped in paper wrap and I ate 1/2 with part of my lunch & saved the other 1/2 to eat with the other part of my lunch the next day. As I was putting it away in the fridge, someone took me to task about how RUDE it was to save food that I'd gotten for free at work. Which confused the heck out of me, as well as freaked me out, as she was a much higher-level person than me. Said person then went and took TWO sandwiches from the tray, sternly informing me that you're only supposed to take what you'll eat that day.

Luckily, as she was rounding up her stern talk, someone even higher level came in, overheard the tail end, & asked her what she was talking about. When higher-level woman heard the story, she then dressed down high-level woman for 1) butting in to my reasonable saving of half the sandwich I'd taken and 2) taking 2 sandwiches for herself. After that, there would be little notes next to left-over food trays, letting us know how much we could take before 5PM (after 5, take as much as you want, but before 5, take 1 serving, so more people get some).

Methinks the sandwich monitor was just trying to intimidate you so you wouldn't question her taking two sandwiches.

Boy did that backfire spectacularly. And it's funny, I didn't even notice her taking 2 sandwiches, as I was focused on just putting my stuff away and looking inside the fridge when she accosted me. Had she said nothing, she probably could have grabbed the sandwiches & been halfway back to her desk before I finished trying to find a good position for my stuff in the fridge (not to mention the hilarity of an assistant-level person (me) taking to task a director-level person (her) for taking 2 sandwiches   ::))
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--non-update update p. 19
Post by: camlan on November 03, 2014, 09:15:36 PM
Well, nothing happened today.

There was an announcement this morning that one of our satellite sites will be moving to our main campus. People were in the office buildings measuring the spaces. Someone looked into my cubicle and said, "Oh, there's room for another desk in here!" He sounded happy about it. I'm not so sure.

So with all the foof-rah about the moving and what department is going where and will people from Building A need to move to Building B so as to accommodate two departments from the other site, if anything happened to Pizza Guy, it got lost in the shuffle.

Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Venus193 on November 03, 2014, 09:29:22 PM
Oh, RATS!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: MissRose on November 04, 2014, 07:37:35 AM
I still do not get why many of the the food mooches and thieves in the posts over the years end up being the higher ups.  Still puzzles me... ::)
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: rose red on November 04, 2014, 09:35:39 AM
I still do not get why many of the the food mooches and thieves in the posts over the years end up being the higher ups.  Still puzzles me... ::)

I think it's because a lot (not all) higher-ups got use to the "little" people doing the dirty work while getting the biggest slice of the pie (paycheck). At home, they probably have somebody else doing the cooking. You'd notice in a lot of stories, they are genuinely confused and don't think they are doing anything wrong.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Cherry91 on November 04, 2014, 09:44:48 AM
I still do not get why many of the the food mooches and thieves in the posts over the years end up being the higher ups.  Still puzzles me... ::)

Maybe because if they weren't good at something, they'd be out on their ear (whether explicitly or gently encouraged onwards)?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Celany on November 04, 2014, 09:56:48 AM
I still do not get why many of the the food mooches and thieves in the posts over the years end up being the higher ups.  Still puzzles me... ::)

My experience has been that a lot of higher ups get very arrogant about what they're "entitled to" and actually *being* an higher-up gives them an inflated sense of worth and of what they "deserve".

My company recently had a lot of lay-offs. So we're not doing well financially.

I have recently been having a hard time booking our models. The design VP asks for them to come last-minute, and the only time the model has is from 5-6PM. This doesn't work from the design VP, because she leaves at 5 every day to catch her train, because she likes to be home at a certain time.

Our typical work day is until 6. that's what all the "little people" have to do, unless they have a compelling reason to argue for alternate hours. And if they are able to get alternate hours (which isn't easy!), it's with the understanding that, if company meetings or something require them to be in for a regular workday at times, they need to make that work. Also, to be clear, VP *likes* to be home at a certain time. She doesn't HAVE to be home because of kids or anything, she just wants to be home by a certain hour, which she negotiated when she accepted the job.

So anyways, VP wants to leave at 5. She should really stay until 5:20 this one day, to review something with the model. Throws a total fit about this, and tells one of my coworkers that "this whole 'hiring a freelance model thing' is just too much for her, and what we really need to do is have an in-house model, so our boss just needs to realize that he should hire one".

Salary for an in-house model is upwards of 100k. We just laid off people. Clearly, the answer to her occasionally being inconvenienced by having to stay later & take a later train is to hire a 100k+ a year in-house model, when we've just laid a bunch of people off. The entitled mentality is breath-taking.

And doesn't even being to address the part where she needs to see a model a few times a month, but we deal with them 3+ days a week, and yet she has the nerve to tell, not ask, but TELL my coworker what my boss should be doing with his model budget.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: rose red on November 04, 2014, 10:02:08 AM
With the discussion about higher-ups, I *just* remembered this! At one place I worked, managers are given a budget to take their department out for lunch (birthdays, holidays, etc.). My department always paid our own way and only found out about that budget after someone moved to another department. We speculated our manager used the money earmarked for us to take her own family/friends out (or something similar to that). I never reported it, and I don't know if anyone else did. At the end, that department was no longer needed in the company anyway so she's no longer there.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Venus193 on November 04, 2014, 12:49:34 PM
With the discussion about higher-ups, I *just* remembered this! At one place I worked, managers are given a budget to take their department out for lunch (birthdays, holidays, etc.). My department always paid our own way and only found out about that budget after someone moved to another department. We speculated our manager used the money earmarked for us to take her own family/friends out (or something similar to that). I never reported it, and I don't know if anyone else did. At the end, that department was no longer needed in the company anyway so she's no longer there.

Karma is wonderful, isn't it?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: becktheriddler on November 05, 2014, 03:36:15 PM
I remember a time, years ago, where our office got a "thank you" basket of cookies from one of our support areas. These were really nice, individually wrapped, very high end cookies. IIRC, there were about 20 cookies, and 8 of us worked there, so, plenty for all, right? Except J, who wasn't so much a food hoarder as she was a person with large appetites, wandered over, looked through the wrapped selections, picked out about 6 and started back to her desk.

R, however, was having none of that. She stopped J before she got to her desk, and basically said "There are 20 cookies, there are 8 of us, no way in heck do you get all of those, you get 2, pick which 2 you want and give back the rest". And J complied.

The funny thing was, R was about 15 years younger than J, and made a significant amount less money, but R was a mother hen type, and looked at all of us as her kids (including J). What I thought was nice was that J apologized for taking so many, but they all looked so good she just wanted to try them all! She hadn't thought through the logistics of how many cookies to people, but, like a kid "Yummy! Cookies! I want!"
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on November 06, 2014, 11:14:45 AM
The only time I had my lunch stolen it was embarrassing to me.  It was the day before payday, and I was scraping the not quite moldy food from the refrigerator.  I could picture the thief looking at it and exclaiming, "This is garbage!" as they threw it away.

Someone gave me some money to buy a lunch, but I always wondered if it was someone who thought my lunch was overdue for the trashcan.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Chip2 on November 06, 2014, 11:53:23 AM
I remember a time, years ago, where our office got a "thank you" basket of cookies from one of our support areas. These were really nice, individually wrapped, very high end cookies. IIRC, there were about 20 cookies, and 8 of us worked there, so, plenty for all, right? Except J, who wasn't so much a food hoarder as she was a person with large appetites, wandered over, looked through the wrapped selections, picked out about 6 and started back to her desk.

R, however, was having none of that. She stopped J before she got to her desk, and basically said "There are 20 cookies, there are 8 of us, no way in heck do you get all of those, you get 2, pick which 2 you want and give back the rest". And J complied.

The funny thing was, R was about 15 years younger than J, and made a significant amount less money, but R was a mother hen type, and looked at all of us as her kids (including J). What I thought was nice was that J apologized for taking so many, but they all looked so good she just wanted to try them all! She hadn't thought through the logistics of how many cookies to people, but, like a kid "Yummy! Cookies! I want!"

I made shortbread cookies for my office once. Because we get a lot of walk-in customers it was a lot of shortbread cookies. But they were disappearing much faster than they should. The mystery was solved when I walked by and spotted a coworker grabbing a 3" stack of them.

"Dude," I said, "that's about a half-stick of butter right there."

"Well, I've already two sticks then!"
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: jaxsue on November 06, 2014, 03:22:22 PM
The posts about gift baskets for the entire office reminds me of a job I had about 30 yrs ago. We'd get nice gift baskets, meant for the whole office (the attached card said so), that would end up at the big bosses' house. We'd get nothing. This guy made a heck of a lot more money than we did. Some peoples' sense of entitlement is amazing!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: HGolightly on November 06, 2014, 04:16:34 PM
I worked at a dental office like that.  Our staff would be sent gorgeous baskets and they would be left on the break room table under the bosses' orders not to touch them until lunch. Of course prior to lunch they would disappear.  The owner and his wife would take them and use them as Christmas gifts for their relatives.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TootsNYC on November 06, 2014, 04:25:06 PM
He took candy that was going to be donated to a food bank.
That's sleazy.  The fact that he took cash, and a higher-up's cash, as well, hopefully will slam the door on his backside.

Of course, he didn't intend to take the cash. But still...

I find it interesting that when the candy was gone, the Big Boss went straight to Pizza Thief's office. Even if he doesn't get fired, he won't have the confidence of anyone after this!



Quote
Clearly, the answer to her occasionally being inconvenienced by having to stay later & take a later train is to hire a 100k+ a year in-house model, when we've just laid a bunch of people off.

Or, perhaps, plan better so she can book the models earlier?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Celany on November 06, 2014, 04:28:59 PM
Clearly, the answer to her occasionally being inconvenienced by having to stay later & take a later train is to hire a 100k+ a year in-house model, when we've just laid a bunch of people off.

Or, perhaps, plan better so she can book the models earlier?

I suggested that once. The look she gave me was the kind that I would give a cockroach that I smooshed on the bottom of my shoe. Creative people can't *plan* these things, you know. The little people just need to get better at anticipating their needs!

I'm so glad that I rarely work with her, because when I do, I inadvertently ooze an aura of "your selfish narrow-mindedness is unimpressive and irritating".
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TootsNYC on November 06, 2014, 04:38:30 PM
I still do not get why many of the the food mooches and thieves in the posts over the years end up being the higher ups.  Still puzzles me... ::)

I think it's because a lot (not all) higher-ups got use to the "little" people doing the dirty work while getting the biggest slice of the pie (paycheck). At home, they probably have somebody else doing the cooking. You'd notice in a lot of stories, they are genuinely confused and don't think they are doing anything wrong.

One guy started a "Bagels on the Honor System" business in Wash,D.C., office buildings and discovered that the people on the executive floor would cheat.

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/06/magazine/what-the-bagel-man-saw.html


It's a form of white-collar crime.

Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Venus193 on November 06, 2014, 04:50:30 PM
A woman who was slotted into a director spot by her friend, the VP, here at adult education had a lot of money. She made good money, owned a home and an expensive vacation rental, and yet still had the nerve to take home a box of See's candy that had been gifted to the staff from a student for the holiday season. I felt absolutely no grief or sympathy when she was diagnosed with cancer a couple of years later and died.

Reminds me of the CEO of one of my past companies.  My boss, I, and the head of the production department used to get gifts from our vendors at Christmas time; this is routine in the advertising industry.  The corner office tried to stop this by sending a form letter to all those companies telling them that we would not be permitted to accept anything.  I got at least three calls from vendors about this with a few words that could get me banned from here.

Nobody cried when she declared bankruptcy and got her diagnosis.  And nobody went to her funeral.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Phoebe on November 06, 2014, 05:24:59 PM
A woman who was slotted into a director spot by her friend, the VP, here at adult education had a lot of money. She made good money, owned a home and an expensive vacation rental, and yet still had the nerve to take home a box of See's candy that had been gifted to the staff from a student for the holiday season. I felt absolutely no grief or sympathy when she was diagnosed with cancer a couple of years later and died.

Wow.



Reminds me of the CEO of one of my past companies.  My boss, I, and the head of the production department used to get gifts from our vendors at Christmas time; this is routine in the advertising industry.  The corner office tried to stop this by sending a form letter to all those companies telling them that we would not be permitted to accept anything.  I got at least three calls from vendors about this with a few words that could get me banned from here.

Nobody cried when she declared bankruptcy and got her diagnosis.  And nobody went to her funeral.

And wow again.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TootsNYC on November 06, 2014, 05:30:47 PM
I'll 2nd your wows, Phoebe.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Jones on November 06, 2014, 05:46:42 PM
I had to read that 4 times to be sure I read it correctly.


At the risk of sounding repetitious, wow.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Winterlight on November 06, 2014, 06:04:22 PM
I'm nthing the wows. I'm also horrified that people are suggesting that cancer is a just punishment for petty crimes.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: TheBardess on November 06, 2014, 06:09:41 PM
A woman who was slotted into a director spot by her friend, the VP, here at adult education had a lot of money. She made good money, owned a home and an expensive vacation rental, and yet still had the nerve to take home a box of See's candy that had been gifted to the staff from a student for the holiday season. I felt absolutely no grief or sympathy when she was diagnosed with cancer a couple of years later and died.

Seriously? Seriously?? Because she once nicked a box of candy??

Yeah. "Wow" about sums it up.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza
Post by: Ehelldame on November 07, 2014, 04:51:55 PM
A woman who was slotted into a director spot by her friend, the VP, here at adult education had a lot of money. She made good money, owned a home and an expensive vacation rental, and yet still had the nerve to take home a box of See's candy that had been gifted to the staff from a student for the holiday season. I felt absolutely no grief or sympathy when she was diagnosed with cancer a couple of years later and died.

Reminds me of the CEO of one of my past companies.  My boss, I, and the head of the production department used to get gifts from our vendors at Christmas time; this is routine in the advertising industry.  The corner office tried to stop this by sending a form letter to all those companies telling them that we would not be permitted to accept anything.  I got at least three calls from vendors about this with a few words that could get me banned from here.

Nobody cried when she declared bankruptcy and got her diagnosis.  And nobody went to her funeral.


Yeah...um...wow.  I don't think it was wise to think that or write it.   
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: camlan on November 08, 2014, 09:27:08 AM
Well, for those who wanted an update on Pizza Guy.

The company had lay-offs yesterday. Not entirely unexpected; there has been a huge shakeup in our industry in the past year and a half and we've lost a few clients.

Pizza Guy was one of those let go.

The reason I was given by my supervisor and his boss, was not the theft of the pizza and candy, but more on-going issues with how he managed his team.

He was great with clients, and I think we all thought that made his job safe. But there were other problems that the general staff didn't know about. He had been on an improvement plan for several months, apparently. I wasn't given details, just the general outline of what was going on.

The pizza and the candy incidents didn't help him any, however.

And why did I get the outline of what was going on with Pizza Guy? There's going to be a general reshuffling and re-organization, and I'm getting promoted. Not to Pizza Guy's job, but a new one they are creating. The bigger bosses wanted me to know a bit about what's happened, so that I can help to squelch rumors.

I feel badly that Pizza Guy lost his job, and so close to the holidays. Part of me is glad I won't have to deal with him again, part of me wouldn't wish unemployment on anyone (I was unemployed/underemployed for two years and it stunk), and all of me is walking around with my feet not completely making contact with the floor over my good news. Yesterday was a very mixed up sort of day.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: artk2002 on November 08, 2014, 09:45:01 AM
Congratulations on the promotion!

As for pizza guy, I have a tiny modicum of sympathy, but it doesn't go very far. All of his problems were of his own creation. He clearly knew that he was on the edge but proceeded to do things that would get him fired. He made his bed, he can lie in it.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: SamiHami on November 08, 2014, 09:59:17 AM
Congratulations Camlan! What great news for you!

Like you said, I hate to see anyone unemployed esp around the holidays, but that was out of your hands.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Celany on November 08, 2014, 09:59:47 AM
I feel badly that Pizza Guy lost his job, and so close to the holidays. Part of me is glad I won't have to deal with him again, part of me wouldn't wish unemployment on anyone (I was unemployed/underemployed for two years and it stunk), and all of me is walking around with my feet not completely making contact with the floor over my good news. Yesterday was a very mixed up sort of day.

(((hugs)))

We had layoffs at my company not too long ago. IMO, they did a really "great" job of picking the people they laid off. Every single person that I personally knew & worked with who was laid off was a problem to work with. A guy in accounting who was perpetually disorganized & lost invoices. A product development person who either regularly lied about conversations she had with other people, or genuinely had such a bad memory that she grossly misremembered what was said and would tell other people you'd do something you said you wouldn't do, or that you couldn't do something you actually can do. A designer who refused to understand why something was physically impossible, no matter how many times it was explained, and would continue to demand that it be done her way because "she just knew it would work if you would only try harder". I felt bad for all of them losing their jobs, as fellow human beings. But I also felt happy that I wouldn't have to work with any of them any more.

And congrats on the promotion! Even if it came under tough circumstances, it's still great news that they feel so good about your work!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: cicero on November 08, 2014, 01:56:59 PM
congrats!

and thanks for the update.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Venus193 on November 08, 2014, 02:44:09 PM
Congratulations, Camlan, and thanks for the update.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: KenveeB on November 08, 2014, 03:57:30 PM
Congrats on the promotion, and thanks for the update! I'd feel bad for anyone being laid off, but knowing lay offs were coming and still acting like he did?? That was just begging for it.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Mel the Redcap on November 08, 2014, 07:27:57 PM
Congratulations! Is there going to be a pizza party to celebrate your promotion? >:D

I agree that the pizza and candy incidents wouldn't have helped Pizza Guy at all. If it comes down to a choice between two workers who are equally good (or bad) at their jobs, and one is well-liked while the other occasionally does things that annoy people, the choice is going to be much easier.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Amara on November 08, 2014, 08:58:15 PM
May I first congratulate you, Camlan? That is wonderful news for you.

Second, please allow me to apologize to eHellDame and especially to all of you who found my post offensive, unpleasant, nasty or just plain unnecessary. It was all of those. There was background--the person had a long history of abuse to staff so it was not a single incident that caused those feelings in me. Regardless, it was inappropriate of me to post it. I am truly sorry, and will try harder to learn from this and to become a better person.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: zyrs on November 08, 2014, 11:56:40 PM
Congratulations Camlan!
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: FauxFoodist on November 09, 2014, 04:28:24 AM
May I first congratulate you, Camlan? That is wonderful news for you.

Second, please allow me to apologize to eHellDame and especially to all of you who found my post offensive, unpleasant, nasty or just plain unnecessary. It was all of those. There was background--the person had a long history of abuse to staff so it was not a single incident that caused those feelings in me. Regardless, it was inappropriate of me to post it. I am truly sorry, and will try harder to learn from this and to become a better person.

I just want to say that I never thought that you and Venus193 were stating person stealing food = deserves to get cancer and die.  To me, the "logical" conclusion was that these were people who, as you stated for clarification above, likely had a history of other bad behavior and the mention of what ultimately resulted (no one cared that they died) was an unfortunate next mention that made it seem (to others) that you were each stating that petty bad behavior deserved to have no one care they got sick and died.  I had a hard time fathoming that either of you (and your comrades) felt these individuals "deserved" what they got just for stealing candy.  Wow -- what a reminder to include those missing details in the future, huh?

Slightly O/T -- in high school, a girl I socialized with but didn't know that well, when we were hanging out one night, asked me what I think of her and gave examples -- did I think she was nice, crazy, what?  I told her I thought she was crazy.  She was surprised and asked me why.  I said anyone who stabs her sister with a knife for taking her (Girl's) sweater has got to be crazy (Sister didn't die; I think Girl stabbed her in the arm).  Girl was indignant and said it was a nice sweater and that her sister had no right taking it.  It's almost 30 years later and, yeah, I still think that was an over-the-top crazy reaction to your sibling taking an article of clothing.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on November 09, 2014, 07:00:53 AM
That really is crazy!  I'll never forget one guy who was absolutely awful to me in middle school and in our 8th grade year when other people were signing my yearbook, he got a hold of it and wrote "I hope you get hit by a Mack truck". I know it was him cause he actually signed it.

Fast forward about 5 years, my mom told me that after this guy graduated he was joining the military and his sister was driving him to basic.  There was an accident on the way and while she made it, he did not.   I remember being surprised and while I honestly wasn't sad due to his behavior towards me, I wasn't joyous, either cause well, that wouldn't make me any better than him.  But I do admit thinking that was a good reason to not say things like that to someone.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: weeblewobble on November 09, 2014, 10:30:49 AM
Part of me feels bad that he was fired, but my rational brain knows he doesn't deserve a job where he abuses his power and coworkers.

He knew he was on an improvement plan and THIS is how he behaves?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Jocelyn on November 09, 2014, 11:12:49 AM
Second, please allow me to apologize to eHellDame and especially to all of you who found my post offensive, unpleasant, nasty or just plain unnecessary. 

I didn't take it as you saying they deserved it...but as a statement that sometimes, people have created so much unnecessary pain for others, it is impossible to muster up the sympathy they deserve when a tragedy hits them. I once worked with a woman who made no bones about resenting the approximately 5 minutes a day, 2 days a week, my presence added to her workload.  After several years of pettiness, she retired, and I decided I had to suck it up and participate in the farewell festivities. She was away from her desk when I walked in, so I set the flowers down where she could not miss them, and went on to my office. I was later told by the person at the next desk, that when she came back, she asked who'd brought them, and when she was told that I had, she sat down, stunned, and teared up. A few years later, after I'd left that office, one of the other workers told me that she was in the hospital in the town where I lived, very ill. Again, I decided to do the right thing, and went to visit. She acted as if I had been her best friend at work, introducing me to people on the unit. I thought that probably she hadn't had too many visitors, to have been so glad to see me. Apparently she'd burned a lot of bridges over the years, and people weren't willing to drive the 15 miles to my city to visit her. It's very sad to think about people dying alone, but sometimes, it's because they've just worn the caring out of the people who know them, no matter how deserving their situation might be.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Gogi on November 09, 2014, 02:10:59 PM
Amara, I, too, read your comment as you meant it -- the intent was clear, if a bit awkwardly phrased. I commend you for your follow-up comments. Also, thanks to the mods for not putting this thread into permalockdown -- it's one of the most intriguing threads on the site, leaving me perpetually perplexed by the actions detailed!


Jocelyn , your words are incredibly insightful. Thank you for the comment.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Shalamar on November 10, 2014, 10:15:33 AM
Quote
He knew he was on an improvement plan and THIS is how he behaves?

Is it possible that he deliberately sabotaged himself - possibly even without realizing it?

The reason I ask is that I have a friend who knew that he was skating on thin ice at his previous job.  He'd been caught doing some stuff that the company didn't approve of.  Nothing really shady - just things like chatting to his work friends instead of getting his job done, surfing during the day, coming in late and leaving early - that sort of thing.  He was given an official "Cut it out or we'll consider terminating you" warning.  He didn't cut it out - if anything, his behavior got worse.   Somehow, though, he was completely shocked that they did indeed fire him.  To this day, he talks bitterly about how they had the audacity to fire him on his son's 1st birthday.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Lynn2000 on November 10, 2014, 02:05:11 PM
I've known people who seemed to subconsciously sabotage themselves. My former co-worker Emma, for example. She didn't get fired from her job with us (though honestly she probably should have), but she would do stuff like miss a deadline to turn in a form that could give her an entirely different future (visa stuff), or choose the hardest possible way to get something done (and then fail), or insist that she just couldn't find something vital that Googling by someone else turned up immediately. It was almost like if you told her not to do something, her brain would interpret that as, "Do this, it's a great idea!" And it didn't just happen once or twice--like all the people who confessed to sleeping through a final exam in the Student Darwinism thread--it happened over and over again.

I think a lot of the time she skated by because she was so nice and people felt bad for her and tried to help her/excuse her, but I always kind of wondered if maybe she just needed/wanted to hit bottom and be told no--in my opinion she was in completely the wrong profession and would have been better in a specific different one where she had talent and enjoyed it as a hobby, but she felt our profession was prestigious and her hobby was just a silly little thing. Sometimes I wonder if she wouldn't be happier if someone had told her, "You're not going to make it in this profession because XYZ," and then she'd be forced to try something completely different. So maybe after some reflection Pizza Guy will find a job he's better suited to.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: TeamBhakta on November 10, 2014, 02:54:29 PM
Quote
He didn't cut it out - if anything, his behavior got worse.   Somehow, though, he was completely shocked that they did indeed fire him.  To this day, he talks bitterly about how they had the audacity to fire him on his son's 1st birthday.

I'm reminded of a past thread that involved "Well yes, Crazy Lady should be fired for disobeying her company. But not at Christmas, that's unfair"
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: lollylegs on November 10, 2014, 05:23:09 PM
May I first congratulate you, Camlan? That is wonderful news for you.

Second, please allow me to apologize to eHellDame and especially to all of you who found my post offensive, unpleasant, nasty or just plain unnecessary. It was all of those. There was background--the person had a long history of abuse to staff so it was not a single incident that caused those feelings in me. Regardless, it was inappropriate of me to post it. I am truly sorry, and will try harder to learn from this and to become a better person.

I just want to say that I never thought that you and Venus193 were stating person stealing food = deserves to get cancer and die.  To me, the "logical" conclusion was that these were people who, as you stated for clarification above, likely had a history of other bad behavior and the mention of what ultimately resulted (no one cared that they died) was an unfortunate next mention that made it seem (to others) that you were each stating that petty bad behavior deserved to have no one care they got sick and died.  I had a hard time fathoming that either of you (and your comrades) felt these individuals "deserved" what they got just for stealing candy.  Wow -- what a reminder to include those missing details in the future, huh?

Honestly? I don't think it matters about the backstory. Cancer is an awful thing and to lack sympathy for someone's suffering is an ungracious thing to think, let alone say. Likewise with no one showing up to someone's funeral.

But the apology is obviously heartfelt and we all make mistakes.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: FauxFoodist on November 10, 2014, 06:03:22 PM
May I first congratulate you, Camlan? That is wonderful news for you.

Second, please allow me to apologize to eHellDame and especially to all of you who found my post offensive, unpleasant, nasty or just plain unnecessary. It was all of those. There was background--the person had a long history of abuse to staff so it was not a single incident that caused those feelings in me. Regardless, it was inappropriate of me to post it. I am truly sorry, and will try harder to learn from this and to become a better person.

I just want to say that I never thought that you and Venus193 were stating person stealing food = deserves to get cancer and die.  To me, the "logical" conclusion was that these were people who, as you stated for clarification above, likely had a history of other bad behavior and the mention of what ultimately resulted (no one cared that they died) was an unfortunate next mention that made it seem (to others) that you were each stating that petty bad behavior deserved to have no one care they got sick and died.  I had a hard time fathoming that either of you (and your comrades) felt these individuals "deserved" what they got just for stealing candy.  Wow -- what a reminder to include those missing details in the future, huh?

Honestly? I don't think it matters about the backstory. Cancer is an awful thing and to lack sympathy for someone's suffering is an ungracious thing to think, let alone say. Likewise with no one showing up to someone's funeral.

Actually, the backstory *does* matter (depending upon who you are), but I'm not going to try to provide examples where someone could feel justified or where others might understand why an individual would feel that way (not agree with it but understand).  I wish I could be as gracious as Jocelyn, but I am not.  We will have to agree to disagree (or not, but I'm bowing out of this particular discussion).  Like you said, the apology was heartfelt (and that is what matters here).

Anyway, add me to not understanding why someone on a performance improvement plan would further sabotage himself (and over such trivial things like company-financed lunch or bowls of candy).
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on November 10, 2014, 06:13:59 PM
I imagine someone who doesn't think what he's doing is wrong wouldn't understand it is sabotaging to behave that way.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: nayberry on November 10, 2014, 06:34:46 PM
May I first congratulate you, Camlan? That is wonderful news for you.

Second, please allow me to apologize to eHellDame and especially to all of you who found my post offensive, unpleasant, nasty or just plain unnecessary. It was all of those. There was background--the person had a long history of abuse to staff so it was not a single incident that caused those feelings in me. Regardless, it was inappropriate of me to post it. I am truly sorry, and will try harder to learn from this and to become a better person.

I just want to say that I never thought that you and Venus193 were stating person stealing food = deserves to get cancer and die.  To me, the "logical" conclusion was that these were people who, as you stated for clarification above, likely had a history of other bad behavior and the mention of what ultimately resulted (no one cared that they died) was an unfortunate next mention that made it seem (to others) that you were each stating that petty bad behavior deserved to have no one care they got sick and died.  I had a hard time fathoming that either of you (and your comrades) felt these individuals "deserved" what they got just for stealing candy.  Wow -- what a reminder to include those missing details in the future, huh?

Honestly? I don't think it matters about the backstory. Cancer is an awful thing and to lack sympathy for someone's suffering is an ungracious thing to think, let alone say. Likewise with no one showing up to someone's funeral.

Actually, the backstory *does* matter (depending upon who you are), but I'm not going to try to provide examples where someone could feel justified or where others might understand why an individual would feel that way (not agree with it but understand).  I wish I could be as gracious as Jocelyn, but I am not.  We will have to agree to disagree (or not, but I'm bowing out of this particular discussion).  Like you said, the apology was heartfelt (and that is what matters here).

Anyway, add me to not understanding why someone on a performance improvement plan would further sabotage himself (and over such trivial things like company-financed lunch or bowls of candy).

I think that just because someone gets a disease, it doesn't mean that you have to like them and forgive all past transgressions.
I worked with a lady who went through a breast cancer scare and whilst I could wish her well, it didn't mean that I was going to get along with her, we never had before so why would an illness change that?

Also podding the bolded.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Mollie on November 10, 2014, 09:15:57 PM
To quote Leonard Pitts Jr. when he was writing about the death of Fred Phelps. "You can hardly blame people for not being prostrate with grief....And yet it is also hard not to feel saddened by this reaction, diminished by it."
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: greencat on November 10, 2014, 09:55:44 PM
Can we move along from the discussion of the people not feeling bad for their coworkers?  The mods have moderated, the posters have apologized...

The person who I replaced evidently used to have a habit of stealing another specific coworker's lunches - which every once in awhile meant the other coworker went hungry because there was no way for him to go buy food. 

Does it shock anyone that the reason this person was let go was for stealing things from the company?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: PlainJane on November 11, 2014, 08:05:44 AM
The person who I replaced evidently used to have a habit of stealing another specific coworker's lunches - which every once in awhile meant the other coworker went hungry because there was no way for him to go buy food. 

Does it shock anyone that the reason this person was let go was for stealing things from the company?

Not at all. A thief will steal what they think they can get away with. If the company did nothing to stop the food theft (assuming they knew about it) then (in my humble opinion only) they encouraged the thief to escalate his/her behavior. And it came back to bite them.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: fountainof on November 11, 2014, 09:35:50 AM
On the illness and sympathy issue: Having/getting an illness doesn't automatically make you a good person.  Aholes get cancer too and while I wouldn't wish an illness on someone generally (I admit I might wish ill on someone who abused me)  I don't think there is a requirement to feel sympathy just because of the illness.  One is allowed to just not care.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Harriet Jones on November 11, 2014, 09:49:09 AM
No one says you have to feel sorrow if a jerk dies.  (General) You don't need to gloat about it.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Celany on November 11, 2014, 09:56:36 AM
The person who I replaced evidently used to have a habit of stealing another specific coworker's lunches - which every once in awhile meant the other coworker went hungry because there was no way for him to go buy food. 

Does it shock anyone that the reason this person was let go was for stealing things from the company?

Not at all. A thief will steal what they think they can get away with. If the company did nothing to stop the food theft (assuming they knew about it) then (in my humble opinion only) they encouraged the thief to escalate his/her behavior. And it came back to bite them.

POD. With a further comment that I think it's ironic when the people in the company are surprised when the food thief escalates into non-food stealing. Because so many people thing food stealing isn't *really* stealing, and so they are amazed to find that the food...forager...has suddenly and "mysteriously" begun to steal, too.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Lynn2000 on November 11, 2014, 10:02:47 AM
I imagine someone who doesn't think what he's doing is wrong wouldn't understand it is sabotaging to behave that way.

Another thing I was thinking about, maybe not for direct theft of items, but something more like wasting time surfing the Net or chatting with co-workers--if the person is miserable at their job, those things could be the only things they enjoy doing at work. Or if they feel in over their heads with the work, those things might be all they feel they can handle--like it's their job to chat to a customer a little bit, but they draw it out way too much. It's their comfort mechanism and the only part of being at work they look forward to, maybe. In that case those things would be very hard to give up, even if they've been warned they're placing their job in jeopardy.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: DanaJ on November 11, 2014, 10:06:53 AM
I imagine someone who doesn't think what he's doing is wrong wouldn't understand it is sabotaging to behave that way.
POD. If Pizza Thief sees company property as a "personal opportunity" then he's not seeing it as sabotaging his career or risky behvior to help himself. The fact that he hadn't been reprimanded on previous occasions probably further justified his behavior - at least in his own mind.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Figgie on November 11, 2014, 10:28:39 AM
I was sharing some of the stories in this thread with my spouse and he told me a story about an office food issue and how it was handled.  This was a number of years ago when he worked at a company that had mostly male people working in the factory part.  My spouse was surprised that he had never told me about this, since the caramel corn I had sent to work for a work potluck was involved.  :)

My spouse had brought in two large bags (about 3 gallons) of my caramel corn.  He also brought in a bowl large enough to hold about half the caramel corn at a time.  He kept it all in his office until it was time to bring the food together for the potluck.  He went downstairs with one bag of the caramel corn and the bowl and set it down on the table.  The people who were setting up the potluck thanked him and told him that everything would be ready in about half an hour.

When he went back down, the bowl and caramel corn were both missing, so he asked where it was (thinking that he needed to go and get the bag in his office if it had all been eaten).  No one knew and so a couple of them went looking.  They found one of the guys from the factory sitting (hiding) behind some machinery with the entire bowl in his lap eating the caramel corn.

Being the kind of workplace that it was, the people who had found the guy, yelled out to everyone to come and look.  People did (it was just across the room from where the potluck was going on). 

And then the teasing started.  Someone started making pig sounds and someone else ran and got a half pigs mask that was hanging from the corner of a cubicle and they made the guy put it on.  My spouse said it was pretty funny and that he never had that happen to the caramel corn again.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on November 11, 2014, 11:20:11 AM
No one says you have to feel sorrow if a jerk dies.  (General) You don't need to gloat about it.

I can't help but think of the times that some ehell members have had toxic family get sick or pass and we've told them that the hurt the person caused that member isn't suddenly erased because they are sick, and the poster shouldn't feel they have to pretend all was well just because the person is terminally ill/sick.

It's not wishing that person ill will, just saying their illness/ passing doesn't automatically earn them our forgiveness for the wretched things they've done.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: rose red on November 11, 2014, 11:40:58 AM
Can we move along from the discussion of the people not feeling bad for their coworkers?  The mods have moderated, the posters have apologized...

Yes. Let's please move on. I wouldn't want this thread locked again.

As for food thieves, my sister would love to bring candy and baked goods to work, but there is a woman who will take the whole thing. Sis would bring in a family size bag of M&M's and others will grab a handful, but there will not be a second handful because the whole bag will all be gone within an hour. Nobody brings in treats unless they pass it out individually because why waste your time and money on one greedy person? A classic mooch and narcissist. I wish Sis is interested in Ehell because, boy, does she have stories about this woman (not all food related) to keep you all horrifyingly entertained for years.

eta: I forgot to say what makes her a thief and not just a mooch is that she thinks it's her right to go into people's desk to take their snacks. In her mind that's OK because it's "Just food. It's not like it's money." I don't work there so I don't know why she keeps getting away with it.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Morticia on November 11, 2014, 11:42:38 AM
I was sharing some of the stories in this thread with my spouse and he told me a story about an office food issue and how it was handled.  This was a number of years ago when he worked at a company that had mostly male people working in the factory part.  My spouse was surprised that he had never told me about this, since the caramel corn I had sent to work for a work potluck was involved.  :)

My spouse had brought in two large bags (about 3 gallons) of my caramel corn.  He also brought in a bowl large enough to hold about half the caramel corn at a time.  He kept it all in his office until it was time to bring the food together for the potluck.  He went downstairs with one bag of the caramel corn and the bowl and set it down on the table.  The people who were setting up the potluck thanked him and told him that everything would be ready in about half an hour.

When he went back down, the bowl and caramel corn were both missing, so he asked where it was (thinking that he needed to go and get the bag in his office if it had all been eaten).  No one knew and so a couple of them went looking.  They found one of the guys from the factory sitting (hiding) behind some machinery with the entire bowl in his lap eating the caramel corn.

Being the kind of workplace that it was, the people who had found the guy, yelled out to everyone to come and look.  People did (it was just across the room from where the potluck was going on). 

And then the teasing started.  Someone started making pig sounds and someone else ran and got a half pigs mask that was hanging from the corner of a cubicle and they made the guy put it on.  My spouse said it was pretty funny and that he never had that happen to the caramel corn again.

What the guy did was wrong, but that sounds way over the top as a response. It seems terribly cruel.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Figgie on November 11, 2014, 12:14:39 PM
It was that kind of work environment and it was a number of years ago.  That actually was pretty mild compared to some of the stories I heard over the years.  :)  It was pretty much an all male environment on the shop floor and the kinds of pranks they used to pull on each other always seemed over the top to me too. 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: VorFemme on November 11, 2014, 12:24:31 PM
Yeah - VorGuy remembers events that happened in the male locker room with an odd fondness that would have had those of us in the female locker room traumatized for years....

And he can't understand why there was no similar "horseplay" in the female locker room - because the teenaged female methods of establishing & demonstrating relative rank in the hierarchy is not the same...
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: TeamBhakta on November 11, 2014, 12:45:31 PM
And then the teasing started.  Someone started making pig sounds and someone else ran and got a half pigs mask that was hanging from the corner of a cubicle and they made the guy put it on.  My spouse said it was pretty funny and that he never had that happen to the caramel corn again.

That reminds me of a particular Cold Case episode I vowed never to watch again  :-X
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: DanaJ on November 11, 2014, 01:20:58 PM

What the guy did was wrong, but that sounds way over the top as a response. It seems terribly cruel.
As someone else pointed out, some factory settings are a lot more like lockerrooms complete with hazing-like rituals. I wroked for an employer that was half-white collar, half-blue collar, so the corporate culture was interesting.

In such a case, no one would have to wear a pig mask, but you might have ended up standing on a podium while you were presented with the "Puck-Up of the Month" award which was an actual, shiny hockey trophy re-engraved with the pun.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Queen of Clubs on November 11, 2014, 01:51:10 PM

eta: I forgot to say what makes her a thief and not just a mooch is that she thinks it's her right to go into people's desk to take their snacks. In her mind that's OK because it's "Just food. It's not like it's money." I don't work there so I don't know why she keeps getting away with it.

That attitude infuriates me.  It *is* money.  Does she think everyone she steals from shoplifts the food they bring in?  Or shoplifts the food to replace it?  They have to use money to buy or replace that food, so she might as well be opening their wallets and taking the money directly.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: lollylegs on November 11, 2014, 02:25:16 PM
I was sharing some of the stories in this thread with my spouse and he told me a story about an office food issue and how it was handled.  This was a number of years ago when he worked at a company that had mostly male people working in the factory part.  My spouse was surprised that he had never told me about this, since the caramel corn I had sent to work for a work potluck was involved.  :)

My spouse had brought in two large bags (about 3 gallons) of my caramel corn.  He also brought in a bowl large enough to hold about half the caramel corn at a time.  He kept it all in his office until it was time to bring the food together for the potluck.  He went downstairs with one bag of the caramel corn and the bowl and set it down on the table.  The people who were setting up the potluck thanked him and told him that everything would be ready in about half an hour.

When he went back down, the bowl and caramel corn were both missing, so he asked where it was (thinking that he needed to go and get the bag in his office if it had all been eaten).  No one knew and so a couple of them went looking.  They found one of the guys from the factory sitting (hiding) behind some machinery with the entire bowl in his lap eating the caramel corn.

Being the kind of workplace that it was, the people who had found the guy, yelled out to everyone to come and look.  People did (it was just across the room from where the potluck was going on). 

And then the teasing started.  Someone started making pig sounds and someone else ran and got a half pigs mask that was hanging from the corner of a cubicle and they made the guy put it on.  My spouse said it was pretty funny and that he never had that happen to the caramel corn again.

What the guy did was wrong, but that sounds way over the top as a response. It seems terribly cruel.

+1
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Coralreef on November 11, 2014, 03:33:17 PM

eta: I forgot to say what makes her a thief and not just a mooch is that she thinks it's her right to go into people's desk to take their snacks. In her mind that's OK because it's "Just food. It's not like it's money." I don't work there so I don't know why she keeps getting away with it.

That attitude infuriates me.  It *is* money.  Does she think everyone she steals from shoplifts the food they bring in?  Or shoplifts the food to replace it?  They have to use money to buy or replace that food, so she might as well be opening their wallets and taking the money directly.

Yes, food is money in another form.  It just happens to be edible.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: camlan on November 11, 2014, 03:48:30 PM
One of my desk drawers at work always has a few basic supplies--Advil, Pepto-Bismal, some feminine supplies, a flashlight, tissues, a Tide-to-go stick, that sort of thing. They are there because sometimes I need them, and I don't want to have to ask around for them. Saves time and energy.

One time, I had a large, 250 tablet, bottle of Advil. Someone from another department emailed around asking if anyone had any painkillers and I gave her a few.

Two months later, I had a splitting headache and went for the Advil. There were three left. Out of 250. I'd maybe taken 10-15.

So people in my office were sneaking in when I was not at my desk and taking them. Was I so terrifying that they were afraid to ask me? Why did they wait until I wasn't there? I would have gladly given anyone who asked a couple of tablets. There was no need to steal them. I was angry and hurt.

They were probably the same people who waited until I was out of my office to sneak all the chocolate out of the candy bowl I kept on my desk.

The supplies got put in a locked drawer and several months later, after constant complaints about the type and variety of candy in the bowl, I stopped that, too.

But it still stings that people I worked with and that I liked and that I though liked me, thought I was that mean that I'd refuse to give someone in pain a few Advil. 
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Coralreef on November 11, 2014, 04:00:40 PM
^^^^
No good deed goes unpunished.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: LazyDaisy on November 11, 2014, 04:12:05 PM
One of my desk drawers at work always has a few basic supplies--Advil, Pepto-Bismal, some feminine supplies, a flashlight, tissues, a Tide-to-go stick, that sort of thing. They are there because sometimes I need them, and I don't want to have to ask around for them. Saves time and energy.

One time, I had a large, 250 tablet, bottle of Advil. Someone from another department emailed around asking if anyone had any painkillers and I gave her a few.

Two months later, I had a splitting headache and went for the Advil. There were three left. Out of 250. I'd maybe taken 10-15.

So people in my office were sneaking in when I was not at my desk and taking them. Was I so terrifying that they were afraid to ask me? Why did they wait until I wasn't there? I would have gladly given anyone who asked a couple of tablets. There was no need to steal them. I was angry and hurt.

They were probably the same people who waited until I was out of my office to sneak all the chocolate out of the candy bowl I kept on my desk.

The supplies got put in a locked drawer and several months later, after constant complaints about the type and variety of candy in the bowl, I stopped that, too.

But it still stings that people I worked with and that I liked and that I though liked me, thought I was that mean that I'd refuse to give someone in pain a few Advil.

No single raindrop believes it is responsible for the flood. Each one rationalizes that they only took a few and that it's everyone else's fault that your supplies were gone.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: Lynn2000 on November 11, 2014, 04:12:54 PM
When I used to drink coffee at work, I liked to put a spoonful of cocoa in it, so I had a big tin of cocoa sitting on the break room table with my initials on it. If anyone asked if they could have some I happily said yes. (Though, that really shouldn't matter, right? I mean, if I say no, that's still no reason to steal it.) I started to notice that it seemed to be less than I was expecting, and finally I asked someone who sat in that room, "Have you ever noticed someone using my cocoa?" She kind of thought for a moment and then said, "Yeah, I think so." I didn't ask her who (though I had suspicions) but I moved the tin to my desk after that. ::)

I mean, seriously people, we are all supposed to be adults here. I probably wouldn't have noticed a single spoonful or two so they must have been taking it pretty regularly--why they thought that was cool, I don't know. The most charitable explanation I had was that maybe I had told them yes once, and they took that as leave to have some whenever they wanted. Though oddly I never came across them actually doing it--if they really thought I had given them broad permission you'd think I would have spotted them doing it once in a while, or they would have said something to me or offered to bring in more or something.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: DanaJ on November 11, 2014, 04:24:14 PM
eta: I forgot to say what makes her a thief and not just a mooch is that she thinks it's her right to go into people's desk to take their snacks. In her mind that's OK because it's "Just food. It's not like it's money."

So does she walk out of the grocery store without paying too?
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: LazyDaisy on November 11, 2014, 04:31:34 PM
eta: I forgot to say what makes her a thief and not just a mooch is that she thinks it's her right to go into people's desk to take their snacks. In her mind that's OK because it's "Just food. It's not like it's money."

So does she walk out of the grocery store without paying too?
I wouldn't be surprised if she's the type that eats a handful of something that is priced by the weight but only pays for what rings up, or opens a container to try the product before she's paid for it. After all, why should she pay for the whole bag of chips when she only ate two and decided she didn't like them? Pay for a pound of cherries, but the scale only says 14 ounces -- the ones in her stomach don't count!  :o  Yes, these people do exist.
Title: Re: Oh, dear, someone stole the thief's pizza--final update p. 20
Post by: alkira6 on November 11, 2014, 04:35:28 PM
I have moved to a desk job due to health issues (I just couldn't do it anymore - the standing or the workload) and am part of a 6 person office in an elementary school. I had to adjust to the culture, because to everyone here once you say "yes" once, your yes is good evermore.

We all had to have a discussion about all of the things in my little fridge - my juice in particular as well as my ginger beer. Those are off limits always.  Everything else is open game and I am given money to make an amazon order and have it delivered to the school for everything else. Everyone chips in and everyone can use the food/drinks/supplies.

Now these are not moochers. They are very good people. Lunch is provided by someone at least 3 times a week and people share everything.  It just took me a while to get used to this attitude, as I came from a school where you locked up everything. Here people bring and take interchangeably. except for my ginger beer and fruit juice. Once it was explained in excruciating detail what happens to me if I don't take my medicine with them, the staff check in regularly to make sure that I am stocked  >:D