Etiquette Hell

General Etiquette => Etiquette Hell Classics => Topic started by: Brentwood on February 22, 2007, 11:15:27 PM

Title: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on February 22, 2007, 11:15:27 PM
FauxPasofYear1114-06

(Ehelldame's comments are in red.)


Two  friends of ours, a lovely couple named 'Casey' and 'Mindy', were invited to a housewarming party by a friend of Casey's from work. In fact everyone at the workplace was invited, via a large Invite and map on the breakroom wall. Casey and Mindy were new to the area, recent newlyweds, and decided to go to meet some new friends. They were told dinner would be a buffet and mostly just "the grand tour" of the host's new abode, and chit chat over cocktails.   Casey and Mindy arrived, bringing with them a nice bottle of Bordeaux from a local vineyard, and told by the smiling hostess as she took their coats that every one was congregating in the living room, and once everyone was there, they would "get started". Alrighty then!

Casey left the wine on the gift table, and he and Mindy seated themselves on some folding chairs (2 of about 30) in the front room. There was a man at the front of the room that Casey did not recognize, in a shirt and tie, setting up a DVD player to a large TV
 facing the "audience". They chatted with the people around them, and soon found out no one else had any idea what was going on...was this some type of "how we found and bought our new home" show?   Were the hosts planning on everyone watching a movie? More and more people filed in, and finally the lights dimmed as Howard (the host and Casey's co-worker) said,   "As you may have guessed, we have owned this home for over 3 years now, and while we never had a housewarming, The REAL reason we have brought you all here together is to tell you about a super business opportunity that my wife and I have recently discovered, called AMWAY."   

Looking immensely pleased with himself, he then introduced his manager, "BOB" who was way up on the Amway ladder and could let these people all follow him down the road to riches beyond imagining. Someone asked if they could have the housewarming part first, as they were not interested in the Amway. "Bob" spoke to all assembled as if they were slightly dense 3 year olds, and promised, no more than 1 HOUR of Amway, and they you will be allowed to make your way over to the buffet.   

My friend Casey and his wife stood instantly and asked for their coats. Several other guests did the same.   On their way out the door, they picked up their bottle of "housewarming wine" and went home and drank it themselves, laughing all the time.   To this day, "Bob" has never apologized for bringing people into his home on false pretenses, but has let it be known how rude his co- workers are, especially since corporate has told him he cannot advertise for any Amway related business on company property. I know Casey and Mindy's actions were probably rude as well. But I can't help but giggle every time I picture him snagging his bottle of wine off the gift table on the way out!   

FauxPasofYear1114-06

When I was 22, I was very briefly snagged into Amway and actually participated in getting a co-member of a health club I worked at to come hear an Amway presentation under false pretenses.  She thought she was coming to hear about tax help for her portfolio.  Where ever you are, please forgive me.  My innards were just crawling in disgust over what I was doing.   


My own comment: This story literally made my jaw drop. 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kathrynne on February 23, 2007, 12:19:49 AM
Ouch. A coworker pulled this stunt on DH and me before we got married, only he came to our home. He got the boot pretty quickly, and I never saw him the same way again. Too bad, I had thought he was a nice guy.

Now my brother's my upline in Quixtar. He's put 20 people under me but I can't really make money unless I start a second line of people. Not gonna happen. I have two friends in this state and I intend to keep them that way. They offer a few products I like and can't get anywhere else--like an energy drink that actually tastes good!--and that's my full intent with the company.

Besides, my brother could sell space heaters in the tropics. I could never be a "rah rah" type or sell anything someone wasn't asking to buy from me.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: citybrat on February 23, 2007, 04:14:39 AM
Many years ago, my husband and I were subjected to a similar meeting. The guy gave us this schpiel about getting rich by selling these products. He told us he drove a Mercedes and lived in a big house all by selling this stuff and getting other people to sell for him.

He proceeded to go around the room to ask us what our "dream" was. The poor sch#### never knew what hit him. People said things like "finishing law school", "run a marathon"... you get the picture.

It came around to my husband's turn, and my very smart husband says "living to a ripe old age in good health". I picked on his cue and said "being well read and well educated". We got a thumbs up from a few people across the room. Some were laughing. The guy was clearly annoyed telling us we need money for both of those things. Yes, you need some, but not a fortune.

I was talking to a friend who taking a business degree in university and she informed me that you can work 40-50 hours a week on these schemes and earn only $7K to $10K if you are lucky. You are better off working part time at WalMart and you won't have to annoy your friends.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: retreadbride on February 23, 2007, 09:45:48 AM
Quixtar and Britt Marketing were begun by the same guy who started Amway. BEWARE.

The key is that there is ANOTHER business in these MLMs....the business of selling the tapes, videos, and holding the seminars. The people in the downlines do NOT make money.

My parents got sucked into that poop for awhile. They were pressed to hoodwink friends and told directly not to tell them why they were invited, or they wouldn't come. "They won't be offended because they are your friends" when they find out otherwise. "Hey, your friends don't yell at you, do they?"

No reputable business will work as an MLM. Period.

http://www.metroactive.com/papers/metro/10.03.96/cover/multilevel-9640.html

http://www.mlmwatch.org/

http://www.mlmsurvivor.com/
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Bob Ducca on February 23, 2007, 09:56:56 AM
This happened to us as well- DH's best friend, whom he had known for years, ensnared us into an Amway meeting.  He and DH were estranged for a little while over it- it was kind of a "last-straw" sort of situation.

According to our pitchman, it was our dream to own a "motorcoach."  To this day, DH snickers when he hears the term.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Evil Duckie on February 23, 2007, 10:17:26 AM
We have ensnared into some Amway meetings.

This has actually ended a couple of friendships because of this tacit. Afterwards we will tell then that we felt they lied to us about the visit and depending on how they respond we might end most of or our contact.

One couple had been a friend for years. After this stunt we told him that we didn't appreciated it and felt he lied to us. His response was that how else would we hear about this wonderful opportunity and join it.  He kept trying to get us to join so he could make more.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: catsrme7 on February 23, 2007, 10:33:00 AM
I've never actually been to a meeting or cornered by anyone about Amway.  But, when I was much, much younger I babysat a few times for couple who I discovered were Amway distributors.  They had left some brochures and literature on the coffee table, so I didn't feel that I was snooping when I read them - in fact, I felt that perhaps they wanted me to see them. 

One paper (which perhaps they didn't really mean to leave out) outlined how to set up such a meeting.  It didn't say specifically to lie to your friends, but it did out & out say to not tell them it was about Amway.

I've always been curious.  If Amway is such a good business opportunity and you are proud to be associated with them, why would you even want to lie to your friends and family? 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Pixie on February 23, 2007, 10:51:22 AM
I actually "sold" AMWAY for a couple years, but I made it VERY clear to my friends that I was selling it so that I could buy the products at a slight discount.  If my friends truly wanted the products, and wanted to order from me, fine, but no one was pressured, and I didn't want anyone to feel obligated to buy  from me.   I didn't get into the whole up-line thing or any of the nonsense,  I simply liked the products and wanted to use them. 

Lately I have thought about selling Pampered Chef simply because I love the products.... but I don't want to be a pushy salesperson or have my friends run and hide in fear I may ask them to host a party.


That party?  RUDE and TACKY!

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: megswsu on February 23, 2007, 03:25:32 PM
Yes, I about died when I read that story. DH and I would have been out of there too. Good for them for snagging their wine back!  >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: minnaloushe on February 23, 2007, 05:25:29 PM
When I was younger I was approached by an Amway distributor, but of course he didn't say that until I asked for an application.  For a week he'd come into the shop telling me I was working too hard, and that he had a great job opportunity for me, and did I want to come and talk to him about it? Since he was reluctant to say what the great business opportunity was, I thought that he was trying (in his polite, grandfatherly way) to ask me out until I said I'd take an application and see where it went.

Since I'd already been involved in a MLM that didn't pan out, I knew I wasn't cut out for that kind of thing and politely declined.  Mr. Pushy continued to drop by every other day until the owner caught him chatting up other customers.

Since then my MIL got into another MLM, and that has resulted in her destroying a 36 year marriage, losing a lot of her friends and some family because she won't stop selling.

I've looked up the sites mentioned, and now when people approach me with a "plan" I politely decline, and if they persist, I will unleash a barrage of questions the Agent is usually unwilling or unable to answer.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Fabrashamx on February 24, 2007, 12:34:36 AM
Hi E-Hellers!

 The Amway-Housewarming story was mine. I just noticed it made faux pas of the year and called my friends who were actually there to come on line and have a peek.
 I tried to do it justice. but to hear my friend 'Casey' tell it (BTW, His real name? K.C., LOL must have been not feeling too imaginative that day! ) You would die laughing.

 My DH and I also had an Amway story, we had a young couple move into an apartment across from us years ago and one day they asked if they could come over that night to talk to us about 'something', We we're more than hi-and-bye in the parking lot aquainted, so DH and I could not think why they wanted to 'speak to us' and we went over the possibilitys up to and including DH suggesting they might be swingers, EW lol or we were too loud getting our paper in the mornings, well it was Amway and they brought their own version of 'Bob'. It took us 3 hours to politely decline and shoo them away with out being too rude. Athough they had invited themselves and we probably didnt owe them much more than a swift boot in the bottom, LOL.

Having so much fun reading all the new updates, Hope all of you are as well.
Your Friend,
Fabby  8)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: TheDisappeared on February 24, 2007, 12:41:13 AM
I don't like MLMs.  Most of the time it is family that gets you in to it.  For some reason, even though I knew it was an MLM and to an extent a scam, my DH and I joined one.  His grandparents wanted us to join because half of the family was getting in and they told them you needed to "Hold your place in line", so we did it.  I never really expect to see any money from it (we spend $170 and we got a whole $4 check last month), but it is hard to say no when DH wanted to and his grandparents wanted him to.  He sees what it is now, but when we joined they said you could make millions without even selling anything, but after reading the info, DH knows taht is a lie.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Fabrashamx on February 24, 2007, 12:50:22 AM
LOL Hubby just reminded me of our once sitting in a coffee shop in the bay area, there were about 20-40 people in this place, which did poetry readings and other such things.

A small group of people with acoustic guitars and things took the stage, and we were waiting for something like maybe bluegrass or celtic music, The man leans into the mic, looks all around the room, and says 'The REAL reason we're all here tonight is to learn about the wonderful world of Amway'

For a second you could have heard a pin drop, then the whole room cracked up. Thank goodness he was joking, after reading some of these stories, it might have been true lol.

Hugs, Fabby  :)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Fabrashamx on February 24, 2007, 12:59:56 AM
'Casey' and 'Mindy' just emailed me, they loved seeing their story on the website and said to tell everyone the wine was excellent, LOL

~Fab :D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Sophia on February 24, 2007, 01:06:06 AM
My very first grown-up dinner party was ruined by Amway.  I had become friends with this couple at work.  They mentioned Amway when I was at their house once after shopping with her.  I blew it off, and didn't say much beyond 'not interested'.  I invited them over for a nice dinner and cards afterward.  I made this dish called Piedmontese something-or-other, it was a hunk of meat cooked in wine, tomatoes and other stuff for like 10 hours.  It was really wonderful.  Somewhere in between their acceptance of my invitation, and the dinner he dropped by my place unannounced with a Bob.  I got them out in about a half hour.  The day of the party, she called me AFTER they would have had to leave to say that 'their son was sick'  Yah, right, you just now realized that.  The following Monday at work, she mentioned that Amway teaches "that friends who aren't willing to help you make money, aren't your friends."

The good news is that my parents live 45 minutes away, and hadn't eaten yet.  Dad said he has never seen mom move as fast as that night



Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kathrynne on February 24, 2007, 09:41:50 AM
The following Monday at work, she mentioned that Amway teaches "that friends who aren't willing to help you make money, aren't your friends."
Is this like "a family member who's not willing to give you the house isn't really family?"

There are some truly amazing "philosophies" out there. Wow.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Just Lori on February 24, 2007, 09:59:55 AM
I had friends who were going to get rich selling Amway.  When they approached me, I told them that I would not go into business with friends, but I would be more than happy to look over Amway's catalog and see if I could use any of the products Amway sells.  They did not take me up on my offer.  I guess they figured all of their Amway money would come from the people below them.  But someone has to sell the stuff, don't they?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Twik on February 24, 2007, 10:04:44 AM
Sophia, that was a truly appalling way to be treated. I'm glad your mom and dad got a nice meal, though!

MLM schemes seem to become very "cult-like". We had a woman in our office get into H********. She started spending most of her time on the phone with her own customers, rather than ours (she had her own office, so fortunately for her the bosses didn't notice this at first). She started selling products to several of the other women in the company, who liked the product, but got very annoyed when they wouldn't agree to become distributors under her, so she stopped allowing them to buy from her (a little counterproductive, to my mind).  She kept telling us about how the product would do wonders for health - "It even cures AIDS!" I asked her why it wasn't widely known, and she explained how the evil medical community had quashed this news for their own profit.

Finally, she decided to quit, because the organization had apparently brainwashed her into believing that she would make her first million in one year (also, she was convinced our management had treated her very badly - OK, they're not philanthropists with their staff, but most of her complaints were ridiculous). I had to watch her on her last day because of vague threats of her destroying her work records before she left.

As she left, she promised to come by in six months, to show us her new Cadillac. That was 8 years ago, and we're still waiting.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Twik on February 24, 2007, 10:06:10 AM
I had friends who were going to get rich selling Amway.  When they approached me, I told them that I would not go into business with friends, but I would be more than happy to look over Amway's catalog and see if I could use any of the products Amway sells.  They did not take me up on my offer.  I guess they figured all of their Amway money would come from the people below them.  But someone has to sell the stuff, don't they?
Lorir, that's what puzzles me. Even a pyramid scheme needs some sort of suppport at the bottom. Apparently even the distributors agree you can't make a profit just by selling the stuff.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kathrynne on February 24, 2007, 10:35:47 AM
Lorir, that's what puzzles me. Even a pyramid scheme needs some sort of suppport at the bottom. Apparently even the distributors agree you can't make a profit just by selling the stuff.
This got much longer than I intended. Sorry.

Here's how my brother pitched the Quixtar to me, quick and dirty (we were on the phone, so he couldn't come close to a full sales talk):

We'll get lots of people in my "downline" and everyone just buys what they would normally buy, only from the website instead of a brick and mortar store. As long as you spend the minimum to get a check each month, you get some credit for everything spent in your downline. And your downline's downline. And so on.

One huge problem for me is that DH and I are a two-person household and the everyday stuff available on the website is horribly overpriced, so we can't possibly spend our "minimum" there even once every three months. Even that is assuming we're buying the low-carb cookies and energy drinks (which I admit are very good, and the only reason I stayed in for another year), which is really expensive stuff,

In order to generate a check, I have to spend about $150 in a month on the site. The largest check I've seen was for $12. I'm in this only to have access to products I couldn't otherwise buy.

My sister, otoh, does not have web access, but suddenly has excellent reason to get online ASAP. Bill also talked her into Quixtar and because she doesn't have web access he's been ordering things for her. Each month he places an order on her credit card for enough product to generate a check for her. She wants to get online and control her own orders before the stockpile grows any larger.

She told me this week that her mudroom is filling rapidly, mostly with cases of energy drink because that generates the best "spiff." Granted she could use a can or two of this herself every day to help chase after the two kids, but she sure isn't letting the kids drink it or she'd need rocket fuel to keep up.

I'm just glad I don't live near Bill, so he's not trying to drag me along to every "rah-rah" session, like he is my sister (who can't spare the time). He suggests I go to the meetings in my state, but apparently doesn't understand that a two-hour trip each way for a two-hour meeting on a weeknight is not happening. Actually, if the meetings were held in my own livingroom I wouldn't attend.

He has so many people signed up under him he may actually make some money. If, however, he makes enough to actually impact his finances he may well alienate his sisters and friends in the process.

I've told him I'm signed up and it ends there. No more talk, no pressure to attend meetings, and don't push me to try selling this to every person I meet on the street. I like a few products and will buy them when I need them, but if any more pressure is applied I will not renew.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: beckygoesape on February 24, 2007, 10:56:00 AM
My husband and I, while we were in college, invited some friends over for dinner.  We were in an italian cooking mood.  I made a huge meal, baked fresh breads, lasagna, alfredo.  It was very over the top simply because we got some sort of windfall and we could.

After the meal we wanted to show a video that we thought they'd like, since we all knew each other from being in theatre.  My husband introduces this with, "And now we'd like to show you something!"

Our guests turned three shades of white.  One mumbled to his wife, "If this is Amway we gotta go!"  My husband and I looked at each other confused.  Then it hit us.  Amway salesmen had been running rampant in our little college community.  When we said that it was just a movie we all had a good laugh.

Becky
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: FUNKIEFAIRY on February 24, 2007, 01:19:49 PM
LOL Hubby just reminded me of our once sitting in a coffee shop in the bay area, there were about 20-40 people in this place, which did poetry readings and other such things.

A small group of people with acoustic guitars and things took the stage, and we were waiting for something like maybe bluegrass or celtic music, The man leans into the mic, looks all around the room, and says 'The REAL reason we're all here tonight is to learn about the wonderful world of Amway'

For a second you could have heard a pin drop, then the whole room cracked up. Thank goodness he was joking, after reading some of these stories, it might have been true lol.

Hugs, Fabby  :)

LOL!!! :o I choked on my sandwich laughing at this! While trying to pay for school, I was working as a waitress at the local pizza place. Every week, a group of well-dressed people would come in for a business type meeting and they would occasionally try to get us to stay in and listen to what they had to say, but we always declined. One night, we were completely dead except for this group, so as they were comming in, one of them stopped to chat at the counter with me. At first it was polite and the typical "nice weather we're having." kind of chat between strangers, but then it quickly became a sales pitch and wanting me to "make loads of money" doing almost nothing. I smiled politely and said "No thanks! I like doing something." and walked away. From that moment on, I became their number one target, they would leave their tips folded around business cards and pamplets under plates. I was glad to quit that job!  :D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Jaywalker on February 24, 2007, 03:58:52 PM
the part about Amway that just floors me is the number of devotees who confuse it with Christianity -- don't want to buy overpriced cleaning products?  you must not be saved.  What is it with that?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Athos_000 on February 24, 2007, 04:25:37 PM
Ack Quixtar! Here is my horror story:
When my best friend got married she hired a lady to do our make-up. We were supposed to meet at this lady's house and have a trial run before the wedding - ok cool free makover.. or so we thought. The lady sold Quixtar and after the makeover told us if we didn't setup an account my friend would have to pay an outrageous amount for us to have our make-up done for the wedding. Now we were all struggling college students and couldn't really afford this stuff, but were basically forced into it, if I had more backbone back then I would have stood up and left, and told them I'd do my own freaking makeup for the wedding.

unfortunately I did not have any backbone, I get my account setup and she wants me to make it so that things are automatically debited from my bank account each month. I told her I'd do that later and wouldn't let her do it at the party ( I had no intentions of doing this as I couldn't possibly use up or afford skin care things on a monthly basis). At some point before the month was up I got curious about the account and checked it...thank goodness I did - the woman had gone into my account and set it up to debit behind my back! Had I not checked it the thing would have emptied my bank account. I was sooooo mad. The account was cancelled immediately.

She did my makeup for the wedding and I looked like a clown...should have done it myself to begin with. I hope my friend didn't have to pay a ton for it but I never asked.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: nonesuch4 on February 24, 2007, 04:46:03 PM
We had an Amway guy at work. His name was Bill.  Bill talked constantly about how he was building the "business," and was constantly sprinkling his conversation with the jargon he was brainwashed into using.  

Bill sometimes replaced things in our workroom- the most memorable things being wastebaskets.  Colleague A and I were happy with our wastebaskets, and came in one morning to find them gone.  In place of our old ones were new ones that did not fit under our worktables, and therefore took up more floor space.  I went into the back room, took our old baskets out of the trash, put them back in our room, took the new Scamway ones out of the room, and stacked them out back, where Bill could do what ever he wanted with them.  Bill swapped them out a second time, I swapped them back, and told him to leave us alone.  He got quite angry as he was "only trying to help."  This was his excuse every time I told him to stop pitching "the business" to me.  

Bill continued spending hundreds of dollars a month to get a check for $10 or so.  He bought junk food, (though he complained about being overweight), a water-purification system (couple thousand dollars, and the city water really is fine).  He was spending so much money trying to get rich, that when he went on vacation and needed money, he credited himself $500 from the store we worked for the night before he left.  You know those commercials in which the credit card companies say they'll call you if they suspect fraudulent activity on your account?  CC companies call vendors too, and say, "Some one from your staff issued a credit to a customer who hasn't purchased much from you lately."

Amazingly, Bill wasn't fired for that.  I guess Boss decided his best shot at getting the money back was to keep Bill employed and dock his pay.  After Bill selling Scamway clothing at work, when he was supposed to be selling ours, and finally "forgetting" to take deposits to the bank, Bill was fired.

Bill and his wife moved west to Arizona and spent the next year mooching off her daughters and their significant others.  We haven't heard from them since.  Oh, wait, Bill did call and ask the Boss for a letter of reference, and Boss's only comment was, "He's lucky I didn't have his arrested."
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Fabrashamx on February 24, 2007, 06:33:43 PM
Wow, when I sent this story to Jeannie, I had NO idea that so many people had had this happen to them too. I am blown away that it was business as usual for them to lie to people to get them in, and I almost feel sorry for the people who were so foolish as to lose their shirts from these wackos.

The people I met reminded me of tele-evangelists, that Jim and Tammy Bakker special kind of crazy lol. I was glad to see in wikpedia that William Gouldd (He added the extra d, for dollars, of course  ::) ) Is no longer allowed to do business in this country.

Not sure of the fate of Amway, though, anyone know? Is it still around?
loved the person who said their Amway guy had a 'Bob of his own' LOL and the crazy guy with his wastebaskets and free vacation cash, sheesh he is so lucky not to be in jail.


~~Fabby :o)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LJM on February 24, 2007, 07:52:27 PM
Speaking of getting dragged to high-pressure cult-like groups under false pretenses-- has anyone here ever been to a sales-pitch meeting for the Landmark Forum? I had no idea what I was walking into the middle of -- I had been given to believe it was something like a rotary club meeting -- and the whole time I was there, I felt like I was in a sit-com parody of a weird, cultish "self-help" group that was heavy on "cult" and light on "self" or "help".

I declined to purchase one of their expensive day-long, self-help seminars, nor did I sign up for one of their weekend retreats. The only reason I didn't leave very quickly after I arrived was because I was dependent on the people who brought me for my ride, and they were off in another room someplace.

Those of us who had been dragged here as "first timers" --note the sales technique of making it sound like we've already joined-- were spit up into groups of six to eight, each of whom went into a different room where two members of the forum were to give a "presentation" to tell us what the forum was all about.

The incredibly-high-pressure sales-people / recruiters / whatever they were said that since they weren't being paid and were doing the "informational meeting" on volunteer basis (because the program had "helped them so much"), we should trust them, because they clearly weren't just trying to make money. They used a lot of cult-recruitment type methods to try to get us to join. It's the only time I've ever been in a conversation with people who gave me the impression of having been brainwashed.  And everyone there (except the other "first-timers") was just a little bit "off" in a way that it was hard to put my finger on.

I was seriously, seriously creeped out by the encounter.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kathrynne on February 24, 2007, 07:58:05 PM
Not sure of the fate of Amway, though, anyone know? Is it still around?
Amway is Quixtar is Amway. Amway became Quixtar and focuses mostly on internet business (and seminars, of course). The links below are purely for informational purposes. I ain't selling anything!

http://www.amquix.info/amway.html

http://www.amway.com/en/General/faqs-10229.aspx
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: retreadbride on February 24, 2007, 08:17:17 PM
Landmark has been linked to cult activity and to the Church of Scientology.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LJM on February 24, 2007, 09:04:47 PM
Landmark has been linked to cult activity and to the Church of Scientology.

I tried to get them off my back at the event by making it clear (truthfully) that I was living paycheck to paycheck at the time, and could not afford their seminars in any way, shape, or form. So they just tried to convince me that going into debt to pay for the seminar would be a wise investment! Um, no-- even if I weren't repulsed by the cult-like atmosphere, I was raised with more financial sense than that.

Any objection anyone had, they came back with a practiced script for why that was all the more reason they should come to one of the retreats. The scary thing was, they seemed to believe every word of nonsense they were spewing. They were far worse than any pushy salesperson, or any obnoxious proselytizer, that I have encountered before or since.

(Yes, even worse than the salesperson who has gone down in family folklore for the five hours (!!!) he spent in our house attempting to hard-sell my Mom a kirby vacume cleaner one sunny summer day when I was six. When he came back the next day with a more senior sales person in tow, she told them she wasn't interested without taking the chain off the door!)

OK, sorry for the hijack. We now return you to your regularly scheduled programming.

A good friend of mine has some horror stories from the month or two that she was involved with AMWAY, but those are hers to tell. She got out pretty darn quick.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Shoo on February 24, 2007, 10:01:00 PM
Landmark has been linked to cult activity and to the Church of Scientology.

What a shocker.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Fabrashamx on February 24, 2007, 11:34:38 PM
It was started by Werner Herzog >:D, who did the EST thing in the 70's and is now into scientology. I have a good friend who was raised in the heirarchy of the church of scientology (she was married at Karen Blacks home in bennet canyon) and it is a cult, I dont think the people like Tom Cruise and John Travolta have any idea what its REALLY like on the inside.  :o

 LOL, LJM, I love that you said 'I wasnt worried about the cult thing, it really was a bad investment' hahaha! they must hate people like us  8)

Hugs, Fabby
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Quesselin on February 25, 2007, 03:49:02 AM
If anyone's interested, here's a link to a skeptic site that also looks at mlm scams:
http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles/mlm1.htm

Here's a link to the same site, leading to a book, free for download, written by a man who had his life destroyed by Amway. It's an absolutely horrifying read.
http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles/books/reviews/es_merchants.htm
Note how they use religion to draw people in.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: FUNKIEFAIRY on February 25, 2007, 08:12:30 AM
If anyone's interested, here's a link to a skeptic site that also looks at mlm scams:
http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles/mlm1.htm

Here's a link to the same site, leading to a book, free for download, written by a man who had his life destroyed by Amway. It's an absolutely horrifying read.
http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles/books/reviews/es_merchants.htm
Note how they use religion to draw people in.

Thanks for those links! I have a load of free time on my hands at work, reading all about mlm made my stomach lurch! It makes me mad how people can be so heartless and want to trick others into something they know is bad! >:(
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Quesselin on February 25, 2007, 01:44:29 PM

Thanks for those links! I have a load of free time on my hands at work, reading all about mlm made my stomach lurch! It makes me mad how people can be so heartless and want to trick others into something they know is bad! >:(

You're welcome. Yes, the top tiers-people in MLM organizations are definately criminals, in my not so humble opinion. With those further down, it becomes more tricky. From what I can gather, they're basically brainwashed, of which the gentleman who wrote the abovementioned book is a good example.
I felt sick to my stomach the whole time I read that book. I could hardly finish it, that's how awful it made me feel.

For those who mentioned they're already involved in this sort of thing, please take care of yourself. Please.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Pinky830 on February 25, 2007, 01:48:23 PM
I've heard of people contacting cult deprogrammers to try and get their friends/family out of Amway. Yeesh.

My New Year's resolution this year was to keep in better touch with my friends, and I've been calling a few people I haven't seen in awhile. So DH and I called one of our good friends from college who it turned out lived less than 10 miles from us. We ended up inviting him and his family over for dinner. They accepted and sounded glad to hear from us, but he did ask us apprehensively, "Um, y'all aren't trying to sell us Amway or anything, are you?" We were not, and I had to talk DH out of telling him when they got here, "So, we've got this great MLM opportunity for you guys!" because he sounded genuinely nervous. (We had a great time with them, BTW.)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: caranfin on February 25, 2007, 09:51:49 PM
I got conned into going to lunch with a colleague who I really liked and admired... I was too naive at the time for the alarms go off when he said he wanted to talk to me about an "opportunity." I thought it would be a new job or some freelance work. Talk about disappointment.

Has anyone here heard about Mona Vie? It's some health juice drink MLM. I went to a "party" thinking it would be more like a Pampered Chef party - mostly to sell the product, and then some low-key encouragement to become a salesperson yourself. Instead, the seller (a friend of mine who was always trying the "next big thing" not only bragged about what a wonderful MLM it was, but said it had been founded by the founders of Amway - as if that were a good thing!!!  :o
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on February 25, 2007, 09:56:22 PM
I got conned into going to lunch with a colleague who I really liked and admired... I was too naive at the time for the alarms go off when he said he wanted to talk to me about an "opportunity." I thought it would be a new job or some freelance work. Talk about disappointment.

Has anyone here heard about Mona Vie? It's some health juice drink MLM. I went to a "party" thinking it would be more like a Pampered Chef party - mostly to sell the product, and then some low-key encouragement to become a salesperson yourself. Instead, the seller (a friend of mine who was always trying the "next big thing" not only bragged about what a wonderful MLM it was, but said it had been founded by the founders of Amway - as if that were a good thing!!!  :o

I was tricked into doing a "sample test" of Arbonne products and then tricked into meeting with the person's upline afterward. The hard sell to become an Arbonne consultant was unreal. These were two people from a common community and with whom I'd always been very friendly. One of them has never spoken to me since then.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: willow08 on February 26, 2007, 06:40:46 AM
I was tricked into doing a "sample test" of Arbonne products and then tricked into meeting with the person's upline afterward. The hard sell to become an Arbonne consultant was unreal. These were two people from a common community and with whom I'd always been very friendly. One of them has never spoken to me since then.

My Mom loves Arbonne, not enough to sell it, but really likes what it does for her skin. She bought me a set for my birthday and hubby (a cop) immediately started complaining that my face "smelled funny." I pushed, trying to figure out what "funny" meant. He finally told me, "Pot! OK?! Your face smells like pot!" I stopped using it because obviously, that's not a smell I want to remind him of his wife.

Last week, a friend hosted an Arbonne party. I declined and told her the "Pot!" story. She called me the day after the party, laughing, turns out some Arbonne products contain hemp, and that's why my face smelled like "Pot!

P.S. My favorite line from "The American President" is after Bob Whatever gives a speech about how immoral Michael Douglas is and said, "My name is Bob Whatever, and I'm running for President!" and Michael Douglas said, "Thank God, because for a minute there, I thought he was going to try to sell us Amway."
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: blue2000 on February 26, 2007, 07:38:32 AM
I've had relatives in Amway. They acted pretty normal at the time, and they are out of it now.

The only problem I've encountered was with a friend of mine from college. He was a really sweet guy, very friendly and chatty. I lost touch with him for a few years after we graduated, and then bumped into him at the grocery store.

I didn't even recognise him at first. And then I realised who it was and all I could think of was "Oh, my WORD! What HAPPENED!?"

He was talking so fast! And Very, Extremely Happy. Soooo happy to have this business opportunity! Soooo happy to be moving up in the world!

I seriously thought he might be on drugs. Even brainwashed people don't usually sound like that.

And I felt really sad that such a nice guy could get wrapped up so completely in a business that it would change his personality.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Millicent on February 26, 2007, 11:18:42 AM
Thankfully, the first time I'd ever heard about Landmark Forum was through this http://www.rickross.com/ (http://www.rickross.com/) website. 
Rick Ross's website has a ton of information on different cults, and I remember reading first hand accounts about what The Forum is like on his message board.  If I ever meet someone into that, I'm sure I will run like the wind in the opposite direction.
He's also got some info on Amway and Quixar and Herbalife.  Herbalife is run much the same way as Amway.
Anyway, it's a very interesting website if you're interested.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: mumma to KMC on February 26, 2007, 01:00:58 PM
Coming in late on this one, but I am glad to read E-hell Dame's comments about getting people to come to a meeting. I once dated a guy who sd that he wanted to take me out for dinner on Valentines Day. I got all dressed up to go to this nice dinner. He picked me up, I got in the truck and saw a few other people. He didn't mention it was a group date but oh well, off we went.

We went to a local hotel that was known to have a nice restaurant. I was excited as I had never been to this particular place before and we looking forward to a nice date. We walked in and were directed toward a "ball room". I entered and my heart sunk. It was an Amway meeting. Crap.

Looking back it is funny now, but at the time, being 20 years old, I was mortified. How horrible!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Jaywalker on February 26, 2007, 04:42:20 PM
these programs cater to people who have authoritarian personalities and who desperately want to be 'big shots' -- they lap up the special jargon 'I'm his 'upline'' and sprinkle their conversations with words they think high powered movers and shakers use.  it is a desperate cry for self importance.  and any question or criticism then becomes a personal assault from their perspective.  and if this gets mixed with religion than any refusal to buy an overpriced product or join the system is interpreted as 'heathen' -- tres weird

of course some are just decent hard working people who hope to catch a break and turn their dedication into a good life.  my husband used to prosecute securities fraud -- and the saddest stories were people who were disabled and had sunk every last dime into some business 'opportunity' and lost it all -- they were often very hard working people willing to take a risk to have  a business, but they had no skills at defending themselves from scammers who prey on honest people with old fashioned values and no clue about business.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: snowflake on February 26, 2007, 06:05:14 PM
I once joined an MLM because I loved the products and wanted to get them (and some of my family did too) for a discount.  I spent the next year with people pestering me that I needed to start investing and branching out and pushing parties.  My higher-up had all sorts of people calling me.

I finally figured it wasn't worth a discount.  I found other products to use.

Oh, and my pre-bachelor's peon office-assistant job made me more money than my higher-up's sales commission.  AND I had better hours.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: mindibrad on February 26, 2007, 07:04:30 PM
I was tricked into doing a "sample test" of Arbonne products and then tricked into meeting with the person's upline afterward. The hard sell to become an Arbonne consultant was unreal. These were two people from a common community and with whom I'd always been very friendly. One of them has never spoken to me since then.

My Mom loves Arbonne, not enough to sell it, but really likes what it does for her skin. She bought me a set for my birthday and hubby (a cop) immediately started complaining that my face "smelled funny." I pushed, trying to figure out what "funny" meant. He finally told me, "Pot! OK?! Your face smells like pot!" I stopped using it because obviously, that's not a smell I want to remind him of his wife.

Last week, a friend hosted an Arbonne party. I declined and told her the "Pot!" story. She called me the day after the party, laughing, turns out some Arbonne products contain hemp, and that's why my face smelled like "Pot!


While I am NOT promoting ANY MLM, I do know that Arbonne has a "personal use" program where it costs $40/year to buy the products at 35% off.....it's just a matter of signing up under a rep who is CRYSTAL CLEAR that you don't want to "build your business", conduct parties, etc. (my sister is a "personal use consultant"...I used to buy my products from her at her discount until I switched to Philosophy skin care)

Quote
P.S. My favorite line from "The American President" is after Bob Whatever gives a speech about how immoral Michael Douglas is and said, "My name is Bob Whatever, and I'm running for President!" and Michael Douglas said, "Thank God, because for a minute there, I thought he was going to try to sell us Amway."

I love that movie!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: mindibrad on February 26, 2007, 07:07:23 PM
If anyone's interested, here's a link to a skeptic site that also looks at mlm scams:
http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles/mlm1.htm

Here's a link to the same site, leading to a book, free for download, written by a man who had his life destroyed by Amway. It's an absolutely horrifying read.
http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles/books/reviews/es_merchants.htm
Note how they use religion to draw people in.

Thanks for those links! I have a load of free time on my hands at work, reading all about mlm made my stomach lurch! It makes me mad how people can be so heartless and want to trick others into something they know is bad! >:(

If you REALLY want to get queasy, check out www.pinktruth.com (http://www.pinktruth.com)

It is mainly a site exposing a certain organization of pink-cadillac-driving-nutjobs, but it can be a real eye-opener about a company that most people think of as "fairly annoying, but overall harmless"
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on February 26, 2007, 09:59:47 PM
The updates to the website are not good for my Lenten goals. I have already yielded to temptation to read a few of them.  This one was about the first, and HOLY COW!  :o What a way to begin!

Never got suckered into Amway, but I'm still a little miffed at my friend Carolyn for giving out my name and number to a salesperson. The girl called and said that Carolyn had viewed a presentation she had done and that Carolyn had suggested that I should look over it as well. Since Carolyn and I had both been in advertising and newspaper, I thought the girl had done some sort of PowerPoint, and I set up a table with a line to a surge protector so she could hook up her computer.

Nope. She was selling extremely overpriced knives. I ended up buying a pair of shears because I did need some new ones and it was about the cheapest item on her list. (No, I was not going to buy an entire set of knives.) And boy, did she get furious when I refused to give her any names and addresses of people for her to contact. I kept telling her "no," and finally she whined, "But if I don't get any names from you, I won't get credit for this sale!"

Sorry, babe, them's the breaks. Next time be honest and upfront and you won't be presenting to someone who fantasizes about chasing you off the property with one of your knives.

(And as for the shears — they aren't any better than the Fiskars I can get for about a quarter of the price.  :P)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on February 26, 2007, 10:07:37 PM
The updates to the website are not good for my Lenten goals. I have already yielded to temptation to read a few of them.  This one was about the first, and HOLY COW!  :o What a way to begin!

Never got suckered into Amway, but I'm still a little miffed at my friend Carolyn for giving out my name and number to a salesperson. The girl called and said that Carolyn had viewed a presentation she had done and that Carolyn had suggested that I should look over it as well. Since Carolyn and I had both been in advertising and newspaper, I thought the girl had done some sort of PowerPoint, and I set up a table with a line to a surge protector so she could hook up her computer.

Nope. She was selling extremely overpriced knives. I ended up buying a pair of shears because I did need some new ones and it was about the cheapest item on her list. (No, I was not going to buy an entire set of knives.) And boy, did she get furious when I refused to give her any names and addresses of people for her to contact. I kept telling her "no," and finally she whined, "But if I don't get any names from you, I won't get credit for this sale!"

Sorry, babe, them's the breaks. Next time be honest and upfront and you won't be presenting to someone who fantasizes about chasing you off the property with one of your knives.

(And as for the shears — they aren't any better than the Fiskars I can get for about a quarter of the price.  :P)

You must be talking about Cutco. And how do I know? My daughter's friend was selling it last summer and wanted to "practice" her presentation on me. She also tried to get names and numbers from me, and I said I absolutely would not give out names and numbers without the prior approval of the people they belonged to.

I did buy the knives because I needed new ones, and I thought I'd give the kid a break (she was working her way through college). Never again.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: bhmcintosh on February 27, 2007, 01:02:42 PM
My father spent THIRTY YEARS in what I teeth-grittingly refer to as "the silly little soap business."  He spent a fortune in books, tapes, retreats, conferences, seminars, products, sucking up to the likes of Bob Zender, Bill Britt, etc.  To this day I see red every time I hear "Amway", "DeVos", or any other reference thereunto.  The crown jewel was when my father blew off my birthday dinner (wife, kids and I drove from FL to MD to spend my birthday and Thanksgiving with Mom and Dad) to go to a weekly "pitch the business" confab.

When I was in college back in the early 80s, there were several cult or cult-like groups on campus, and our church and  local campus ministries did classes on various characteristics of such organizations (big glaring ones were twisting of language into an "in" jargon, strong focus on the personalities of the leadership, isolation from friends and family, fostering of an almost militant "us v. them" mentality, and oftentimes in the more overtly "church-like" groups some really pretzel-factory twisting of Biblical texts to make the group seem ok and everyone else seem the damned and benighted), many of which I had observed in the Amway organization Dad was associated with.  It was probably the single biggest bone of contention between Mom and Dad, and between Dad and I, and I'll always regard the silly little soap business as having stolen a healthy chunk of my father's life out from under him.

In retrospect, one of the most emotionally catharthic things was, after Dad passed away from leukemia about 5 years ago, was helping Mom go through all of Dad's effects.  I told her in no uncertain terms, and she and my brother were only too happy to acquiesce, that anything even remotely associated with Amway (except maybe their disinfectant cleaner - that was pretty good stuff actually) could be discarded with extreme prejudice.  Hearing those bundles of cassette tapes bottoming out in the trash can... such a lovely sound it was!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Edallia on February 27, 2007, 03:40:01 PM
Luckily for me, I've never been approached in this fashion.  The only people I knew who were into Quixtar (which is pretty much Amway, I believe) were very much "I'll tell you about it, but only if you express an interest, and in the meantime, you can buy these things from me, but only if you really want them."  And I got some makeup I really liked that way.  But having read through this thread, I can see that I was fortunate there.  :)

I did ask them about the tales of people losing gobs of money through Amway, and they said they didn't see how that could happen unless the person bought a boatload of books and videos and spent money travelling to seminars and buying tickets to "Amway! The Musical!" or whatnot.  I'm not sure how indelibly true that is, but I got it from the source, for what it's worth. 

Unfortunately, I'm sure there are plenty of people who get caught up in frenzy of What A Good Idea This Is and spend too much money trying to figure out how to *make* money.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: ladycrim on February 27, 2007, 04:47:28 PM
My parents got involved in Amway (or INA, as it's often called now) when I was 13.  Dad believed in it with all his heart; Mom did not.  It caused increased tension over the years, and I am certain it played a part in their eventual divorce.  Dad's still in it a little bit, although not as active as he used to be.  It never did make him the wealth he saw others achieve.

Aside: my dad once won ten tickets to a comedy club, and told me to invite some of my friends along.  Two of his friends from INA were there, and they tried signing two of my friends up for the business!  My friends were NOT happy, and I was embarrassed.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on February 27, 2007, 05:47:48 PM
she mentioned that Amway teaches "that friends who aren't willing to help you make money, aren't your friends."
My husband says, "Become an Amway salesperson & join the NFL - No Friends Left. :D

I guess we are like everyone else, we've been ambushed by a couple selling Amway.  To paraphrase another poster, If Amway is so great, why do they lie to get people to hear their pitch?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on February 27, 2007, 05:49:41 PM
As she left, she promised to come by in six months, to show us her new Cadillac. That was 8 years ago, and we're still waiting.

I'm guessing you aren't holding your breath, twik  ;)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on February 27, 2007, 05:59:07 PM
I had to talk DH out of telling him when they got here, "So, we've got this great MLM opportunity for you guys!"
Oh pinky, your husband is bad!  I mean that in a good way  ;)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on February 27, 2007, 06:09:50 PM
When I was in junior college, another student talked me into going to a Lifesprings seminar with her.  Fortunately I had my head screwed on straight & was able to resist the cult recruitment.  I remember them saying my future was worth $1,000 (I don't remember the exact amount) and four weekends.  I said I had worked very hard to position myself financially so I could pursue my dream of getting an engineering degree & was doing it right now.  I wasn't going to turn from my chosen path to pursue their dreams of getting my $1,000.  I was escorted out of the meeting shortly after lunch & asked to leave.  I guess they didn't want anyone else hearing my confident assertions.

When I got home, one of my roommates told me that Lifesprings is a cult that brainwashes students & I was lucky to get out.  Amazingly enough, I contacted him several years later & found out he joined Lifesprings and became a true believer.

The truth is stranger than fiction  :-\
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: sammycat on February 27, 2007, 06:54:57 PM
these programs cater to people who have authoritarian personalities and who desperately want to be 'big shots' -- they lap up the special jargon 'I'm his 'upline'' and sprinkle their conversations with words they think high powered movers and shakers use.  it is a desperate cry for self importance.  and any question or criticism then becomes a personal assault from their perspective. 

That line jumped out at me as it perfectly describes the husband of a friend of mine.  They joined an Amway offshoot called Omega Trend (I don't know if this exists outside of Australia), or "The Business" as they both started calling it.  Somehow "The Business" managed to be dropped into almost every conversation and they seemed to have the attitude that if you weren't interested in joining up you were crazy and not really worth being friends with anymore. :-[ ::)

That was about 5 years ago and sadly my friend and I have gone from speaking daily for the 5 years prior to them joining, to only speaking about once a year now if we run into each other at the shops.  The husband was definitely the one behind joining up.  They had a plan in place that by the first anniversary of joining he could quit (yet another) job/go on extended holidays/upgrade the car and house etc.  Last I heard he's still working and now she has a full time job too. 

I've clicked on the links some people have highlighted throughout the thread (to read later) and am regarding them with trepidation from the comments those who have already read them have posted.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Edallia on February 27, 2007, 06:55:47 PM
Quote
Wow, that's not even an enticing amount to be brainwashed for *grin*

Yeah, my own brain has a reserve price of at *least* a million.  ;D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: willow08 on February 28, 2007, 11:13:50 AM
Has anyone ever seen the movie "Go" when the cop serving as a consultant on  a crime show takes two actors home for dinner with his wife. They make increasingly bizarre statements, including the husband asking one actor to sit on his bed, "Isn't this the softest comforter you've ever felt?" The actors are terrified that the cop is about either to proposition them or kill them, and it turns out the whole thing was a pitch for a direct sales company. Almost everything in the house, from the comforter to the food, to the furniture is from the company and the cop sells it, too! The cop wants to use the actors' Hollywood connections to ramp up his own operation. It's very creepy, but hilarious at the same time.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: mbbored on February 28, 2007, 11:32:02 AM
When I was first out of college, I was hunting for jobs, and also doing some part time work on the side until I could find something full time.  A friend said that he was starting an online business with a few acquaintances and that they needed somebody to help with answering emails, typing etc.  He told me they were having a meeting with their main financer, and that I should come to it, make sure to wear a suit, and then meet the rest of the team.  Yay!  Parttime work.

I trotted myself out in my suit & heels to find that the meeting was in a B&N with no seating, and it was just a pyramid scheme.  I walked out once I got over the shock.  My friend tried to stop me & when I said I didn't like being deceived, he told me I was too base to understand the need for wealth & he couldn't be friends with somebody like that.

Not a friend anymore.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on February 28, 2007, 11:34:41 AM
What is a "B&N"?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: retreadbride on February 28, 2007, 12:07:06 PM
That brings up something that I could start another thread on....misleading HELP WANTED ads. I can't tell you how many times I've gone to "sales job" or "new company needs staffing, hiring for all positions" "interviews" that turned out to be a hook for MLMs.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Sophia on February 28, 2007, 12:48:26 PM
What is a "B&N"?

Barnes and Noble bookstore
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on February 28, 2007, 02:32:20 PM
What is a "B&N"?

Barnes and Noble bookstore

They have business meetings at a book store?  ???

First clue to "it's not a professionally run business."

Next clue: They lie to you because they know no one would be interested if they knew the truth.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: snowflake on February 28, 2007, 06:32:50 PM
I'm so glad to see that I'm not the only person creeped out by Landmark.

The strangest conversation I had was with some guy who put a massive series of seminars on his credit card.  I had gone on 2 dates with him and it just didn't work out (but we were still friends.)  When he wanted to start a "new life" they told him he had to go work out all the loose ends.  So I couldn't get rid of him for two hours while he wanted to discuss a relationship that had never happened.  He dredged up every single interaction we had ever had and wanted to analyze it.  I nearly shot him.

He was worrying how he was going to pay for the next forum.  I told him to wait and save up for it rather than go into debt.  He said that his "friends" told him this was a terrible idea and that his life wouldn't improve without it.  He put $2000 on his credit card so he could listen to a 4 hour talk on improving his finances.  I'll say that was effective!

Months later, he was paying it off (and paying masses of interest on top of it.) I asked him if he had made all the changes he wanted to make.  What would you know - while this massive fantastic seminar made him realize that his life COULD be better, he had no clue how to make actual changes in his behavior.  He was still stuffed in credit card debt, in a dead-end job, no fulfilling romantic relationships, etc.

He said, "Well at least it's cheaper than therapy." 

Nuh uh.  He paid between $100-$200 per hour for those sessions.  He had perfectly good insurance that would have charged him a $20 co-pay for a therapist who could help him set up actual behavior changes.  If he had gone to a state financial or job counselor, it would have been free at his income level.

Wouldn't you know his best friend stopped talking to him when he reached his credit limit.  Some of my other friends who were suckered by this "friend" said, "He wasn't bad.  He dressed so well!  He was so nice.  He opened our eyes!"  Yeah, any professional user does that.  And from what they told me (when they thought I was going to drop money on this thing) it wasn't anything that I couldn't get from reading a classic self-help book.

For some reason, I have never met another person who thought Landmark was evil.  (Though many people haven't heard of it.)  I'm glad I've run into others who think it's shady.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: FUNKIEFAIRY on February 28, 2007, 07:21:13 PM
If you REALLY want to get queasy, check out www.pinktruth.com (http://www.pinktruth.com)

It is mainly a site exposing a certain organization of pink-cadillac-driving-nutjobs, but it can be a real eye-opener about a company that most people think of as "fairly annoying, but overall harmless"

CRUD MONKEYS!!! My wife once spent roughly $200.00 to start selling this stuff because she loves some sort of lotion they sell. After spending the $200.00 and getting a huge case of crap to lug around, they inform her that she needed to buy about $18,000.00 worth of "inventory" in order to really be in business. She quickly told them where to put their inventory and now we both use St. Ives  ;) I had forgotten about that untill now!! lol!!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Ticia on February 28, 2007, 09:15:36 PM
You must be talking about Cutco.

Once a year online friends of mine from all over the country get together and have a "convention" of sorts. It's open to anyone who has been involved in one particular website.

There's a period of time on Saturday where we all show off whacky stuff that we can do, or recite poetry or whatever. One year I showed how I could walk on my knees with my legs crossed. Whacky stuff like that. :D

Last year we met in Colorado and one of the website semi-regulars (He only posted occasionally in the forum, and had never been in the chat room) who happened to live in the area decided to come. The Saturday morning stuff was progressing nicely when it was his turn to get up and show off whatever he wanted to. He pulled out a bunch of knives and asked if anyone had a penny...

Yup, he used our annual internet get-together as a Cutco demonstration.

*headdesk*

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Bob Ducca on March 01, 2007, 08:16:05 AM
DH sold Cutco for about two weeks when we were in college.  His mom bought two knives, my mom bought two knives, and that was it.  He bought the sample set, because we didn't have any knives for our new apartment.

He never was brainwashed- he thought the knives were pretty good.  He refused to lie to people when he demonstrated for them, so he didn't get that many opportunities, but it was okay.  The knives are actually pretty good- we've had them for 10 years.  I just wish you didn't have to go to a brainwashing seminar to get them.

He still regrets doing it, though.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on March 01, 2007, 12:31:21 PM
The poster who talked about being pitched to by one of these companies while working as a waitress triggered something similar that happened when I was working at a pizza restaurant years ago. A large group from a company came in for an after-hours party and really whooped it up. One of the bosses came up to my co-worker and was telling her all about this company and trying to get her to quit the restaurant and come join his deal. It was a company called CA Design, and they sold door-to-door perfume and other little wholesale items to retailers to sell to their customers. I almost got suckered into it myself when I was in college and looking for part-time work. I answered a very vague sales help wanted ad in the paper and got an interview at an office that was very sparsely furnished with just folding chairs and tables. Yet the walls were covered with plaques celebrating the $$$ successes of this company and also photos of employees partying away at celebrations. I was interviewed by a flashy-looking young guy who was decked out in fake designer clothes and jewerly, which he was trying to pass off as real. He kept calling me 'babe' throughout the interview and was telling me how I could go into business on my own through them and how I could manage my own team of employees. Except that I would have to find this team of employees, which would mean recruiting friends and  aquaintances to go out into little groups around town, hawking their goods. I couldn't get out of there fast enough. A few years later I was working at a private college and one of our students, a young single mother, got suckered by them. She actually quit school and moved to Seattle for one of their fabulous business opportunities. She was going on and on about how she was going to run her own business and wasn't it so great what she accomplished with them. I couldn't believe her naivete. I don't know what ever happened to her, but I hope they didn't burn her too badly.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LJM on March 01, 2007, 02:55:32 PM
I'm so glad to see that I'm not the only person creeped out by Landmark.
...
 And from what they told me (when they thought I was going to drop money on this thing) it wasn't anything that I couldn't get from reading a classic self-help book.

From talking to others (and a good friend of mine had several "friends" who were really into it, and constantly pressuring her to join, so she found out a lot of one-sided stuff from them, plus some investigation of her own) it seems what they do is have you delve into past issues in such a way as to manipulate you into an emotional catharsis-- and then convince you that the catharsis is some sort of life-changing breakthrough.

Produce a powerful emotional experience, and then convince the participants that it means what you want them to think it means. Since it's harder to exersize good judgment when in the throws of powerful emotion, this can be an effective technique.

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on March 01, 2007, 03:07:52 PM
Now I'm intrigued. What is Landmark?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Edallia on March 01, 2007, 05:58:33 PM
Quote
He kept calling me 'babe' throughout the interview

Kingsrings, your whole story sounded like it was just awful, but this part really jumped out and gave me a shudder or two!  Gross!

And also unprofessional and odd, but mostly just icky.  Judging from the tales on this thread, at least these pyramid schemers did things that obviously pointed out their shadiness before anyone thought they could possibly trust them. 

Yikes.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: audiolove on March 02, 2007, 02:18:42 AM
Has anyone ever seen the movie "Go" when the cop serving as a consultant on  a crime show takes two actors home for dinner with his wife. They make increasingly bizarre statements, including the husband asking one actor to sit on his bed, "Isn't this the softest comforter you've ever felt?" The actors are terrified that the cop is about either to proposition them or kill them, and it turns out the whole thing was a pitch for a direct sales company. Almost everything in the house, from the comforter to the food, to the furniture is from the company and the cop sells it, too! The cop wants to use the actors' Hollywood connections to ramp up his own operation. It's very creepy, but hilarious at the same time.
"It's not Amway, it's Confederated Products."  I loved that movie.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on March 02, 2007, 10:15:23 AM
Quote
He kept calling me 'babe' throughout the interview

Kingsrings, your whole story sounded like it was just awful, but this part really jumped out and gave me a shudder or two!  Gross!

And also unprofessional and odd, but mostly just icky.  Judging from the tales on this thread, at least these pyramid schemers did things that obviously pointed out their shadiness before anyone thought they could possibly trust them. 

Yikes.

But some people did trust them, and that's the scary part.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: RoseRose on March 03, 2007, 11:41:10 PM
I found this just now, and immediatly thought of this thread.  This is from a VERY funny webcomic, but the webcomic as a whole has some very political overtones.  This strip does not, however.

http://www.ozyandmillie.org/d/19980529.html (http://www.ozyandmillie.org/d/19980529.html)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Larrianntoo on March 04, 2007, 03:12:47 PM
This all reminds me of the friends who were selling the "amazing" products that incorporated magnets that were supposed to improve one's health and all the other vague, nonspecific claims that the health related scams have.  We repeatedly demurred from purchasing any of these hideously overpriced items.  The couple finally asked just what we had against the products.  My electrical engineer husband and geeky, tremendously into research me told them that this stuff just couldn't, by the laws of physics, DO what they purported to do.  They shut up about the stuff after that and were cool to us for a year or two, but we are still friends - or were until their divorce, but that is an entirely different story!  ;D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: ginlyn32 on March 04, 2007, 03:27:50 PM
The only MLM I was ever sucked into was MaryKay Cosmetics. I bought the kit and some inventory and was "on my way with MaryKay". I think I sold about $200 worth of product. THe best sales I ever had was at a yard sale where I sold off all my inventory.

Most people did not want to spend money on something that they could get at the corner drugstore for cheaper. The only thing most people said the liked about MK was that you could try it before you bought it. Still most drugstores and dept. stores offer refunds for stuff you bought if you have a receipt. I took some stuff that I got from Estee Lauder back and got my card credited. Harder to do that with an MK dealer who may have already spent your money.

I guess I am one of the few who has never been approached by Amway. I amost got sucked into Vector and Primerica. Both are sleazy (imo) in that they make you think you are there on a legit job interview until they start talking then you find out what it's about.

Ginger
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kathrynne on March 04, 2007, 03:37:58 PM
I guess I am one of the few who has never been approached by Amway. I amost got sucked into Vector and Primerica. Both are sleazy (imo) in that they make you think you are there on a legit job interview until they start talking then you find out what it's about.
I got sucked into one of those cattlecall "interviews" for Primerica, way back when, and walked out disgusted. Every now and then somebody will call to "discuss career alternatives" with DH, always between 9 and 5 when he's at work, and I've learned to spot the Primerica spiel within a few words. They hate to say upfront who they're representing, so when they stay vague as I'm asking for details I ask outright if they're calling about Primerica. Then I laugh and tell them to stop spamming my phone and delete us from any and all calling lists, which they never do.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on March 04, 2007, 05:22:00 PM
I guess I am one of the few who has never been approached by Amway. I amost got sucked into Vector and Primerica. Both are sleazy (imo) in that they make you think you are there on a legit job interview until they start talking then you find out what it's about.
I got sucked into one of those cattlecall "interviews" for Primerica, way back when, and walked out disgusted. Every now and then somebody will call to "discuss career alternatives" with DH, always between 9 and 5 when he's at work, and I've learned to spot the Primerica spiel within a few words. They hate to say upfront who they're representing, so when they stay vague as I'm asking for details I ask outright if they're calling about Primerica. Then I laugh and tell them to stop spamming my phone and delete us from any and all calling lists, which they never do.


Who are Primerica and what do they sell?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: ginlyn32 on March 04, 2007, 05:33:41 PM
I guess I am one of the few who has never been approached by Amway. I amost got sucked into Vector and Primerica. Both are sleazy (imo) in that they make you think you are there on a legit job interview until they start talking then you find out what it's about.
I got sucked into one of those cattlecall "interviews" for Primerica, way back when, and walked out disgusted. Every now and then somebody will call to "discuss career alternatives" with DH, always between 9 and 5 when he's at work, and I've learned to spot the Primerica spiel within a few words. They hate to say upfront who they're representing, so when they stay vague as I'm asking for details I ask outright if they're calling about Primerica. Then I laugh and tell them to stop spamming my phone and delete us from any and all calling lists, which they never do.


Who are Primerica and what do they sell?

Supposidly, they sell insurance. Ofcourse they also "give financial advise".

What disgusted me about them was that they made it sound like a legetimet job interview.

What tipped me off about them was the way they kept me waiting. I was there on time, early in fact. I noticed that they had this room of people for a seminar. What also tipped me off that they were shady, was that they would not tell me what they sold. I had to do some digging on my own to find out that they were an MLM.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kisu on March 05, 2007, 03:35:42 AM
A casual friend of mine once tried to get me into some MLM operation. He called me one night, telling me he had something really urgent and important to discuss with me, but wouldn't say what it was on the phone. He asked me to meet him in the city centre the next day. I went, as I was worried - he'd sounded stressed on the phone, so I thought he was sick or in some sort of trouble. I saw him, we greeted and then he introduced another man (with over-trendy haircut and expensive-looking clothes) to me.

We then went into a cafe, where the other man flipped open his briefcase and started presenting this wonderful business scheme that I'd only have to pay 100€ to get into at beginner level. I was so confused about the whole thing that I listened to the spiel and told my friend I'd think about it when they pressured me into joining right away. My friend then called me a few hours after I'd left from our charming get-together, reeeally pushing me to join. I refused, and haven't really seen the friend since.

The business scheme was in the news about a month afterwards, as it'd been declared a pyramid scheme by the officials and thus was illegal. I think the man who did the talking during my recruitment attempt was sentenced to at least fines, if not jail.

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: snowball's chance on March 06, 2007, 02:22:57 PM
Has anyone ever seen the movie "Go" when the cop serving as a consultant on  a crime show takes two actors home for dinner with his wife. They make increasingly bizarre statements, including the husband asking one actor to sit on his bed, "Isn't this the softest comforter you've ever felt?" The actors are terrified that the cop is about either to proposition them or kill them, and it turns out the whole thing was a pitch for a direct sales company. Almost everything in the house, from the comforter to the food, to the furniture is from the company and the cop sells it, too! The cop wants to use the actors' Hollywood connections to ramp up his own operation. It's very creepy, but hilarious at the same time.
"It's not Amway, it's Confederated Products."  I loved that movie.
"It's a different company; it's a different quality of product."
The creepiest part about that situation is that the actors are only there in the first place b/c they have a DRUG arrest hanging over their heads . . .
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Tosha Go on March 06, 2007, 10:13:25 PM
Speaking of getting dragged to high-pressure cult-like groups under false pretenses-- has anyone here ever been to a sales-pitch meeting for the Landmark Forum?
Landmark Forum!! I've been wracking my brains trying to remember the organization I was invited to once!

I was invited to a meeting by an acquaintence once! He told me about a party he was having and he was going to introduce me to a "new way of thinking."

I was fine with my current way of think so I didn't go...  :P

I heard later from a mutual acquaintence that LF was pretty much a cult that would try to sucker in lonely people, which made sense because while acquaintence #1 was a nice guy, he kinda creeped me out.  :-\
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: goblue2539 on March 07, 2007, 01:34:44 PM
Now that I've read the whole thread, I have to ask a question. And I promise I don't mean to get political. 

Anyone wondering why wingadingdingy DeVos wasn't elected governor of Michigan?   >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Tosha Go on March 07, 2007, 07:32:30 PM
Now that I've read the whole thread, I have to ask a question. And I promise I don't mean to get political. 

Anyone wondering why wingadingdingy DeVos wasn't elected governor of Michigan?   >:D

::shudder:: I left Michigan 5 months before the November election, so i didn't get the opportunity to vote.  Honestly I was suprised that Granholm got re-elected, but knowing that DeVos was the president of Amway makes me glad he didn't get elected.

Hey wait a minute!  Maybe his huge economic plans for Michigan involved signing everyone who is unemployed up for Amway products!!!!  He would have brought so many jobs back to Michigan that way!!!!

 >:D >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kethria on March 08, 2007, 09:56:42 AM
I can remember being in Bogota Colombia as a starving student who was teaching English classes to make ends meet seeing a newspaper ad that said they needed Bilingual people to tutor in English, and I was assuming it was for some kind of place like Sylvan... so I got all dressed up, went across the city to an "interview"... It was an Amway seminar. I have never been so disgusted in my life...
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: goblue2539 on March 09, 2007, 08:56:13 AM
::shudder:: I left Michigan 5 months before the November election, so i didn't get the opportunity to vote.  Honestly I was suprised that Granholm got re-elected, but knowing that DeVos was the president of Amway makes me glad he didn't get elected.

Hey wait a minute!  Maybe his huge economic plans for Michigan involved signing everyone who is unemployed up for Amway products!!!!  He would have brought so many jobs back to Michigan that way!!!!

 >:D >:D

Yet another case of choosing the lesser of two evils.  I'm even sad to say that I stayed in The Amway Grand Plaza Hotel in Grand Rapids... but I didn't pick it, so it's no so bad. 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LadyFlyingAce on March 13, 2007, 11:26:39 AM
I have been harassed by Primerica so many times it is unreal.  It reminds me of the time I had two Mormon missionaries on my tail trying to get me to convert.

Unfortunately my university posts the home phone numbers of its students directly on the university web site.  Now that I've had a cell phone for three years, I know that if anyone calls my parent's house (I lived at home and commuted) then there was a 90% chance it was Primerica.

And it's different people every time, always wanting to know if I'm interested in a job interview for a great business opportunity.  I've had three friends of mine ask me to get involved in Primerica and about five cold calls from people I don't even know.  When I asked the last woman how she got my number, she refused to tell me.   First sign of trouble.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on March 13, 2007, 11:50:24 AM
What exactly is Primerica? I am trying to see if it's the same thing a couple of my friends got involved in some time ago. They were looking to change careers and paid a lot of money to take these financial classes to become some kind of financial representative, but I can't remember what exactly it was all about.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: phred246 on March 13, 2007, 12:22:19 PM
Way Back When, I was invited to lunch by a Primamerica guy who spent the whole time trying to get me to become one of his salespeople for some some kind of investment. All I remember from his talk was "the rule of 72", (an interest calculation, I think), and how much commission I could make each month from recurring client payments. I declined, stating that I couldn't spare the time away from home at night and weekends doing in-person sales calls at prospective clients homes, as my wife was expecting our first and I had to be available at all times. I did thank him for the free lunch, but to this day, I have no idea who gave him my name or work phone number!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: retreadbride on March 13, 2007, 03:18:24 PM
I got stung by Primerica. I was told to show up on Saturday "for licensing" and to pay $150. Like a complete physical part I can't use her, I paid it. In advance. I thought it was for the paperwork, etc, since in my state license fees tend to run high, including marriage licenses.

The Saturday session and fee was for a CLASS, and then you had to take an exam. I got out and count myself fortunate that I only lost $150. I know people who lost BIG money on other MLMs, including a coworker who kissed 5 grand goodbye to a guy with a double D at the end of his name.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: blue2000 on March 13, 2007, 05:00:09 PM
Primerica is an insurance company. A friend of mine was going to go into it, but he ended up doing something else (he's always looking for a quick buck ::)).

Apparently, you sell people insurance, and you get a percentage of that. If it is, in fact, a pyramid scheme, your upline would get a cut of your money.

But they were very nice, and didn't push anything. Perhaps the US ones are more aggressive?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Lauren on March 18, 2007, 02:26:38 AM
Ooooh, I had this sprung on me by a guy I worked with a couple of years ago. Invited me to lunch and did the whole spiel. I was a bit iffy about it (just didn't seem logical to me) and he said that "he thought I had more ambition" Was quite annoyed about that. He rang me at home a couple of days later but (truthfully) told him my dad was in hospital dying and had to put the decision off. He quit not long after that.

Ran into him about six months ago, he's gone broke but just 'waiting for the break-though' Its actully quite sad. I gave him my card and told him to call me if he wanted a job at my work (I work in telephone sales, and the guy actully is a good salesperson that I saw of the spiel) Never heard from him.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Cz. Burrito on March 19, 2007, 10:54:45 AM
I was approached by a guy trying to get me to go to a Landmark Forum meeting at work this week. Thank goodness for this thread, otherwise I wouldn't have known what the heck he was talking about!

See?  Etiquette Hell saves lives!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Animala on March 20, 2007, 12:13:54 AM
I must be some kind of mark or something I have been approached 3x about AMWAY (or whatever it is called now).

  The first time was by my roommate's fiance's brother.  (I can't spell tonight.)  The first and last time I met him he laid in to me immediately so hard that if I had been interested there would be no way I'd do it.  I think his bother had to threated to kick him out of the apartment before he stopped.

  The second time was after I was married.  We were invited to a coworker of my husband's house.  She had set up a meeting for him with a state patrol officer to try to help him get place (he was in the police academy at night).  So the guy doesn't want to talk shop, but starts in on a schpeel .  Eventually I stop him and ask him what the name of the company was AND HE REFUSED TO SAY!  I drug my husband out.

  The third time again through someone my husband knew somehow.  They took us out to dinner (at the worst place in town) and gave their pitch.  I would have nothing to do with it and the guy got a bit abusive that I wouldn't sign up too.  My husband and I got into some pretty big arguments over it.  He did it any way.  A few weeks later after he had sold zip the guy starts calling and harassing us.  He kept telling me he need all this stuff hubby borrowed back.  I think I didn't answer the phone for awhile after that.  The only satisfaction I got from that was when we moved I threw out all the stuff he had borrowed and I am sure he didn't pay in what it was worth to that guy.

Interesting though, since we broke up I haven't been pitched for a thing.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Chartreuse on March 20, 2007, 08:04:48 AM
Oh, you guys will LOVE this one:

http://kutv.com/topstories/local_story_078212142.html
Quote
CINCINNATI  Procter & Gamble Co. won a jury award of $19.25 million in a civil lawsuit filed against four former Amway distributors accused of spreading false rumors linking the company to Satanism to advance their own business.

The U.S. District Court jury in Salt Lake City on Friday found for the Cincinnati-based consumer products company in a lawsuit filed by P&G in 1995. It was one of several the company brought over rumors alleging a link with the company’s logo and Satanism.

Rumors had begun circulating as early as 1981 that the company’s logo – a bearded, crescent man-in-moon looking over a field of 13 stars – was a symbol of Satanism.

The company alleged that Amway Corp. distributors revived those rumors in 1995, using a voice mail system to tell thousands of customers that part of Procter & Gamble profits went to satanic cults....

Pyramid scam, check. 
Annoying the hell out of everyone you know, check.
Defaming your competition through illegal means, check.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: retreadbride on March 21, 2007, 09:50:17 AM
Any product that is worth purchasing will not need an MLM to peddle it.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: thehunter on April 10, 2007, 06:14:00 PM
I just joined the forums so I could post in this thread.  ;D

Has anyone here heard of Premiere Designs? They're a jewelry company with a direct-selling program. A close friend of my mother's is involved in it and I've been to several parties. The jewelry is nice and the deal for party hosts is actually pretty good...and I used to think the company was quite reputable. But a couple of years ago, they added the whole "downline/upline" concept into their marketing plan, and now it seems to be just another MLM. When I was looking for a way to make money during college, my mother mentioned it to her friend, who got her to guilt-trip me into letting her come to the house and try to convince me to join the Premiere "family". As soon as I heard the word "downline," I lost any interest I may have had--which wasn't much, as I was already turned off by the idea of harrassing my friends and family into giving those annoying parties.

I was dumbfounded as to why a lot of women from my mother's church signed up--of the ones who would have been interested in hosting or attending a party, probably a quarter became members, so they were off the list. The remaining women were not many, and they were all within the same circle of friends, so if the new members wanted to make any money (or even to recover what they spent on the kit and demo jewelry), they would have had to go out and meet new people specifically for the purpose of selling to them.

Granted, the way this woman worked was not exactly typical of companies like Amway: she wasn't pushy or manipulative and she was okay with it if someone walked away without buying anything or joining, so I didn't have a problem with her personally. I actually bought small pieces from her on a few occasions. But the organization itself seems pretty sketchy to me. It claims to be "Biblically based" and to put "more emphasis on people than sales," and maybe that was true before they started the downline thing, but I doubt it's the case anymore.

Is there anyone else here who's had experience with these people?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: tiggeril on April 10, 2007, 09:13:22 PM
Biblically based? Since when was Jesus into bling?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LadyDyani on April 11, 2007, 10:10:29 AM
We got roped into one of those meetings once.  I can't remember what it was, but it wasn't Amway, just another of those MLM schemes.  It was not long after hubby and I were married, and I think we were both 19 or 20.

We were invited to dinner by hubby's superior officer.  He said he wanted to talk to hubby about his future.  Instead, we sat at their table for FOUR hours, listening to them try to sell this stuff to us.  I took a look at the prices for these "brands", and they were more expensive than brand names at the store!  For someone who shops the store brands, the prices made my jaw drop.  We couldn't figure out any way to get out of there earlier, because this was hubby's SUPERIOR OFFICER! 

We did decline to start selling the crap, and hubby got transferred soon after that.  We recently heard about that guy.  Apparently, he hasn't been promoted in years, (hubby is actually above him now on the promotion scale), and he's been in trouble several times for trying to sell to soldiers during guard hours, as well as using his guard car for deliveries.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Caya on April 11, 2007, 05:29:28 PM
I was a member of a church once, where the pastor got suckered into MLMs sometimes. He didn't sell them to members outright, he had more integrity than that. But in that church many people got the idea that MLMs were somehow legitimate, so there were a number of those stupid things going around. I just want to slap people that are so naive and stupid, and are old enough to be my parents (in their 50's) and should know better. They also got caught up into a number of stupid Alternative Medicine hoaxes- like those stupid laundry balls, and various gadgets to "align your energies", and the whole Hulda Clark "Cure For All Cancers" LIE. The whole "Western Medical Establishment is evil and Keeping The Truth from you" thing. One church member believed that line so thoroughly, that when she developed cancer, she refused to go the Western Medical Route whatsoever, despite the advice of most everyone around her who told her to see a regular doctor, even the New-Agey woman who brought that fiction I mentioned there in the first place. She spent her last days traveling around the country, trying to find some alternative medicine "cure". They spent a ton of money on this, and finally came home to die. The cancer had eaten through her. I am told that she said she wished she had had the western medical treatment in the beginning- and she would not have died. She left behind a husband and three children. To me, those Alternative Medicine hoaxes are just the same kind of lies as MLMs, and worse sometimes.

Another forum I know of is run by a pastor, and he and a member of his church both do this one MLM, I forget which. They actively push it on that forum, its disgusting.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on April 11, 2007, 06:10:48 PM
The whole "Western Medical Establishment is evil and Keeping The Truth from you" thing.

Do you know my mother? ::)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on April 11, 2007, 06:22:38 PM
The whole "Western Medical Establishment is evil and Keeping The Truth from you" thing.

Do you know my mother? ::)

She must know my mother, too. But Mother adds to it with, "I'm smarter than the doctors so I (a) won't listen to anything they say," or (b) "bully them into performing surgery that won't help just because I want to be the center of attention."

(I'm beginning to believe Mother's hypochondria has morphed into Munchausen's Syndrome.  ::) )
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Caya on April 11, 2007, 06:24:05 PM
I LOVE Quackwatch.org.  http://www.quackwatch.org/ (http://www.quackwatch.org/) It gives the truth on all that nonsense. The owner and author of the site is a really nice guy, too, I've written to him before. That site also maintains a number of other sites on various related subjects relating to quackery and scams and MLMs, too.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on April 11, 2007, 07:17:06 PM
(b) "bully them into performing surgery that won't help just because I want to be the center of attention."

Then she's not exactly like my mom.  The surgeon botched her right hip replacement surgery, severely damaging the sciatic nerve so she has no feeling or control over her right foot - permanently!  The surgeon thinks the surgery was successful & wants to schedule the left hip replacement.  Right >:(  She'll schedule it right after the proverbial cold day in he!!.  Her left hip is giving her a lot of pain and it will probably fracture soon if she doesn't have the surgery.  Doesn't matter to her.  She's undergoing every *alternative* approach to regenerating cartilage, etc.  Supplements, "cold laser" therapy, whatever they have.  As long as the AMA disapproves, it must be effective & she's all for it.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on April 11, 2007, 07:19:50 PM
(b) "bully them into performing surgery that won't help just because I want to be the center of attention."

Then she's not exactly like my mom.  The surgeon botched her right hip replacement surgery, severely damaging the sciatic nerve so she has no feeling or control over her right foot - permanently!  The surgeon thinks the surgery was successful & wants to schedule the left hip replacement.  Right >:(  She'll schedule it right after the proverbial cold day in he!!.  Her left hip is giving her a lot of pain and it will probably fracture soon if she doesn't have the surgery.  Doesn't matter to her.  She's undergoing every *alternative* approach to regenerating cartilage, etc.  Supplements, "cold laser" therapy, whatever they have.  As long as the AMA disapproves, it must be effective & she's all for it.

Gad, that's terrible.  :(
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on April 11, 2007, 07:25:39 PM
I like your sig line, Scritzy.  It reminds me of one of DH's favorite lines:  If you're not living life on the edge, you're taking up too much room!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on April 11, 2007, 10:31:22 PM
I like your sig line, Scritzy.  It reminds me of one of DH's favorite lines:  If you're not living life on the edge, you're taking up too much room!

Bwahahahahaha! I love it!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: blue2000 on April 12, 2007, 02:53:34 PM
I LOVE Quackwatch.org.  http://www.quackwatch.org/ (http://www.quackwatch.org/) It gives the truth on all that nonsense. The owner and author of the site is a really nice guy, too, I've written to him before. That site also maintains a number of other sites on various related subjects relating to quackery and scams and MLMs, too.

I've looked at that one before, and I don't find it any more accurate than the sites and nutritional experts it campaigns against. I find it much more helpful to look at the research myself, when I want to know about a medical claim, than take anyone's word for it. There is a lot of legitimate research going on with alternative medicine, as well as mainstream western medicine.

The last time I looked something up (a variety of mushroom, and supplements made from them), there was twenty or thirty published research articles to choose from just on my first search (on a research site, not google). I was able to find out from the research results whether this was tested on people my age/body type/medical problem, and what the percentages were for that research trial. It turned out the results were very good for some people, but my age group sucked. They almost never mention that kind of thing on the commercial sites, no matter how legit they are. It's usually just a blanket "yes it will work" or "no it won't" kind of statement.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: retreadbride on April 12, 2007, 06:23:32 PM
I don't like quackwatch because, to them, ANY alternative treatment other than conventional Doc-In-A-White-Coat is innately evil. They have tons of stories posted by relatives of patients who died using alternative therapies rather than conventional ones.   I'm sorry for their grief, but their relatives were adults, and that's what they chose. Should they have been forcibly hospitalized and medicated against their will? I don't want to see that either.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Sirius on April 19, 2007, 05:43:50 PM
I think a lot of us have had encounters with "Bob"s.  They're pretty thick on the ground in some places, unfortunately.

     - saphie

Fortunately, a friend who started selling Amway woke up and smelled the coffee, to quote Ann Landers, and got out.  I think what really woke him up was how much a mutual friend changed after starting to sell Amway, even to the point of joining a larger church so he'd have more possible customers.  This "friend" also stopped associating with me because I refused to buy from him or sign up, and stopped associating with my friend because he got out of it.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Twik on April 19, 2007, 06:26:56 PM
I don't like quackwatch because, to them, ANY alternative treatment other than conventional Doc-In-A-White-Coat is innately evil. They have tons of stories posted by relatives of patients who died using alternative therapies rather than conventional ones.   I'm sorry for their grief, but their relatives were adults, and that's what they chose. Should they have been forcibly hospitalized and medicated against their will? I don't want to see that either.

No, but maybe the people who, you know, LIED TO THEM FOR PROFIT should be stopped.

Not to mention the children who are harmed. A family in my city was prosecuted some years ago because they starved their infant daughter to death. All on the advice of a "nutritionalist/herbal expert", who quickly picked up his considerable wealth and skipped the country.

While there may be "legitimate research" going on in alternative medicine, remember that these people also campaign VERY heavily that their product should NOT be held to the same standards of proof, and even safety, as "conventional medicine".
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Jaywalker on April 19, 2007, 10:31:51 PM
I don't like quackwatch because, to them, ANY alternative treatment other than conventional Doc-In-A-White-Coat is innately evil. They have tons of stories posted by relatives of patients who died using alternative therapies rather than conventional ones.   I'm sorry for their grief, but their relatives were adults, and that's what they chose. Should they have been forcibly hospitalized and medicated against their will? I don't want to see that eithe--

------

no one suggests they be forcibly medicated -- the whole point of information is to provide data so people can make better decisions. -- and people who lie and scam and kill people for money as these quacks do, should certainly be held accountable.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on April 19, 2007, 10:47:35 PM
Don't get me going about my mother & "medicated against [her] will."  She believes every CAM* fad & disbelieves everything the AMA approves.  When she had hip replacement surgery, she refused the post-surgery medication.  She wanted her special nutrient drops in water.  The surgery did not go well.  The pain must have been horrendous.

They made her sign upteen forms for not following doctor's orders.  They told her she was a "bad patient."  When we heard that, we thought, "No kidding!  You people just met her.  You have no idea what a bad Medicare patient she really is!"  She told me later that she felt like asking them if they were going to write that in her permanent record  >:D


*Complimentary Alternative Medicine
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: blue2000 on April 20, 2007, 05:54:39 PM
I don't like quackwatch because, to them, ANY alternative treatment other than conventional Doc-In-A-White-Coat is innately evil. They have tons of stories posted by relatives of patients who died using alternative therapies rather than conventional ones.   I'm sorry for their grief, but their relatives were adults, and that's what they chose. Should they have been forcibly hospitalized and medicated against their will? I don't want to see that either.

No, but maybe the people who, you know, LIED TO THEM FOR PROFIT should be stopped.

Not to mention the children who are harmed. A family in my city was prosecuted some years ago because they starved their infant daughter to death. All on the advice of a "nutritionalist/herbal expert", who quickly picked up his considerable wealth and skipped the country.

While there may be "legitimate research" going on in alternative medicine, remember that these people also campaign VERY heavily that their product should NOT be held to the same standards of proof, and even safety, as "conventional medicine".

After researching my own medical problems for many years now, I have encountered some of the most idiotic people, and cures, that I have ever seen in my life.

I have heard of, and been treated by, people in both 'alternative' and 'conventional' medicine who will lie and manipulate people for profit, and people on both sides who will lie and say they follow high standards when they do not, or complain when someone questions their level of standards.

This has made me rather paranoid ::), so I check up on even the most innocent medications if I am going to use them or recommend them.

If I was to pick the group that I found the MOST helpful and honest, it would have to be alternative medicine. But I believe that neither side is better or worse, nor is any treatment automatically better or worse. It depends on whether sufficient research has been done to prove or disprove the claims that have been made.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: afbluebelle on May 08, 2007, 10:01:27 PM
Zombie thread....

 Just a question, any military people/spouses on this board notice the rampant infection of MLM's on Military bases.  Ergh, it seems like ALL the spousesin my shop are in one form or another (jewelry, candles, dishes, knives, makeup, you name it).  Try telling a guy with 5 more ranks than you that his wife can forget her party...
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Amy Rose on May 09, 2007, 04:45:12 PM
It's a big thing on my campus and when I was in HS to sell Mary Kay. One girl asked me if I wanted to join, and I do like the Mary Kay Velocity line (I bought some from a former dance instructor of mine, who btw, wasn't trying to get people to sell, she just really likes makeup and gets a commission through catalogue orders. I asked her about it, and she said "Well, primarily I sell makeup, but the REAL money's from getting other people to become sellers. I ask you to sell, you sell, and then you ask all your friends, and get paid!" And my response was "Isn't that a pyramid scheme? I mean, if everybody sold, there wouldn't be anyone left to recruit." She stopped talking to me.

Pity. I was going to buy some expensive blue eyeshadow off of her. :P
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: SweetTinkerbelle on May 09, 2007, 07:54:02 PM
I read the entire thread, but I must have missed it...what does MLM stand for???
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Ticia on May 09, 2007, 07:57:58 PM
Multi-Level Marketing
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: SweetTinkerbelle on May 09, 2007, 08:01:12 PM
Multi-Level Marketing

Thanks...that makes a lot more sense than what I was thinking (major league money)... ;D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on May 09, 2007, 08:52:53 PM
Multi-Level Marketing

Thanks...that makes a lot more sense than what I was thinking (major league money)... ;D

The MLM promoters would disagree.  For the guys at the top, they make MLM (major league money)!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: nancyhf on May 11, 2007, 11:16:06 AM
Reading about this reminded me of a time back before my husband and I were married (early 90's) and my mom had a guy come over and do some carpentry work in her house. This guy was the son of a friend/colleague that she taught with. My husband has a great personality and had chatted with this guy while he was working on my mom's house. He and his wife invited us for coffee, saying that he had a business opportunity that he thought would suit my husband perfectly. We met them and, long story short, it was an Amway hard sell. When we first sat down and he started talking, my first impulse was to ask "Is this Amway?", since I had encountered quite a few of these people when I was unfortunate enough to work in a restaurant that would oblige these people by staying open after hours so they could come in after their convention, pack the place way over the fire code limit, eat only pie and coffee, and not tip any of the servers. I didn't ask, it took about two hours to find out it was, in fact, an Amway pitch, and they didn't even offer to pay for our coffee, even though they had issued the invitation. By the way, now that I've got everyone's attention with my riveting story  ;), what does MLM stand for?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: SFCRetired on May 14, 2007, 09:22:59 PM
One of my favorite writers, Robert Heinlein, said it best, "The hardest man to cheat is an honest man."  As long as folks are looking to make huge amounts of 'quick' money, we will have these mlm schemes.  My late wife and I got sucked into Shaklee before I learned better and taught her better.  There's a fellow named Rick Ross who has a website exposing all the various cults and Amway is listed right up there at the top along with some others I won't name. 

I've really enjoyed reading these stories and even got a good laugh or two out of them.  A laugh I badly needed, by the way.  I thank all of you for that.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Shoo on May 14, 2007, 09:31:57 PM
There's a fellow named Rick Ross who has a website exposing all the various cults and Amway is listed right up there at the top along with some others I won't name. 


Aw, c'mon.  We won't tell.  ;)

I'd like to have the URL to that website, too.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Lady Snowdon on May 14, 2007, 09:34:58 PM
I googled and came up with www.rickross.com
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on May 14, 2007, 10:03:11 PM
My late wife and I got sucked into Shaklee before I learned better and taught her better. 

Oh, heavens, Shaklee! I'd forgotten about that one!

We used to turn down their ads all the time when I was in newspaper, along with all the Herbalife ads.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: sunflower on May 15, 2007, 11:29:56 AM
Ah yes, good old Amway...

Back in high school I had a really close guy friend named Rich (no, I'm not changing his name to protect the innocent).  I had it bad for him for a long time, it was a kind of messed-up relationship.  We drifted apart after graduation, mostly because he realized I'd stopped pining for him and was no longer willing to be his stand-by date when he couldn't get anyone else to spend time with him.  I did see him briefly when we both attended the same community college and had a biology class together, but other than that we were kind of out of each other's lives.  He wasn't a bad person, just a little manipulative and self-absorbed.

A few years down the road, I was living with my DH, to whom I was then only engaged.  I happened to stay home from work one night and the phone rang; it was Rich!  I was floored.  He'd called my mom's house to talk to me, and she gave him my new number.  I was really happy to hear from him, thinking maybe we could catch up, possibly double-date with his fiancee and my fiance.  Instead, he started talking to me about "Wouldn't it be great if you could make money just by buying things you need anyway?"

I let him go on for a few minutes, confused; then I commented, politely, "It sounds like Amway."

"Well...yeah, it is."

"No."  I explained that I knew someone who had been involved in Amway for a time and had needed to resort to rather drastic measures (changing phone numbers, etc.) in order to get out of the mess, and I preferred to keep my distance.  Besides, I liked my job.  We chatted a bit longer, I told him I hoped we could hang out sometime, and he said we'd keep in touch.

That was spring of 2000.  I haven't heard from him since.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Sahaira on June 05, 2007, 03:04:56 PM
This is my first post!

Anyway, when I was about 19 I worked at a hospital, in the kitchen. One of my duties was delivering trays to patients. Now, I'm a very curvy, non-makeup-wearing, plain-faced and friendly looking lady, and apparently that's what attracted this person to me (though I'm not quite sure why!). I ran into her in the elevator while on my way back down to the kitchen. She kinda stared at me, then asked me my name. I just told her my first name, but apparently she saw my last name on my employee namebadge. Eek! My last name ("McLaine") isn't common, but there are a few different "McLaines" in the phone book, and my family's number is last. Apparently, she called EVERY "McLaine" in the phone book just looking for me! I wasn't living at home, but she pressured my mom (Mom resisted as much as she could, but the lady would not leave her alone! I've forgiven my mom, though  :P ) into giving her my phone number. She called me, informed me that she had spent days just trying to find me, because I "looked so cherubic and nice and wonderful!", and that she just HAD to have me! I asked her what she meant, and she said that she was a "High-up" Mary Kay consultant and that she wanted to visit me at home to give me a free facial and a gift! I tried to decline, but I've never been able to say no to people   :-\ I committed my own breach of etiquette when I left with my roommate when she was due to arrive, but I just couldn't bring myself to face her! That was three years ago and I'm glad I didn't get suckered into anything. I wonder how many other "impressionable" looking girls she's tried to exploit! The whole thing was just bizarre, how she stared at me and generally acted like I was her long-lost love until she got to the sales pitch. But seeing the rest of the stories, here, I'm not surprised!

Thanks for letting me rant!

~Sahaira
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LadyDyani on June 05, 2007, 03:12:23 PM
Welcome, Sahaira!

That is pretty bad.  I had my boss trying to get me to sell Mary Kay once.  And I very rarely wear make-up either.

Did she really think that I would want to go from ten minutes in the morning drying my hair to an hour trying to get my face right?  I need mah butey sleep.  Of course, getting up an hour earlier would probably make me need the make-up.  It's a vicious circle.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: theofficefan on June 07, 2007, 01:47:21 PM
I absolutely REFUSE to attend Pampered Chef, Tupperware, Avon, Partylite parties since my friend invited me and several other prople to her place to "hang out".  When I got there, there was great snacks on the coffee table (dip, pitas, etc.) and suddenly a Pampered Chef sales lady comes into the room and starts her spiel.  I was dying to get out of there, and got the evil eye for declining to order anything.  Thank God I didn't because the saleslady quit the next day, and my friend never did receive the $200 order she paid for.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: MarieX on June 11, 2007, 01:48:16 PM
Are there ANY direct-selling companies that aren't evil cult-like MLM monsters?  My roommate hosted a couple of Creative Memories parties are our place (she wasn't the consultant, but the woman who was didn't have room at her house and was a friend of hers) and that's always seemed pretty innocuous.  Everyone there was a scrapbooker, needed the stuff, no one got pressured to buy or become a consultant, etc.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: goblue2539 on June 11, 2007, 01:57:14 PM
Are there ANY direct-selling companies that aren't evil cult-like MLM monsters? 

Funny you asked this today.  I just experienced a jewelry party that wasn't actually bad at all.  Any pressure I felt came from my friends, not from the presenter.  :-\  Anyway, I did ask some nosy questions, enough to find out that the pressure to pyramid isn't there with this particular one.  I thought that was cool. 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Harriet Jones on June 11, 2007, 02:14:05 PM
Are there ANY direct-selling companies that aren't evil cult-like MLM monsters?  

I think it depends on the particular salesperson and their chain of command (upline), too.   I've actually known quite a few low-pressure MLM salespeople  (even Amway!) 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: MarieX on June 11, 2007, 03:44:09 PM
It was started by Werner Herzog >:D, who did the EST thing in the 70's and is now into scientology.

I read this and thought...wait a minute!  Werner Herzog?  Seriously?

Quick Google.

EST and Landmark were started by Werner Erhard, and it's not his real name.  Werner Herzog is an Oscar-nominated film director!   ;D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Shoo on June 11, 2007, 04:38:15 PM
This gal I know who sells Mary Kay has sold so much stuff and has recruited so many people, she's thisclose to getting the Cadillac.

Yet she is still in the red and hasn't actually made any money. Her dh told me they're getting closer to having all of her "inventory" paid off.

Yeah, so she wins the Cadillac but she can't afford to put gas in it because she's not making any money.  Sounds like a REAL good job, doesn't it?

[/sarcasm]
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Evil Duckie on June 11, 2007, 05:22:22 PM
My middle son received in the mail a letter that sounded like a job recruitment letter. He was getting a bit desperate for a job and set up an "interview". I found out they sent the letter to all new grads in the area.

Well I did some checking on the company and it was a MLM that sold knives. the poor guy at the bottom had to pay out $$$ for the demo knives and their own sale contacts all for $15 a sale. Oh, the knives had to be returned when they quit or they would be charged $$$$ more.

We had him cancel the "interview". They kept calling and calling him after he told them that he wasn't interested. They quit calling when I answered the phone and told them that if they continued to call I would call the police.

He has since found a summer job with a landscape company.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on June 11, 2007, 05:31:03 PM
Aha, I remember that knife company when I was in college. They were constantly putting help wanted ads all over the place, looking for college students.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kareng57 on June 11, 2007, 08:44:36 PM
Aha, I remember that knife company when I was in college. They were constantly putting help wanted ads all over the place, looking for college students.


I know the company, they recruit in Canada too.  Apparently their product is quite good, but they really put these poor youth through the wringer.  And with their recruitment tactics here, the students often don't realize that it's a commission-income-only job until they turn up for the first interview.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kareng57 on June 11, 2007, 08:53:47 PM
This gal I know who sells Mary Kay has sold so much stuff and has recruited so many people, she's thisclose to getting the Cadillac.

Yet she is still in the red and hasn't actually made any money. Her dh told me they're getting closer to having all of her "inventory" paid off.

Yeah, so she wins the Cadillac but she can't afford to put gas in it because she's not making any money.  Sounds like a REAL good job, doesn't it?

[/sarcasm]




Yes, I used to know a Mary Kay rep (I actually used to use some of their products) who pretty much had a Mary Kay "store" in her home - a separate room in the finished-basement (complete with the pink decor etc.)  Sure it was convenient - you could stop by after making an appointment and chances are that she had whatever you wanted right there - the correct shade, scent etc - no fussing with ordering it and picking it up later.  But as we all know, the stuff sure ain't cheap and I used to figure that she likely kept $ 20 or $30 thousand dollars of inventory on hand.  That's an awful chunk to have to "eat" in case a rep suddenly finds that she just can't continue any more.  Things like family emergencies, forced-moves do happen after all.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LadyDyani on June 11, 2007, 09:11:27 PM
Anyone else ever get sucked into an interview for Kirby vacuum sales?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kareng57 on June 11, 2007, 09:25:00 PM
Anyone else ever get sucked into an interview for Kirby vacuum sales?



An job-interview or a sales-pitch?

My friend fell for the latter and she and her Dh had to spend a whole Saturday morning a couple of weeks ago watching this guy give a demonstration in their home.  (Her Dh keeps reminding her that she owes him, bigtime).  She really has no idea how she so willingly agreed to the presentation.  The guy did offer some hotel-coupons (which they still can use even though they didn't buy) but they're pretty limited.  The fairly nearby ones are midweek only, and the further-away ones don't include air-fare and don't seem to be that great a deal.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LadyDyani on June 11, 2007, 09:35:50 PM
I got suckered into an interview when I was about 17.  Ended up sitting for an hour and a half listening to them telling a roomful of people how much money they would make.  I dunno how long they went on after I left.

A couple years ago, I opened the front door to see an old friend from high school.  I invited him in, and he pulled in the case with him.  That was my first clue.   ::)  I listened to his spiel, and he was very nice about me refusing.  Haven't seen him since.  So much for old friends, eh?

My friend Joe has a hilarious story in his book about "Rainbow" vacuums.  Dunno if the name is real or not.  Had the same sales system as Kirby though.  His whole book is hilarious.  www.mentallyincontinent.com  He's writing a second book right now.   ;D  /shameless plug
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Quossum on June 11, 2007, 09:57:04 PM
Creative Memories is pretty innocent.  Most of the consultants I know are in it to get the discount on their own stuff, not to recruit others.  I don't think the company operates on the "downline" principle.

Rainbow vacuums are very real, and that's their real name.  I don't know how much of a MLM selling them is, but I remember my experience with them...

I worked for a dog groomer, and she had a Rainbow.  It's a fancy vacuum / air freshener which works using water--the hair gets sucked up and goes into a tray of water which you periodically dump out.  It was a great machine and did wonders in our shop, and goodness knows there's a hella lot of hair on the floor at the end of a dog groomer's day!

So when I moved out on my own, I wanted a Rainbow for my house.  I called the company, they eagerly sent a salesman.  He gave me the spiel despite the fact that I knew all about the machine.  I listened patiently, then we started doing the paperwork.

That's when he said something about my payments being $119.  Now, this was perhaps terribly naive of me, but I hadn't even worried about the price of this thing.  I figured hey, it's a really really good vaccuum, I'm willing to spend even like $400 on it.  (This was back in 1994, btw.)  I said, "How many payments in all?"

The guy says, "Ten."

I was literally struck dumb.  When I finally regained the power of speech, I stammered something about, "This vacuum costs over ONE THOUSAND dollars?"

I think the poor sob could already see a tiny contract with wings on it flittering away.  He tried to sell me again on how very wonderful this vaccuum was, and I assured him, "Look, I know it's worlds' greatest vaccuum.  I used one every day at the shop.  I had no idea my boss paid that much for it.  There is no way I can pay that much for a vaccuum unless it squirts gold out its hose.  Sorry."

I felt terribly foolish and I did apologize profusely to this poor man who'd come out to sell this thing to me.  Little had I known.   ::)

Oh, and now I have a Dyson vaccuum that works really well that I didn't pay over $500 for.   ;)

--Q
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: retreadbride on June 12, 2007, 07:52:28 AM
I have a Rainbow vacuum and it was WELL WORTH the money. My doc even recommends them for his allergy patients. By the way - if you can get your doc to write a note verifying that you need a HEPA filter (or water filter, like a Rainbow) vac because your dust allergies are severe, then you can write the vacuum off as a medical expense. I did.

Anyway....

I have also been suckered into answering ads for "Retail Sales Work" and even "support staff for office" that turned out to be hooks to get people into the office to listen to their MLM spiel. Burns my behind like nothing else. They prey on people who are desperately hunting for jobs!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kareng57 on June 12, 2007, 08:47:43 PM
I have a Rainbow vacuum and it was WELL WORTH the money. My doc even recommends them for his allergy patients. By the way - if you can get your doc to write a note verifying that you need a HEPA filter (or water filter, like a Rainbow) vac because your dust allergies are severe, then you can write the vacuum off as a medical expense. I did.

Anyway....

I have also been suckered into answering ads for "Retail Sales Work" and even "support staff for office" that turned out to be hooks to get people into the office to listen to their MLM spiel. Burns my behind like nothing else. They prey on people who are desperately hunting for jobs!




I sure agree with you there.  If they believe in their product so much, then why be so evasive about it?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LJM on June 14, 2007, 07:31:45 PM
Anyone else ever get sucked into an interview for Kirby vacuum sales?

Yes.

Oh. my. G-d.

That was one of the most surreal experiences of my life...

 :o :P
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kathrynne on June 19, 2007, 11:38:34 AM
I got tricked into one of the group interviews for Rainbow vacuums in the early '80s, and was pretty rude about how I left the "interview" the moment I realized what they were talking about. I had walked four miles to the office and sat through about 30 minutes of BS-Babble (with 15 or so other people in the room) before they finally brought the product out and started telling us why we were really there. I stood up, laughing angrily, and said I didn't have time for this garbage because I needed a REAL job that paid actual money I could use to pay rent and buy food, and I walked out. Half a dozen or so people followed me, and I suspect they might have stayed the rest of the afternoon had I not broken that ground.

I have an excuse for that reaction, though. My BF at the time was hauling a Kirby all over town trying to sell it and was spending every dollar we had on gas to do so. I couldn't see myself putting a Rainbow in the car alongside his Kirby and telling the poor prospective customer, "And if you don't like HIS exhorbitantly-priced vacuum, let me show you MINE!"

No. We really needed for SOMEBODY to be making actual money. Every moment wasted potentially meant another missed meal and took us that much closer to eviction from our scummy, roach-infested apartment.

Jobs were tight when I was in college and right after I graduated. I actually sat through the presentation for Primerica (another ripoff), and a couple of other bogus "interviews" in my desperation to find somebody to pay me to do something.

Some representative or other with Primerica calls every few months for my DH. I start out dealing with the call quite professionally, in case it's a legitimate job lead, but I screen tightly enough that I can recognize the spiel, confirm that's why they're calling, and THEN laugh and tell them to never call back.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: icfrugal2 on June 23, 2007, 12:52:53 AM
6/22/07

Years ago I was invited to a "party" by some friends of mine, I asked them if it was Amway and I was assured that it was not.

Lo and behold it was Amway and when I met my friends at the break, (they were in a different meeting) I was mad that they lied to me and I told them so. There reply was that they did not lie because this was the NEW AMWAY. LOL

IC   
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: icfrugal2 on June 23, 2007, 01:02:40 AM

MLM schemes seem to become very "cult-like". We had a woman in our office get into H********. She started spending most of her time on the phone with her own customers, rather than ours (she had her own office, so fortunately for her the bosses didn't notice this at first). She started selling products to several of the other women in the company, who liked the product, but got very annoyed when they wouldn't agree to become distributors under her, so she stopped allowing them to buy from her (a little counterproductive, to my mind).  She kept telling us about how the product would do wonders for health - "It even cures AIDS!" I asked her why it wasn't widely known, and she explained how the evil medical community had quashed this news for their own profit.

[/quote]

6/22/07

My DH and I had a service business for 20 plus years, long story short, one of our employees started selling some MLM products of her own business, now this was the killer, she tried to tell her customer to only come at  certain days and times to pick up the products, the times that she knew that my DH and I would not be there. Well you know how people are they did not keep to the schedule and she would be working on our customers only to be interrupted by her customers wanting their products. Needless to say when we figured it out we told her that she had to quit selling out of our office.

IC 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on June 23, 2007, 01:25:25 AM
My middle son received in the mail a letter that sounded like a job recruitment letter. He was getting a bit desperate for a job and set up an "interview". I found out they sent the letter to all new grads in the area.

Well I did some checking on the company and it was a MLM that sold knives. the poor guy at the bottom had to pay out $$$ for the demo knives and their own sale contacts all for $15 a sale. Oh, the knives had to be returned when they quit or they would be charged $$$$ more.

We had him cancel the "interview". They kept calling and calling him after he told them that he wasn't interested. They quit calling when I answered the phone and told them that if they continued to call I would call the police.

He has since found a summer job with a landscape company.

Cutco, right?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on June 23, 2007, 01:27:27 AM
I got suckered into an interview when I was about 17.  Ended up sitting for an hour and a half listening to them telling a roomful of people how much money they would make.  I dunno how long they went on after I left.

A couple years ago, I opened the front door to see an old friend from high school.  I invited him in, and he pulled in the case with him.  That was my first clue.   ::)  I listened to his spiel, and he was very nice about me refusing.  Haven't seen him since.  So much for old friends, eh?

My friend Joe has a hilarious story in his book about "Rainbow" vacuums.  Dunno if the name is real or not.  Had the same sales system as Kirby though.  His whole book is hilarious.  www.mentallyincontinent.com  He's writing a second book right now.   ;D  /shameless plug

There really are Rainbow vacuum systems. They are hideously expensive (like $1500!), and they encourage their salespeople to use high-pressure tactics and to guilt their friends. Like Cutco, they encourage people to tell their friends they just want to "practice" their spiel.  ::)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on June 23, 2007, 01:30:25 AM
Creative Memories is pretty innocent.  Most of the consultants I know are in it to get the discount on their own stuff, not to recruit others.  I don't think the company operates on the "downline" principle.




It does. Consultants are encouraged to recruit new consultants, and the upline makes a commission on her downline, much the way Mary Kay reps do. CM also operates on a $500 minimum order every three months to remain active. Those just in it for the discount probably either have a tough time making that quota, or they spend a lot out of pocket.

The products are good, and I used to use exclusively CM products, but I hardly buy any now. We have too many really nice local scrapbook stores for me to bother with CM much anymore.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: sammycat on June 23, 2007, 03:08:54 AM
CathyF, you took the words right out my mouth. :)

I was a CM consultant for 4 1/2 years.  My upline was/is a lovely person, but very CM business focused.  She's put in a lot of hard work and has, quite deservedly, done very well at it.  That's great if you want to go in that direction, but I wasn't interested in building it into a huge business.  I quit as I was just sick of the pressure I felt from the higher ups in the business to recruit, recruit, recruit.  Recruiting just wasn't my cup of tea, but it seemed that if you weren't interested in doing that then you weren't valued by the company.

I think just about all party plan companies (Tupperware, MK, CM, Stamping Up, etc) will have good and bad in them.  There will be people in them who are out to recruit and/or build the business and will harass do whatever it takes to get there, whilst there will be others, like me, who just want to do it on a very low scale or as a hobby.  The trouble is that the more focused/determined ones give all the rest a bad name.

I watched a documentary once on MK consultants and was shocked at the level some of them will go to for a sale or to recruit someone.  If I was to base my opinion of MK solely on that show I'd run screaming everytime a MK rep came near me, but I have a friend who sells MK so thankfully I know otherwise.  With her personality, (she could sell ice to Eskimos and recruit them in selling more to other Eskimos :)) could easily have grown it into a big business if she'd chosen too.  She deliberately kept it low key as to her (and me when I was in CM) keeping her friends is more important than selling an extra mascara or earning a few dollars a month commission from a friend's sales.  Not to mention all the extra paperwork involved the bigger your team gets.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Fabrashamx on June 23, 2007, 04:52:16 AM
I remember hearing about a company in the 70's that had incredible deals on carpet shampooing, they would send people out, and then the people would try and get you into a weird religeous cult. I was reminded of this when they spoofed it on 'Seinfeld', but I do remember it was a real thing.
 I dated a guy briefly who sold the rainbows, they were awesome, but way expensive and the company was quasi cultish in their selling tactics.
Anyone remember the name of the religeous carpet cleaners??

BTW, Thanks to the poster who pointed out I had mixed up Werner Hertzog with Werner Erhardt. I had just rented Grizzly Man and my mind was on the director!  ::)

~Fabby 8)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Jaywalker on June 23, 2007, 08:12:03 AM
and to call them cultish is not overreacting

I have had more than one interaction with an Amway seller who believes that one is not 'Christian' if they dn't buy Amway.  They seem to attract and feed the same kind of paranoia that many politicians do -- everyone is out to attack their religion (because we all know Jesus Christ was very clear about the all purpose cleaner his followers should use)  And often these folks lack social skills so they are sullen and pout if you don't want to deal with them.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: hollasa on June 23, 2007, 08:22:37 AM
I was at a compliance seminar once (making sure that our financial company complied with rules and regulations). One of the compliance officers gave an example of a situation he once encountered - one of the managers at this one office started to work for Amway, and he would go into the recruiting manager's office after work, root through his files and wastepaper basket, and find the names of people who'd applied for work there. He would then contact these people and ask them to work for Amway.

He was quickly fired after they found out.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: icfrugal2 on June 23, 2007, 01:16:11 PM
That brings up something that I could start another thread on....misleading HELP WANTED ads. I can't tell you how many times I've gone to "sales job" or "new company needs staffing, hiring for all positions" "interviews" that turned out to be a hook for MLMs.

6/23/07

That happened to me a few years ago when I was desperately looking for work. I was very upset when I realized that it was a "cattle call" for sales people. The ad that I answered was for a front office person, paper work. 

It was very maddening because at the time my DH and I were both out of work and were counting every gallen of gas ect.

IC
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Evil Duckie on June 23, 2007, 01:47:17 PM
My middle son received in the mail a letter that sounded like a job recruitment letter. He was getting a bit desperate for a job and set up an "interview". I found out they sent the letter to all new grads in the area.

Well I did some checking on the company and it was a MLM that sold knives. the poor guy at the bottom had to pay out $$$ for the demo knives and their own sale contacts all for $15 a sale. Oh, the knives had to be returned when they quit or they would be charged $$$$ more.

We had him cancel the "interview". They kept calling and calling him after he told them that he wasn't interested. They quit calling when I answered the phone and told them that if they continued to call I would call the police.

He has since found a summer job with a landscape company.

Cutco, right?

Bingo! That is correct.

They actually be good knives but the way they recuit employees was too pushy and dishonest so I won't be buying them.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Balletmom on June 23, 2007, 09:11:26 PM
My ex SIL called me years ago to see if her mother could "practice" her Rainbow vacuum speech on us--since I told her that we weren't really interested in buying one, could her mother just come and "practice" on  us. Oh, and her supervisor/manager/upline would be coming along as well.

Uh, no.

My BIL called last summer to ask DH about this MLM electric company. Should he join? DH listened to the facts and said, no, that's a MLM, don't go there.

The next day there was a lengthy message from BIL on our answering machine about how we "really needed" to come to this two hour meeting to listen to a guy tell us why this power company would be great one for us.

Uh, no.

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: ladiedeathe on June 23, 2007, 09:48:26 PM
I got the door-to-door Kirby team at my house, days after I left the ex and moved down to the smaller house my son had been living in before he moved. My son was 20 at the time, and the house needed a real cleaning.

I don't think the Kirby guy will ever be the same.

I told the nice man up front I didn't want one. He assured me that after a good demo I wouldn't be able to say no.

I told him feel free to clean anything you like, but I'm not buying. Period.

This guy spent the whole morning showing me how wonderful the Kirby was. He vaccuumed my steps, my carpets, my couch. He worked on my drapes, and showed me how to use it on kitchen tile. He took me to the upstairs hall and bedrooms and showed me how it would remove cat hair and "permenant" dirt spots.

4 freaking hours after he arrived he finished with a smile and asked me if I wasn't amazed and impressed by the Kirby.

I told him yes, it was really wonderful.

He told me payments would be $136 a month for a year.

I told him I still had no intention of buying, but that it was really nice of him to clean the house.

He started to sputter and I reminded him that I had told him up front and several times during his demo that I was not buying.

He asked if he could use my phone and I told him I had to run errands and would be happy to walk him out.

I thought he was gonna cry but what the hey- I kept telling him NO, I am not buying.

(edited cause I still can't spell)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: dawbs on July 01, 2007, 09:09:43 PM
and to call them cultish is not overreacting

I have had more than one interaction with an Amway seller who believes that one is not 'Christian' if they dn't buy Amway.  They seem to attract and feed the same kind of paranoia that many politicians do -- everyone is out to attack their religion (because we all know Jesus Christ was very clear about the all purpose cleaner his followers should use)  And often these folks lack social skills so they are sullen and pout if you don't want to deal with them.

A close family member recently got out of a MLM for internet shopping and fulfilling her "destiny" (and promptly into another, less agressive MLM or 2  ::) I know longer have the details, I haven't been able to supress my eyerolls enough for them to be shared)...

But she had to change churches.
That particular MLM markets itself through churches very strongly, and the leadership in her church basically made it clear she wouldn't be welcome because she had quit working for their "team".
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: hellokaty on July 04, 2007, 02:11:26 AM
Arg, I just today (er, yesterday now) met with a friend I hadn't seen in a long time.  She'd been trying to get ahold of me for a while, and I figured she wanted to catch up.  She did....but she told me over the phone she also wanted to tell me about this new business opportunity she was involved in.  She was up front about it, at least.  It actually didn't sound so bad.  But then I looked into it and I think (having trouble finding ANY info on this company under the name she told me, which in itself seems odd) it is part of Quixtar/Amway.  ::)  They don't appear to do much aside from recruiting other people to be part of it.  I don't know how to tell her though, or if I should.  She's so excited about it, and i really don't want to hurt her feelings.  I don't suppose there's a polite way to say "I think you're getting involved in a pyramid scheme," is there?

Although I was thinking about selling Avon.  I know a lot of ladies who like it, and there aren't any avon ladies in this area.  I've never had an Avon lady (or tupperware, or partylite, etc) try and recruit me, mostly they just seem interested in selling the products, but the Mary Kay reps are really pushy about it.  Makes me skeptical about getting involved in any of that type of selling, to be honest. 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Felicity09 on July 04, 2007, 06:28:16 PM
Very interesting thread. I got a letter in the mail when I was in college that bragged about "internship opportunities." I showed up, and it ended up being a group interview for the knife selling company. After sitting through the first spiel, I walked out. The guy asked me where I was going, and I just said I wasn't interested. I wast the only one who walked out.

I have to admit, they are the best knives I've ever had. My husband and I wanted to buy them once, and had to ask around to friends to find a salesperson who could sell them to us. I don't understand why they don't just sell them in a store or online.

I don't like most MLM companies, but I did go to a purse party recently that I really liked, and loved the purse I got. I have no interest in hosting, but would definitely attend another one. I don't remember the name of the company.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: cheyne on July 06, 2007, 09:52:02 AM
My Aunt's husband (Uncle) was very sick and dying of cancer a few years ago.  He had married my aunt after my sister and I were adults, so we were friendly but not close. 

My Aunt had driven Uncle up to see my parents one last time before the end (they were pretty close).  My sister happened to be at my parents house when Aunt and Uncle were visiting.

Uncle calls Sister to him and tells her he has something he wants to tell her.  Sister complies, believing Uncle is going to say some kind of important last words, or at least ask her to look-out for Aunt.

Uncle takes a deep breath and starts telling her all the benefits of selling Amway...
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: MiladyOak on July 06, 2007, 12:05:52 PM
My Aunt's husband (Uncle) was very sick and dying of cancer a few years ago.  He had married my aunt after my sister and I were adults, so we were friendly but not close. 

My Aunt had driven Uncle up to see my parents one last time before the end (they were pretty close).  My sister happened to be at my parents house when Aunt and Uncle were visiting.

Uncle calls Sister to him and tells her he has something he wants to tell her.  Sister complies, believing Uncle is going to say some kind of important last words, or at least ask her to look-out for Aunt.

Uncle takes a deep breath and starts telling her all the benefits of selling Amway...

ROFL!!!! Thanks, now I have to clean coffee out of the much-abused keyboard...
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: afbluebelle on July 06, 2007, 05:17:48 PM
My Aunt's husband (Uncle) was very sick and dying of cancer a few years ago.  He had married my aunt after my sister and I were adults, so we were friendly but not close. 

My Aunt had driven Uncle up to see my parents one last time before the end (they were pretty close).  My sister happened to be at my parents house when Aunt and Uncle were visiting.

Uncle calls Sister to him and tells her he has something he wants to tell her.  Sister complies, believing Uncle is going to say some kind of important last words, or at least ask her to look-out for Aunt.

Uncle takes a deep breath and starts telling her all the benefits of selling Amway...

Please tell me that you are joking...

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LittleWoman on September 23, 2007, 08:22:20 PM
I got roped into one of those group interviews when I was 17. I needed a job very badly at the time, but was unable to do work that required a lot of manual labor (I have a condition). So, this posting in the newspaper for office work sounded great. The company scheduled an interview with me, and I showed up at the right time, dressed very well.

Strangely, there were many other applicants in the waiting room. Odd.

Then someone came out and told us all to follow them to a group interview. Having had no experience with this sort of thing at the time, I went in with the group.

Us applicants sat down but there were more chairs than necessary for the small crowd present. A group of well-dressed and smiling people came pouring out of the back room. They all sat in the empty seats amongst us.

What followed was a pitch for selling overpriced water purification systems and tablets. Wouldn't we like to make thousands every month selling these to just friends and family? Wouldn't we want our own business? Wasn't it worth the $90 for the manual?

Right after he started talking, it was clear that it was a commission-only position. Of course, I could not take such a thing. I stayed out of sheer, morbid curiosity.

All of the people that had come from the back would nod, smile and clap throughout the presentation. Afterwards, we were to talk in groups with a few of the bots leading the discussions about how we had to get in on this opportunity and buy the manual. They tried to play on the fears and wants of all of the people in the group. Apparently, I will get so much further with this 'position' than I will with a 9-to-5 job, if I am willing to invest in the manual. I was 17, mind you. I was and am very small, and I looked a lot younger than 17. Do I look like I have a lot of friends who need or care about water purification?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: JoW on November 09, 2007, 10:19:29 PM
I’m another one who joined this forum to add a story to the Amway thead

It was in about 1990, my mother was working for a small electronics firm.  One of their engineers sold Amway.  He was good at his job, but he spent about half of his time selling to his co-workers.  So between his time and the time of the folks he was selling to he wasted 40 man-hours each week.  The company fell on hard times, they need to fire a few people, and Mr. Amway was the 1st to go.  Sometimes the Amway Salespest gets exactly what he deserves.

The worst part is, Amway makes decent products.  If they were sold in stores beside the Tide and Dawn I might buy them.  But I will never buy on the impose-on-your-friends plan. 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: hjaye on November 12, 2007, 10:11:10 AM
Speaking of getting dragged to high-pressure cult-like groups under false pretenses-- has anyone here ever been to a sales-pitch meeting for the Landmark Forum? I had no idea what I was walking into the middle of -- I had been given to believe it was something like a rotary club meeting -- and the whole time I was there, I felt like I was in a sit-com parody of a weird, cultish "self-help" group that was heavy on "cult" and light on "self" or "help".

I declined to purchase one of their expensive day-long, self-help seminars, nor did I sign up for one of their weekend retreats. The only reason I didn't leave very quickly after I arrived was because I was dependent on the people who brought me for my ride, and they were off in another room someplace.

Those of us who had been dragged here as "first timers" --note the sales technique of making it sound like we've already joined-- were spit up into groups of six to eight, each of whom went into a different room where two members of the forum were to give a "presentation" to tell us what the forum was all about.

The incredibly-high-pressure sales-people / recruiters / whatever they were said that since they weren't being paid and were doing the "informational meeting" on volunteer basis (because the program had "helped them so much"), we should trust them, because they clearly weren't just trying to make money. They used a lot of cult-recruitment type methods to try to get us to join. It's the only time I've ever been in a conversation with people who gave me the impression of having been brainwashed.  And everyone there (except the other "first-timers") was just a little bit "off" in a way that it was hard to put my finger on.

I was seriously, seriously creeped out by the encounter.

My ex wife got involved with Landmark for a while.  I went to one meeting but I was not impressed.  Especially when they locked the door during the presentation so no one could leave.  The person giving the presentation said he did not want to hear someone say it sounds good I might do it later, "Either you're going to do it, or you're not.  If not, just say so and that will be the end of it"  When asked after the presentation if I was going to enroll, I said very firmly, "No" For some reason that was not the end of it, they kept badgering me for the rest of the night.  I did not waver though.

I let my wife do her thing so long as she left me alone.  I did get a call once from a friend of her's in the program.  I was not pleased, but he never called me again:

Wife's Friend (WF) Hello Hjaye, I'm a friend of your wife.  She tells me you don't like Landmark and are not interested in taking the program.  I had the same problem with my wife and I thought you would like to hear how we resolved our differences and how happy we both are now.
Me:  I'm sorry, I don't know you, and I can assure you, I have no interest in any problems you may have had with your wife and how you have overcome them.  I don't appreciate you calling me, I have no desire to talk to you about anything, and I especially am not interested in discussing any issues I may or may not be having with my wife concerning anything, let alone Landmark.  I'm sorry if this is rude, but the next sound you are going to hear is the click of me hanging up on you.....................click
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: hjaye on November 12, 2007, 10:30:21 AM
Way Back When, I was invited to lunch by a Primamerica guy who spent the whole time trying to get me to become one of his salespeople for some some kind of investment. All I remember from his talk was "the rule of 72", (an interest calculation, I think), and how much commission I could make each month from recurring client payments. I declined, stating that I couldn't spare the time away from home at night and weekends doing in-person sales calls at prospective clients homes, as my wife was expecting our first and I had to be available at all times. I did thank him for the free lunch, but to this day, I have no idea who gave him my name or work phone number!

The rule of 72 is a way to calculate how long it will take to double your money depending on the return your invested money is giving you.  If you invest 1000 dollars and get a 12% return on your investment 72/12= 6 you will have 2000 dollars in six years.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: willow08 on November 12, 2007, 10:36:15 AM
  I'm sorry if this is rude, but the next sound you are going to hear is the click of me hanging up on you.....................click

Well, you did warn him!  :D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on November 14, 2007, 01:47:06 PM


My ex wife got involved with Landmark for a while.  I went to one meeting but I was not impressed.  Especially when they locked the door during the presentation so no one could leave. 
[/quote]

They LOCKED the door? Isn't that unlawful imprisonment or unlawful detention or some such?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on November 14, 2007, 03:43:14 PM
Me:  I'm sorry, I don't know you, and I can assure you, I have no interest in any problems you may have had with your wife and how you have overcome them.  I don't appreciate you calling me, I have no desire to talk to you about anything, and I especially am not interested in discussing any issues I may or may not be having with my wife concerning anything, let alone Landmark.  I'm sorry if this is rude, but the next sound you are going to hear is the click of me hanging up on you.....................click

Hjaye:  You are my new hero. :-*
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Elle on November 14, 2007, 09:08:11 PM
Very interesting thread. I got a letter in the mail when I was in college that bragged about "internship opportunities." I showed up, and it ended up being a group interview for the knife selling company. After sitting through the first spiel, I walked out. The guy asked me where I was going, and I just said I wasn't interested. I wast the only one who walked out.

I have to admit, they are the best knives I've ever had. My husband and I wanted to buy them once, and had to ask around to friends to find a salesperson who could sell them to us. I don't understand why they don't just sell them in a store or online.

I don't like most MLM companies, but I did go to a purse party recently that I really liked, and loved the purse I got. I have no interest in hosting, but would definitely attend another one. I don't remember the name of the company.

I sold Cutco for about 5 minutes. I sold a paring knife and a pair of shears to my mom. 
It occured to me I didn't necessarily want to be selling knives door to door . . . . . . .
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: mindibrad on November 15, 2007, 07:49:13 AM

I did do MK for a while but let it lapse which I'm still a tad upset about.  I miss my discount!!! But yes, I love MK products and will probably use them for the rest of my life.  It's really one of the few skin care products that help my acne out.  I didn't do "parties" though.  If friends wanted to play with my new color pallets, it was up to them.  If they wanted to buy something, cool. 


There are thousands of consultants who are trying to unload their $5K of inventory that they were suckered in to buying by their Director because they were told "you can't sell from an empty wagon".

Check Craig's List for your area....chances are that you will find a local consultant looking to get rid of their inventory at 40-50% off (MOF - I just Googled "mary Kay 50%" and the first page of hits were all Craig's list linsting for various cities)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: hjaye on November 15, 2007, 10:52:56 AM


My ex wife got involved with Landmark for a while.  I went to one meeting but I was not impressed.  Especially when they locked the door during the presentation so no one could leave. 

They LOCKED the door? Isn't that unlawful imprisonment or unlawful detention or some such?
[/quote]

I figured it was at least a violation of the fire code.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: mindibrad on November 15, 2007, 11:59:58 AM


My ex wife got involved with Landmark for a while.  I went to one meeting but I was not impressed.  Especially when they locked the door during the presentation so no one could leave. 

They LOCKED the door? Isn't that unlawful imprisonment or unlawful detention or some such?

I figured it was at least a violation of the fire code.
[/quote]

But don't ya know?  Only the "weak" would complain abuot being locked in....the whole purpose of that seminar is to teach you to be a stronger person!

(sarcasm off)

Sorry - my mom & Sf took "the forum" (right after they switched from being called "Est") and they kept bugging me to take it when I was a slightly unruly 13-year old.....almost forced me to take it until my father threatened to sue my mom for full custody if she ever brought it up again....he knew what a bunch of whack-jobs "the forum" was!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: hjaye on November 15, 2007, 12:28:22 PM


My ex wife got involved with Landmark for a while.  I went to one meeting but I was not impressed.  Especially when they locked the door during the presentation so no one could leave. 

They LOCKED the door? Isn't that unlawful imprisonment or unlawful detention or some such?

I figured it was at least a violation of the fire code.

But don't ya know?  Only the "weak" would complain abuot being locked in....the whole purpose of that seminar is to teach you to be a stronger person!

(sarcasm off)

Sorry - my mom & Sf took "the forum" (right after they switched from being called "Est") and they kept bugging me to take it when I was a slightly unruly 13-year old.....almost forced me to take it until my father threatened to sue my mom for full custody if she ever brought it up again....he knew what a bunch of whack-jobs "the forum" was!
[/quote]

OK, this is completely off topic but I have to agree they are indeed whack jobs.

Three years ago my ex and I were coming back from a vacation in New England, we had a connecting flight in Atlanta, who should get on but a large group of Landmark people that my wife knew coming back from one of their seminars.

I ended up sitting next to two of them, my wife was sitting one row in front of me. I had an aisle seat, the guy sitting next to the window was wearing a tank top t shirt.  There was an older guy sitting behind us, and he was giving the younger guy wearing the tank top holy heck for dressing so disrespectfully.  He was not properly representing the organization and the flight home was just as much a part of the program as the seminar itself.  According the older "gentleman" this younger guy couldn't be told anything because he was too stubborn to learn and no one could tell him anything because he already knew everything and what a poor representative of Landmark he was.

I sat there and listened to this guy go on.  I really wish I had spoken up and said something along the lines of what I was thinking.

The guy wearing the tank top didn't bother me at all, but you, the guy with the mouth, is irritating the crap out of me.  In my opinion he was an obnoxious, overbearing, control freak, and if anyone was giving landmark a bad name (aside from Landmark itself) it was him with the mouth, not the guy with the tshirt.

However, I did not want to start an argument so I just sat there wishing he would shut up trying to read my book.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: mddg4 on December 01, 2007, 02:47:19 PM
I guess I am one of the few who has never been approached by Amway. I amost got sucked into Vector and Primerica. Both are sleazy (imo) in that they make you think you are there on a legit job interview until they start talking then you find out what it's about.
I got sucked into one of those cattlecall "interviews" for Primerica, way back when, and walked out disgusted. Every now and then somebody will call to "discuss career alternatives" with DH, always between 9 and 5 when he's at work, and I've learned to spot the Primerica spiel within a few words. They hate to say upfront who they're representing, so when they stay vague as I'm asking for details I ask outright if they're calling about Primerica. Then I laugh and tell them to stop spamming my phone and delete us from any and all calling lists, which they never do.
[/quote]
Who are Primerica and what do they sell?
[/quote]
Supposidly, they sell insurance. Ofcourse they also "give financial advise".
What disgusted me about them was that they made it sound like a legetimet job interview.[/quote]

I worked for American Express Financial Advisors (which is now Ameriprise) for 9+ years. 3 of which as a recruitier. I can't tell you how many times I had to convince people that we were a legit company, we were NOT primeamerica, and we did not do pyramid schemes in any way shape or form. The first interview was done as a group interview, because this is a sales intensive position and we wanted people who knew what the job was about BEFORE they did a one on one interview. (we went to this interview process in the first place, because we would hire people who halfway through our training would up and leave because "it's a sales position". Well duh, we told you that!)Because of Primeamerica, we have had to completely revamp our interview process, so I effectivly "lost my job", however, they didn't want to get rid of me and kept me on until my DH got transferred.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: bionelly on December 07, 2007, 05:09:27 AM
Anyone else ever get sucked into an interview for Kirby vacuum sales?

My DH once actually started training to sell Rainbows.  He quit when he realized that 1) we really didn't know that many people who would be willing to spend $1500 on a vacuum, and 2) they wanted him to do his spiel in a Forrest Gump voice.  Seriously.  They claimed it would help sales, but I really can't imagine how.  He said they showed him a demo tape of someone doing it with a person called, of all things, "Jenny," and he didn't know how he kept from just cracking up in the middle of the training session.

The updates to the website are not good for my Lenten goals. I have already yielded to temptation to read a few of them.  This one was about the first, and HOLY COW!  :o What a way to begin!

Never got suckered into Amway, but I'm still a little miffed at my friend Carolyn for giving out my name and number to a salesperson. The girl called and said that Carolyn had viewed a presentation she had done and that Carolyn had suggested that I should look over it as well. Since Carolyn and I had both been in advertising and newspaper, I thought the girl had done some sort of PowerPoint, and I set up a table with a line to a surge protector so she could hook up her computer.

Nope. She was selling extremely overpriced knives. I ended up buying a pair of shears because I did need some new ones and it was about the cheapest item on her list. (No, I was not going to buy an entire set of knives.) And boy, did she get furious when I refused to give her any names and addresses of people for her to contact. I kept telling her "no," and finally she whined, "But if I don't get any names from you, I won't get credit for this sale!"

Sorry, babe, them's the breaks. Next time be honest and upfront and you won't be presenting to someone who fantasizes about chasing you off the property with one of your knives.

(And as for the shears — they aren't any better than the Fiskars I can get for about a quarter of the price.  :P)

When I was a kid, my friend's mom was ambushed by one of these people who was apparently going door-to-door just as we were leaving for an outing.  By that, I mean everybody was in the car ready to go, she went back in to grab something, and the guy knocked on the door and wouldn't take no for an answer.  When he finally got done with his presentation (about an hour later), she basically told him that she had sold those same knives years before, and knew better than to act the way he had (talking over her, refusing to pause in reciting the script to answer questions, refusing to reschedule in the first place) with somebody she actually wanted to sell something to.  Probably rude, but if it got the guy to stop doing those things, I think she prevented a lot more rudeness than she caused.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: geordicat on December 07, 2007, 07:17:35 AM


My parents got sucked into that poop for awhile. They were pressed to hoodwink friends and told directly not to tell them why they were invited, or they wouldn't come. "They won't be offended because they are your friends" when they find out otherwise. "Hey, your friends don't yell at you, do they?"



This is the part that gets me.  If all these MLMs are SO great and wonderful and everyone makes a gazillion dollars, why all the secrecy and subterfuge to get people to attend the danged meetings?

I used to work with one guy who was into this stuff.  Of course if we say the "A" word at work we can get into major trouble.  This guy kept asking me to go out with him.  Ok.. first, I dont' date coworkers.  Second, he set off my creep-o-meter.  He was just.. you know that picture of Ted Bundy and his eyes are all demented and intense looking?  Ya.. this guy had those eyes, only more intense.  He would wear dirty stained torn t shirts to work.  All of us just felt violated if he talked to us.

So he's asking me out to go see this guy talk.. it's interesting.. I'll like it.  It may help me raise my son better.  Meanwhile, another co worker behind him is waving his arms wildly and violently shaking his head back and forth, signaling a big NO to me.  He was mouthing the word AMWAY. 

Eww.  just... ewww.

Oh yea.. then there was the doctor who, after refusing to help me with some constructive surgery that I needed, suggested I go to his seminar.  It will help me with my self esteem and I can take some products home.  See, if I learned to talk to people and be more sure of myself, nobody would notice my disfigurement, so go listen to this speech....Me and my big mouth.. "Is it AMWAY?"  He looked surprised and said in a small unsure voice... ".... yes...."

I turned him in to the ethics board AND found a doctor who did my reconstructive surgery at no cost to me.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Elle on December 07, 2007, 11:13:33 AM
Hooooooleeeeee crow,

Geordicat, there are no words in my vocabulary to describe the temerity of that doctor. I love your big mouth  ;D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Twik on December 07, 2007, 06:20:27 PM
He was just.. you know that picture of Ted Bundy and his eyes are all demented and intense looking?  Ya.. this guy had those eyes, only more intense. 

Thank you, I will go have nightmares now....
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: geordicat on December 07, 2007, 07:51:18 PM
He was just.. you know that picture of Ted Bundy and his eyes are all demented and intense looking?  Ya.. this guy had those eyes, only more intense. 

Thank you, I will go have nightmares now....

I'm sorry.  :(

dang it.. I'd post pictures of the fort I built around my desk today, but I don't know how!!

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Animala on December 07, 2007, 10:51:30 PM
Put them on the picture thread!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: geordicat on December 08, 2007, 08:38:35 AM
Put them on the picture thread!

I would.. but I don't know HOW to post them!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Elle on December 08, 2007, 09:11:11 AM
I don't know how it happened. BadElle got loose in public. I think she ran into an Amway shill salesman. Let's see what she has to say for herself.

*****

I was browsing the Graphic Novel section at my local bookstore. I spend a lot of time in this section so when a nicely dressed (and kinda cute) guy was there for a while without pulling anything off the shelf, I asked if he was looking for anything in particular.

Guy: Do you work here?
BadElle: No, I just spend a lot of time in this section
G: Oh, ok. So what do you do full time?
That's a rather odd phrasing. But there are a lot of college kids and yuppy puppies here. He probably just wants to figure out which I am
BE: Oh I work for a consulting firm. I'm the data gopher.
G: That's cool. Do you do anything else to make money?
BE: Huh? Well, I do a little crafting I sell at flea markets. Mostly to pay for my hobbies. And the light dawns on me. I decide to test my theory I had some friends try to convince me to get into Amway a few times. Sh'yeah right. Like that's not a total ponzi scheme.

Th look on his face told me he was indeed working for Amway.  I said something about needing to find where Boyfriend wandered off to and flounced away.

*****

BadElle's going back in her sack now. She knows she's not supposed to tease people.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Suze on December 08, 2007, 09:35:59 AM
MY BIL (the one with NO money to live on) has gotten into one of those "Juice" things

You know - If you only drink 2 oz  of this juice a day it will cure all your ills.  Costs like $40 a bottle......

At Thanksgiving he was trying to get the WHOLE family to sell under him - INCLUDING THE 12 YEAR OLD

I laughed at him

and his wife (my darling clueless sister) bought him a portable DVD player so that he can sell this "stuff" better......

This is the pair that are getting the house forclosed on and are declaring bankrupcy - I really don't feel sorry for them any more.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Animala on December 08, 2007, 09:36:03 AM
Right click the picture where ever it is hosted.  Select properties.  Copy the address on the location line.  Place the address like this [ i m g ] link [ / i m g ].  I placed the spaces in so it would display.  If you can't figure it out, send me the link and I'll post it for you.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: geordicat on December 08, 2007, 10:18:57 AM
Right click the picture where ever it is hosted.  Select properties.  Copy the address on the location line.  Place the address like this [ i m g ] link [ / i m g ].  I placed the spaces in so it would display.  If you can't figure it out, send me the link and I'll post it for you.

ah.. that's the thing.  They are 'hosted' on my computer, no web site.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Animala on December 08, 2007, 10:50:26 AM
Ahh you can put them up free at a variety of places.  I have mine on facebook.
http://www.facebook.com/ (http://www.facebook.com/)
http://img.photobucket.com/ (http://img.photobucket.com/)
http://www.imageshack.us/ (http://www.imageshack.us/)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: geordicat on December 08, 2007, 12:16:08 PM
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=2099&id=1000530086 (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=2099&id=1000530086)

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=2100&id=1000530086 (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=2100&id=1000530086)

well, poo.  No images, just stupid links.

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Animala on December 08, 2007, 12:23:31 PM

I got them to post in the pictures in the coffee break thread.  When you get the address for the picture right click the picture.  Ignore the first address and copy the location which looks like this-
http://photos-d.ak.facebook.com/photos-ak-sf2p/v166/42/55/1000530086/n1000530086_2099_3675.jpg

The end result should look something like this-
[ i m g ] http ://photos-d.ak.facebook.com/photos-ak-sf2p/v166/42/55/1000530086/n1000530086_2099_3675. j p g [ / i m g ]

I have thrown in extra spaces so you can see what it looks like.

The link to the thread where they are displayed is here-http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=1707.msg452009#msg452009 (http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=1707.msg452009#msg452009)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: scap64 on December 22, 2007, 11:14:50 AM
About 11 years ago, Amway almost cost me my marriage.

Being recent immigrants, we were quickly targeted by my husband's coworker. After attending a "meeting", it became obvious to me that it was a pyramid scheme.

My DH's coworker (also a recent immigrant in hot pursuit of his "American Dream" who was driving 2 hours one-way for pep talks with his "upline") was particularly interested in involving me because, as an immigrant community volunteer and a later a public service employee, I was dealing with many vulnerable people who trusted me. He openly said that he wants me "to bring in new customers because people trust me". I refused - exactly for the same reason. Then this individual started pitting my husband against me, hammering into him that I "did not want him to succeed in America", "out of spite was standing in his way to becoming a millionaire" etc. Hubby could not avoid him because the guy was his foreman at work. It almost led to separation.

The strangest thing is that my hubby should've been much more aware, having lost his distant relative to a religious sect many years ago and being very critical about her gullibility. He fell for the same "meat" served under slightly different dressing. :shock:

This happened in 1996-97. My husband later came to own a small but successful business (which I helped him start and which has absolutely nothing to do with MLM), obviously prefers not to bring up Amway subject and gets visibly irritated whenever I do. Oh yes, and the guy who was pulling him in, became an alcoholic instead of a millionnaire.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: talvikki on January 18, 2008, 04:55:57 PM
My very first grown-up dinner party was ruined by Amway.  I had become friends with this couple at work.  They mentioned Amway when I was at their house once after shopping with her.  I blew it off, and didn't say much beyond 'not interested'.  I invited them over for a nice dinner and cards afterward.  I made this dish called Piedmontese something-or-other, it was a hunk of meat cooked in wine, tomatoes and other stuff for like 10 hours.  It was really wonderful.  Somewhere in between their acceptance of my invitation, and the dinner he dropped by my place unannounced with a Bob.  I got them out in about a half hour.  The day of the party, she called me AFTER they would have had to leave to say that 'their son was sick'  Yah, right, you just now realized that.  The following Monday at work, she mentioned that Amway teaches "that friends who aren't willing to help you make money, aren't your friends."

The good news is that my parents live 45 minutes away, and hadn't eaten yet.  Dad said he has never seen mom move as fast as that night


Is it just me who thinks this, but don't Amway and other such MLM schemes seem a bit... cult-like? The whole idea that people would lure others into meetings under false pretenses to make them join an organization, relentlessly try to make family and friends buy products, destroying relationships because they're so immersed in the business scheme, and especially the case you mentioned about actually following advice from a BUSINESS on how to choose one's friends... it just seems unbelievable to me, and sounds just like the warning signs mentioned when warning people against religious cults.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Animala on January 19, 2008, 01:45:10 AM
Amway has been listed in at least one book on cults a number of years ago. 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: geordicat on January 19, 2008, 07:24:26 PM
Amway is VERY cult-ish speaking as one who was involved with it for 3+ years (I'm sorry!  I know better now!)
They sold my DH on it using the old "American Dream" dream scenario - work like the devil for 5 years and relax and have time for the kids then.  One of his daughters had a game or something (this was all 20+ years ago) and he was loading up the car for a meeting,  telling her he couldn't go.  She was disappointed of course, and he was explaining he was doing these meetings for HER and he would be able to retire in 5 years, etc, etc.  She looked him in the eye and said "Dad, in 5 years I'll be in college and I'll be too busy to spend any time with you then."  Cue Harry Chapin music - Dad started unpacking the car and that was the last Amway we ever did.
As you moved up in the levels, they had reading lists for the women: how to support your busy husband, how to care for the details and leave him free to concentrate on business, how to dress, talk, act.  They even made special trips to shop for clothing all together so everyone could 'help' with your choices.  They made the Stepford Wives look like a bunch of wild, tattooed biker babes! (speaking as a formerly wild, still tattooed biker not so much a babe anymore ;D)

that's spooky
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: seren on January 19, 2008, 07:31:46 PM
According to our pitchman, it was our dream to own a "motorcoach."  To this day, DH snickers when he hears the term.

He wanted to own a Greyhound bus???

Seren
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LJM on January 20, 2008, 08:03:23 AM
The strangest thing is that my hubby should've been much more aware, having lost his distant relative to a religious sect many years ago and being very critical about her gullibility. He fell for the same "meat" served under slightly different dressing. :shock:

I think that whenever someone is in transition and trying to get their sea-legs in a new situation, they are more vulnerable to things that under ordinary circumstances they'd never fall for.

You know that some things are naturally going to be different now, but you don't yet have a handle on HOW, so something that would normally raise a lot of suspicion doesn't raise quite as much. In addition to the positive effects of being determined to make things work, I think it's a state where it's easier to lie to yourself. I know I came dangerously close to falling for some whoppers when I was in transition and struggling to find my feet (both in the form of "employment opportunities" one of which was clearly a scam, the other was at least exceedingly dishonest and a bad deal all around.)

The Amway folks (and assorted other cult groups, scammers, con-artists, and the like) know all this, and so work particularly hard to target people who are in that state.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: baglady on January 21, 2008, 07:25:43 PM
Aha, I learned something from this thread. My boyfriend lost his job in October and in addition to registering with employment agencies, answering ads wherever he can find them, networking, etc., he's posted his resume on all the help-wanted sites. And he keeps getting calls from people who want to "hire" him to sell insurance. He *hates* the very idea of selling and has nothing on his resume that would indicate he's interested in a sales position of any kind, much less insurance.

I never heard of an MLM that sold insurance, but now I'm guessing it's Primerica people making these calls. Vultures.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LadyDyani on January 22, 2008, 06:09:07 AM
Aye.  I've had four calls from Primerica since my unemployment started, as well.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: scap64 on March 19, 2008, 05:59:18 PM
The strangest thing is that my hubby should've been much more aware, having lost his distant relative to a religious sect many years ago and being very critical about her gullibility. He fell for the same "meat" served under slightly different dressing. :shock:

I think that whenever someone is in transition and trying to get their sea-legs in a new situation, they are more vulnerable to things that under ordinary circumstances they'd never fall for.

The Amway folks (and assorted other cult groups, scammers, con-artists, and the like) know all this, and so work particularly hard to target people who are in that state.

Precisely.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Shoo on March 24, 2008, 04:10:45 PM
I have a close friend who just confided that her MK business has cost her and her family something like $50k in debt.  She's got the car, which she's trying to give back, and it's going to cost her around $9k just to get them to take the stupid car back.  Now she's trying to sell off all the inventory she purchased.  She's offering BOGO's and other good deals to try and recoup some of her money.

She was in it around 1.5 years.  She became a "director" and got the car (the entry level Grand Pris or whatever it is).  She did every single thing they ever told her to do.  She sold, she recruited, she held shows.   She sacrificed time with her family and her home life was wrecked.  Her kids are a mess and her dh was threatening to leave her.

The sad part is that she BELIEVED every thing they told her.  She absolutely believed it.  Never questioned it.  Until the walls came tumbling down on the house of cards she had built.

And that's what an MLM will do to you.

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on March 24, 2008, 06:25:21 PM
Oh dear, I'm afraid I let a MK rep sucker me last week. She was one of the vendors at the membership appreciation day my health club was holding. I was just going around to each one, looking at the stuff. And I love little free samples of beauty products, so that is where she got me. I just can't bring myself to say no sometimes, so she got my personal info, such as name, address, email, and phone number. At least I did say no to the free facial, though. However, I fear I am going to get hounded through the other means of communication now, especially since I gave her permission to send me little free samples of some MK stuff.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Just Lori on March 24, 2008, 06:27:59 PM
I was at a jewerly party a few months ago and the topic turned to buying the discontinued jewelry on Ebay.  From there, we discussed other Ebay finds.  I mentioned that I've heard you can get some good deals on Ebay from former Mary Kay consultants who are trying to unload their inventory and recoup their investment.

Wouldn't you know it, there was a Mary Kay consultant at the party.  She quickly pointed out that they don't recommend buying off Ebay, because you should only keep makeup for a year.  Yes, shoe leather left an aftertaste in my mouth that night.   :-[
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on March 24, 2008, 06:45:16 PM
I was at a jewerly party a few months ago and the topic turned to buying the discontinued jewelry on Ebay.  From there, we discussed other Ebay finds.  I mentioned that I've heard you can get some good deals on Ebay from former Mary Kay consultants who are trying to unload their inventory and recoup their investment.

Wouldn't you know it, there was a Mary Kay consultant at the party.  She quickly pointed out that they don't recommend buying off Ebay, because you should only keep makeup for a year.  Yes, shoe leather left an aftertaste in my mouth that night.   :-[

In my experience, people who sell make up tell you that you have to toss it after a year, people who sell motor oil tell you to change it every 3,000 miles, and people who sell shoes tell you to buy new ones every year.  Anyone else detect a common thread here?  Yep, the people who are saying it benefit by having you toss something that was probably perfectly serviceable and buying what they are selling.

Call me cynical, but I'll keep my comfortable shoes until I wear them out, use my make up until it's gone, change my oil every 5,000 miles, and keep my hard earned money in the bank until I really need to spend it.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: My Own World on March 24, 2008, 06:51:16 PM
This is the part that gets me.  If all these MLMs are SO great and wonderful and everyone makes a gazillion dollars, why all the secrecy and subterfuge to get people to attend the danged meetings?

Fifteen years ago, an acquaintance from church asked me to look into this "great, new marketing business" he was starting.  I asked him point blank if this his own up start company or if it was like a franchise of something else.  He assured me he was starting the business for himself.  I went with him to a meeting he was having with some of the people involved in "his" business.  Yep.  Amway.  Our group sat for a ninety minute sales presentation.   After it was over, he came over to me and asked me what I thought about it.  I told him I was shocked that he had lied to me about this being HIS business.  He smiled and said that Amway allows him to set up his own business DBA for his marketing,  so it WAS his own business.  He just did business solely with Amway for his distributor.  I told him that if lying and/or telling half truths was the way he did business, then I was not about to trust him or the organization.  He got mad at me for saying that and did not have much to do with me after that night.

About three years later, another friend asked me to look into his "multilevel marketing" company he was operating.  I asked him outright if it was Amway.  He asked me why I asked him that; and when I responded that I was not interested in dealing with Amway after my experience with the first guy, he laughed and said to trust him that what he wanted to show me was nothing like anything I had seen before.  I agreed to go to his house to see this business.  Yep. Amway again - but this time REVAMPED in its recruiting presentation, so it was "nothing like" what I had seen before.  My friend got a kick out of telling me that.  I left rather quickly.
This friend dropped out of Amway after a few money-losing months.  He later told me that Amway trains people not to let on what it is they are recruiting for because Amway has such a bad reputation.  He said that Amway admitted that if most people knew ahead of time the business was Amway, they would stop the sales pitch and walk away, so Amway was coming up with ways to avoid saying its name.  Some of these involved creative "parties" that never mentioned business until the "guests" arrived.  He also said that he was told that lying about the name was OK as it was for the betterment of the person being recruited and the sales person had the other person's "best interests" at heart.  He told me that from what he experienced, Amway EARNED its poor reputation.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Harriet Jones on March 24, 2008, 10:31:30 PM
I was at a jewerly party a few months ago and the topic turned to buying the discontinued jewelry on Ebay.  From there, we discussed other Ebay finds.  I mentioned that I've heard you can get some good deals on Ebay from former Mary Kay consultants who are trying to unload their inventory and recoup their investment.

Wouldn't you know it, there was a Mary Kay consultant at the party.  She quickly pointed out that they don't recommend buying off Ebay, because you should only keep makeup for a year.  Yes, shoe leather left an aftertaste in my mouth that night.   :-[

In my experience, people who sell make up tell you that you have to toss it after a year, people who sell motor oil tell you to change it every 3,000 miles, and people who sell shoes tell you to buy new ones every year.  Anyone else detect a common thread here?  Yep, the people who are saying it benefit by having you toss something that was probably perfectly serviceable and buying what they are selling.

Call me cynical, but I'll keep my comfortable shoes until I wear them out, use my make up until it's gone, change my oil every 5,000 miles, and keep my hard earned money in the bank until I really need to spend it.

And there's also a difference in *used* makeup that's a year old and new-in-package makeup of the same age.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: mindibrad on March 25, 2008, 08:08:35 AM
I was at a jewerly party a few months ago and the topic turned to buying the discontinued jewelry on Ebay.  From there, we discussed other Ebay finds.  I mentioned that I've heard you can get some good deals on Ebay from former Mary Kay consultants who are trying to unload their inventory and recoup their investment.

Wouldn't you know it, there was a Mary Kay consultant at the party.  She quickly pointed out that they don't recommend buying off Ebay, because you should only keep makeup for a year.  Yes, shoe leather left an aftertaste in my mouth that night.   :-[

MK Corporate and Directors tell their consultants to say that.  The image that they hope to create is one where eBay sellers are wiping their bumm with the makeup right before they list it.

The reality is that many of these sellers are the same as these Directors and Consultants, just a few months/years later.  They are the ones who were told "you can't sell from an empty wagon" and convinced that the only way that they would be successful is with a "full store" of products that are quickly discontinued, revamped and/or repackaged.

The other people selling are MK liquidators, who make their living buying remaining inventories from Consultants looking to cut their losses and don't have the time/energy to eBay it themselves.  And of course, there are the people selling for Directors...the ones who have a unit that is not producing enough for them to maintain their Director status, so they make up the difference on their own credit cards and then try to recoup the money by having a friend sell it for them on eBay.

MK Reps like to say "well, you don't know if the stuff was kept in a hot/freezing car" or whatever "scare tactic conditions" they want to say.  But the truth is, you don't know what conditions under which ANY rep keeps their product.  You just have to trust that the seller (whether an eBay-er or current MK Rep) is providing you with honest and accurate info.

(oh - of course there is the standard disclaimer that if the color/product was discontinued 4 years ago, then you know it is 4 years old.  But if it is a current product in the current packaging, then chances are the item is safe to buy)

Sorry - don't mean to sound ranty - I just know too many people who were bullied/pressured in to spending money on inventory they couldn't afford, then guilted in to keeping it (as opposed to sending it back for the 90% buyback) because their Director (who pressured them to buy it in the first place) would be charged back the commission.  I sold MK for about 6 months, made money (because I never bought in to the "must have a full store" mentality") and got out when I opened my eyes and saw what they were doing to a large portion of the sales force.  I still liked the products - I just refused to have my name associated with a company that silently condoned the horrible tactics of the Directors.

Check out www.pinktruth.com (http://www.pinktruth.com) for more information on the deceptive practices of MK and their sales force

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: ginlyn32 on March 25, 2008, 08:35:45 AM
POD to the nth degree Mindibrad!

I was an MK consultant for about a year. I never sent back my inventory because I bought the lie that I would never be allowed to sell again. Not that I'd want to.

So my DH and I went into to debt so I could get $1,000 of product that I couldn't sell.

I tried everything, right down to cold calling (which we were told not to do). I'm afraid I even made a few etiquette blunders as well (what can I say? I was young and stupid) and pressured friends and family into having parties.

When I finally decided to quit, I never recieved a call from my director or anyone asking me what the problem was. I liked their product and still continued to use it, even after I quit. I stopped using it years ago when it was easier just to go to Estee Lauder or to the drug store.

I was almost conned into Vector (sold Cutco knives) and Primerica (insurance). The thing that made me mad about the both of these org. is that they farm names off Careerbuilder and Monster looking for people who are desperate for a job. Esp. when they pretend it is a legit. job. I asked at least 3 times at my interview if the job was commission or salary and the lady wouldn't answer me. So I walked out of the interview.

Ginger
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Just Lori on March 25, 2008, 10:40:35 AM
My husband's siblings are currently selling machines that scan your finger and tell you how many antioxydants you need.  They'll then graciously offer to sell you the antioxydants, for a few hundred dollars a month.  I did some research on the company for my FIL, because his kids wanted him to buy into it.  The best analysis I read was from someone who said that if this were an amazing medical breakthrough, the company owners would sell the rights to a biotech firm and go retire to Cancun.  They wouldn't be trolling the internet trying to recruit people who want to work at home in their jammies.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on March 25, 2008, 10:46:29 AM
My husband's siblings are currently selling machines that scan your finger and tell you how many antioxydants you need.  They'll then graciously offer to sell you the antioxydants, for a few hundred dollars a month.  I did some research on the company for my FIL, because his kids wanted him to buy into it.  The best analysis I read was from someone who said that if this were an amazing medical breakthrough, the company owners would sell the rights to a biotech firm and go retire to Cancun.  They wouldn't be trolling the internet trying to recruit people who want to work at home in their jammies.

Mr. F and I roll our eyes at the late-night commercials we see selling people opportunities to work at home and make untold wealth in their spare time. "Call and order our success kit today!" they'll say.

We just know that the "success kit" tells people that they can make a ton of money by getting other suckers ...er customers... to buy - you guessed it - "success kits"!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: goblue2539 on March 25, 2008, 03:09:17 PM
Anyone here get suckered into any of the cookware sales from bridal shows?  It was a new one on me, but I'm lucky in that I'm not desperate for the "free" vacation and my fiance always has his laptop available to research at the drop of a hat.  I've gotten three calls in the last month, the last two refusing to say what kind of cookware they were selling, despite being asked point blank at least three times. 

I think it was Regency cookware, but I can't swear to it.  There's another one under the same corporation but by a different name.  If you know anyone who's getting married, give them the warning, please!
Title: Re: The Amway \"housewarming\" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: wolfie on March 26, 2008, 03:06:10 PM
I was almost conned into Vector (sold Cutco knives) and Primerica (insurance). The thing that made me mad about the both of these org. is that they farm names off Careerbuilder and Monster looking for people who are desperate for a job. Esp. when they pretend it is a legit. job. I asked at least 3 times at my interview if the job was commission or salary and the lady wouldn\'t answer me. So I walked out of the interview.

Ginger

I have done the Vector and it is both commission and salary. You get a commission for your sales and if it doesn\'t add up to whatever they say an hour they give you a check to bring you up to that level. I am not a good salesperson so I got that check once and then said never again.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: pollyjean on April 21, 2008, 05:47:49 PM
Had never heard of Amway as I am in UK (though we have many 'you've won a free holiday' type things which end up being time shares through our door each week).

So I looked at the website and noticed there are no prices for anything, just 'contact us for details'. Yeah, so I give you my details and you hound me till I buy something!

Hope this sort of thing doesn't spread over here
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: gadget--gal on April 21, 2008, 06:11:10 PM
Had never heard of Amway as I am in UK (though we have many 'you've won a free holiday' type things which end up being time shares through our door each week).

So I looked at the website and noticed there are no prices for anything, just 'contact us for details'. Yeah, so I give you my details and you hound me till I buy something!

Hope this sort of thing doesn't spread over here

Amway. Marky Kay and Herbalife are all well-known in the UK, they're just not *as big* as in USA., thank goodness. ;)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: MissRose on April 27, 2008, 11:19:22 AM
I remember when I went to Florida with my mother a few years ago, a salesperson approached my mother when we were shopping about seeing timeshares or something then the salesperson asked her where her husband was (my father did not go with us to Disney World).  He then said to my mother sorry can't show them to you as your husband isn't here.   
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Harriet Jones on April 27, 2008, 07:39:32 PM
We were going to talk to a company about buying a whole house water softener, but the only way they'd meet with us is if both of us were at home during regular business hours -- they had no early evening appointments.  That's fine if that's their business model, but what family can afford to have both adults take off work to spend a few hours listening to a hard sell?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Sophia on April 27, 2008, 08:58:52 PM
We were going to talk to a company about buying a whole house water softener, but the only way they'd meet with us is if both of us were at home during regular business hours -- they had no early evening appointments.  That's fine if that's their business model, but what family can afford to have both adults take off work to spend a few hours listening to a hard sell?

That is totally weird.  I used to work for one of those companies and they didn't work during regular business hours, well except for the manager and the installer. 

My advice is to look into it yourself, decide if you want one, then call back and say you want one, you don't want a salesman and therefore you want a huge discount.  If they fuss tell them you'll take one that someone turned in.  My old company used to sell them to people like this and removed the sales commission, which was 1/3.  They never had any that were turned in, but that was their deniability to get everyone from wanting 1/3 off. 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on April 28, 2008, 01:57:27 PM
I remember when I went to Florida with my mother a few years ago, a salesperson approached my mother when we were shopping about seeing timeshares or something then the salesperson asked her where her husband was (my father did not go with us to Disney World).  He then said to my mother sorry can't show them to you as your husband isn't here.   

I think I got us black-listed by all the timeshares in Hawaii.  We used to get nice invitations for lovely weekends on the Neighbor Islands, free condo, car, & airfare, in exchange for a couple hours of hard sell.  Being a civil engineer, I enjoy visiting construction sites, so I didn't mind being driven around the "new units under construction."  I asked uncomfortable questions about how they got their water allocation, where's the sewage treatment plant, etc.  About half way through they start cutting DH & I out of the herd to prevent the contamination from spreading.  We usually get the bum's rush long before they are done with the rest of the group.

Even though we make more money now than we did when we got all these great invitations, they don't send them to us anymore.  Maybe they changed marketing strategies >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: CutebutPsycho on May 04, 2008, 01:00:38 PM
I remember when I went to Florida with my mother a few years ago, a salesperson approached my mother when we were shopping about seeing timeshares or something then the salesperson asked her where her husband was (my father did not go with us to Disney World).  He then said to my mother sorry can't show them to you as your husband isn't here.   

I think I got us black-listed by all the timeshares in Hawaii.  We used to get nice invitations for lovely weekends on the Neighbor Islands, free condo, car, & airfare, in exchange for a couple hours of hard sell.  Being a civil engineer, I enjoy visiting construction sites, so I didn't mind being driven around the "new units under construction."  I asked uncomfortable questions about how they got their water allocation, where's the sewage treatment plant, etc.  About half way through they start cutting DH & I out of the herd to prevent the contamination from spreading.  We usually get the bum's rush long before they are done with the rest of the group.

Even though we make more money now than we did when we got all these great invitations, they don't send them to us anymore.  Maybe they changed marketing strategies >:D

MK I just had to say - you crack me up!  ;D I love asking tough questions as well - particularly when I get the impression people have taken one look at me and assumed I'm some dumb blonde who knows nuthin' about nuthin'.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: buttercup_anne on May 04, 2008, 01:27:13 PM
I had friends who got sucked into an MLM something bad.  They're both fairly intelligent people, but never had any discernable business sense.  So imagine my surprise when I learned that they had BOTH quit their jobs so that they could "work on their business".  Business?  Hmmm...ok, good for them, I thought.  Until they sent me a link to their website.  MLM all the way baby!

I think they finally figured it out and got real jobs again, but oh boy, those few months must have been rough.


My own MLM story:  I met a lady at a church function when I was living in DC. We were talking, and somehow the topic of past experiences came up, and I mentioned that I had dabbled in business and sales a bit.  Well, "interest in business" combined with "young and dumb" (how she must have seen me, I was 22 at the time) to become her inviting me to perhaps join her in her business.  I wasn't really interested, but when she invited me to one of her "company meetings", I said ok.  One never knows when opportunity will knock, right? Riiiiiiiiigggggggghhhhhhhhhtttt.  So, I show up at this "company meeting" and knew the second I got there that I got suckered.  50-60 lost looking souls in a room with a podium and informational pamphlets does not a company meeting make.  It was more like an indoctrination ceremony.  I hightailed it out of there as fast as I could, and never spoke to the woman again.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on May 04, 2008, 07:05:41 PM
Within the past few years, once in a while in the mail I will get an invitation to a FREE DINNER! - but I have to sit through a group such-and-such company meeting about retirement options, investments, etc., etc. other business sales pitches. I love free meals more than anybody, but it's not worth going through the hell of someone trying to sucker me into something.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Suze on May 04, 2008, 07:18:24 PM
oh gads my BIL has been suckered into one after another of these MLM deals.....

right now he is selling some sort of "Juice" (and I really can't remember which one it is - cause I don't care)

now they are declaring bankrupcy and are going to lose the house. (bank foreclosed on it, so they are going to lose it anyway)

so what does my Sister do - go out and buy the man a DVD player so that he can play vidios for people to try to sucker them into either buying this stuff or selling it under him.

Oh it isn't a pyamid scam - you  have a "tree" and sell "upline and downline" he even tried to get his 14 year old grandson to sell at school......

I wouldn't be surprised if my name isn't on his tree just to make it look better for him to sucker other people in on it.

(as if you haven't noticed I really have not a lot of use for BIL)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kareng57 on May 04, 2008, 08:45:21 PM
I remember when I went to Florida with my mother a few years ago, a salesperson approached my mother when we were shopping about seeing timeshares or something then the salesperson asked her where her husband was (my father did not go with us to Disney World).  He then said to my mother sorry can't show them to you as your husband isn't here.   

For time-shares, that's pretty much it.  They want both of a couple there, or it's a no-go.

We usually visit Whistler BC once a year (we live in the Vancouver area) in the summer.  One year, about every half-minute we got stopped by a time-share person.  "Hello, you people seem to live in Vancouver, how would you like.."  We stopped them right there - not only do we have no interest in buying a time-share there, we wouldn't come close to meeting the income requirements.  We couldn't figure out how they knew we lived near Vancouver though, till we finally figured out that Dh was wearing a souvenir-T-shirt that he'd gotten from volunteering at a half-marathon in Vancouver.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kareng57 on May 04, 2008, 08:52:58 PM
Oh dear, I'm afraid I let a MK rep sucker me last week. She was one of the vendors at the membership appreciation day my health club was holding. I was just going around to each one, looking at the stuff. And I love little free samples of beauty products, so that is where she got me. I just can't bring myself to say no sometimes, so she got my personal info, such as name, address, email, and phone number. At least I did say no to the free facial, though. However, I fear I am going to get hounded through the other means of communication now, especially since I gave her permission to send me little free samples of some MK stuff.


Some are really okay.  For a long time I liked their products, till I started reacting to them.  And while the rep did seem to keep a huge inventory, it was nice that she usually had what I wanted right away.  (She'd been with MK about 20 years or so, it probably wasn't bankrupting her).  And she never once tried to recruit me - she said  that she'd never do this unless a client was showing a sincere interest.  After I politely told her I was getting a reaction to too many of the products, she really did accept that.  Other reps might have tried "there's been a re-formulation, you really must try again..." etc.

I do understand about some reps having to off-load the inventory, though.  Someone I knew years ago had a mom who'd been a MK rep for less than a year but still had a huge inventory.  She and her sisters and sisters-in-law always knew what their birthday and Christmas gifts were going to be.  :)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on May 04, 2008, 09:14:07 PM
We usually visit Whistler BC once a year (we live in the Vancouver area) in the summer.  One year, about every half-minute we got stopped by a time-share person.  "Hello, you people seem to live in Vancouver, how would you like.."  We stopped them right there - not only do we have no interest in buying a time-share there, we wouldn't come close to meeting the income requirements.  We couldn't figure out how they knew we lived near Vancouver though, till we finally figured out that Dh was wearing a souvenir-T-shirt that he'd gotten from volunteering at a half-marathon in Vancouver.

When Chip and I are at the beach, we have people sticking their heads out of kiosks ("How you folks doing today?") or even following us around Barefoot Landing trying to get us to listen to their time-share spiels by offering us discount tickets to some of the shows. I always say, "I'm a local," and walk on. And I do consider myself a local, since I'm only four and a half hours away and am down there at least once a year, sometimes oftener, and I just about know the town as well as I do my own. At any rate, I'm a local while I'm there! :D

I simply cannot abide pushy salespeople, no matter what they are selling. And I'm especially tired of those (admittedly hunky) guys who work at kiosks at the mall grabbing my hands, wanting to rub lotion on them. One recently asked me how I cleaned my face. "With soap and water," I answered. "Well, you know how you can smooth out those lines that begin with aging?" he asked.

"Sure," I said. "Botox." And that was that.

Evil Scritzy tends to wander around the mall a lot.  >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Tierrainney on May 04, 2008, 09:17:47 PM
I remember when I went to Florida with my mother a few years ago, a salesperson approached my mother when we were shopping about seeing timeshares or something then the salesperson asked her where her husband was (my father did not go with us to Disney World).  He then said to my mother sorry can't show them to you as your husband isn't here.   

For time-shares, that's pretty much it.  They want both of a couple there, or it's a no-go.



Yup, the few times I go to Vegas with hubby, there are places where he shoos me ahead of him, so we aren't a couple walking in.  He finally explained it was so we wouldn't get mobbed by the time-share people.  They aren't interested in only half a couple and leave us alone.

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: caranfin on May 05, 2008, 09:46:02 AM
oh gads my BIL has been suckered into one after another of these MLM deals.....

right now he is selling some sort of "Juice" (and I really can't remember which one it is - cause I don't care)


I wonder if it's Mona Vie. I attended one their pitches and the lady giving the pitch actually bragged that the guy who started this MIM was one of the founders of Amway. As if that were a good thing.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on May 05, 2008, 01:36:13 PM
oh gads my BIL has been suckered into one after another of these MLM deals.....

right now he is selling some sort of "Juice" (and I really can't remember which one it is - cause I don't care)

now they are declaring bankrupcy and are going to lose the house. (bank foreclosed on it, so they are going to lose it anyway)

so what does my Sister do - go out and buy the man a DVD player so that he can play vidios for people to try to sucker them into either buying this stuff or selling it under him.

Oh it isn't a pyamid scam - you  have a "tree" and sell "upline and downline" he even tried to get his 14 year old grandson to sell at school......

I wouldn't be surprised if my name isn't on his tree just to make it look better for him to sucker other people in on it.

(as if you haven't noticed I really have not a lot of use for BIL)

Ha - I wonder if this company was one of the vendors at my health club, hawking this juice. We have several over time doing this on a regular basis.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: geordicat on May 05, 2008, 02:08:44 PM
oh gads my BIL has been suckered into one after another of these MLM deals.....

right now he is selling some sort of "Juice" (and I really can't remember which one it is - cause I don't care)

now they are declaring bankrupcy and are going to lose the house. (bank foreclosed on it, so they are going to lose it anyway)

so what does my Sister do - go out and buy the man a DVD player so that he can play vidios for people to try to sucker them into either buying this stuff or selling it under him.

Oh it isn't a pyamid scam - you  have a "tree" and sell "upline and downline" he even tried to get his 14 year old grandson to sell at school......

I wouldn't be surprised if my name isn't on his tree just to make it look better for him to sucker other people in on it.

(as if you haven't noticed I really have not a lot of use for BIL)

Ha - I wonder if this company was one of the vendors at my health club, hawking this juice. We have several over time doing this on a regular basis.

I had someone want to sell me a bottle of Noni juice that was supposed to be the cure-all for EVERYTHING.   Why the medical profession didn't know about this cure is beyond me.  ;)  Oh yea.. that's because the medical profession wanted to keep me 'sick' so they could keep taking my money!!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on May 05, 2008, 02:26:35 PM
I had someone want to sell me a bottle of Noni juice that was supposed to be the cure-all for EVERYTHING.   Why the medical profession didn't know about this cure is beyond me.  ;)  Oh yea.. that's because the medical profession wanted to keep me 'sick' so they could keep taking my money!!

Well, hey, remember my massage therapist told me bipolar disorder was caused by dehydration! So maybe that drink IS a cure-all. ;)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Harriet Jones on May 05, 2008, 02:39:15 PM
I think I'd just stay sick if the only cure was a $40 bottle of juice.  :P
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Animala on May 05, 2008, 02:41:17 PM
I had someone want to sell me a bottle of Noni juice that was supposed to be the cure-all for EVERYTHING.   Why the medical profession didn't know about this cure is beyond me.  ;)  Oh yea.. that's because the medical profession wanted to keep me 'sick' so they could keep taking my money!!

Wow I missed that one!! Are you serious?

Well, hey, remember my massage therapist told me bipolar disorder was caused by dehydration! So maybe that drink IS a cure-all. ;)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: blue2000 on May 05, 2008, 02:50:09 PM
I think I'd just stay sick if the only cure was a $40 bottle of juice.  :P

Save the $40. Buy it in the grocery store.

Seriously. Some stores have it, and it is much cheaper. But don't get your hopes up. It is still just juice.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Harriet Jones on May 05, 2008, 02:52:26 PM
I think I'd just stay sick if the only cure was a $40 bottle of juice.  :P

Save the $40. Buy it in the grocery store.

Seriously. Some stores have it, and it is much cheaper. But don't get your hopes up. It is still just juice.

I remember reading that the juice is actually good for something (I don't remember what, though).  It's certainly not a cureall.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Suze on May 05, 2008, 03:12:19 PM
oh gads my BIL has been suckered into one after another of these MLM deals.....

right now he is selling some sort of "Juice" (and I really can't remember which one it is - cause I don't care)


I wonder if it's Mona Vie. I attended one their pitches and the lady giving the pitch actually bragged that the guy who started this MIM was one of the founders of Amway. As if that were a good thing.

I think that's it.....

all I know is when he starts in I tune him out.

the (not so polite word) spent all of Thanksgiving day trying to get us to either buy the crud or sell the crud.

I spent most of the day in the kitchen around the table with the rest of the family that also thinks like I do.....


IT'S JUST JUICE ! ! ! !
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on May 05, 2008, 03:41:46 PM
I had someone want to sell me a bottle of Noni juice that was supposed to be the cure-all for EVERYTHING.   Why the medical profession didn't know about this cure is beyond me.  ;)  Oh yea.. that's because the medical profession wanted to keep me 'sick' so they could keep taking my money!!

Wow I missed that one!! Are you serious?

Well, hey, remember my massage therapist told me bipolar disorder was caused by dehydration! So maybe that drink IS a cure-all. ;)

Seriously. And I laughed at him before I caught myself. (I apologized.)

As I said in the previous thread, I always knew Coke made me feel better. Now I know why! :D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: geordicat on May 05, 2008, 06:21:40 PM
I had someone want to sell me a bottle of Noni juice that was supposed to be the cure-all for EVERYTHING.   Why the medical profession didn't know about this cure is beyond me.  ;)  Oh yea.. that's because the medical profession wanted to keep me 'sick' so they could keep taking my money!!

Wow I missed that one!! Are you serious?

Well, hey, remember my massage therapist told me bipolar disorder was caused by dehydration! So maybe that drink IS a cure-all. ;)

Seriously. And I laughed at him before I caught myself. (I apologized.)

As I said in the previous thread, I always knew Coke made me feel better. Now I know why! :D

I can't drink a whole coke by myself.  My friend at work can't drink a whole one by herself, either, so we always share one.

We joke about "sharing a coke habit"
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Cz. Burrito on May 06, 2008, 08:38:08 AM
I can't drink a whole coke by myself.  My friend at work can't drink a whole one by herself, either, so we always share one.

We joke about "sharing a coke habit"

 ;D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kethria on May 06, 2008, 12:24:08 PM
I think I'd just stay sick if the only cure was a $40 bottle of juice.  :P

Save the $40. Buy it in the grocery store.

Seriously. Some stores have it, and it is much cheaper. But don't get your hopes up. It is still just juice.

Costco has Noni juice for about 9 bucks. It tastes like spoiled cheese. Darling and I bought some and drank it because we didn't want to waste the money. I think his description was that it tasted like baby vomit smelled. :P
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on May 06, 2008, 04:10:50 PM
Within the past few years, once in a while in the mail I will get an invitation to a FREE DINNER! - but I have to sit through a group such-and-such company meeting about retirement options, investments, etc., etc. other business sales pitches. I love free meals more than anybody, but it's not worth going through the hell of someone trying to sucker me into something.
Hence the Robert Heinlein slogan: TANSTAAFL (There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch) >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: sadiemae on June 11, 2008, 09:44:06 AM
Back when my parents had three young children and were avid campers, they "won" a free weekend vacation at an RV park. We went, enjoyed the weekend, then on Sunday morning my parents went to their "appointment," which was a hard sell to purchase the RV campground version of a timeshare. After over an hour in the room with three kids and many firm refusals to purchase, the representative told them that we had fifteen minutes to pack and leave or we would be charged for the whole weekend and every event we attended. We booked out of there to a scene of other campers breaking down camp in a panic. Seems we weren't the only ones told to buy or leave, NOW...  Anyhow, we got out on time. Many people would have been annoyed and would have vowed never to return. Not my mother- she sensed opprotunity...

See, we were outdoorsy campers who hiked and camped in the wild, and these were RV camps, which are basically a field with trailer after trailer lined up. We would never purchase a space in one place, and especially not a space in a field. However, they always had a pool or a well kept pond and activities for the kids, so it was a nice break away form our normal weekend of hiking and trail blazing.

My mother signed up for every RV timeshare she could find. Since they want to sell, they let you pick the weekend you want to stay. She had us booked for random weekends for a good three years. We went all over portions of the northeast for free, camping on Friday & Saturday night. Mom & Dad would head in for the hard sell and the three kids would pack up camp. They would say no, be told to leave and be driving away minutes later.

Finally, they stopped letting us book weekends. We were fine with that. Of course, I don't think what she did was right, but I will say that it was a creative way to beat the hard sell. My mom really is a salesman's worst nightmare.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Just Lori on June 11, 2008, 10:01:13 AM
My husband likes to shop Goodwill.  My daughter shares this love.  They returned from a Goodwill trip the other day and he said, "Look honey, this woman asked me if I wanted a job!"  He showed me her Primerica business card.  He didn't realize it was an MLM organization.

I'm really nervous about anyone who thinks it's good business to offer jobs to strangers, whether they're at a Goodwill store or having dinner in a five-star restaurant.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: My Own World on June 11, 2008, 04:27:56 PM
Of course, I don't think what she did was right, but I will say that it was a creative way to beat the hard sell. My mom really is a salesman's worst nightmare.
I have no problem with what your parents did.  They agreed to attend a sales pitch in consideration for the Friday and Saturday night stay the business offered them.  I doubt seriously that your parents approached the RV time share to ask to be given a free weekend.  I also doubt that at any time they stated they had ANY intention of buying anything, so they did not go due to a lie.  What did they do that was not "right" in your eyes?

The business asked them to come and hear a sales pitch.  They did that.  Contract fulfilled.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Sophia on June 11, 2008, 05:47:09 PM
Of course, I don't think what she did was right, but I will say that it was a creative way to beat the hard sell. My mom really is a salesman's worst nightmare.
I have no problem with what your parents did.  They agreed to attend a sales pitch in consideration for the Friday and Saturday night stay the business offered them.  I doubt seriously that your parents approached the RV time share to ask to be given a free weekend.  I also doubt that at any time they stated they had ANY intention of buying anything, so they did not go due to a lie.  What did they do that was not "right" in your eyes?

The business asked them to come and hear a sales pitch.  They did that.  Contract fulfilled.

I agree.  Plus, It seems to me that the RV park went over the line telling people to leave immediately if they didn't buy. 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: MrsMicah on July 02, 2008, 11:29:49 AM
I have a Rainbow vacuum and it was WELL WORTH the money. My doc even recommends them for his allergy patients. By the way - if you can get your doc to write a note verifying that you need a HEPA filter (or water filter, like a Rainbow) vac because your dust allergies are severe, then you can write the vacuum off as a medical expense. I did.


Until reading this thread, I had no idea that Rainbows were that expensive...or sketchy. My parents were 37 when they got married (first marriage) and had saved up a bit. So I suppose it's less shocking that they'd get such an expensive vacuum.

I can attest to their being very good...I don't know if it was worth the money or not, but it lasted for years and years. Because it's water based, we would use it to suck up termites when we had an infestation. Then they drowned. We'd leave them in there for a while and then dump it into the toilet and flush in case there were survivors. It was quite comforting for dealing with swarmers (my only real childhood memory of that vacuum).

Also really heavy.

One of my friend's wives was recently recruited to sell MonaVie, but she decided to buy it online instead (people getting rid of their products that wouldn't move). I think that's probably the best option for MLM products...if you really want them.

It makes me sad when I see people online who are talking about how they're building their own business, on their way to freedom, etc. Because I know that for most of them it won't work out.

Speaking of Amway and the OP, this site is rather badly designed, but the free ebook about this guy's experience inside Amway is quite illuminating. I read it last year as a part of my fascination with MLM & cults. http://www.merchantsofdeception.com/DOWNLOADBOOK.html

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on July 02, 2008, 11:36:18 AM

Until reading this thread, I had no idea that Rainbows were that expensive... <snip>
I can attest to their being very good...



Cutco knives are also very good - but I object to their marketing practices in much the same way that I object to Rainbow's marketing practices. Both companies use high-pressure tactics, encourage people to trade on their friendships (both suggesting that salespeople tell their friends they "just want to practice their presentation"), and require salespeople to obtain names and phone numbers from the people they present to. A young woman I know who briefly sold Cutco also told me that she was not allowed to receive credit for her sales UNLESS she got 10-15 names and numbers from the buyer.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: NsWife on July 02, 2008, 11:58:38 AM
I got sucked into Mary Kay last year......and, no, I do not have time or desire to sell it or recruit.  I have tons of the stuff.....guess what folks are getting for Christmas  >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Just Lori on July 02, 2008, 02:11:18 PM
My husband's sister was in town last month and wanted to sell us on a new spa treatment that zaps wrinkles from your face.  Now, I'm all about zapping some wrinkles.  But the device is $300 and the assorted lotions are $50, and I just don't have that kind of budget for zapping wrinkles.  I'm more in the L'Oreal wrinkle cream category myself.

I think what I hate most is that these tactics can put you on the spot with people you know and love.  I'd love to support my SIL in this venture. She and my BIL are putting all four kids through college right now.  But I can't buy things I don't want or need.  Besides, I'm a little nervous about a product that basically uses an electronic current to plump up your skin.  I can't see it working well in the long term.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: MrsMicah on July 02, 2008, 02:37:33 PM

Until reading this thread, I had no idea that Rainbows were that expensive... <snip>
I can attest to their being very good...



Cutco knives are also very good - but I object to their marketing practices in much the same way that I object to Rainbow's marketing practices. Both companies use high-pressure tactics, encourage people to trade on their friendships (both suggesting that salespeople tell their friends they "just want to practice their presentation"), and require salespeople to obtain names and phone numbers from the people they present to. A young woman I know who briefly sold Cutco also told me that she was not allowed to receive credit for her sales UNLESS she got 10-15 names and numbers from the buyer.

That's a good point. Even if I had the money, I'd think twice before buying a Rainbow (if they're still available) instead of finding one sold legitimately.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on July 02, 2008, 03:10:04 PM
Cutco knives are also very good - but I object to their marketing practices in much the same way that I object to Rainbow's marketing practices. Both companies use high-pressure tactics, encourage people to trade on their friendships (both suggesting that salespeople tell their friends they "just want to practice their presentation"), and require salespeople to obtain names and phone numbers from the people they present to. A young woman I know who briefly sold Cutco also told me that she was not allowed to receive credit for her sales UNLESS she got 10-15 names and numbers from the buyer.

Exactly. That's how I got sucked in. And as I said, the girl whined when I wouldn't give her names and phone numbers of my other friends (or worse, co-workers!). She said she wouldn't get credit for the sale. I was so sorry for her. Not.

And I still say the shears I bought are no better than Fiskars. In fact, I like my Fiskars better.
Title: Re: The Amway \"housewarming\" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: wolfie on July 02, 2008, 07:52:37 PM

Until reading this thread, I had no idea that Rainbows were that expensive... <snip>
I can attest to their being very good...



Cutco knives are also very good - but I object to their marketing practices in much the same way that I object to Rainbow\'s marketing practices. Both companies use high-pressure tactics, encourage people to trade on their friendships (both suggesting that salespeople tell their friends they \"just want to practice their presentation\"), and require salespeople to obtain names and phone numbers from the people they present to. A young woman I know who briefly sold Cutco also told me that she was not allowed to receive credit for her sales UNLESS she got 10-15 names and numbers from the buyer.

Either she was lying or her manger was lying to her. I did cutco for one summer - I suck as a salesperson and hardly sold anything or got references. And I got a credit for every sale I did.
Title: Re: The Amway \"housewarming\" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on July 02, 2008, 09:21:29 PM


Either she was lying or her manger was lying to her. I did cutco for one summer - I suck as a salesperson and hardly sold anything or got references. And I got a credit for every sale I did.

She had no reason to lie to me.
Title: Re: The Amway \\\"housewarming\\\" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: wolfie on July 03, 2008, 04:03:48 AM


Either she was lying or her manger was lying to her. I did cutco for one summer - I suck as a salesperson and hardly sold anything or got references. And I got a credit for every sale I did.

She had no reason to lie to me.

then her manger was lying or they really changed things. Because when i did it they never even asked me how many references I got. They only wanted a signature on a piece of paper saying I did a demonstration. They advertised as being $14 an hour. So if commissions for 40 presentations didn\'t add to up at least that amount they would cut you a check for the difference. So they wanted some proof that you actually did the demonstrations. I did my 40 and never looked back.
Title: Re: The Amway \\\"housewarming\\\" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on July 03, 2008, 09:38:52 AM

then her manger was lying or they really changed things. Because when i did it they never even asked me how many references I got. They only wanted a signature on a piece of paper saying I did a demonstration. They advertised as being $14 an hour. So if commissions for 40 presentations didn\'t add to up at least that amount they would cut you a check for the difference. So they wanted some proof that you actually did the demonstrations. I did my 40 and never looked back.

If this was more than two years ago, then it's entirely possible they did change things.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: ginlyn32 on July 27, 2008, 10:48:37 PM
Sorta OT:

DH and I were watching TV the other day and a commercial for Amway came on. I didn't even know they had commercials!

Anyway, I said this was a hugh scam and DH disagreed with me. He said "It's a good way to make loads of money" I informed him it was an MLM and he said "Yeah, I know...but you can still make good money at it"

I seriously hope he never gets caught by one of these guys.

Ginger
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on July 27, 2008, 10:52:56 PM
Ginger, your hub should read this thread. Then see what he thinks about Amway!  >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: ginlyn32 on July 27, 2008, 11:51:41 PM
Oh, he'd never do that!

Because he's ALWAYS right! I'll let him find out the hard way! If he ever did want to do something like that.

Ginger
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: bionelly on July 27, 2008, 11:57:59 PM
Sorta OT:

DH and I were watching TV the other day and a commercial for Amway came on. I didn't even know they had commercials!

Anyway, I said this was a hugh scam and DH disagreed with me. He said "It's a good way to make loads of money" I informed him it was an MLM and he said "Yeah, I know...but you can still make good money at it"

I seriously hope he never gets caught by one of these guys.

Ginger

DH has a coworker who swears that not only are MLMs an excellent way to make money, the whole group can make money without anybody ever selling anything, just from recruiting people.  After all, you make money from the people you recruit, and from the people they recruit, and they all make money the same way, so why should any of them ever have to actually make a sale?  He really doesn't understand that the money you're making from recruits comes, at some point, from a customer buying a product.  ::)  He tried to recruit DH by telling him it wouldn't involve any selling, using this line of "logic".
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Brentwood on July 28, 2008, 10:39:33 AM

DH has a coworker who swears that not only are MLMs an excellent way to make money, the whole group can make money without anybody ever selling anything, just from recruiting people.  After all, you make money from the people you recruit, and from the people they recruit, and they all make money the same way, so why should any of them ever have to actually make a sale?  He really doesn't understand that the money you're making from recruits comes, at some point, from a customer buying a product.  ::)  He tried to recruit DH by telling him it wouldn't involve any selling, using this line of "logic".

The money often doesn't come from an end-user purchasing the product. In Mary Kay, for example, the recruiter makes money on what her downline purchases. It doesn't matter if those products ever reach an end-user. That's why unit leaders and directors encourage their consultants to buy inventory ("You can't sell from an empty store!") and also why Mary Kay changes it's product line and design so often. They make money off the backs of the people who shell out money for their own inventory, and when it bottoms out, they're the ones holding the bag with a bunch of often unsellable and/or obsolete product. This is also why you see some people trying to unload their product at garage sales and eBay.

Some people DO make money from Amway (my husband and I know a couple who do, but we have told them in no uncertain terms that we will never join the company nor buy the products), but for every big money maker, there are plenty of people left with nothing, or worse, a pile of debt.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: sisbam on July 28, 2008, 01:38:57 PM
A couple years ago I dated this guy Ray. He got involved in one of these business deals (he has since left, which is a relief - that time was scary). It was a long distance relationship, and I never saw him often. But he knew that business deals and such were off limits to me.

Anyway, he, Kay and Jay went to a bar one night. All three were in the business cult o' death and working in relatively close capacity in some way or another... They see two attractive ladies standing at the bar and decided to strike up conversation.

Jay: Hi ladies!
Ladies: Hi!
*insert chit chat here*
#1: We're waiting on some people...
Jay: Oh yeah?
#2: You could call them clients...
Jay: *eyes growing big at the sight of perfect business opportunity* Oh yeah? You guys are in a business?
Ladies: *giggles* Something like that...

Jay then proceeds to take out his business card and quote from the BCOD Bible Chapter 10, titled Awkward Situations and Why You'll Never Get Any... But That's Okay Because You'll Be Rich. Luckily, Ray had enough sense to grab Jay and explain that these women were escorts.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: asta on September 08, 2008, 07:57:45 AM
My folks (outta their pure greed, imho) got taken by their "Christian" church.  Preacher Man found this dude who was building "Christian homes," where churchin' investors would recieve a huge return on their $20,000 investment.  This was about 15 years ago.

Everybody on the bandwagon!! This "builder" held "investment" meetings in the church, etc.  Where about 2/3 of the congregation gave to this guy.  Well, wouldn't 'ya know it - those churchin homes never got built and this "fine Christian man" disappeared with about half a mil.

What the builder did was encourage the congregation to tell all their friends how they could make an exhorbitant amount of $ on this. 

BTW, my mother would risk getting hit by a bus to pick up a nickel.  She also drags poor dad to every free meal, trip, seminar, where he just turns off his hearing aid.  They're so cheap, they're embarrassing.  After they lost the $20,000, my mother (whose never wrong or makes mistakes) just said it was the Lord's will.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: sbtier on September 09, 2008, 07:17:09 AM
In the past few weeks Amway and Pixar have started running TV commercials in my area.   ::)  I've never seen that before.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Harriet Jones on September 09, 2008, 07:19:21 AM
You mean Quixtar, I hope.  Pixar makes movies  ;)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Scritzy on September 09, 2008, 08:54:47 AM
You mean Quixtar, I hope.  Pixar makes movies  ;)

Now Pixar's a company I wouldn't mind getting involved with. :D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: mikeylou on September 09, 2008, 06:22:25 PM
Two years ago I was visiting a friend in Australia.  A friend of his asked us to come over for BBQ and then a "presentation".  He didn't disguise it was going to be for something, but we got over there early enough to play some pool, eat dinner, then sit down and chat before another friend of his and "Bob" showed up.

It was for some sort of phone service.  I just sat there thinking "how the heck would this really work?" to get friends and family to sign up for it.  You sign up your cell and landline and apparently make and save money, too.  His friend bought into it, but my friend didn't.  "Bob" asked me if I was interested and I just looked at him and opened my mouth for the first time - "I'm just here visiting from the States."  "Bob" left me alone after that.  But I did spend the presentation thinking longingly of the pool table.

I've had family members get sucked into the MLM stuff and some try to suck us in as well.  While I was away at college, my brother bought into Amway.  I came home for break one year and there was all this Amway stuff and people saying "Don't ask".

My aunt bought into Shaklee.  My gma, otoh, bought into their philosophy.  Yeah, I understand that their stuff breaks down easier and you do need certain vitamins and stuff.  But I could not STOMACH taking 24 Alfalfa pills a day.  I still bought the Multi-Vit from her though.  When I was pregnant with DD my doc said that was just as good as any prenatal she could prescribe for me, and didn't have the added bonus of containing something that made my colon stress.

So a few years ago same Aunt invited us over to a friend's house for a party.  My cousins watched DS while we went with her.  It was...  Quixtar.  "No, this isn't Amway" we were told...  We bought into it on the "trial" thing to see what it was like.  Found a few things that weren't overpriced.  [One of which died 16 months later after the warranty expired.]  I didn't even bother to cash the $2 check that came in the mail. 

Last year I went to New Zealand and stayed with a friend of mine.  He was a seller for Usana.  Let me try some of the stuff he had (they have a great citrus shower gel).  Tried to sell me a bit more, but I wasn't going for it.  I'm really picky in my personal products - I have scent allergies and sensitivities.  He did send me home with a bottle of the shower gel (for free).  After I got home he tried to convince me to sign up for a buyer's account so I could get that shower gel discounted ($30/bottle.  yikes), but he suddenly stopped.  He'd decided to cancel his own account.

Same friend, while we were driving back from Rotorua to Auckland stuck one of those promotional tapes.  He apologized for putting it in as he put it in.  It was about some pharmaceutical benefits from some herbs and stuff.  Initially it made me think, had some interesting info, then my eyes glazed over.  He noticed & turned it off.  He never mentioned it again.

Same friend was going to some self-improvement seminars.  I can't remember the name of the company (they do incorporate oriental warriors into their "thing") but he had to have spent about $10k US on the seminars.  Not to mention lodging and transportation, as most were not in NZ (Surfer's Paradise, LA...)  For awhile he really pushed them on me.  "If you can't manage a weekend, go to their 3 hour seminar".  Thing is, their seminars would go from 3 hrs, to 3 days, to 1 week...

It was during one of them he was relaying his experiences.  My opinion was, that if you want to do "good work", you don't have to pay $2k for a seminar that takes you out to hand out lunches.  There were apparently other sorts of things they did, mostly bonding stuff, and one instance where there wasn't a dry eye in the room, talking about personal things.  Sorry, I cannot even conceive of going up in front of strangers and airing my skeletons.  I'll go talk to my shrink for that...

I can't really say if it changed his life much, or me flying out to hang out with him for 2 weeks did.  Shortly after I left he started looking into leaving his solitary man-life.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Cellardoor14 on September 10, 2008, 03:45:14 PM
Quote
Now Pixar's a company I wouldn't mind getting involved with.

Funnily enough I have a good friend who works for Pixar. 
She hates it but says she can't even go into details as she signed a confidentiality agreement.  :)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Harriet Jones on September 10, 2008, 05:02:12 PM
Quote
Now Pixar's a company I wouldn't mind getting involved with.

Funnily enough I have a good friend who works for Pixar. 
She hates it but says she can't even go into details as she signed a confidentiality agreement.  :)

But it always looks so cool in the bonus material ...  :-\
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: sbtier on September 11, 2008, 11:53:41 AM
You mean Quixtar, I hope.  Pixar makes movies  ;)
Ha, ha, yes I meant Quixtar.  I don't think Nemo is running a MLM scheme!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: ginlyn32 on September 12, 2008, 11:37:23 AM
You mean Quixtar, I hope.  Pixar makes movies  ;)
Ha, ha, yes I meant Quixtar.  I don't think Nemo is running a MLM scheme!

But if he was, what would he sell?

Ginger
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: blue2000 on September 12, 2008, 12:35:31 PM
Seashells by the seashore?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: nonesuch4 on September 13, 2008, 10:08:13 PM
I had a colleague who joined Amway.  A couple times a week he tried to sell things to us, his coworkers and captive audience.  Oddly, it was after he "started his own business" that he started stealing money from the store.  Until he got involved with Amway, he was making enough money to cover his bills.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: emeraldsage85 on September 14, 2008, 09:24:49 AM
My mom sold Watkins for a short time in the early 90's. I remember they sent her a "training video" which encouraged you to buy all their products and then sell to your friends and family. I don't think it's as cultish as Amway but they put a lot of pressure on her to give people the hard sell. My mom isn't that type of person so she got out (much to my dad's relief).
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: haggis for the soul on October 14, 2008, 02:20:22 PM
My middle son received in the mail a letter that sounded like a job recruitment letter. He was getting a bit desperate for a job and set up an "interview". I found out they sent the letter to all new grads in the area.

Well I did some checking on the company and it was a MLM that sold knives. the poor guy at the bottom had to pay out $$$ for the demo knives and their own sale contacts all for $15 a sale. Oh, the knives had to be returned when they quit or they would be charged $$$$ more.

We had him cancel the "interview". They kept calling and calling him after he told them that he wasn't interested. They quit calling when I answered the phone and told them that if they continued to call I would call the police.

He has since found a summer job with a landscape company.

My son got a letter like this this past spring.  I think they sent them to all the HS grads.  He called them and was really excited about having an interview, but after he and I talked and he read some things online about Vector, he cancelled his interview.  Whew!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: haggis for the soul on October 14, 2008, 02:48:47 PM
In the past few weeks Amway and Pixar have started running TV commercials in my area.   ::)  I've never seen that before.

I've been seeing Amway and Herbalife commercials in the past few weeks.  I guess they're trying to appear more mainstream.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: downtomarsgirl on October 26, 2008, 12:38:47 PM
That brings up something that I could start another thread on....misleading HELP WANTED ads. I can't tell you how many times I've gone to "sales job" or "new company needs staffing, hiring for all positions" "interviews" that turned out to be a hook for MLMs.

6/23/07

That happened to me a few years ago when I was desperately looking for work. I was very upset when I realized that it was a "cattle call" for sales people. The ad that I answered was for a front office person, paper work. 

It was very maddening because at the time my DH and I were both out of work and were counting every gallen of gas ect.

IC

This happened to a friend very recently!  Now, some of these companies are going through online job seeking sites (i.e. Monster, etc.) and contacting people with profiles. This was a one-on-one interview, but they never asked about oh, her job experience, or anything, nor did they say anything about the work she might be doing.  Furthermore, they told her that if she made it through this interview (Round 1), she would go on to Round 2, which would be a 9-5 "hands-on" kind of deal (in other words, she'd work for an entire day without pay!) She had a weird feeling, and did some online research and lo and behold, this was an MLM type scheme. She, of course, "made it" to Round 2, and declined.    So, especially in this economic downturn, google the companies with whom you have interviews, and make sure they are legit!  Warn your kids/young friends as well, because they seem to be the most vulnerable (and are the most likely, probably, to post on Monster, etc.) 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: downtomarsgirl on October 26, 2008, 12:45:55 PM
I was at a jewerly party a few months ago and the topic turned to buying the discontinued jewelry on Ebay.  From there, we discussed other Ebay finds.  I mentioned that I've heard you can get some good deals on Ebay from former Mary Kay consultants who are trying to unload their inventory and recoup their investment.

Wouldn't you know it, there was a Mary Kay consultant at the party.  She quickly pointed out that they don't recommend buying off Ebay, because you should only keep makeup for a year.  Yes, shoe leather left an aftertaste in my mouth that night.   :-[

In my experience, people who sell make up tell you that you have to toss it after a year, people who sell motor oil tell you to change it every 3,000 miles, and people who sell shoes tell you to buy new ones every year.  Anyone else detect a common thread here?  Yep, the people who are saying it benefit by having you toss something that was probably perfectly serviceable and buying what they are selling.

Call me cynical, but I'll keep my comfortable shoes until I wear them out, use my make up until it's gone, change my oil every 5,000 miles, and keep my hard earned money in the bank until I really need to spend it.

And there's also a difference in *used* makeup that's a year old and new-in-package makeup of the same age.

I agree with all of the above, EXCEPT mascara!  I don't know if it's really only good for 3 months, but anything that close to my eyes, I'm pretty neurotic about. 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Bharris on October 26, 2008, 01:55:51 PM
Kind of ironic that one of the Google ads on this site is for Amway.  ;D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Winterlight on October 27, 2008, 09:28:48 AM
Kind of ironic that one of the Google ads on this site is for Amway.  ;D

I got Amway AND Mary Kay. >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kisu on October 28, 2008, 08:17:22 AM
I was at a jewerly party a few months ago and the topic turned to buying the discontinued jewelry on Ebay.  From there, we discussed other Ebay finds.  I mentioned that I've heard you can get some good deals on Ebay from former Mary Kay consultants who are trying to unload their inventory and recoup their investment.

Wouldn't you know it, there was a Mary Kay consultant at the party.  She quickly pointed out that they don't recommend buying off Ebay, because you should only keep makeup for a year.  Yes, shoe leather left an aftertaste in my mouth that night.   :-[

In my experience, people who sell make up tell you that you have to toss it after a year, people who sell motor oil tell you to change it every 3,000 miles, and people who sell shoes tell you to buy new ones every year.  Anyone else detect a common thread here?  Yep, the people who are saying it benefit by having you toss something that was probably perfectly serviceable and buying what they are selling.

Call me cynical, but I'll keep my comfortable shoes until I wear them out, use my make up until it's gone, change my oil every 5,000 miles, and keep my hard earned money in the bank until I really need to spend it.
And there's also a difference in *used* makeup that's a year old and new-in-package makeup of the same age.
I agree with all of the above, EXCEPT mascara!  I don't know if it's really only good for 3 months, but anything that close to my eyes, I'm pretty neurotic about. 

A friend of mine, who's a beautician, says that you can use unopened makeup that's over 1 year old. Makeup that's been opened and used for over a year mightn't be such a good idea. She says unopened makeup stays good for years, it's just the bacteria and dirt that accumulate in the makeup when using it that make it go bad. I've even heard of only using a mascara for three months...
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Elle on November 03, 2008, 02:29:35 AM
Same friend was going to some self-improvement seminars.  I can't remember the name of the company (they do incorporate oriental warriors into their "thing") but he had to have spent about $10k US on the seminars.  Not to mention lodging and transportation, as most were not in NZ (Surfer's Paradise, LA...)  For awhile he really pushed them on me.  "If you can't manage a weekend, go to their 3 hour seminar".  Thing is, their seminars would go from 3 hrs, to 3 days, to 1 week...

It was during one of them he was relaying his experiences.  My opinion was, that if you want to do "good work", you don't have to pay $2k for a seminar that takes you out to hand out lunches.  There were apparently other sorts of things they did, mostly bonding stuff, and one instance where there wasn't a dry eye in the room, talking about personal things.  Sorry, I cannot even conceive of going up in front of strangers and airing my skeletons.  I'll go talk to my shrink for that...

I can't really say if it changed his life much, or me flying out to hang out with him for 2 weeks did.  Shortly after I left he started looking into leaving his solitary man-life.

I'm LOLing here because I think I know which company you're thinking about. I'm LOLing because I just got back from one of their seminars (if I'm thinking about the right thing). Literally I was sitting in the classroom this morning. And yes, I'm in LA writing this.  ;D

FWIW it is a great organization (pricey, but great). And I have had a lot of benefit from it (maybe not so much from the weepy, woo-woo, happy-clappy bonding part granted). I'll admit it comes off like a MLM scam at first blush, but there's a lot of great stuff in it. Anyway, I'm not telling you this to convince you it's a great deal or try to buy in or anything, i just wanted to assure you that I don't think your friend is being taken advantage of.

At least, not if you're talking about what I think you're talking about.  ;D

PM me, I'm dying to know if we're talking about the same thing.  :)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on November 06, 2008, 06:01:36 PM
Anyone know anything scary or bad about ecommerce? A friend of mine has just gotten involved in it, and he wants me and his other friends to hear about it. I don't know a thing about it. Legit, or another cult-like thing such as Primerica or Amway?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: atirial on November 06, 2008, 09:51:37 PM
Anyone know anything scary or bad about ecommerce? A friend of mine has just gotten involved in it, and he wants me and his other friends to hear about it. I don't know a thing about it. Legit, or another cult-like thing such as Primerica or Amway?
ecommerce is a whole field, and lots of MLMs have an ecommerce arm. Do you know which specific company he's involved with?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on November 07, 2008, 09:47:55 AM
I don't. He said it was a company that teaches people how to shop online. I would attend some two-hour meeting with him and this business guy who would tell me all about it and see if I wanted to get involved. I trust my friend that this is legit, but I still want to know for sure.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Harriet Jones on November 07, 2008, 10:15:55 AM
I don't. He said it was a company that teaches people how to shop online. I would attend some two-hour meeting with him and this business guy who would tell me all about it and see if I wanted to get involved. I trust my friend that this is legit, but I still want to know for sure.

Honestly, I can't see where this would be a big money maker. Wouldn't someone just ask a friend if they need help? Online shopping isn't that complicated. 

Or is it a seminar on how to shop at a particular vendor/MLM?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Animala on November 07, 2008, 10:40:16 AM
OK, that sounds like one of the silliest ideas ever.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: caranfin on November 07, 2008, 01:59:02 PM
I don't. He said it was a company that teaches people how to shop online.

Yes, I'm sure that's what he was told to tell people.  ::)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on November 07, 2008, 02:08:26 PM
I don't know. But I don't think I'm interested enough to want to attend this meeting thing. Now the hard part is telling him, as he is rather pushy, although a good friend.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: LJM on November 16, 2008, 10:15:19 PM
I don't know. But I don't think I'm interested enough to want to attend this meeting thing. Now the hard part is telling him, as he is rather pushy, although a good friend.

I was reading someone on another forum who said they got sucked into a scam involving a company that "taught people how to search online". That particular one turned out to be a load of crock once you scratched below the surface-- but I have no way of knowing if this is the same one or not.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Just Lori on November 17, 2008, 05:29:14 AM
Re:  the e-commerce meeting.

It could be this:
http://www.multilevelstore.com/

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kingsrings on November 17, 2008, 12:11:01 PM
Hmm....I am wondering if that was what he was talking about. Do you know anything more about this, specifically whether it is a scam or not?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Harriet Jones on November 17, 2008, 12:23:03 PM
Even if it isn't a scam, it's pretty hard to make much $$ with a MLM. http://www.skepdic.com/mlm.html
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Just Lori on November 17, 2008, 04:17:21 PM
Hmm....I am wondering if that was what he was talking about. Do you know anything more about this, specifically whether it is a scam or not?

I do not.  However, I would proceed cautiously.  Aside from a few Mary Kay women in pink cars, I know precious few people who've succeeded in MLMs and quite a few who have lost money.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Shoo on November 17, 2008, 09:59:18 PM
Hmm....I am wondering if that was what he was talking about. Do you know anything more about this, specifically whether it is a scam or not?

I do not.  However, I would proceed cautiously.  Aside from a few Mary Kay women in pink cars, I know precious few people who've succeeded in MLMs and quite a few who have lost money.

And even those Mary Kay ladies who manage to get the car are in up to their eyeballs in debt for their inventories they had to purchase.  And the cars are leased for them.  If they decide to quit the business, they have to pay off the balance of their leases.  A friend of mine had to pay over $9,000 to get out, when she turned her car in.  That doesn't include the cost of the inventory she had to get rid of.  She lost a bundle.  It's going to take a long time for her to recover financially.  Mary Kay is the debbil.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Just Lori on November 18, 2008, 05:26:40 AM
Hmm....I am wondering if that was what he was talking about. Do you know anything more about this, specifically whether it is a scam or not?

I do not.  However, I would proceed cautiously.  Aside from a few Mary Kay women in pink cars, I know precious few people who've succeeded in MLMs and quite a few who have lost money.

And even those Mary Kay ladies who manage to get the car are in up to their eyeballs in debt for their inventories they had to purchase.  And the cars are leased for them.  If they decide to quit the business, they have to pay off the balance of their leases.  A friend of mine had to pay over $9,000 to get out, when she turned her car in.  That doesn't include the cost of the inventory she had to get rid of.  She lost a bundle.  It's going to take a long time for her to recover financially.  Mary Kay is the debbil.

I didn't know that about Mary Kay.

We have two couples in our family who are always pursuing the MLM that's going to make them rich.  Coincidentally, these are the only two couples in the family who ever filed for bankruptcy.   The one husband is always traveling for his "businesss."  We thought, well maybe he's making a go at this one - after all, he is a chiropractor and the MLM involves supplements and other medical devices.   Maybe he has a winning combination.  I did a little research and discovered that this company requires a lot of training seminars, all on your own dime.  It's no wonder they can't make any money.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Sara Crewe on November 18, 2008, 02:25:11 PM
Hmm....I am wondering if that was what he was talking about. Do you know anything more about this, specifically whether it is a scam or not?

I do not.  However, I would proceed cautiously.  Aside from a few Mary Kay women in pink cars, I know precious few people who've succeeded in MLMs and quite a few who have lost money.

And even those Mary Kay ladies who manage to get the car are in up to their eyeballs in debt for their inventories they had to purchase.  And the cars are leased for them.  If they decide to quit the business, they have to pay off the balance of their leases.  A friend of mine had to pay over $9,000 to get out, when she turned her car in.  That doesn't include the cost of the inventory she had to get rid of.  She lost a bundle.  It's going to take a long time for her to recover financially.  Mary Kay is the debbil.

I vaguely looked into Mary Kay, which is just starting to try to break into the UK market (I decided that selling wasn't for me whether MLM or not).  One of the first sites I found was pinktruth.com which convinced me I wasn't going anywhere near it!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: SilverOrb on March 26, 2013, 09:39:42 AM
Anyone here get suckered into any of the cookware sales from bridal shows?  It was a new one on me, but I'm lucky in that I'm not desperate for the "free" vacation and my fiance always has his laptop available to research at the drop of a hat.  I've gotten three calls in the last month, the last two refusing to say what kind of cookware they were selling, despite being asked point blank at least three times. 

I think it was Regency cookware, but I can't swear to it.  There's another one under the same corporation but by a different name.  If you know anyone who's getting married, give them the warning, please!

CRUD MONKEYS! it was a scheme! They tried to get me... I told them it seemed too good to be true. Then they refused to meet with me without my fiance. Hahahaha nope!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Emmy on March 27, 2013, 01:15:47 PM
I had my own experience with Amway/Quixtar.  I mostly bought the products for myself at the discount, and passed the catalogs around to friends or family (most people didn't order citing the stuff was too expensive and much of it could be purchased at the store for cheaper).  I hate being pushed and hate pushing other people.  I was skeptical and didn't subscribe to the 'sell your soul to Amway' mentality and didn't go the expensive conferences buy the tapes, ect. they were trying to push.  I did waste a few Saturdays sitting through meetings at people's houses and evenings after work traveling 20 minutes one direction to pick up my deliveries.  Personally I find doing work with my hands that is guaranteed to earn money much more satisfying that trying to push product/recruitment onto people which is not guaranteed to make money.  Selling, managing several downlines, ect. is also a time consuming job that usually doesn't pay as much as a real job (except for the few at the top of the pyramid).

Many of these MLM's seem to work through churches.  In the Bible, it says 'the love of money leads to all kinds of evil' and not to covet, yet so many uplines try to entice potential downlines by telling them they will be rich, rich, rich and showing them brochures of fancy houses, vacations, and cars.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: jedikaiti on March 28, 2013, 01:16:37 AM
Anyone here get suckered into any of the cookware sales from bridal shows?  It was a new one on me, but I'm lucky in that I'm not desperate for the "free" vacation and my fiance always has his laptop available to research at the drop of a hat.  I've gotten three calls in the last month, the last two refusing to say what kind of cookware they were selling, despite being asked point blank at least three times. 

I think it was Regency cookware, but I can't swear to it.  There's another one under the same corporation but by a different name.  If you know anyone who's getting married, give them the warning, please!

CRUD MONKEYS! it was a scheme! They tried to get me... I told them it seemed too good to be true. Then they refused to meet with me without my fiance. Hahahaha nope!

I keep getting calls about Ameri-something from bridal shows. I saw their cookware, and knives, and wedding bands at the shows. The bands look good, but I could buy them for about 1/4 the price on Amazon, and DF, being a chef, would laugh at me and leave if I brought home the garbage knives & cookware. :-) OK, he wouldn't leave, but he'd laugh. Especially if I paid money for any of it.

Mary Kay reps are EVERYWHERE when you're planning a wedding. They make me glad I signed up for a special Google Voice # for wedding planning stuff.

I have a few Cutco knives - Mom knew someone who was selling them, and got guilt-tripped into buying some about the same time I moved into my first real apartment on my own. Great knives, they have served me well for years. Way better than the Ginsu that were acquired for me at a Berkshire-Hathaway shareholder's convention because they're better than nothing. Not a lot better, but they work when you're young and first starting out on your own.

Once, when I was young and unemployed, a friend referred me to an acquaintance who needed occasional computer help. She ended up needing weekly help, and I started charging her whatever would get me out of her house without owing her change later (she paid with only $100 bills, and I never carried cash). She sold something involving magnets and water filters and tried to sell me on it. Uh, no.

Another friend used to sell the jewelry (I think the same line that's been mentioned earlier in the thread), but gave it up as buying the samples to show people was just way too much $. She now sells a non-MK makeup line that doesn't require buying stock up front - they ship right to the customer. It's some pretty nice stuff, and no more expensive than the department store makeup, so I usually buy what little I use from her. And DH adores their men's products - work great on his skin. It helps that she's not the type to do the full Kool-aid hard-sell recruitment thing. If you're interested, she'll help you out. If not, no worries!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Waterlight on April 22, 2013, 09:24:53 PM
I have a close friend who sells Pampered Chef and have bought a couple of things from her--but they're things I would've bought anyway, and, like jedikaiti's friend, she's not the type to do high-pressure sales or recruitment tactics.  She is also very honest about the sales parties she hosts; she'll tell you right up front that it's a Pampered Chef party. 

That's nothing at all like the experience I had with Amway in the fall of 1995:

I was "prospected" while walking home from the grocery store. The nice man who offered to help carry my bags talked to me about an opportunity to start my own business. It sounded pretty good. I was recently out of school, and looking for work. We exchanged phone numbers.

I called him back, and we arranged to meet at a coffee shop on a Sunday afternoon to discuss this "opportunity." He drew the circles, quoted some statistics, and asked me about my "dream."

Several things bothered me. When the guy drew the circles for me, he commented, "Some people will look at this and say, 'pyramid.' But then, aren't most businesses structured that way?" He emphasized the legality and honesty of "the business"--which until then I hadn't thought to question. Methinks the man did protest too much!  ::)

He also equated "being successful" with making money. The elderly and the poor were "burdens." Diamonds and furs could be mine if I joined the business. He asked me what I would be willing to give up for all those material goods.

What bothered me most was that his personal story sounded entirely too much like a religious testimony. It can be summed up in a few sentences: 1. I was once just like you; 2. Here's what I was doing (exaggerating how awful, boring, etc. it was, of course) before I "got saved" by the business; 3. I had doubts at first, but 4. once I was "saved," it changed my life; 5. My life is wonderful now, and yours can be too!  (I already have a religion--I don't need another.)

Only at the end of the story was Amway mentioned.

He encouraged me to "check the facts" and listen to some tapes. I passed on the tapes, but said I would check the facts, and call him back once I had. I never did call him.

In the course of "checking the facts" I found several books and Web pages critical of Amway, and was horrified at what I found out. The "personal story" I'd heard had been plagiarized from an Amway tape.  I had a 99%+ chance of losing money I could ill afford to lose. (At the time, I was living on a grocery budget of about $20 per week.  Just to give you an idea...)  And in order to "be successful" in Amway, I would have had to give up all the things in my life that were and are central to who I am--my faith, my family, my friends, my writing, my music--in order to "show the plan" five or six nights a week.

In short, it was not worth it.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on April 24, 2013, 02:25:14 PM
And in order to "be successful" in Amway, I would have had to give up all the things in my life that were and are central to who I am--my faith, my family, my friends, my writing, my music--in order to "show the plan" five or six nights a week.

In short, it was not worth it.
When I started community college, I had a female friend who asked me to go with her to a Life Springs event.  She was younger than I was and did not have any direction.  In contrast, I took leave of absence from my full time job with Hewlett Packard to get my engineering degree so I could advance professionally.  The LS spin doctors tried to convince me that I needed to drop out of school and commit myself to LS so I could "realize my dreams."  I told him I was already busy realizing my dreams and I wasn't going to let him or LS get in my way. >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: MommyPenguin on April 24, 2013, 09:27:59 PM
Anybody know about those other party sales companies?  I have a couple of friends who seem to be doing something called "31."  And then of course there's Pampered Chef, and now Usbourne books is doing it, too.  Do the party sales count as MLMs?  Just curious.  I have a few things from Pampered Chef because people have gone to the parties and bought me things.  I love Usbourne books, but I'd rather buy off Amazon.  :)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: hyzenthlay on April 24, 2013, 09:46:09 PM
Do the party sales count as MLMs? 

They share the characteristics of promising vendors more than can ever be achieved. And they oversaturate their markets and the vast majority of people won't make any money. The real test of an MLM is how hard is a vendor pushed to sign up more vendors.

Pampered Chef is kinda midway, Cutco is pretty close to an MLM, Mary Kay not so much.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Harriet Jones on April 25, 2013, 06:09:12 AM
Anybody know about those other party sales companies?  I have a couple of friends who seem to be doing something called "31."  And then of course there's Pampered Chef, and now Usbourne books is doing it, too.  Do the party sales count as MLMs?  Just curious.  I have a few things from Pampered Chef because people have gone to the parties and bought me things.  I love Usbourne books, but I'd rather buy off Amazon.  :)

Yes, they're MLMs, but IME they're not as obsessed with the downline as others may be.

And "31" is tote bags and purses.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Just Lori on April 25, 2013, 06:19:13 AM
Some MLMs are more focused on products; others are more focused on adding others to the downline, attending seminars (that you pay for) and buying books (that you pay for.)  I'm also wary of MLMs that peddle miracle cures.  I've seen too many people go broke trying to buy their miracle.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: rose red on April 25, 2013, 09:20:04 AM
Years ago, I was at a coworker's house (we were also kind of friends) and she showed my a catalog of furniture and said she and her husband were going "into business for themselves."  Then she played some motivational tapes with some guy telling the listener/members how they can get to "diamond" status and have all the money they deserve (you can hear a large audience cheering in the background).  This coworker told me it's not a pyramid scheme because she knows about those and this is not it. ::)  I don't remember what the company is called.

I just kept my mouth shut.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Just Lori on April 25, 2013, 05:13:32 PM
I think you've hit on what I really don't like about MLMs.  They are the cause of so many awkward conversations.  For instance, I was having some health concerns, and my neighbor came over to ask how I was doing.  She sounded very interested and sympathetic, and then she launched into a discussion of this awesome juice she sells and how it cures everything.  I was left wondering if she really cared how I felt, or if she just wanted to sell me some juice.

Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Klein Bottle on April 28, 2013, 06:46:32 PM
Do the party sales count as MLMs? 

They share the characteristics of promising vendors more than can ever be achieved. And they oversaturate their markets and the vast majority of people won't make any money. The real test of an MLM is how hard is a vendor pushed to sign up more vendors.

Pampered Chef is kinda midway, Cutco is pretty close to an MLM, Mary Kay not so much.

Really?  I always thought Mary Kay was a classic example of an MLM.  Anyone I have ever encountered who was involved with it seemed to be as interested in recruiting as in selling cosmetics. 
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: hyzenthlay on April 29, 2013, 12:49:05 AM
Do the party sales count as MLMs? 

They share the characteristics of promising vendors more than can ever be achieved. And they oversaturate their markets and the vast majority of people won't make any money. The real test of an MLM is how hard is a vendor pushed to sign up more vendors.

Pampered Chef is kinda midway, Cutco is pretty close to an MLM, Mary Kay not so much.

Really?  I always thought Mary Kay was a classic example of an MLM.  Anyone I have ever encountered who was involved with it seemed to be as interested in recruiting as in selling cosmetics.

Could just be differing experiences, I've known about 5 sellers, and none of them were interested in signing me up, or really in doing anything other then ordering for themselves, and you know, if you want something let me know, I'll place an order in a week or so . . . it was just a side line for them.

I didn't get the impression that the Mary Kay organisation pushed the downstream recruiting, but maybe I have mostly known people too laid back to care  ;D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: dawbs on April 29, 2013, 07:26:35 AM
Do the party sales count as MLMs? 

They share the characteristics of promising vendors more than can ever be achieved. And they oversaturate their markets and the vast majority of people won't make any money. The real test of an MLM is how hard is a vendor pushed to sign up more vendors.

Pampered Chef is kinda midway, Cutco is pretty close to an MLM, Mary Kay not so much.

Really?  I always thought Mary Kay was a classic example of an MLM.  Anyone I have ever encountered who was involved with it seemed to be as interested in recruiting as in selling cosmetics.

Could just be differing experiences, I've known about 5 sellers, and none of them were interested in signing me up, or really in doing anything other then ordering for themselves, and you know, if you want something let me know, I'll place an order in a week or so . . . it was just a side line for them.

I didn't get the impression that the Mary Kay organisation pushed the downstream recruiting, but maybe I have mostly known people too laid back to care  ;D

I think that this is key.
I've known people who have a 'personal account' to sell Amway--as in, they and 2 or 3 of their friends want the laundry soap so one of them 'officially' is a seller and supplies and no one is ever pushy.  So the exact opposite of what I consider the 'typical' Amway person.
I've also known avon/mary kay/etc people who fit both ends of the spectrum.
(IME, I've found more Mary Kay people who push pink kool-aid than not, but that may just be the luck of my draw.  Although thepinktruth.com ssays that it may not be that unusual)
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Shoo on April 29, 2013, 08:50:54 AM
Do the party sales count as MLMs? 

They share the characteristics of promising vendors more than can ever be achieved. And they oversaturate their markets and the vast majority of people won't make any money. The real test of an MLM is how hard is a vendor pushed to sign up more vendors.

Pampered Chef is kinda midway, Cutco is pretty close to an MLM, Mary Kay not so much.

Really?  I always thought Mary Kay was a classic example of an MLM.  Anyone I have ever encountered who was involved with it seemed to be as interested in recruiting as in selling cosmetics. 

It absolutely IS an MLM.  I know someone who nearly lost EVERYTHING because of Mary Kay.  It's one of the worst, IMO.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: alkira6 on April 29, 2013, 09:20:13 AM
I'm kind of iffy about MLM - everyone I know now who sells got into more to order their own stuff and score the occassional freebie.  I used to "sell" melaluca just to order for myself.  I would place orders for other people when they asked me about it, I was never about the "sell sell sell" push that everyone else seemed to be. No one ever pushed me to recruit either.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: DianeRN on April 30, 2013, 11:32:40 AM
I was briefly in MK. It is definitely an MLM. The emphasis is on how much the MK "consultant" orders to keep well stocked, not so much on how much he/she sells. Each person above the consultant gets a percentage of the value of whatever he/she orders. And heavy emphasis on recruiting.

I have bought several "31" bags and really like them. I have not had any kind of pushiness from their people.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Lillie82 on May 01, 2013, 12:26:53 PM
I have a verse from John Conlee's "Domestic Life," stuck in my head:

Our neighbors' names are Fred and Ruth
He wears a lot of leisure suits

She sells Avon and Tupperware too,
We're always ducking all the bull they shoot

I never thought the reason they were shooting bull was BECAUSE they were selling Avon and Tupperware....

Now I'm curious about Avon and Tupperware, which haven't been mentioned in this thread yet.

For a long time it seems like those were the products famously sold by people (especially women) who didn't have regular jobs.  Now the song was written back in the 70s. Maybe the market wasn't saturated then?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: ladyknight1 on May 01, 2013, 01:20:20 PM
DH's cousin sells Cutco and will drive anyone batty with sales pitches.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Emmy on May 03, 2013, 09:32:36 PM
I'm kind of iffy about MLM - everyone I know now who sells got into more to order their own stuff and score the occassional freebie.  I used to "sell" melaluca just to order for myself.  I would place orders for other people when they asked me about it, I was never about the "sell sell sell" push that everyone else seemed to be. No one ever pushed me to recruit either.

I was also involved with Melaluca to use the products.  I have the same experience as you.  Nobody pushed me to recruit or sell, and they don't seem to have the vast array of endless meetings that I hear about from many MLM's.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Lillie82 on May 24, 2013, 09:56:44 PM
The other night at an event I met someone selling Tastefully Simple (food) products. She had samples which were very good. Since there was a sign on the table, "Start your business for as little as $70," I assume it's probably and MLM, so having read this thread I felt guilty about ordering a dip which I like. But she didn't pressure me to become a seller and in fact said, "It's not for everybody." Which isn't something a really brainwashed person would say.

Also, she had to place orders - which means she hadn't bought a ton of inventory.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: magician5 on May 24, 2013, 11:33:52 PM
So many equivocal statements here about various MLM methods ("Well it's not really a pyramid scheme, and my sister just does it to get discount product...")

You may be interested in a good restatement of the empty promises behind all of these plans (WARNING: LANGUAGE, NUDITY, DELIBERATE IN-YOUR-FACE OFFENSE) in an episode of Penn & Teller's "Bull****"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep3pO7X7fEQ
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: OSUJillyBean on October 03, 2013, 03:26:27 PM
Dredging up an old thread to tell this story:

I graduated college in  May 2008, right before the big economic downturn.  I am also not a strong interviewer and was working part-time at a JCPenneys to pay bills.  After helping a customer, she said she was impressed with my customer service and asked for my phone number so her husband could give me an interview.  I was beyond excited!!

You guessed it - MLM.  It was Primerica and it wasn't until well into the stage 1 interview that I realized I had no interest in bothering my friends and family and this wouldn't be a good fit for me.  The recruiter guy was surprisingly okay with that in person but continued to call afterwards.   He even wanted to talk to my boyfriend as "It's a family decision.:  Which I took to mean "Your lack of male reproductive parts makes you inferior and incapable of making big decisions.  Please let me speak with your assigned male person."

Soooo glad I got out of there!

My cousin pulled a bait-and-switch amway-type "housewarming party" during college and it made me look at him in a different light for years that he would lie to get us to visit and then try to hard sell us and several others his company's products.  I've heard through the family grapevine that he lost BIG on that scheme.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Twik on October 03, 2013, 03:49:31 PM
It was Primerica and it wasn't until well into the stage 1 interview that I realized I had no interest in bothering my friends and family and this wouldn't be a good fit for me.  The recruiter guy was surprisingly okay with that in person but continued to call afterwards.   He even wanted to talk to my boyfriend as "It's a family decision.:  Which I took to mean "Your lack of male reproductive parts makes you inferior and incapable of making big decisions.  Please let me speak with your assigned male person."

What did he expect, your boyfriend would *make* you take the job?
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Midnight Kitty on October 03, 2013, 03:51:51 PM
My cousin pulled a bait-and-switch amway-type "housewarming party" during college and it made me look at him in a different light for years that he would lie to get us to visit and then try to hard sell us and several others his company's products.  I've heard through the family grapevine that he lost BIG on that scheme.
I met a woman at a professional seminar.  We are both civil engineers.  She expressed an interest in staying in touch.  I was new to the area, so I thought "Can't have too many friends, right?"  DH & I met her, her husband, and their young son at a restaurant for dinner once.  Then she and her husband suggested meeting at our home so she could show me a new makeup look.  They didn't bring their son.

It was the classic amway bait & switch: Don't you want to belong to a Fortune 500 company?  You can buy everything you need for your house and yourself from Amway and save lots of money.  The more you buy, the more you save.  The name "amway" wasn't mentioned for the first half hour.

After they left, my husband said, "Become an Amway distributor and join the NFL - No Friends Left." >:D
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: OSUJillyBean on October 03, 2013, 04:14:32 PM

What did he expect, your boyfriend would *make* you take the job?

Like I said, I got the impression this guy was a sexist and that my boyfriend was somehow in charge of my employment and could make these decisions for me.

Unfortunately for him, my then-boyfriend (now DH) told the guy some very non-ehell-approved things he could do with his anatomy and hung up on him.  It might have been rude but it got the job done!  We didn't get any more calls after that.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: ladyknight1 on October 03, 2013, 05:25:59 PM
I currently have three groups of friends involved with three different MLM organizations.

Beware of Ad-vo-care (added dashes to prohibit ads), Meta-boliq, and Slum-ber parties. I guess a new one pops up every day!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: kherbert05 on October 03, 2013, 05:34:59 PM
I have SHOCKED at how many teachers get involved with this nonsense. There is always a catalog party going on with someone. I always reply to the email with


"This is my work address. Please only send me information related to work. To contact me about outside issues/events please e-mail me @ google email."
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: alkira6 on October 03, 2013, 06:47:54 PM
I currently "sell" AVON.  I do it for me and a couple of friends just to get the kickbacks and ultracheap samples.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: AnaMaria on October 03, 2013, 10:07:06 PM
I only read the OP but felt compelled to say: I have been an amway rep for years now because they have great products, but my uplines have repeatedly emphasized proper sharing etiquette to us: Do not share the Amway business plan at your job on company time, do not try to recruit strangers unless some wild circumstance opens the door for you to do so (i.e. someone comes up to you and says, "Is that Artistry lipgloss you have??  Where did you buy it; I've been looking for someone to sponsor me in Amway!"), and do NOT try to share the Amway plan under false pretenses.  I recruited my strongest downline after she tried one a product (some hand lotion that I offered her at work) and she asked me where I'd purchased it because she really liked it.  I ended up telling her about my Amway business and she wanted to get her own business started. 

Sadly, some people are so desperate to build their businesses that they will forgo these guidelines and do whatever they want to do.  Recently, I had a pile of strangers contacting me over facebook and linkedin saying I seemed like a really "sharp" person and asking if I was interested in a new business opportunity.  I'm almost positive they were with Amway or a similar business.  They are being completely superficial by calling me "sharp"- all they can see, since my profiles are set to private, is my picture, my name, and my status of "Grad Student At University X."  If they could see my profile, they would see that I already have an Amway business!!!  They are just trying to recruit me because they know I'm a student and are assuming I'm desperate for money and will take on any new "business opportunity."

So, let me apologize on behalf of people like the couple described in the OP.  Rest assured that this is NOT how Amway or any other multi-level marketing business is supposed to be run, and that people who run their businesses in such a manner are sure to fall flat!
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: AfleetAlex on October 04, 2013, 08:39:59 AM
I once had a Mary Kay consultant friend of mine/eventual coworker ask me to sell and when I said no, she said, "Don't you want to help people?"  :o My startled response was, "I'm a (insert job here). I help people every day."

She was hired in for sales at our company, and then her bosses got complaints that she was selling both our company product AND Mary Kay at her sales meetings. She was eventually fired.
Title: Re: The Amway "housewarming" party (FauxPasofYear1114-06)
Post by: Knitterly on October 04, 2013, 11:54:53 AM
I currently "sell" AVON.  I do it for me and a couple of friends just to get the kickbacks and ultracheap samples.

I don't think Avon really counts as a MLM.  First, there is a very definite organization to this company.  President, CEOs, VPs, Division managers, and district managers.  The startup cost is ridiculously low (it costs $10 to start up, and that just covers the cost of your brochures, plus you usually get a ton of free stuff - most of the people I know sign up to get the free stuff and then never sell anything).  You do have the opportunity to develop a team of representatives and some managers push that, but it's not necessary.  The money doesn't all come from the people below you on your team, and you can do perfectly fine and make a decent income without every once having recruited anyone.  And you can't just recruit people.  You actually have to sell the product, too, in order to be considered... you know... a sales rep.  ;)  It's more like a commission-only job.  Not much different than selling cars or clothes on commission.

I like love Avon.  I buy it all the time.  I am one of those golden "order every campaign" customers.  Even being a salaried manager with all the office politics didn't kill my love of the actual product.  ;) 

The other night at an event I met someone selling Tastefully Simple (food) products. She had samples which were very good. Since there was a sign on the table, "Start your business for as little as $70," I assume it's probably and MLM, so having read this thread I felt guilty about ordering a dip which I like. But she didn't pressure me to become a seller and in fact said, "It's not for everybody." Which isn't something a really brainwashed person would say.

Also, she had to place orders - which means she hadn't bought a ton of inventory.
This kind of sounds like Epicure, which is also not a MLM.  Order the dips.  Like them.  Enjoy them.  Just because they offer you the opportunity to sell and get your stuff at a discount, doesn't mean it's a MLM.

I think it's important to distinguish between catalog companies and MLMs.  With an MLM, you CAN'T make money unless you recruit people.  Recruiting people is how you make your money.  Catalog companies do operate in the home-selling model, which is different from a MLM.

I sell Epicure Selections, which is a Canadian company that makes dip mixes and stuff.  The startup fee was kind of steep, but I buy it all the time and LOVE it.  My friends who like it order through me and I do a big order twice a year.  The commission is a flat rate (30%) and you don't have to keep inventory.  If you sign other people up, you get something like 1-3% on their orders.  Really minimal.  The bulk of your commission comes from your own hard work.
A friend sells Norwex.  Norwex is a cleaning-supplies company and again, their product is really amazing.  It looks expensive on the surface, but it lasts and lasts and lasts and lasts...like, forever.  It's great stuff.  And again, the bulk of your commission comes from your own hard work and sales.

My sister in law sells Shaklee.  Shaklee is totally a MLM.  She hates when I try give her orders because she doesn't get anything for it.  She wants me to place my own orders because that's the only way she can get paid.  But I don't want an account.  I just want the fabric softener once in a while because I like the way it makes my clothes smell. 

Another friend works for Primerica, which again is totally a MLM.  A friend kept wanting to get together for coffee because she wanted to talk to me about this amazing business opportunity.  I asked her for an overview and she wouldn't give it, which was a big red flag.  Then, during the interview, she wanted all this really personal information about my insurance and investing, etc, which I thought was really weird because I thought I was going to sell, not buy.  I ended up wanting nothing to do with it and told her flat out not to bring it up again.  She doesn't like me much and won't get together with me for playdates anymore.

So when you look at whether something is a MLM or not, look at how you make your money and what they are promising you.  Endless financial freedom?  Get all your clients from family and friends?  Probably a MLM.  Work hard and get a high commission on sales?  Probably not, even if you can build a team and run your own business.

As a side note, I went to a Mary Kay presentation just after quitting Avon.  There is a world of difference in the way the two businesses operate.  It was creepy.  Really, really creepy.