Etiquette Hell

Etiquette School is in session! => The Ehell Guide to Never Behaving Badly => Topic started by: supernova on February 27, 2009, 08:00:40 PM

Title: Public Transportation
Post by: supernova on February 27, 2009, 08:00:40 PM
Here goes.  If I've done/am doing this wrong, please let me know.

The most important part of the phrase "public transportation" is the word "public."  You are sharing a small space with strangers, and standard rules of etiquette apply, but here are a few special pointers when traveling on a city bus, commuter train or other short-distance public transport:

1.  When you are waiting at a bus stop, and the approaching bus is not the one you want, please communicate your intentions to the driver before he or she stops.  You can do this by stepping back from the stop, shaking your head "no," or waving him on courteously.  If there are other passengers waiting, simply step back.  If the approaching bus is yours, please step forward, attempt eye contact with the driver, and smile or raise your hand to communicate your intent.

2.  When boarding a bus or train compartment in which the seats are full, step all the way to the back and find a good, safe handhold.  Please do not stop in the middle or next to the door.

3.  It is acceptable to place your bag, briefcase or backpack on the empty seat next to you only if the bus or train car is less than half full.  It is preferable, however, to carry it on your lap regardless of the number of occupants.  If you choose to set it down, be mindful of the point at which the car becomes half full, and pick it up before being asked. 

4.  When approaching a double seat that already has one occupant, ask politely if you may sit down, rather than expecting your potential seatmate to know your intention.  This is especially important if the seat is occupied by the person's legs, feet or bag.

5.  Exchanging conversation with your seatmate is not required, and may be considered an intrusion, especially if the person is reading, listening to music, or doing a craft such as knitting.  However, a polite social exchange, if kept brief, is not out of place.

6.  It is never incorrect to greet the driver when entering the bus, or thank him when exiting.  In fact, some skills-development classes for the developmentally disabled teach them to always thank the bus driver when exiting.

7.  Most buses, commuter trains, and the like have posted rules about not eating, drinking, smoking or listening to loud music.  It's important to remember that, even if the rules are not posted or there are others around you violating these rules, it's still not polite to do so yourself.

8.  If you're seated in front closest to the driver, don't engage him or her in unnecessary conversation, unless the driver encourages it.  He or she has an important job to do and may not enjoy making conversation while negotiating traffic.

9.  Keep your music, conversations, cell-phone exchanges, and other noises as quiet as possible, as a courtesy to your fellow passengers and to the driver.

Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Lisbeth on February 27, 2009, 08:18:37 PM
10.  Many forms of mass transportation have rules prohibiting smoking, eating, or drinking; even if they don't, it is best not to engage in these activities.

11.  If a sick, injured, pregnant, or elderly person is on board, offer to yield your seat to them.  It is also a kindness to do this for a parent with a small child.

12.  Unless you fall in the categories in Rule 11, the rules of seating are "first come, first served."  Later passengers are not entitled to seats, and while it is a kindness for a child to yield his/her seat to an adult, it is not required and adults should not expect it.  The child may need that seat as much or more than an adult.  Also, adults who are seated are not required to yield their seats to children.

13.  Take all your belongings with you when you leave the vehicle, including newspapers, magazines, flyers, and any trash.  Don't leave them on the vehicle.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: kareng57 on February 27, 2009, 08:25:21 PM
Most of those sound fine to me - except for #4.  If the seat is clearly empty, I really don't see why I have to ask the next-seat occupant if it's okay for me to sit there.  If it was me already sitting there I'd be awfully surprised if a newly-boarded passenger did the same.

Maybe this is one of those regional-etiquette things?

I do very much agree about passengers not hanging-out around the doorway on trains.  They really get in the way of other passengers entering or exiting.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Shores on February 27, 2009, 08:31:24 PM
14. The people standing there, staring at you when the train doors open aren't doing it for fun. They want to get OFF the train. If you let them OFF, there will be more room for you to get ON. Pushing past them does not make the process go any faster, nor does standing in the center so they have to squeeze around you. Just take one big step to the left (or the right! Your choice!) and this will all go much faster.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Dindrane on February 27, 2009, 09:46:04 PM
Quote
8.  If you're seated in front closest to the driver, don't engage him or her in unnecessary conversation, unless the driver encourages it.  He or she has an important job to do and may not enjoy making conversation while negotiating traffic.

I would say that you shouldn't engage the driver in unnecessary conversation, period.  I'm pretty sure that the buses in my area ask passengers not to chat with the bus drivers, since they need to be able to put their full attention on driving.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: supernova on February 27, 2009, 11:21:23 PM
Quote
8.  If you're seated in front closest to the driver, don't engage him or her in unnecessary conversation, unless the driver encourages it.  He or she has an important job to do and may not enjoy making conversation while negotiating traffic.

I would say that you shouldn't engage the driver in unnecessary conversation, period.  I'm pretty sure that the buses in my area ask passengers not to chat with the bus drivers, since they need to be able to put their full attention on driving.

I'd thought about that; but I've had a couple of cool busdrivers over the years that *liked* to chat with the front-seat passenger.  I've been that passenger a few times, too; and the driver was definitely engaging me and spinning out the conversation.  So I think it's best to leave it to the driver to make the call, rather than the passenger.  :)

As for the empty seat thing...  I find that it's pretty impossible to share one of those double seats on a bus or train without coming into physical contact with my seatmate, either at the shoulder or knee or something.  I figure if I'm about to press my body up against someone, the least I can say is, "May I?" or "'Scuse me" or something.  But that may just be my take on it.  :)

Just my two cents.  :)

     - saphie
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: celine.lechat on February 28, 2009, 08:57:51 AM
11.  If a sick, injured, pregnant, or elderly person is on board, offer to yield your seat to them.  It is also a kindness to do this for a parent with a small child.

Not a suggestion but a question : if you really need a seat but don't look like you need it, how do you communicate that? (foot surgery for example)
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Lisbeth on February 28, 2009, 10:41:38 AM
11.  If a sick, injured, pregnant, or elderly person is on board, offer to yield your seat to them.  It is also a kindness to do this for a parent with a small child.

Not a suggestion but a question : if you really need a seat but don't look like you need it, how do you communicate that? (foot surgery for example)

Just politely ask:  "Excuse me, but may I sit down?  I have a foot problem and can't stand up for a long period of time."  Unfortunately, while a polite person should give you your seat, etiquette can't force anyone to yield their seat to you.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: StaciNadia on February 28, 2009, 12:38:51 PM
14. The people standing there, staring at you when the train doors open aren't doing it for fun. They want to get OFF the train. If you let them OFF, there will be more room for you to get ON. Pushing past them does not make the process go any faster, nor does standing in the center so they have to squeeze around you. Just take one big step to the left (or the right! Your choice!) and this will all go much faster.

Definitely.  There are often rules on the bus/train/whatever to allow people to leave first and then people may board.

16.  If your bus has two doors, it's preferable to leave through the back door so people can board through the front door.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: AprilRenee on February 28, 2009, 12:43:04 PM
This goes without saying, at this board at least but based on my experiences...

If you are going to be riding transportation where you are in close contact with others SHOWER. And wear deoderant
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: skbenny on February 28, 2009, 12:51:53 PM
If your fellow passenger has headphones on or puts them on, leave them alone. 

Headphones = privacy bubble. 

This privacy bubble should only be broken when necessary, and then for a brief time only.

May I sit here? 
Yes, please do. 

End of conversation.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: supotco on February 28, 2009, 02:03:18 PM
11.  If a sick, injured, pregnant, or elderly person is on board, offer to yield your seat to them.  It is also a kindness to do this for a parent with a small child.

Not a suggestion but a question : if you really need a seat but don't look like you need it, how do you communicate that? (foot surgery for example)

Just politely ask:  "Excuse me, but may I sit down?  I have a foot problem and can't stand up for a long period of time."  Unfortunately, while a polite person should give you your seat, etiquette can't force anyone to yield their seat to you.

With emphasis on the politely. Never, never assume - even if you are old, disabled or heavily pregnant -  that other people are not standing for you out of ill manners or spite. If it is in the early morning or in the rush hour, it is quite possible that they are in a little world of their own and they have not seen you. It is also perfectly possible that they, like me, have an invisible disability and are not standing for you because Meniere's attack + moving vehicle + corners = either passing out or being violently unwell.


Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: RainhaDoTexugo on February 28, 2009, 03:26:07 PM

As for the empty seat thing...  I find that it's pretty impossible to share one of those double seats on a bus or train without coming into physical contact with my seatmate, either at the shoulder or knee or something.  I figure if I'm about to press my body up against someone, the least I can say is, "May I?" or "'Scuse me" or something.  But that may just be my take on it.  :)

Just my two cents.  :)

     - saphie

Maybe I'm cynical, living in Chicago, but I can only imagine saying "may I?", and being told "no."  Then what?  I'll say excuse me if someone has their bag on a seat, but otherwise, I find that it's best and safest to keep to myself.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Kaylee on February 28, 2009, 03:38:49 PM
14. The people standing there, staring at you when the train doors open aren't doing it for fun. They want to get OFF the train. If you let them OFF, there will be more room for you to get ON. Pushing past them does not make the process go any faster, nor does standing in the center so they have to squeeze around you. Just take one big step to the left (or the right! Your choice!) and this will all go much faster.

YES!  PLEASE!  This is the thing that makes me insane on the subway at rush hour, along with the "move to the back of the bus or the center of the car" rule that people like to ignore.  I understand some people are trying to stay close to the door because they're getting off at the next stop or whatever, but it is maddening to have the first three or four people get on and just stop there in the doorway when there is clearly room further on in the car.  That puts me in the position of having to shove past them to get on the train, which is also rude.

15.  If you are bringing something of unusual bulk onto the train, it is your job to minimize the effect it has on others.  There are usually rules about when items like bicycles may be brought on board, and strollers should be folded if at all possible, especially when it is crowded.  Large bags or backpacks should be placed on the floor at your feet if it is crowded, not worn so that they bump other passengers or prevent them from standing. 

16.  Small children, for reasons of safety as well as courtesy, should be seated, held on an adult lap or stand next to an adult who is holding their hand.  It isn't cute for them to run up and down the car, swing around the commuter poles, or climb/stand on the seats.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Miranda on February 28, 2009, 06:46:47 PM
Maybe I'm cynical, living in Chicago, but I can only imagine saying "may I?", and being told "no."  Then what?  I'll say excuse me if someone has their bag on a seat, but otherwise, I find that it's best and safest to keep to myself.

I can see your point; however, I also live in Chicago (hi neighbor!) and have never had anyone refuse me when I've asked to sit down.  If someone is sitting in the window seat, and the aisle seat is open, I will just sit down.  However, if they're sitting in the aisle seat while the window seat is vacant (which totally ticks me off, by the way) I'll smile and say "excuse me, can I sit down?"  Same thing if they have their bag in the seat next to them.

People get away with being rude only as long as you let them.  There's nothing wrong with reminding people, via a polite request, that the bus or the El is a shared space. 

Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: RainhaDoTexugo on February 28, 2009, 06:49:20 PM
Oh, I agree, something needs to be said if someone is sitting in the outside seat.  I just think it's a bit odd to ask permission to sit in an open seat that doesn't require anyone to move for you to get into it.  I've never had anyone refuse me either, but why ask a question if yes is the only acceptable answer?

(also, we're planning a Chicago meet and greet in the Chicago folder, if you're at all interested)
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Miranda on February 28, 2009, 06:51:42 PM
Very cool--I'm going to check that out!  Thanks for the heads-up!
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: One Goat to Rule Them All on February 28, 2009, 11:10:46 PM
If there is a seat available and the bus is filling up, you should sit down. I've often seen people unable to get on a bus because there is no more standing room available, when meanwhile there are empty seats at the back.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: ShadesOfGrey on March 02, 2009, 08:11:29 AM
If there is a seat available and the bus is filling up, you should sit down. I've often seen people unable to get on a bus because there is no more standing room available, when meanwhile there are empty seats at the back.

POD.

Also, if you have headphones on or are talking on your cell phone, please keep all volume to a reasonable level.  Not everyone shares your taste in music, nor do they want to hear about your previous evening's escapades, thankyouverymuch. 
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: snowball's chance on March 02, 2009, 11:43:17 AM
Also, if you have headphones on or are talking on your cell phone, please keep all volume to a reasonable level.  Not everyone shares your taste in music, nor do they want to hear about your previous evening's escapades, thankyouverymuch. 

Pod!  Or there's this new thing called "texting"  ::)

Plan your trip ahead of time!!  Figure out where you are going, where you need to get off, where/when/if you need a transfer ahead of time.  Most transit authorities have this info available online and by phone.  My transit authority has a service that will walk you through planning your trip by phone.

It's one thing to confirm with a bus driver as you enter, "Is this the 15B or 15C?"; it's another to take up time getting lots of directions from the driver, and even then it's helpful til you've waited til everyone is seated instead of holding up the line because you want to know where to catch the bus you need to transfer to.

Have exact fare ready if you are paying cash, or your card ready if you pay using that.  It's not fair to get on the bus and expect that other passengers will have change for a twenty!  It's also not fair to everyone waiting behind you on cold/hot days for you to hold up the line looking for money or your card at the bottom of your bag. 

If others were at the bus/train stop ahead of you, it's polite to let them enter before you.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Gyburc on March 06, 2009, 06:03:07 AM
I'd like to add:

If you take the aisle seat on the bus next to someone who is already sitting there, please do respect their personal space as far as possible. Some contact is probably unavoidable, but please try to avoid squishing right up against them or sticking your elbow into their ribs.

(Yes, I take the bus to work regularly  :))

Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Winterlight on March 06, 2009, 07:51:51 AM
Important rule- If you must ride escalators within your subway system, do NOT stop at the bottom or top of the escalator. You may not know where you are going, but the 20 people behind you do. Right into the tracks if they can't get around you. (Not because they deliberately pushed you, but because they can't stop because of the crush behind them.)

Also, obey the Stand Right Walk Left signs. Don't walk along the middle of an escalator that is meant to hold two people on each step. Let others pass.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: snowball's chance on March 06, 2009, 07:53:37 AM
When you're sitting on the aisle, the person sitting on the inside of your seat may need to exit before you do, so keep in mind you may need to stand up to let them out, even is you're in the middle of your book or texting someone.  
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: RainhaDoTexugo on March 06, 2009, 01:31:56 PM
Quote from: Winterlight

Also, obey the Stand Right Walk Left signs.

Even if they're invisible!
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Elphaba on March 07, 2009, 09:44:04 AM
Plan your trip ahead of time!!  Figure out where you are going, where you need to get off, where/when/if you need a transfer ahead of time.  Most transit authorities have this info available online and by phone.  My transit authority has a service that will walk you through planning your trip by phone.

It's one thing to confirm with a bus driver as you enter, "Is this the 15B or 15C?"; it's another to take up time getting lots of directions from the driver, and even then it's helpful til you've waited til everyone is seated instead of holding up the line because you want to know where to catch the bus you need to transfer to.

I cannot POD this one enough. The driver is NOT there to plan your trip. Though many drivers are very familiar with the bus schedules, they probably dont know everything and asking them endless questions about the next bus, exactly where this bus stops, what it connects with, etc etc etc at length will only annoy them and your fellow passengers especially if you do this while standing in the doorway before/during/after paying your fare.

So, if you're new to an area or just visiting, take the time to visit the area's transit authority website before you  get on the train/bus. Most areas (even the smaller urban areas) have trip planners, schedules or at least a customer service phone number available online so you can get all the information you need ahead of time.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: skbenny on March 07, 2009, 11:51:01 AM
I cannot POD this one enough. The driver is NOT there to plan your trip. Though many drivers are very familiar with the bus schedules, they probably dont know everything and asking them endless questions about the next bus, exactly where this bus stops, what it connects with, etc etc etc at length will only annoy them and your fellow passengers especially if you do this while standing in the doorway before/during/after paying your fare.

So, if you're new to an area or just visiting, take the time to visit the area's transit authority website before you  get on the train/bus. Most areas (even the smaller urban areas) have trip planners, schedules or at least a customer service phone number available online so you can get all the information you need ahead of time.

Absolutely!

So many people stop our bus and want to ride it downtown.  When informed that it is an express bus and does not go downdown, or make any stops between point x and point y, they will get all irritated and whine "why can't/don't you go downtown?" or they will spend 5 minutes asking the driver which bus to take downtown.

Big problem, our bus comes from district A as an express into district B.  The drivers only work in district A and this one particular route.  They have no idea of the routes in district B.  The irritant?  Less than five minutes from any point in our bus route is a light rail train, using the same pass system, that only goes downtown, along with free shuttles to take you to the light rail.

That five minutes being wasted belongs to not just the questioner and driver, but to the 30 to 60 passengers on the bus.  Be considerate of them.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Venus193 on March 09, 2009, 10:29:29 AM
If you are using a music device with headphones, please do not sing along with it in a confined space like a subway car.  The whole point of headphones is to keep the sound contained.  This goes double if the lyrics of what you are listening to are potentially offensive to others.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: KittyBass on March 09, 2009, 01:03:20 PM
When you're sitting on the aisle, the person sitting on the inside of your seat may need to exit before you do, so keep in mind you may need to stand up to let them out, even is you're in the middle of your book or texting someone.  

I'd like to add to this: If you're the person sitting on the inner seat, it's generally not nice to just shove the person sitting in the outer seat out of the way when you reach your stop. A simple 'excuse me' would suffice.

(Yup, that happened to me a few years ago, the man next to me actually PUSHED me out of my seat when the bus came to a stop. He didn't even indicate before that he was planning on getting off there, he just got up and pushed me out. I shouted 'Excuse me would be NICE!' as he made his way out but I doubt he really cared.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Miss Vertigo on March 09, 2009, 01:16:52 PM
Massive POD to holding up the bus asking for directions. Especially bad if it's a) rush hour or b) raining, and people queuing outside the bus can't get on while you're standing in the doorway.

This seems obvious but I don't see it mentioned yet: Your handbag/rucksack/weekly shopping is not a paying customer and is not entitled to a seat all of its own. If someone needs the seat on which you're resting it, please move it.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: KittyBass on March 09, 2009, 04:25:58 PM
Yup, that's another one. That's what the storage compartments are for. If I have 1 bag I might place it on the empty seat next to me. If the bus is filling up I just put it on my lap.

I once witnessed a bus driver that made an assumption about boarding passengers. I lived in a tourist area and there was one bus that went into the main city and another that went to the beach. A family of tourists got on and the driver SHOUTED 'This is NOT going to the BEACH. The bus for the BEACH is the number 6!' They wanted to go to the main city for shopping. For one, they weren't wearing beach stuff or carrying beach items, and two, it was raining that day..so why would he assume that to begin with?
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: kareng57 on March 09, 2009, 09:13:37 PM
Yup, that's another one. That's what the storage compartments are for. If I have 1 bag I might place it on the empty seat next to me. If the bus is filling up I just put it on my lap.

I once witnessed a bus driver that made an assumption about boarding passengers. I lived in a tourist area and there was one bus that went into the main city and another that went to the beach. A family of tourists got on and the driver SHOUTED 'This is NOT going to the BEACH. The bus for the BEACH is the number 6!' They wanted to go to the main city for shopping. For one, they weren't wearing beach stuff or carrying beach items, and two, it was raining that day..so why would he assume that to begin with?



Frustration, probably?  Not to excuse his exclamation at all, but maybe he'd had it up-to-here with tourists who'd get on the wrong bus, realize it a half-hour later, and then act as though it was his fault?  I too agree about people who expect a transit-driver to be a transit guide-book.  No - the bus driver does not automatically know when the 288 bus is coming next.  He/she is likely very professional and experienced, but does not have a computer for a memory.  Even when they're very patient - a passenger with multiple questions can put the bus two or three minutes behind schedule.  That can be enough for some fellow-passengers to miss their connections, and they will not be happy.  Most municipal transit systems have websites, along with print-schedules that are usually available at places such as libraries.

My beef?  There have been a couple of mentions about when someone is in the inside-seat and has to exit. Sometimes I politely say "excuse me, I get off here" - and the outside-person wordlessly manages to shift-her-knees to the outside about 20 degrees.  Uh - that's not going to do it.  While I wouldn't call myself a large person, I'm not small either.  Honestly - can't you stand up for a few seconds, if necessary?
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: snowball's chance on March 09, 2009, 09:48:11 PM
My beef?  There have been a couple of mentions about when someone is in the inside-seat and has to exit. Sometimes I politely say "excuse me, I get off here" - and the outside-person wordlessly manages to shift-her-knees to the outside about 20 degrees.  Uh - that's not going to do it.  While I wouldn't call myself a large person, I'm not small either.  Honestly - can't you stand up for a few seconds, if necessary?

Even worse when accompanied by an annoyed look.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: camlan on March 09, 2009, 10:18:54 PM

My beef?  There have been a couple of mentions about when someone is in the inside-seat and has to exit. Sometimes I politely say "excuse me, I get off here" - and the outside-person wordlessly manages to shift-her-knees to the outside about 20 degrees.  Uh - that's not going to do it.  While I wouldn't call myself a large person, I'm not small either.  Honestly - can't you stand up for a few seconds, if necessary?

I've been on buses that were so crowded with people standing that it would be hard for the person on the outside seat to stand up--there would be no room for them. But if the aisle is clear, the outside person should make adequate room for the inside person to exit.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Miss Vertigo on March 10, 2009, 03:36:27 AM
I really have hesitated in posting this. It's absolutely not anti-child, and I remember such a topic getting quite heated on a previous thread. But it's very pertinent to public transport etiquette, and something that we run across an awful lot in London, so I'd imagine it applies elsewhere in other big cities.

If you must take a pram or puschair onto the bus during morning or evening rush hour, please park it in the designated area.  Neatly. With the whole pram inside the space. Don't leave half of it poking out into the aisle and then tut when people find they can't get past it to get off.  They are not being awkward; you are creating a bottleneck. London buses work a particular way: in at the front doors, out of the back doors, and if anything impedes this flow of passengers, chaos ensues.

This is for your baby's sake as well as for that of the other passengers; if it's not in the space, it will get bumped as people try and get past it in the already very narrow space to keep the system 'flowing'.

If there is already a passenger with a pram, or a wheelchair user (the space is interchangable) in the designated space, please, please wait for the next bus to come along instead of trying to crowbar your way onto the already-packed bus with it. Nobody who gets on after you will be able to get off if you stand in the aisle with it. Nobody will be able to get past you to use the stairs to get a seat if there are any up there.

This is possibly my biggest pet peeve about bus travel. It may work differently in other parts of the world, but in London at least, where generally there isn't room to maneuver on a bus anyway, this is a real problem.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Ferrets on March 10, 2009, 06:17:52 AM
Do not play music without headphones on. Please.

Keep a check on your language. Whilst bad language doesn't really bother me, and I am not going to be remotely fussed by the odd swearword, nevertheless a steady, loud stream of constant profanity (not to mention vulgarity) is not at all pleasant for other people to listen to.

If you have a child with you, don't allow them to press the bell repeatedly. Once is enough: it's not a toy. (Most people with children who let them press the bell are actually really good about this, and I realise that sometimes kids will manage to sneak in an extra couple of prods against one's best efforts, but I'm talking about those who indulgently allow the constant ding-ding-ding, and those who even encourage it.)

It is not cute to sit in the luggage rack when there are seats available. (You shouldn't really do it at all, but someone perched on there when the bus is chock-full doesn't bother me - so long as they shift if another passenger wants to put luggage there.)

You'd think all these would go without saying, wouldn't you? ::)

(Hrumph. I was up at the local school again this morning to complain about a solid twenty minutes of screamed [yes, full-volume, top-of-the-lungs screamed] vulgarity and profanity from certain of their pupils on the [public] bus I catch for work, and am therefore feeling a little raw about the subject. :P)
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: snoopygirl on March 10, 2009, 03:15:09 PM
On our buses ( not sure how it is in other parts of the world) there is one set of doors. It is expected that the people getting off the bus get off first before those getting on get on. When I am trying to get off the bus do not get on until I am off. Most of the time I am pushed. I have balance issues. The last thing I need to do is trip getting off the bus.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: jane7166 on March 10, 2009, 07:31:07 PM
Do not engage in public arguments and, if you are a child or teenager, do not whine!

I don't really get to ride the bus that much but we were at Big Mouse Land once, taking the bus back to the hotel, and this kinda upscale looking family of five was the only other group on the bus. 

Teenage daughter was asking Dad to do something and he said no.  Teenage daughter then began to WHIIINNNEE and the Dad kept egging her on with more nos but not telling her to can it.  She kept it up for several miles until she and Dad caught a look I gave them along with a deep sigh which, I hope, was portraying the utter disgust I was feeling towards them.  She shut up and the rest of the ride was peaceful. 
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: snowball's chance on March 11, 2009, 09:28:46 AM
I really have hesitated in posting this. It's absolutely not anti-child, and I remember such a topic getting quite heated on a previous thread. But it's very pertinent to public transport etiquette, and something that we run across an awful lot in London, so I'd imagine it applies elsewhere in other big cities.

If you must take a pram or puschair onto the bus during morning or evening rush hour, please park it in the designated area.  Neatly. With the whole pram inside the space. Don't leave half of it poking out into the aisle and then tut when people find they can't get past it to get off.  They are not being awkward; you are creating a bottleneck. London buses work a particular way: in at the front doors, out of the back doors, and if anything impedes this flow of passengers, chaos ensues.

This is for your baby's sake as well as for that of the other passengers; if it's not in the space, it will get bumped as people try and get past it in the already very narrow space to keep the system 'flowing'.

If there is already a passenger with a pram, or a wheelchair user (the space is interchangable) in the designated space, please, please wait for the next bus to come along instead of trying to crowbar your way onto the already-packed bus with it. Nobody who gets on after you will be able to get off if you stand in the aisle with it. Nobody will be able to get past you to use the stairs to get a seat if there are any up there.

This is possibly my biggest pet peeve about bus travel. It may work differently in other parts of the world, but in London at least, where generally there isn't room to maneuver on a bus anyway, this is a real problem.

My transit authority requires that strollers/prams be folded up and the baby/child held in your lap (so the stroller doesn't strat rolling around or tip over if the bus brakes suddenly).  However, the only time I saw a bus driver try to enforce this, the woman w/ the stroller started yelling & swearing at him.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Miss Vertigo on March 11, 2009, 10:53:48 AM
My transit authority requires that strollers/prams be folded up and the baby/child held in your lap (so the stroller doesn't strat rolling around or tip over if the bus brakes suddenly).  However, the only time I saw a bus driver try to enforce this, the woman w/ the stroller started yelling & swearing at him.

That's a great idea if it works in your (you general, not you-you) particular area; sadly it'd never work in London, I don't think. There just isn't room - the chance of the mother finding a seat in which to sit with the child on her lap are minimal at best - or time for someone to juggle the baby/fold up the stroller while everyone else is piling onto the bus. I guess that's why we have the area to park them in.

I've seen strollers tip over on buses, but it's usually when the mother's got a load of shopping hanging off the handles.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: familyfun on March 11, 2009, 12:02:39 PM
Maybe I'm cynical, living in Chicago, but I can only imagine saying "may I?", and being told "no."  Then what?  I'll say excuse me if someone has their bag on a seat, but otherwise, I find that it's best and safest to keep to myself.

I can see your point; however, I also live in Chicago (hi neighbor!) and have never had anyone refuse me when I've asked to sit down.  If someone is sitting in the window seat, and the aisle seat is open, I will just sit down.  However, if they're sitting in the aisle seat while the window seat is vacant (which totally ticks me off, by the way) I'll smile and say "excuse me, can I sit down?"  Same thing if they have their bag in the seat next to them.

People get away with being rude only as long as you let them.  There's nothing wrong with reminding people, via a polite request, that the bus or the El is a shared space. 

I think it's ok to take an aisle seat to avoid getting squished, but then there's a responsibility to be alert and pay attention to see if anyone else needs the window seat.  They shouldn't have to ask to get into it. 

From my own experience, I tend to get on fairly early at both points of my commute (they're express buses, which are desinged like coach type buses).  I used to take the window seat.  But after being repeatedly squished by people who had room to spare in the aisle (no standees), I've started taking the aisle seat.  Just because being squished in with one quarter to one third of my seat space infringed upon with a bag in my lap & the seat in front of me being reclined was enough to make me start thinking murderous thoughts.  I usually head all the way towards the back (which only fills up if the bus gets more crowded than usual).  If for some reason I can't, I take an aisle seat.  But I make it a point to be aware if the bus is filling up (I don't listen to music, etc. during this time because I tend to zone out when I do).  And I offer the window seat to anyone I see making their way back towards my area.  Usually via eye contact and standing up and/or motioning to the seat & saying, "would you like to sit here".
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: camlan on March 11, 2009, 12:09:14 PM
If I have only a few stops left, I'll stay in the aisle seat, rather than move over and be blocked in when it's time for me to get off, which would require making the person in the aisle seat to stand up to let me out. If I've got a long way to go, I'll move over to the window seat.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Venus193 on March 11, 2009, 12:41:48 PM
If you are wearing a backpack, please take it off and carry it on if the bus or train is crowded.  It is very rude and even dangerous to wear it and make a sudden move near a passenger who can easily get smacked in the face with it.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: TheaterDiva1 on March 11, 2009, 01:18:39 PM
Plan your trip ahead of time!!  Figure out where you are going, where you need to get off, where/when/if you need a transfer ahead of time.  Most transit authorities have this info available online and by phone.  My transit authority has a service that will walk you through planning your trip by phone.

And don't hold up the rest of the train trying to figure it out.  I'm referring to the group of bratty teens who suddenly couldn't remember if they had to get off at a particular stop, so three of them ran out to the platform to check the map while the other two stood in the open doorway to hold the train for them.  This went on for several minutes until another passenger pointed out that they were holding everyone up.  Please, if you don't know where you're going, ask someone, or EVERYONE get off and check the map and take the next train if necessary (or check the map in the car).  Don't make us pay the price for your lack of preparation!

And while I'm at it, a moving subway car is no place for cheerleading practice.  Yes, I'm referring to the same group.  Not only was the shouting and chanting annoying, but the pyramids and shoulder stands were dangerous.  Yes, they were doing all that.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: snowball's chance on March 13, 2009, 01:58:52 PM
Motorists: Be very careful about switching lanes in front of a bus, especially on the highway.  If you cut the bus off, every passenger on the bus can get thrown forward if the bus driver has to slam on the breaks.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: familyfun on March 15, 2009, 12:01:30 PM
Motorists: Be very careful about switching lanes in front of a bus, especially on the highway.  If you cut the bus off, every passenger on the bus can get thrown forward if the bus driver has to slam on the breaks.

And a corollary, if you do cause an accident by doing this at an entrance to a highway and you're fortunate enough not to have caused injuries, don't be suprised to learn that an entire busful of people are more than a bit miffed at having to find an alternate route home because that's the last run of their particular bus line for the evening.  And/or laughing at you because your need to save a few seconds by cutting in front of the bus is now going to cost you a whole lot more time & money.

Also in this situation, passengers who witnessed the facts should give their contact information to the driver.  They have to go through a whole process including drug testing, etc. to prove the accident was not their fault.  I gave my contact information to the driver when this happened one commute home.  Never got called, but I figured he might need it.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: arkzak on May 03, 2010, 03:22:32 PM
One for the gentlemen: We know you are built differently, but do you really need to sit with your knees that far apart? If you are storing prickly pineapples, please consider placing them in a carrier bag instead. And you are allowed to fold your newspaper and not hold it at arm's length.

And while I'm at it, if you (general) are going to have a 42 minute top-of-your-voice cellphone conversation, can you try to make it more interesting? I'm sure your flower arrangement was delightful, but I didn't need to know about it in that much detail.

I think I had a bad day on the train today  ::)
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Venus193 on May 03, 2010, 06:53:50 PM
One for the gentlemen: We know you are built differently, but do you really need to sit with your knees that far apart? If you are storing prickly pineapples, please consider placing them in a carrier bag instead. And you are allowed to fold your newspaper and not hold it at arm's length.

You have encountered the infamous Spider Monkey, my biggest subway pet peeve.  We still haven't figured out how to fight this one.

Quote
And while I'm at it, if you (general) are going to have a 42 minute top-of-your-voice cellphone conversation, can you try to make it more interesting? I'm sure your flower arrangement was delightful, but I didn't need to know about it in that much detail.

I think I had a bad day on the train today  ::)

I usually give the Miss Manners Raised Eyebrow at people like this.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: ACBNYC on May 04, 2010, 11:32:02 AM
One for the gentlemen: We know you are built differently, but do you really need to sit with your knees that far apart?

And please keep your feet out of the aisle. I can't count the number of times I have to step over peoples' legs and feet because they're completely sprawled out. And keeping your elbow out of my side would also be much appreciated.  :)

Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: arkzak on May 04, 2010, 03:17:38 PM
And leave your invisible friend at home. If I'm at the window seat and the aisle seat is free, there is no need to squish me into the window and leave a person-sized gap on your other side. I know I'm a nice person, but I haven't invited you to find out!
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Mopsy428 on May 14, 2010, 05:57:04 AM
Don't expect your bus, train car, etc., etc. to be stone silent, especially if it's the middle of the afternoon. People will talk to their neighbor. As long as no one is being obnoxiously loud, you have no right to throw a hissy fit.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: JonGirl on May 14, 2010, 06:28:13 AM


If the bus is crowded and people are standing, could everybody move down the back so people can enter at the front.
And motorists, if a tram has stopped to let someone off, please stop and wait until they cross the road and not continue driving.
The last time someone kept driving, they nearly collected the person getting off the tram.  :(
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Fleur-de-Lis on November 12, 2010, 04:48:45 PM
Maybe I'm cynical, living in Chicago, but I can only imagine saying "may I?", and being told "no."  Then what?  I'll say excuse me if someone has their bag on a seat, but otherwise, I find that it's best and safest to keep to myself.

I can see your point; however, I also live in Chicago (hi neighbor!) and have never had anyone refuse me when I've asked to sit down.  If someone is sitting in the window seat, and the aisle seat is open, I will just sit down.  However, if they're sitting in the aisle seat while the window seat is vacant (which totally ticks me off, by the way) I'll smile and say "excuse me, can I sit down?"  Same thing if they have their bag in the seat next to them.

People get away with being rude only as long as you let them.  There's nothing wrong with reminding people, via a polite request, that the bus or the El is a shared space. 



Your displeasure is noted.

I reserve the privilege of not allowing myself to be penned against the window, especially by somebody creepy, crazy, or dirty. 

I am also mildly claustrophobic; I choose the aisle seat for that reason as well.

Emma
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: One Goat to Rule Them All on November 12, 2010, 04:55:19 PM
Maybe I'm cynical, living in Chicago, but I can only imagine saying "may I?", and being told "no."  Then what?  I'll say excuse me if someone has their bag on a seat, but otherwise, I find that it's best and safest to keep to myself.

I can see your point; however, I also live in Chicago (hi neighbor!) and have never had anyone refuse me when I've asked to sit down.  If someone is sitting in the window seat, and the aisle seat is open, I will just sit down.  However, if they're sitting in the aisle seat while the window seat is vacant (which totally ticks me off, by the way) I'll smile and say "excuse me, can I sit down?"  Same thing if they have their bag in the seat next to them.

People get away with being rude only as long as you let them.  There's nothing wrong with reminding people, via a polite request, that the bus or the El is a shared space. 



Your displeasure is noted.

I reserve the privilege of not allowing myself to be penned against the window, especially by somebody creepy, crazy, or dirty. 

I am also mildly claustrophobic; I choose the aisle seat for that reason as well.

Emma

That's all well and good as long as the bus isn't very full, but if it's starting to fill up etiquette dictates that you either move over and allow someone to sit, or stand and allow someone to take the window seat. You could also pick seats in the front or back where people can sit next to you without penning you in.

People who have dirty jobs or who are mentally ill have just as much right to a seat on the bus as anyone else, and you're not just blocking them from sitting, you're blocking everyone else. You can accommodate the phobias you've outlined above without taking up two seats for yourself.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Fleur-de-Lis on November 12, 2010, 05:11:32 PM
Maybe I'm cynical, living in Chicago, but I can only imagine saying "may I?", and being told "no."  Then what?  I'll say excuse me if someone has their bag on a seat, but otherwise, I find that it's best and safest to keep to myself.

I can see your point; however, I also live in Chicago (hi neighbor!) and have never had anyone refuse me when I've asked to sit down.  If someone is sitting in the window seat, and the aisle seat is open, I will just sit down.  However, if they're sitting in the aisle seat while the window seat is vacant (which totally ticks me off, by the way) I'll smile and say "excuse me, can I sit down?"  Same thing if they have their bag in the seat next to them.

People get away with being rude only as long as you let them.  There's nothing wrong with reminding people, via a polite request, that the bus or the El is a shared space. 



Your displeasure is noted.

I reserve the privilege of not allowing myself to be penned against the window, especially by somebody creepy, crazy, or dirty. 

I am also mildly claustrophobic; I choose the aisle seat for that reason as well.

Emma

That's all well and good as long as the bus isn't very full, but if it's starting to fill up etiquette dictates that you either move over and allow someone to sit, or stand and allow someone to take the window seat. You could also pick seats in the front or back where people can sit next to you without penning you in.

People who have dirty jobs or who are mentally ill have just as much right to a seat on the bus as anyone else, and you're not just blocking them from sitting, you're blocking everyone else. You can accommodate the phobias you've outlined above without taking up two seats for yourself.

I am not blocking them from sitting, and I never said that I would not stand if asked. 

I said etiquette did not dictate that I must accept the window seat simply because I got on the carriage early.

Emma
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Shores on November 12, 2010, 05:16:46 PM

I said etiquette did not dictate that I must accept the window seat simply because I got on the carriage early.

Emma
No one said that it did. One person stated that it personally annoyed her. There are many things that, while perfectly fine in regards to etiquette, personally annoy me. It's not a big deal. No one said it was rude, as long as you're willing to allow anybody (without refusing those that you find "creepy, crazy or dirty" to sit in the window seat.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Fleur-de-Lis on March 02, 2011, 06:01:24 PM
If you have children with you, and are on a train full of cranky commuters, for the love of heaven, *please* endeavor to keep them reasonably quiet. 

When said parent/guardian chooses not to be mindful of the child, is there anything one *can* do, other than, circumstances permitting, move to a different car?  Doing so feels like having been a doormat, by default - somebody can't be bothered to parent their children, so I can leave. 

Emma
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Jolie_kitten on March 03, 2011, 01:57:12 AM
11.  If a sick, injured, pregnant, or elderly person is on board, offer to yield your seat to them.  It is also a kindness to do this for a parent with a small child.

Not a suggestion but a question : if you really need a seat but don't look like you need it, how do you communicate that? (foot surgery for example)

I'd say- try not to make it TMI. Saying that you have had foot surgery is OK; on the other hand, if you need to sit down because you have "that time of the month" cramps, you can say something like "I feel very faint".
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Firecat on March 03, 2011, 05:45:41 PM
If the seats are configured so that there are sets of seats facing each other, please keep your feet on the floor and don't put them on the seats opposite you. Yes, I know it's comfortable. But no one appreciates getting their clothing dirty by sitting on the seat your shoes have been on.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Fleur-de-Lis on March 11, 2011, 10:16:54 AM
If your child cannot sit still and quietly for 45 minutes, maybe you should rethink you transportation choices.  If public transportation is your only choice, *please* remain aware of the child.  Nobody else has learned to tune him out the way you can.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: DangerMouth on March 11, 2011, 10:39:03 AM
My beef?  There have been a couple of mentions about when someone is in the inside-seat and has to exit. Sometimes I politely say "excuse me, I get off here" - and the outside-person wordlessly manages to shift-her-knees to the outside about 20 degrees.  Uh - that's not going to do it.  While I wouldn't call myself a large person, I'm not small either.  Honestly - can't you stand up for a few seconds, if necessary?

Even worse when accompanied by an annoyed look.

If I said I need to get out and they moved their knees a bit, but not their person, then they get my butt in their face when I push past them. I'm not huge, but I can't make myself any smaller than I am (I'm not Harry Potter!), so increasing the space from 2" to 5" inches doesn't actually help me get my 12" cross section past you. Sigh and roll your eyes all you want, I'll be off the bus in a minute, and you'll still be there and as unhappy as you want to to be.

Quote
6.  It is never incorrect to greet the driver when entering the bus, or thank him when exiting.  In fact, some skills-development classes for the developmentally disabled teach them to always thank the bus driver when exiting.

It always amazes me when people don't treat their driver with the minimum of courtesy. S/he's not an automaton, it's real person who generally appreciates being treated as such. Even when exiting out the back door, I generally call out a "thank you!" (well, not in NYC on a crowded bus, but certainly in CT, when often I'm the only one getting off at my stop.)

In my not inconsiderable experience with public transit, bus drivers are unfailingly polite and courteous.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Venus193 on March 11, 2011, 02:49:34 PM
Ditto to Emma's statement about children and transportation choices.

If you are traveling with a young child who gets bored, please don't encourage them to do anything that is annoying or potentially hazardous to others.  I'm referring to the woman who encouraged a little girl to sing "Old MacDonald" on an off-peak train in a car half full with adults attempting to read and the parents who allowed their kids to "pole dance" in the middle of the car.  I should not have to get up to go to another car to get some relative peace or safety.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: JonGirl on March 11, 2011, 11:18:13 PM
Ditto to Emma's statement about children and transportation choices.

If you are traveling with a young child who gets bored, please don't encourage them to do anything that is annoying or potentially hazardous to others.  I'm referring to the woman who encouraged a little girl to sing "Old MacDonald" on an off-peak train in a car half full with adults attempting to read and the parents who allowed their kids to "pole dance" in the middle of the car.  I should not have to get up to go to another car to get some relative peace or safety.

Good grief.  :o
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Jolie_kitten on March 12, 2011, 04:54:57 AM
There's something that happened to me a while ago that I have no idea how I could have handled. So, I'm in the bus, standing, and as someone gets up to leave the bus, a seat is freed. I'm tired and I could really use sitting down a little. There's an elderly man standing in front of me, a bit nearer to  seat (sort of between me and the seat). I wait for 3-4 seconds to see if he makes any move towards occupying the seat. He doesn't. I point to the seat and ask in a polite tone, with a smile: "Excuse me, do you wish to sit down?" He gives me a disgruntled look and says in a PA tone: "No, you can have it." I motion towards the seat a little and he continues "All of you young people act like you have bones growing in your belly." At that point, I lost patience a bit and asked again in a bleaker tone: "Do you or do you not wish to sit down?" He just turned away. Did I do something wrong? I just don't know what to make of this.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Venus193 on March 12, 2011, 07:47:08 AM
You did nothing wrong.  P/A people are manipulators of guilt; don't let them win by letting that work.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Jolie_kitten on March 12, 2011, 11:46:01 PM
What strikes me the most is that I fail to see what he was intending to achieve trough that sort of behaviour. If it was the seat that he wanted, he could totally have had it.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Mopsy428 on March 14, 2011, 07:55:12 PM
For trains: do not move in between train cars while the train is in motion. Not only is it against the rules, but when it's freezing cold outside, the people who are sitting near the doors get blasted with cold air.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: irish1 on March 20, 2011, 10:48:45 AM
"There's something that happened to me a while ago that I have no idea how I could have handled. So, I'm in the bus, standing, and as someone gets up to leave the bus, a seat is freed. I'm tired and I could really use sitting down a little. There's an elderly man standing in front of me, a bit nearer to  seat (sort of between me and the seat). I wait for 3-4 seconds to see if he makes any move towards occupying the seat. He doesn't. I point to the seat and ask in a polite tone, with a smile: "Excuse me, do you wish to sit down?" He gives me a disgruntled look and says in a PA tone: "No, you can have it." I motion towards the seat a little and he continues "All of you young people act like you have bones growing in your belly." At that point, I lost patience a bit and asked again in a bleaker tone: "Do you or do you not wish to sit down?" He just turned away. Did I do something wrong? I just don't know what to make of this."

Buses seem to bring out the crazies! I don't think you did anything wrong at all. You didn't even move towards the seat before offering it to him. He was just a grumpus - not your problem.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Mopsy428 on April 07, 2011, 09:39:32 PM
Do not complain and pitch a fit because the person who bought a reserved ticket and got there after you gets to board the bus before you do. That's what reserved tickets are for.

Pay attention to the line you are in; if you don't know, ask. It's better to ask someone if you are in the general seating line than it is to be told by the bus driver as he (or she) is taking tickets that you are in the reserved seating line and have to go to the back of the general seating line because you don't have a reserved ticket.

If there are numerous seats available, and you choose to sit next to me, do not follow me if I move.

For print at home tickets, make sure you are actually printing a ticket. If the e-mail says, "THIS IS NOT A TICKET" that means you can't use it to board the plane/bus/train; if you can't get on because you don't have a ticket, don't blame the person in charge of boarding.

Speaking of printing, make sure your print-at-home tickets aren't so light that you can barely read them. If it doesn't look like you have an actual ticket, the person in charge doesn't have to let you board. (Yes, I've seen this happen more than once.)
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: snowdragon on May 28, 2011, 06:22:38 PM
Also on the subject of reserved seating. If my ticket says i get seat 1A and you want that seat, tough noogies, you don't get to tell me "go sit somewhere else my kid/bag/computer is here" or what not.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Wonderflonium on June 06, 2011, 09:42:43 AM
I know it's been mentioned, but seriously, if the signs say you are to give up certain seats for the elderly or disabled, for the love of little green apples, do it!

Yesterday, an elderly lady using a cane got on the bus. No one moved. (I was already standing.) The driver asked her if she needed a seat, and she said she'd be OK, but she was unsteady on her feet. People ignored her, so the driver called out, "Can this lady get a seat?" Nothing. He said it again, a bit louder. Nothing. The third time, he practically yelled, and I guess people finally figured out that we were not moving until this woman had a seat. I swear!

Also, I don't expect complete silence (although I'd love it), but keep it quiet. At the very least, use your "indoor voice." It's not necessary to scream.

I know the train is loud. I know you like loud music. That still doesn't mean that you should have your iPod so loud that I can identify the song (by an artist I don't like and therefore don't listen to much) bleeding out of your earbuds from 3 rows away.

No, you cannot touch my hair.

I understand that you are going downtown for a fun day/coming home from a fun day/baseball game. That's great. I'm not, so again, please, keep the conversations low and the kiddos in the seats.

If you are traveling with a friend and you plan to speak to them, sit next to them. Don't sit in separate rows and make us all listen to you yelling your conversation. Even worse when 3 people are chatting separated by several rows. Common sense, people!
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: ═korna on June 06, 2011, 09:55:29 AM
My beef?  There have been a couple of mentions about when someone is in the inside-seat and has to exit. Sometimes I politely say "excuse me, I get off here" - and the outside-person wordlessly manages to shift-her-knees to the outside about 20 degrees.  Uh - that's not going to do it.  While I wouldn't call myself a large person, I'm not small either.  Honestly - can't you stand up for a few seconds, if necessary?

Even worse when accompanied by an annoyed look.

If I said I need to get out and they moved their knees a bit, but not their person, then they get my butt in their face when I push past them. I'm not huge, but I can't make myself any smaller than I am (I'm not Harry Potter!), so increasing the space from 2" to 5" inches doesn't actually help me get my 12" cross section past you. Sigh and roll your eyes all you want, I'll be off the bus in a minute, and you'll still be there and as unhappy as you want to to be.

Quote
6.  It is never incorrect to greet the driver when entering the bus, or thank him when exiting.  In fact, some skills-development classes for the developmentally disabled teach them to always thank the bus driver when exiting.

It always amazes me when people don't treat their driver with the minimum of courtesy. S/he's not an automaton, it's real person who generally appreciates being treated as such. Even when exiting out the back door, I generally call out a "thank you!" (well, not in NYC on a crowded bus, but certainly in CT, when often I'm the only one getting off at my stop.)

In my not inconsiderable experience with public transit, bus drivers are unfailingly polite and courteous.

I use NYC buses frequently, and while I wouldn't call out 'Thank you' from the back door I certainly would from the front. It's depressing how few people do. I absolutely get what you mean about people treating bus drivers like they're automatons-- When I was in high school just before the Thanksgiving break, the bus driver gave a very brief version of the history of Thanksgiving as we pulled into the school bus stop as a joke. He was clearly tired and trying to make us smile, and maybe two or three out of a packed bus even glanced at him at any point.

Another bit of etiquette regarding bus drivers-- Yes, it's incredibly annoying when you've been waiting a long time to see that the bus approaching isn't in service. However, the person driving that bus is probably taking it from one depot to another, as is part of their job. Screaming obscenities at them and displaying certain hand gestures is not acceptable. ...Yes, I do know someone who has this job, how could you tell? ;D
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Bill_P on June 08, 2011, 01:27:14 PM
Been a long time since I used public transportation regularly, but I would only put my stuff on the seat next to me if the bus/train was virtually empty, and as it started to fill up with passengers I would remove my stuff & put it on my lap or the floor to indicate that the seat was vacant & I didn't mind if someone sat next to me.

Here's another rule to add to the list:  If it's raining and you have an empty seat next to you, don't put your wet umbrella on the seat!  I can't believe there are people who have to be told this, but believe it or not people don't like to have to sit in a puddle & have a soggy butt  on their commute to work.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Fleur-de-Lis on July 22, 2011, 09:17:27 AM
Please, just move to your selected seat. I can't push you out of my way to get the one I want, but I don't want to wait while you amble ahead of me, focused on your iPod. Put your toy away and show some courtesy and respect for the person behind you.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: PurpleFrog on July 22, 2011, 11:02:46 AM
If you think you may fall asleep do not put your bags on the seat regardless of how full the bus/train is when you get on.

It is incredibly rude to have your bags next to you on a full bus/train and miraculously fall asleep every time you pull in to a stop, only to 'wake' as soon as every has squashed into a seat.

Try to avoid pungent foods in enclosed areas.

Likewise do nor paint your nails the smell is awful.

No, strange man the female sitting next to you does not want to see pictures of your (frankly unimpressive) scrabble equipment.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: AmyBird85 on August 02, 2011, 05:05:08 PM
One for the gentlemen: We know you are built differently, but do you really need to sit with your knees that far apart? If you are storing prickly pineapples, please consider placing them in a carrier bag instead. And you are allowed to fold your newspaper and not hold it at arm's length.

And while I'm at it, if you (general) are going to have a 42 minute top-of-your-voice cellphone conversation, can you try to make it more interesting? I'm sure your flower arrangement was delightful, but I didn't need to know about it in that much detail.

I think I had a bad day on the train today  ::)

That happened to me a few weeks ago on the bus. A man sat next to me with his legs spread so far apart that even with my legs crossed and facing towards the window they were touching me. And he sat in such a way that his elbow dug into my ribs as well. I was on the top deck and there were no other seats and I felt so uncomfortable.

A colleague of mine had a similar story too, where she sat down next to man also with his legs akimbo. He then proceeded to leer at her and started rubbing his leg, and started trying to chat her up!!! (Think creepy stuff like "Hey pretty girl, how you doing?" in very broken English). It really freaked her out.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Fleur-de-Lis on February 13, 2012, 08:00:02 PM
Gaaahhhhh. Dear female on the train: Really, if I can hear your screeching children from 5 rows away, through my earplugs, they're being disruptive. I wish I could ignore them half as well as you are ignoring them and the inquisitive looks from other passengers. Thank you *so* much for teaching your offspring about indoor voices, courtesy in crowded locations and general acceptable manners.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: GratefulMaria on April 11, 2012, 02:09:42 PM
While at a stop or station:  if at all possible, please leave room around a posted schedule or system map so others could read it.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: emeraldsage85 on May 30, 2012, 01:36:19 PM
14. The people standing there, staring at you when the train doors open aren't doing it for fun. They want to get OFF the train. If you let them OFF, there will be more room for you to get ON. Pushing past them does not make the process go any faster, nor does standing in the center so they have to squeeze around you. Just take one big step to the left (or the right! Your choice!) and this will all go much faster.

I take the bus in my city and all of our busses have two doors. The general rule is that passengers getting on use the front door while passengers getting off use the back.
Title: Re: Public Transportation
Post by: Venus193 on May 30, 2012, 04:01:56 PM
I don't use the bus and that rule is one of the reasons.  I don't have the strength to open the door easily and the step is also very steep.  The steps in the front are easier and the banister is better-arranged.

But I wish more people would remember to let people off first.