Etiquette Hell

Etiquette School is in session! => The Ehell Guide to Never Behaving Badly => Topic started by: Hawkwatcher on March 22, 2009, 12:44:04 AM

Title: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Hawkwatcher on March 22, 2009, 12:44:04 AM
This is a topic that can cause much frustration. How many of us have been cut off in traffic? The following are some ideas for making driving more polite.

1) Turn signals.  Please use them.

2)  Pay attention to crosswalks and other places pedestrians might be present.

3) No Tailgating

4)  Do not follow other cars for fun.  When my husband and I were in college, when had some people decide to follow us around a small college town.  We drove to a police station. They pulled up behind us.  A police officer came out to find out what was going on.  They claimed that they did not mean to scare us.

5) Please do not play your music too loud while driving.
 
6) Passengers should avoid backseat driving.  While there is nothing wrong with speaking up if there is immediate danger of an accident.

7) Passengers should respect the driver's rules. Passengers should ask for permission before eating or drinking in the car.  They also should clean up any
messes they make.

Any others?
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Hawkwatcher on March 22, 2009, 10:20:26 AM
If you know the driver smokes in their car and you are uncomfortable with that, do not accept a ride from them and expect them not to smoke.

The driver determines the choice of music. "No music" is a legitmate choice.



Do not lecture the driver or try passive aggressive stunts if the driver does smoke.

Do not mess with the settings on the radio without the driver's permission.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Lisbeth on March 22, 2009, 11:54:37 AM
If a car in the lane next to you puts their turn signal on to indicate that they wish to move into your lane, do not immediately speed up to prevent them from moving over to your lane.

Yellow lights mean "slow down" - not "speed up so as to avoid having to stop at a red light."

Shouting at drivers and making third-finger gestures at them is rude, period.

Don't talk on your mobile phone while driving-it distracts you, puts others on the road in potential danger, and is illegal in many places like New York.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: marcel on March 22, 2009, 05:53:07 PM
Now, let's have some positive driving etiquette ;)

There is nothing wrong with thanking a person that slows down for you, or otherwise makes room for you in traffic (even if you have a right of way anyway.)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: VorFemme on March 22, 2009, 06:07:42 PM
If the person ahead of you STOPS when the light turns red - don't gesticulate wildly at them because you had to STOP instead of running the red light behind them.  (The light was turning red just as I got to the cross walk.)

To top it off, there had been a fire engine coming up behind us - so I had not wanted to be in the intersection if it came through and needed to make a turn...........I had passed the guy a little earlier - his stereo was so loud that he couldn't have heard Godzilla and Mothra having a fight.

The fire engine turned left BEHIND us into a strip mall - I turned right on the red and got out from in front of him, turned into a grocery store parking lot, and got back on the same road - about six cars or so behind him.  I didn't want to have a confrontation.........or a collision because he wanted to "teach me a lesson" by stopping in front of me when there was no red light. 
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: MDefarge on March 22, 2009, 06:11:57 PM
If you know the driver smokes in their car and you are uncomfortable with that, do not accept a ride from them and expect them not to smoke.

The driver determines the choice of music. "No music" is a legitmate choice.



If the driver is nice enough to let you pick the music for awhile, choosing something you *know* the driver hates will result in an automatic revocation of the privilege.

If someone is nice enough to drive you someplace, it incurs a lot of goodwill if you offer gas money (especially if you asked them and they did not spontaneously offer you a ride)

If someone drives you *very* often you must offer them gas money and if they decline it is a very nice gesture to do something nice and unexpected for them.

EDT - it is rude to take advantage of a driver to the point that *they* have to ask *you* for gas money - they are doing you a favor.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Lisbeth on March 22, 2009, 06:13:16 PM
If you are riding in someone else's car, keep it clean!  Take your belongings with you, and respect any rules they have about not eating, drinking, or smoking while in the car.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Black Delphinium on March 22, 2009, 06:13:37 PM
The heat/AC should be treated like the radio: it is the driver's to set at their discretion. Not to say that you can't ask to turn it up/down/on/off/open the windows, but it should be a discussion, not a demand.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: kareng57 on March 22, 2009, 06:38:15 PM
8.  If you have the right-of-way, then take it.  If you are on the through-street, don't signal (i.e. by madly hand-waving) the driver stopped at a stop sign on the cross-street that he/she can go ahead while you wait.  No matter how nice you want to be, it will just confuse the whole situation.  And if the other driver finally gives up and goes ahead - he/she will be automatically in the wrong if a mishap occurs.  Rules of the road are there for a reason.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: ginlyn32 on March 22, 2009, 06:41:54 PM
If you are carpooling or otherwise have others in the car besides yourself, remember that there are others that may need to eat, drink and use the bathroom.

Ask often if your passengers need to use the bathroom or stop to streach or eat. I find myself often having to remind my DH that he has other people in his vehicle and we are HUNGRY and need to PEE!

ginlyn
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: geordicat on March 22, 2009, 06:44:56 PM
If you are riding with someone and giving them directions, it's nice to let them know of a turn *before* you approach the turn.  "Turn left at the light" said about a block before is acceptable.  Screeching "TURN LEFT TURN LEFT!" as you pass the turn is not cool.

If someone is picking you up, please be prepared and ready to go when they show up.  When they show up at your door is not the time to announce you still need to shower and get ready.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Black Delphinium on March 22, 2009, 06:47:29 PM
If someone is picking you up, please be prepared and ready to go when they show up.  When they show up at your door is not the time to announce you still need to shower and get ready.
However, if you are picking up a friend and they say "I'll be ready at X", don't be mad/impatient if you show up half an hour or more early and they still need that time to shower and get ready.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: geordicat on March 22, 2009, 06:48:13 PM
If someone is picking you up, please be prepared and ready to go when they show up.  When they show up at your door is not the time to announce you still need to shower and get ready.
However, if you are picking up a friend and they say "I'll be ready at X", don't be mad/impatient if you show up half an hour or more early and they still need that time to shower and get ready.

Definitely agreed.  :)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Lisbeth on March 22, 2009, 07:07:27 PM
Unless it's the only way to get the attention of someone who is either seriously backing up traffic or endangering others, don't honk your horn-especially for fun, at night, in a residential neighborhood, or near a hospital.  It seriously disturbs the peace.

If you are picking up a passenger or carpooler, don't honk by way of indicating that you have arrived if your passenger is not waiting for you outside.  Park, get out of your car, and knock or ring the bell.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: kareng57 on March 22, 2009, 07:38:14 PM
Unless it's the only way to get the attention of someone who is either seriously backing up traffic or endangering others, don't honk your horn-especially for fun, at night, in a residential neighborhood, or near a hospital.  It seriously disturbs the peace.

If you are picking up a passenger or carpooler, don't honk by way of indicating that you have arrived if your passenger is not waiting for you outside.  Park, get out of your car, and knock or ring the bell.


And for carpoolers - be there, waiting by the door, a few minutes before the expected arrival time.  No one else should have to exit the car in order to fetch you.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Lisbeth on March 22, 2009, 10:15:37 PM
Also, if your car alarm is set off inadvertently, please turn it off ASAP once you're aware of it.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Tai on March 22, 2009, 11:20:22 PM
I have to expand on the "passenger giving directions" one. 

Please, don't just tell me to "go straight till I tell you to turn".  I need to know where I'm going, so that I can be in the proper lane, not have to slam on the brakes because you told me 3 seconds after I missed the turn that "that's the turn". 

Maybe its just me, but I prefer, "We're going to XYZ, which is on Z street... The easiest way to go is to take A street to C street and turn left onto Z." 

And please, when I'm driving you somewhere, that is not the time to show off every single backroad you know of.  Please, keep it as simple as possible, especially if I'm going to drop you off and have to find my way back. 
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: AprilRenee on March 22, 2009, 11:34:51 PM
For drivers-
The signs are posted for a reason. Look for them, understand them.

I can't seem to get a diagram right, so I will describe it.

The north and south lanes are each one way. There is a turn lane to turn left, but you must pull into it and go straight until you cross over one set of lanes, into a "median" of sorts and then you can turn left.

Despite the FOUR no left turn signs, and the 4 signs with an arrow with a slash through it, the sign above the turn lane that points STRAIGHT people insist on turning into incoming traffic.



    {E}{E}{T}      {W}{W}
=======Southbound========
    {E}{E}{T}{T}{W}{W} 
=======northbound========   
    {E}{E}     {T}{W}{W}   


T=turn lane, E=east and so on. I can understand it looks sort of confusing here, but if you see the signs, it's easier.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Virg on March 23, 2009, 09:09:27 AM
AprilRenee wrote:

"Despite the FOUR no left turn signs, and the 4 signs with an arrow with a slash through it, the sign above the turn lane that points STRAIGHT people insist on turning into incoming traffic."

The flip side of this is to consider the layout.  If people regularly end up driving the wrong way down a one way street, then the intersection is badly designed.  Once a year is a driver error.  Once a week is a fault in the markings.  On a personal note, the intersection you describe is a disaster.  It sounds like an invitation to gridlock.  If the northbound and southbound lanes are that far separated, it should be replaced with an interchange, or a rotary, or at least a four-point so that there's less chance that someone will think turning into the oncoming lane is natural.

I'll use this to point out my entry for polite driving.  While it's true that you may drive the route every day, and you're very familiar with it and the vagaries of traffic flow, consider how it may be for someone who's not familiar with it.  If someone is obviously lost or confused, give them a bit of breathing room.  I agree that they should pull over if they're seriously impeding traffic, but slowing down earlier than you would or making you wait for three seconds so they can find the right sign isn't going to ruin your day.  If it takes you longer to take a deep breath then they take to get where they're going, be kind.

Virg
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: snowball's chance on March 23, 2009, 09:25:14 AM
If someone is picking you up, please be prepared and ready to go when they show up.  When they show up at your door is not the time to announce you still need to shower and get ready.

or to announce that you need to stop for cigarettes, gum, water, breath mints, soda, etc. before you get to your planned destination.  Take care of those things before your ride picks you up.

Also, if you agree to give someone a ride, don't hijack them into an unplanned stop or errand once you are on the road (beyond a short stop for gas).  It's one thing to ask your passenger if they would mind stopping briefly, but don't announce that you need to stop by a friend's house who's a stranger to your passenger for half an hour or decide you feel like driving to Best Buy to pick up a new CD for the party.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: caranfin on March 23, 2009, 09:37:26 AM
If someone gives you a ride, offer gas money even if they were already going there. They are still doing you a favor.

Driver's rules apply. If the driver insists that everyone wears a seatbelt, put your seatbelt on.

If you let someone into traffic, and they do not give you a "thank you" wave, you are allowed to get up under them and drive them into the wall. (Nod to Jeff Foxworthy)  ;D

And here's one for Marina... never assume you are going to able to install your child's carseat in someone else's car.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Aeris on March 23, 2009, 09:38:08 AM
If your friend is driving somewhere, and has offered you a ride, and your friends girlfriend/boyfriend/spouse will be riding with you, do not attempt to "call shotgun" as if you were in high school. If you do so, do not be annoyed when the GF/BF/spouse refuses to acknowledge your claim.

The significant other gets the front passenger seat, absent extenuating circumstances.

(In all likelihood, they are contributing the payment for an upkeep of the vehicle in which you are riding, so it's particularly bad form to complain that you have to sit in the backseat.)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: snowball's chance on March 23, 2009, 11:00:13 AM
I have a question about the radio . . . what if the driver wants to listen to a radio program where the DJ makes homophobic/racist/sexist remarks on a regular basis?  Is it ok for the passenger to ask to switch to something else?
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: gollymolly2 on March 23, 2009, 11:56:58 AM
Seems to me that's a situation where it's okay to ask and it's okay for the driver to say no.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: caranfin on March 23, 2009, 12:11:51 PM
This is why I think "driver's choice for radio" is actually a poor rule that can lead to rudeness. I think the driver should pick something everyone can tolerate.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Betelnut on March 23, 2009, 12:23:03 PM
If your lane is ending and merging into another lane, it is your responsibility to signal and merge as efficiently and seamlessly as possible into the other lane.  The drivers that are already in the established lane are not really obligated to slam on their brakes to "let you in" especially when you are not signalling your intent.

Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Virg on March 23, 2009, 12:25:50 PM
caranfin wrote:

"This is why I think "driver's choice for radio" is actually a poor rule that can lead to rudeness."

I think this rule needs to be respun.  I suggest, "If you're a passenger, you should not alter the radio/CD/whatever without asking the driver.  If you're the driver, you should be considerate as to your listening choices."

Virg
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: snowball's chance on March 23, 2009, 12:31:59 PM
If you offer or agree to give someone a ride TO a destination, it's generally not an unreasonable assumption for the passenger to believe you'll drive him or her home as well.  If driving the passenger back home won't or may not be possible, it's polite to let your passenger know before you pick him/her up, or as soon as possible after you find out the plans changed.

Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Stanwyck on March 23, 2009, 03:45:47 PM
Turn into your own lane.  Don't turn from the inside lane to the outside lane, especially when someone else is trying to turn from the outside lane into the outside lane.

If the intersection is labeled as No Turn on Red, don't honk at the person in front of you because they aren't turning right on red.  I'm not risking a ticket so you can get to where you're going 2 minutes sooner.

Rule of thumb: if you need to put your windshield wipers on, your lights should be on also.  It's actually the law in some judisdictions. 

Driving fast to get all the snow to blow off your car into the car behind you is not only rude, but dangerous.  It's called a snow brush, use it.

Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Lisbeth on March 23, 2009, 04:53:20 PM
If you're giving someone a ride, drop them off as close as practical to their destination-don't drop them off a block or two away because it's out of your way to take them where you promised to take them.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Hawkwatcher on March 23, 2009, 06:59:24 PM
I have to expand on the "passenger giving directions" one. 

Please, don't just tell me to "go straight till I tell you to turn".  I need to know where I'm going, so that I can be in the proper lane, not have to slam on the brakes because you told me 3 seconds after I missed the turn that "that's the turn". 

Maybe its just me, but I prefer, "We're going to XYZ, which is on Z street... The easiest way to go is to take A street to C street and turn left onto Z." 

And please, when I'm driving you somewhere, that is not the time to show off every single backroad you know of.  Please, keep it as simple as possible, especially if I'm going to drop you off and have to find my way back. 

I agree that clear and simple directions are important.  Give the real street names and do not use nicknames for streets. You should also use proper and current names for landmarks.  For example: I live in a city that changed the name of one of its parks over ten years ago.  The name change was controversial so many people insisted on using the old name.  This was confusing to newcomers who did not know the history of the park.  Initially, I thought that there were 2 different parks.

As for the treatment of passengers, if your passenger tells you that he or she gets motion sickness easily, do not try to find out how easily your passenger gets sick.  Do not take tight turns fast just to see your passenger turn green.  If he or she asks you to pull over, pull over.  Yes, you may be inconvenienced but at least you will have a clean car.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Black Delphinium on March 23, 2009, 07:50:23 PM
Don't take "we've always met at X" to be a universal truth. Even if you do always mean at where ever, it never hurts to double check with the person you are meeting.

If someone has offered to help you move things with their car(be it animal, vegetable or mineral), the onus is on you to provide the proper boxes/ties/tarps/etc, unless you have made arrangements with the driver beforehand.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: caranfin on March 24, 2009, 09:39:52 AM
I agree that clear and simple directions are important.  Give the real street names and do not use nicknames for streets.

But that can backfire if your driver doesn't know the real street name.
"Take Highway 49."
"What?"
"You know. The Downtown Expressway."
"Oh, right."
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Black Delphinium on March 25, 2009, 05:04:42 AM
Rentals should be treated with as much respect and care as a car loaned to you by your most cared for BFF. Just because it might be a bit beat up, doesn't mean you can treat it casually.


And on the topic of borrowed cars- if you bump/ding/spill coffee/etc, own up as soon as you return it. Lying, covering up the problem, and arguing it was like that when you got it are disrespectful.
If you can fix the mistake, please do so.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: gadget--gal on March 25, 2009, 06:23:34 AM
Unless it's the only way to get the attention of someone who is either seriously backing up traffic or endangering others, don't honk your horn-especially for fun, at night, in a residential neighborhood, or near a hospital.  It seriously disturbs the peace.


quoting for emphasis, as this is acutally illegal in UK.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: rhirhi on March 25, 2009, 11:42:39 AM
I didn't see this, and if I missed it, let me know...

If you are a passenger in someone's car, and you smoke, but they don't, DO NOT assume you can smoke in their car, even if their spouse smokes.

<DH smokes, I don't- however, he does not use my car enough for anyone to be able to tell that he smokes in my car. I have a cousin that does smoke, and will light up without asking if it's okay and gets offended if I ask her to put it out.>
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: ginlyn32 on March 26, 2009, 12:27:02 PM
If you borrow someone elses vehicle for any length of time, please remember to do the following:

*return the vehicle with a full tank of gas

*clean out the vehicle of any trash. consider also running the vehicle through a car wash.

Remember that the person loaning you the vehicle is still paying the monthly payment and insurance on the vehicle. If you need to borrow a vehicle for longer than a couple of days, consider other options or asking the owner of the vehicle if you could help pay the payment or insurance (this is because of a LONG backstory involving DH's worthless sister. She was in a car accident that ended up totaling her car. He decided, without discussing it with me, to loan her our "good" car so she'd have a way to work. We had to drive a run-down pick up truck. She had the dang car for a MONTH and returned it on an empty tank AND garbage all over the backseat)

ginlyn
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: ginlyn32 on March 26, 2009, 03:15:39 PM
If you are carpooling or ride-sharing with someone:

*Please call them if you are running late or unable to ride that day. Do not wait until your ride has shown up at the door and has had to exit their vehicle to knock on the door.

ginlyn
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: matf on March 26, 2009, 03:31:47 PM
Know what your area's laws are regarding things such as:

Yellow lights (for example, in DC, it's actually illegal to enter the intersection after the light has turned yellow)
Bicyclists
Motorcyclists
Pedestrians (do they automatically have the right of way?)
Turning on red (right in US, left in Australia/UK)
HOV lanes
etc.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Twik on March 26, 2009, 03:42:06 PM
More regarding driving music:

If your passenger has been hit by a blinding migraine, and is curled into a ball with a bottle of cold water pressed to her temples, do not play Alanis Morrissette CDs for two hours straight. In gratitude for your consideration, your passenger will do her best not to throw up in your car.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: geordicat on March 26, 2009, 07:28:18 PM
More regarding driving music:

If your passenger has been hit by a blinding migraine, and is curled into a ball with a bottle of cold water pressed to her temples, do not play Alanis Morrissette CDs for two hours straight. In gratitude for your consideration, your passenger will do her best not to throw up in your car.

If giving someone a ride home and they do have this horrible migraine, go straight home.  No side trips.  No stops at the grocery store for milk.  No stops at the mission to drop off the blankets.  No stops at your office to check on Frank.

Once they are home, leave them alone.  Do not force them to take pain meds, then go to the store and come back with a CARPET STEAMER and then proceed to clean the carpets because you feel the are dirty.

Are you listening, mother???
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Hawkwatcher on March 27, 2009, 12:25:32 PM
There are also rules for parking. 

If you see a spot reserved for disabled people: do not park there.  It does not matter if you are only going to be in the store for a minute or an hour.  You are still breaking the law and possibly inconveniencing someone who really does need the spot.

Be careful when parking in apartment complexes.   Do not park on the street and block other cars.  You should also be careful not to park in a tenant's designated spot. 

You should also be careful not to take up more than one spot when you park your vehicle. 
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: caranfin on March 27, 2009, 12:33:33 PM
If you're riding with others, you are in a small, enclosed space. This is not the time to get out the heavily scented hand lotion and rub it all over. Or paint your nails. (Yes, these things should go without saying, and yet somehow they don't.)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: WhiteTigerCub on March 27, 2009, 12:55:16 PM
If you are a smoker riding or driving in a vehicle with others, be considerate and put your window down a little to draw the smoke out. A little smoke in car can cause others eyes to water and can make them physically ill if subjected to the direct second hand smoke for even a short period of time.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Aeris on March 27, 2009, 01:02:03 PM
Unless there is some absolute necessity, if you are driving a car and have passengers, please do not roll down ALL the windows while going 70 mph on the highway.

Really, I get that you wish you were on a motorcycle and want to feel the wind in your face, but I don't. And I get that you have almost no hair, so it doesn't bother you, but it does me.

Does this bother anyone else besides me? I think I'll make an independent post...
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: VorFemme on March 27, 2009, 02:23:36 PM
Unless there is some absolute necessity, if you are driving a car and have passengers, please do not roll down ALL the windows while going 70 mph on the highway.

Really, I get that you wish you were on a motorcycle and want to feel the wind in your face, but I don't. And I get that you have almost no hair, so it doesn't bother you, but it does me.

Does this bother anyone else besides me? I think I'll make an independent post...

DH loves his convertible - but he still wears his hair cut in a military manner - there is no way that any of it is going to get into his eyes and the number of tangles is going to be kept down since it is short and thinner than it used to be (he's 55).

I like the convertible, too - but I want to be wearing something that controls how much whipping around my hair does.

The debacle last week that ended up with my hair less than half the length I usually prefer has had ONE good effect.  I can leave the top down and have only two or three small tangles to deal with.........a pixie cut may not be my best look, but it does mean that DH can indulge in leaving the top down.

It's been raining the last couple of days - so the top has stayed up!
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: misha412 on June 05, 2009, 04:10:38 PM
When pulling into a turn lane to wait to pull across traffic, please pull your entire vehicle into the turn lane. It is dangerous for drivers in the traffic to have to manuver around the tail end of your vehicle. (seems to be especially prevalent where I live for some reason)

Travel in the lane that is appropriate to your speed. If you are doing 15-20 under the speed limit, the inside or fast lane is usually not the correct one to be in. If school buses and semi's and bi-cyclists are passing you on an uphill incline, you are going too slow to be in the fast lane.

Your cell phone conversation is NOT more important than driving safely. Nor is being able to have the right music station on, or trying to feed the baby in the back seat, or putting on your make-up, or light up your cigarette. Driving with your elbows so you can smoke and talk on the cell phone is impolite among other things. (Seen all of the above in various combinations).

If you do not know an area (new arrival, tourist, etc.), please be aware that gunning the car from the outside lane to the inside lane of a 4-lane busy road/highway all in a one block stretch might make people a little upset. Do not be surprised at honking horns, angry gestures, and rude things screamed out the window. While the reactions are impolite of themselves, some reactions cannot be helped when one fears for their lives or the lives of their loved ones. You might want to drive down another block or two and turn around.

Do not become upset when someone in front of you stops for an emergency vehicle. It might be your loved one that needs to get the help. Please do not chase the ambulance or police officer so you can get ahead of traffic.

Do not become upset when traffic stops for a funeral procession. It is considered good manners in the US South to stop for a funeral procession. And please do not tail onto the end of a funeral procession to get ahead of others in traffic.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: paladin on July 13, 2009, 10:15:59 PM
If you are involved in a minor fender bender, don't just park your car in the middle of the road, pull over to the shoulder or nearest safe place that will not impede traffic to complete your paperwork.

When parking:
-Do not double park. 
-Be sure to leave enough room for others to get in and out of the vehicles in adjacent parking spots. 
-Take care not to block any driveways.

Quote
 
Quote
Unless it's the only way to get the attention of someone who is either seriously backing up traffic or endangering others, don't honk your horn-especially for fun, at night, in a residential neighborhood, or near a hospital.  It seriously disturbs the peace.

quoting for emphasis, as this is acutally illegal in UK.

POD
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: sparklestar on July 14, 2009, 01:59:22 PM
Parking: don't take up more space than necessary, but leave enough space for yourself and other cars to manuvere safely.

Radio: I'm on the driver's choice. My mum tried to enforce "my car, my choice" once but realised Radio4 sends me to sleep - not good if I'm driving!

Accidents: don't yell. Being in an accident is traumatic enough - if everyone is okay, there is no harm done, that is why we have insurance.

Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: gadget--gal on July 14, 2009, 04:22:44 PM
If you're riding with others, you are in a small, enclosed space. This is not the time to get out the heavily scented hand lotion and rub it all over. Or paint your nails. (Yes, these things should go without saying, and yet somehow they don't.)
one spring, my mum inadvertently set pff my allergies because of  her hand cream. I simply couldnt breathe! even when she washed it off, I still had trouble when we got in her car, because it was an enclosed space.  :-[
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Mopsy428 on July 26, 2009, 03:33:06 PM
Drivers and passengers: if you are having a conversation with someone, please do not turn up the radio, interrupt the conversation with the preface, "I LOVE THIS SONG!!", and start singing.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Gyburc on September 09, 2009, 07:47:23 AM
If you intend to pull across the road in order to park on the opposite side, please use your indicator to show you are going to do so. Do not just slam on the brakes and put on your hazard lights before slewing across the road.

Additionally, if there is traffic coming your way, do not continue to drive at them on the wrong side of the road until you reach your preferred parking spot, forcing them to reverse out of your way.

(Why do people do this? It seems to be mainly HGV drivers where I am...)

Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: rhirhi on September 09, 2009, 11:13:14 AM
Just because you are a city counsel man and a woman 5streets up has had her home broken into 2times in 2years, does not give you leeway to be honking your horn up and down EVERY. single. street. of the town every night because 'it should scare the hood'lums away' (Yes, it is happening, and for some reason the cops WILL NOT arrest him, even though ALL citizens complain!)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: JoW on September 12, 2009, 10:54:41 PM
1)  The posted speed limit is a maximum, not a minimum, and it was set because it is appropriate for area.
2)  The sign that says "Blind Drives" means there are hard-to-see driveways along the road.  Cars may be pulling out of those driveways.  Or they may be slowing down to turn into those driveways.
3)  The double yellow line down the middle of the road means do not pass.  It does not mean "speed up when passing".  Its there for a reason. 

My house is one of about 8 on a 1/2 mile stretch of road with "Blind Drive" signs at each end and a double yellow line down the middle.  There have been several accidents and countless near-misses because people don't follow those rules.   
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: shhh its me on September 13, 2009, 03:35:57 AM
  Do not leave your car running in a residential  neighborhood if your muffler is broken or your car is unusually loud especially at night.

Pedestrians should begin to cross while there is enough time to completely cross the intersection. ie not start across a 8 lane road when the warning lights have been flashing for 15 second already.

Drivers should not harass pedestrians.  If while your turning right do not imped pedestrians  by turning 2 feet in front of them or startle them by speeding just behind them. Do not speed at pedestrian "because they know I will stop " 
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: marcel on September 13, 2009, 08:29:10 AM
  Do not leave your car running in a residential  neighborhood if your muffler is broken or your car is unusually loud especially at night.

Pedestrians should begin to cross while there is enough time to completely cross the intersection. ie not start across a 8 lane road when the warning lights have been flashing for 15 second already.

Drivers should not harass pedestrians.  If while your turning right do not imped pedestrians  by turning 2 feet in front of them or startle them by speeding just behind them. Do not speed at pedestrian "because they know I will stop " 

There, corrected that for you
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Ferrets on September 13, 2009, 09:55:47 AM
Do not park on pedestrian crossings (aka pelican crossings over here in the UK)

Really. If the traffic is moving slowly, do not blithely carry on until the queue stopping means you come to rest straddling a pedestrian crossing. Even if the traffic light is green at that point. Because when the traffic light changes to red (as they are wont to do), and the pedestrian light flicks to green, then people have to try and cross the road whilst edging around your vehicle (which is no picnic even when you're perfectly mobile, let alone if you have the extra width and awkwardness of a wheelchair or pushchair).    

And if when drivers have been so inconsiderate as to do that, then please do not decide that this is the optimum moment to jerk your vehicle forward and risk killing any pedestrian who has the temerity to get across when the flaming pedestrian light is green. Please do not shake your fist at us, either.

Conversely, thank you to all those drivers who, when there isn't a car-length of space past the crossing, do as they should, stop before the crossing, and wait until there is space before continuing. You get a big, big smile from me when I'm waiting on the side of the road and see you do that.

And this shouldn't need saying, but...don't run red lights on these crossings, either. (Or red lights full stop, obviously.) Even if you don't think you see anybody on them. I have been very nearly flattened by Mr/Ms 50mph-what-red-light? more times than I care to think about.

[Why, yes, I am fed up of taking my life into my hands every morning when I cross that wretched road. ::) ]
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: JoW on September 14, 2009, 07:24:02 PM
  Do not leave your car running .....
Side note - In Omaha, Nebraska, USA it is illegal to leave a car running unattended.  So if its  brutally cold and you go out, start your car, then go back in the house while it warms up and your car gets stolen you get a ticket.  That law was passed to cut down on the number of cars stolen in the winter when the owners left them running to warm them up.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: BethanyAnne on February 11, 2010, 10:06:28 PM
If your lane is ending and merging into another lane, it is your responsibility to signal and merge as efficiently and seamlessly as possible into the other lane.  The drivers that are already in the established lane are not really obligated to slam on their brakes to "let you in" especially when you are not signalling your intent.



Actually, when one lane is ending you are supposed to merge every other car. No one lane has the right over the other.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: BeagleMommy on February 12, 2010, 08:09:52 AM
If your car became snow covered the night before please clean it off properly.  That means clearing all the windows, not just the driver's side of the windshield.  If the passenger side of the windshield is covered in snow, you can't see what's happening on your right.  Please clean off as much of the roof of your car as possible.  Blowing snow can endanger other drivers or the snow can slide onto your windshield and block your view.

My father and I call cars that look that way "snow tanks".
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Nanny Ogg on February 12, 2010, 08:34:55 AM
There are also rules for parking. 

If you see a spot reserved for disabled people: do not park there.  It does not matter if you are only going to be in the store for a minute or an hour.  You are still breaking the law and possibly inconveniencing someone who really does need the spot.


Ohh, I can add to this:

Just because it is dark or raining it doesn't give you, Mr AnyAbleBody, the right to park in the disabled people's spaces. Rain/dark/snow/whatever does not make disabled people stay indoors.

My one:

If someone is parking legally outside their house, do not leave passive agressive notes about long term parking....
[/rant]!!
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Black Delphinium on February 12, 2010, 09:59:34 AM
If your car became snow covered the night before please clean it off properly.  That means clearing all the windows, not just the driver's side of the windshield.  If the passenger side of the windshield is covered in snow, you can't see what's happening on your right.  Please clean off as much of the roof of your car as possible.  Blowing snow can endanger other drivers or the snow can slide onto your windshield and block your view.

My father and I call cars that look that way "snow tanks".
And in many places(like here in PA) it is illegal to not clean off your car(it's a hefty fine if you get pulled over).
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 15, 2010, 03:27:57 PM

1) If someone is giving yourself and others a ride somewhere in a two door car and drops the person in the back off first, get out of the car and move the seat forward so they can get out more easily. 

In high school, I was the one in the back seat of a two door car.  A friend gave myself and a guy I had a crush on a ride home after school, dropping me off first.  Crush was in the front seat and didn't even bother getting out, just leaned forward and pulled the lever to bring the seat back as forward as it could go with him still sitting in it.   It's hard enough to get out of the back seat of a 2 door, and I had a large backpack and a gym bag with me that I had to squeeze out with me.   

I no longer had a crush on the guy after this incident.   

2) (This one is for my dear husband) In the event your passenger(s) might be prone to motion sickness, for the love of all that is good and holy, if you are in traffic and the car in front of you moves up about 3 car lengths, it really is not necessary for you to hurry up and close the gap then slam on the breaks so that the car lurches forward.   And if you are asked to stop doing this, do not blame it on the car in front of you.   They are not the ones I'll want to slap when I'm trying not to vomit.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: MissRose on February 17, 2010, 04:46:01 AM
I am not sure if its the law in Michigan where I live, but i wish it was.  I hate having snow flying off and hitting my car.  I do my best to clear the snow off my car before driving despite the fact I am short.

If your car became snow covered the night before please clean it off properly.  That means clearing all the windows, not just the driver's side of the windshield.  If the passenger side of the windshield is covered in snow, you can't see what's happening on your right.  Please clean off as much of the roof of your car as possible.  Blowing snow can endanger other drivers or the snow can slide onto your windshield and block your view.

My father and I call cars that look that way "snow tanks".
And in many places(like here in PA) it is illegal to not clean off your car(it's a hefty fine if you get pulled over).
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: magdalena on February 17, 2010, 04:54:09 AM
If a car in the lane next to you puts their turn signal on to indicate that they wish to move into your lane, do not immediately speed up to prevent them from moving over to your lane.


While I pretty much agree with anything and everything posted in this thread, I'd like to point out that this one depends on where the other car is - if there's a car right in front of me and everything's free behind me AND the car on the next lane is at my level, speeding might make it easier for everyone. I know I prefer that when I'm the one trying to change lanes  ;)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: kitty-cat on February 17, 2010, 10:19:25 AM
Be nice to the obviously new drivers. I've been doing driving lessons every weekend now since January and I have improved considerably from the first time I ever drove. That being said, the road that my parents live on is windy as a snake, and if you don't know the turns you can easily meet the trees with your car. I go the speed limit on that road so that I can learn the turns- I have had people honking at me because they want to go 15 over the speed limit, but I'm sticking to the limit of 30mph.

I'm sorry, but I have this little thing about hitting trees- I don't like to do it. I will drive at the speed I feel comfortable at- and if that is the posted speed limit, you are outta luck. The passing point in the road is just ahead. The same goes for the interstate- I'm driving at the speed of traffic, but I'm still learning how to gauge my speed and the distance between the car in front of me. Honking at me just winds me up and makes it harder for me to drive safely. Honk enough times and I won't be able to drive home, and I really need the practice...
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Shoo on February 17, 2010, 10:43:02 AM
If your lane is ending and merging into another lane, it is your responsibility to signal and merge as efficiently and seamlessly as possible into the other lane.  The drivers that are already in the established lane are not really obligated to slam on their brakes to "let you in" especially when you are not signalling your intent.



Actually, when one lane is ending you are supposed to merge every other car. No one lane has the right over the other.

In this same vein, it's quite surprising to me how many people don't seem to realize that Yield and Merge are NOT the same thing.  A Yield sign means you wait until there's a safe clearing for you to pull into.  A Merge sign means you enter the lane, like a zipper, every other car.

There's a hwy near me where I just know there's going to be a horrific accident one of these days.  The Yield sign entering the highway is ignored by a lot of drivers.  People on the hwy don't have to slow to allow them to "merge" but if you aren't aware of the Special Snowflakes who don't believe the Yield sign actually applies to them, you may be putting yourself into a very dangerous situation if you don't.  How I wish they'd put a patrol car there sometime.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: MDefarge on February 17, 2010, 10:51:15 AM

In this same vein, it's quite surprising to me how many people don't seem to realize that Yield and Merge are NOT the same thing.  A Yield sign means you wait until there's a safe clearing for you to pull into.  A Merge sign means you enter the lane, like a zipper, every other car.

Yes! There is one highway near me that is always sluggish at the time I would be using it, so I drive on the service roads instead (amazing how much faster it is) but I always, always stay in the right hand lane until it is time for me to make my left hand turn because people do NOT know what yield means & I've seen more than one near miss.

Also I saw the hat trick of bad driving the other day.  Illegal left U-turn, from the RIGHT lane, at a RED light. (before anyone asks, no this isn't an area where it is ok to make a turn left OR right on red)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: VorFemme on February 17, 2010, 05:08:57 PM

In this same vein, it's quite surprising to me how many people don't seem to realize that Yield and Merge are NOT the same thing.  A Yield sign means you wait until there's a safe clearing for you to pull into.  A Merge sign means you enter the lane, like a zipper, every other car.

Yes! There is one highway near me that is always sluggish at the time I would be using it, so I drive on the service roads instead (amazing how much faster it is) but I always, always stay in the right hand lane until it is time for me to make my left hand turn because people do NOT know what yield means & I've seen more than one near miss.

Also I saw the hat trick of bad driving the other day.  Illegal left U-turn, from the RIGHT lane, at a RED light. (before anyone asks, no this isn't an area where it is ok to make a turn left OR right on red)

It's been a while - but I have had someone turn RIGHT in front of me from the lane to my left....and left from the far right lane while crossing four lanes of traffic (thank the universe that we were the only two cars at the intersection at that moment).  I am still flabbergasted at the degree of SSiness that this takes............but having driven a while since then - I think that there are more SS in the universe.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 17, 2010, 09:30:44 PM
The new drivers one reminded me of another thing I experienced years ago.  Be nice to new drivers and anyone who is obviously driving a manual for the first time.   I learned to drive one when I was about 23-24 and I was half tempted to stick a sign on my bumper that would say: "Driver is learning to drive stick shift.   Tailgate at your own risk!"

I had a particularly hard time starting off.   It took me a while to get the feel of how much I needed to let up on the clutch while giving the car gas.   I was always stalling out at lights, and one particular day I was at an intersection, in the right of the two lanes turning left.  No cars in the lane on my left, and only one car behind me.   I stalled right when trying to get going when the light went green.

The driver behind me, instead of just going around me like he had the room to do, instead laid on the horn repeatedly, then went around me with another irritated honk of the horn.   Leaving me to wonder "Well why didn't you do that in the first place?"
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Miss March on February 18, 2010, 10:08:18 AM
When you drop a friend off at their car, pause a moment and make sure their car starts without any issue before you drive away. There's nothing worse then waving goodbye to a friend and driving off just as they realize their battery is dead.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: MissRose on February 21, 2010, 09:07:16 AM
Not sure if this was mentioned or not, don't give people dirty looks if they choose to drive slower if there is snow coming down, and the roads aren't cleared properly.

I would prefer to keep myself and my new car in 1 piece when I go to and from work, thank you (looks at the special snowflakes who give me looks when they think they can drive as if its 80 degrees & sun is out & dry pavement!)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: sparklestar on February 21, 2010, 10:53:32 AM
If you are on single lane country roads with minimal overtaking opportunities and have created a queue behind you, slow down and indicate right when it's safe for them to overtake you.  Don't speed up on the only straight bit of road therefore nixxing the only chance they have to overtake you for another 67 miles...
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: kherbert05 on February 21, 2010, 12:09:44 PM
I agree that clear and simple directions are important.  Give the real street names and do not use nicknames for streets.

But that can backfire if your driver doesn't know the real street name.
"Take Highway 49."
"What?"
"You know. The Downtown Expressway."
"Oh, right."

Give both especially to out of towners. Houston has official names for different sections of highway http://www.houstonareaweb.com/freeways/ . It can be confusing to an out of towner because the city signs on street level will say Katy Freeway and the TexDOT signs on the actual highway is I10.  (This is west of the city I10 east of town is either BEAUMONT HIGHWAY or East Freeway.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: VorFemme on February 21, 2010, 12:24:20 PM
I moved to Houston in 2006 - I am still learning which sections of which NUMBERED highways & streets are called by other names during traffic reports or when friends are giving me instructions on how to get somewhere.

It can be *interesting* (as well as confusing) to realize how many names one "street" has as it goes across town..............or around town, in the case of some of the loops.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: kherbert05 on February 21, 2010, 12:40:19 PM
I moved to Houston in 2006 - I am still learning which sections of which NUMBERED highways & streets are called by other names during traffic reports or when friends are giving me instructions on how to get somewhere.

It can be *interesting* (as well as confusing) to realize how many names one "street" has as it goes across town..............or around town, in the case of some of the loops.

Old streets that now merge/run into each other because there are now bridges over the bayous that weren't there before the mid 70's can make things very confusing.

I've had to tell more people than I can count that they weren't on Memorial anymore, they were on San Felipe. Memorial curves off north at a light (just after you pass Kinkaid) and if you go straight you go over a bridge and hit San Felipe. I know that bridge wasn't there when me moved into the area in 72, it came a few years later.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Lisbeth on February 21, 2010, 12:56:04 PM
In Houston, it's not just the numbered highways that have multiple names...it's also the streets.

For example, Bellaire becomes Holcombe, Studemont becomes Montrose, Wirt becomes Chimney Rock, North Braeswood becomes South Braeswood and South Braeswood becomes Stella Link, and there are plenty of other examples.  You really have to know where you are and where you're going.

But that's also true in much of NYC, especially in Lower Manhattan and the outer boroughs.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: kherbert05 on February 21, 2010, 03:52:01 PM
In Houston, it's not just the numbered highways that have multiple names...it's also the streets.

For example, Bellaire becomes Holcombe, Studemont becomes Montrose, Wirt becomes Chimney Rock, North Braeswood becomes South Braeswood and South Braeswood becomes Stella Link, and there are plenty of other examples.  You really have to know where you are and where you're going.

But that's also true in much of NYC, especially in Lower Manhattan and the outer boroughs.

If you look at a map/old maps you see that in many cases these streets either cross current/former city lines. Many neighborhoods were once independent cities (The Heights for example that is why the area is still dry - it is in the original city charter)

As Houston engulfed the towns streets were connected, even if the cities weren't annexed (Belliare, Piney Point, Hedwick, Bunker Hill, Spring Valley). Also when the highway traffic got busy enough to need overpasses some streets were moved over to make the pattern of on ramps, over passes, off ramps work better. Voss was moved over that is why you have that section called old Voss. Memorial cut Piney Point in two and now you have that little section called S. Piney Point that Vargos is on (actually most people just call it Fondren because it dead ends into Fondren right about in front of Vargos) Wirt is in Spring Valley (Do not speed there) Chimney Rock is in Houston. 90A is Called Old Main because it was originally Houston's Main Street.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on February 22, 2010, 09:20:55 AM
Speaking of street names, when dealing with Google maps or giving people our address over the phone, we used to have a hard time with our former street name.   It was a through street and even on either end the signs were printed differently.   One read Plumtree Dr, the other read Plum Tree Dr.   If we told someone Plumtree as one word they couldn't find it, but they could find Plum Tree. 

My husband tends to refer to streets by their route names, where applicable.  I tend to use their names but if giving directions from the highway I'll say "Take exit such and such B onto route whatever north" but will also tell them that route whatever is also referred to as Rivername Ave.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: claddagh lass on March 09, 2010, 02:33:48 PM
Don't play potentially dangerous pranks on your passenger.

My ex-boyfriend once thought it would be funny to do suddenly swerve from side to side with me in the passenger seat.  I was wearing a seatbelt but I still ended up hitting the side of my head against the glass window.

I ended up with a welt on my temple and he thought it was hysterical.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Shoo on March 09, 2010, 03:01:29 PM
Don't play potentially dangerous pranks on your passenger.

My ex-boyfriend once thought it would be funny to do suddenly swerve from side to side with me in the passenger seat.  I was wearing a seatbelt but I still ended up hitting the side of my head against the glass window.

I ended up with a welt on my temple and he thought it was hysterical.

Glad he's your ex!
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: VorFemme on March 09, 2010, 05:25:16 PM
Even more so - don't play pranks on the driver.

DD was in the car when an idjit in the back seat decided to put her hands over the driver's eyes and holler "guess who"?

Her date, the driver, and the front seat passenger took turns chewing her out - then told her that the next prank (of any kind) was going to get her put out of the car to walk home......because she wasn't going to put all three of them PLUS any other vehicles in their vicinity on the road in danger.

I understand that she sulked because "they weren't any fun" but she kept her hands in the back seat after that.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: JonGirl on March 10, 2010, 03:53:49 AM
Even more so - don't play pranks on the driver.
DD was in the car when an idjit in the back seat decided to put her hands over the driver's eyes and holler "guess who"?

Her date, the driver, and the front seat passenger took turns chewing her out - then told her that the next prank (of any kind) was going to get her put out of the car to walk home......because she wasn't going to put all three of them PLUS any other vehicles in their vicinity on the road in danger.

I understand that she sulked because "they weren't any fun" but she kept her hands in the back seat after that.


No, definantly not. Do not yell TRAIN! as the driver is about to cross a railway line with the boomgates up.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: AreaWoman on March 10, 2010, 03:18:15 PM

2)  Pay attention to crosswalks and other places pedestrians might be present.


I would just like to emphasize/expand on this one.  Drivers should not inch into the crosswalk while pedestrians are there.  I have a neurological problem that occasionally causes me to fall down unexpectedly, even though I look perfectly normal.  It makes me extremely nervous to have drivers get so close to me, which makes it more likely I will fall!
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Giggity on March 10, 2010, 03:23:55 PM
I can't believe no one's mentioned this simple rule:

Do NOT shave your hoo-ha while driving.

http://keysnews.com/node/21349 (http://keysnews.com/node/21349)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: VorFemme on March 10, 2010, 03:28:16 PM
I can't believe no one's mentioned this simple rule:

Do NOT shave your hoo-ha while driving.

http://keysnews.com/node/21349 (http://keysnews.com/node/21349)

It is hard to believe that anyone would put THIS grooming task off until they were driving........sheesh...........next thing you know they'll have to invent a stain remover to get hair dye out of leather seat upholstery as someone decides to use their 20 minute commute to touch up the gray in their hair......or something.

Sheesh again.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: marcel on March 11, 2010, 03:56:16 AM
I can't believe no one's mentioned this simple rule:

Do NOT shave your hoo-ha while driving.

http://keysnews.com/node/21349 (http://keysnews.com/node/21349)
And I thought men shaving their face while driving was bad.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: rhirhi on March 11, 2010, 02:27:22 PM
I can't believe no one's mentioned this simple rule:

Do NOT shave your hoo-ha while driving.

http://keysnews.com/node/21349 (http://keysnews.com/node/21349)

While I have not done this, I must admit that I have changed clothes (including bra and shorts) while driving on the interstate. But I made it on time to my track meet, goldurnit!
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Bellantara on March 11, 2010, 02:40:06 PM
I can't believe no one's mentioned this simple rule:

Do NOT shave your hoo-ha while driving.

http://keysnews.com/node/21349 (http://keysnews.com/node/21349)

While I have not done this, I must admit that I have changed clothes (including bra and shorts) while driving on the interstate. But I made it on time to my track meet, goldurnit!
Mom proudly recounts the time in the late 60s when she was coming from a job interview and changed from dress, slip, and hose to jeans and a button down while driving.   :o  She can't understand why I see this as a bad thing.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: MinAvi on March 30, 2010, 08:14:59 PM
If you are on single lane country roads with minimal overtaking opportunities and have created a queue behind you, slow down and indicate right when it's safe for them to overtake you.  Don't speed up on the only straight bit of road therefore nixxing the only chance they have to overtake you for another 67 miles...

Actually, please dont do this, as then the drivers behind you dont know if you are indicating it is safe to pass or if you are turning right.

If they decide you are indicating to let them pass and try to pass you, and you are actually turning right it is going to end up very messy! And the driver that is trying to overtake will be a fault.

If you are a slow vehicle and there is nowhere to pass, please pull over to the side of the road. It will only take an extra 30 seconds and everyone behind you will be very very happy :)


Edited to add: This applies if you drive on the left (like in Australia) please read backwards for all your RH drivers :) Sorry!
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: sparklestar on March 31, 2010, 02:17:56 AM
True - specifically I was thinking of long, single track country roads with no turn offs!
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: claddagh lass on April 01, 2010, 03:17:25 PM
If someone has the right of way don't suddenly decide to cut them off.  Sitting an extra two seconds to make your turn will not hurt anything.

This happened to me this morning.  I had the right of way on a turn and someone suddenly speeded across the four way stop.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Shoo on April 02, 2010, 11:13:16 AM
If you HAVE the right of way, USE IT!!  

It is aggravating and very unsafe for someone who has the right of way to just sit there and motion for someone else to turn or go or whatever.  There are traffic rules in place for a reason.  If you just arbitrarily decide to not follow them, someone could get hurt.  You're not doing someone a favor by not taking your turn...you are frustrating and possibly endangering them!!!
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Piratelvr1121 on April 05, 2010, 05:21:48 PM
My pet peeve is the sort of aggressive drivers who feel like they need to teach everyone else how to drive.    IE running up on the bumper of the car in front of you if they're not going fast enough around a turn for your liking.     

Or "Brake checking" a tailgater.   One guy I knew in college would swerve on purpose to get tailgaters to back off.   It worked but made passengers nervous.   
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Aeris on June 28, 2010, 05:06:02 PM
In Houston, it's not just the numbered highways that have multiple names...it's also the streets.

For example, Bellaire becomes Holcombe, Studemont becomes Montrose, Wirt becomes Chimney Rock, North Braeswood becomes South Braeswood and South Braeswood becomes Stella Link, and there are plenty of other examples.  You really have to know where you are and where you're going.

But that's also true in much of NYC, especially in Lower Manhattan and the outer boroughs.

If you look at a map/old maps you see that in many cases these streets either cross current/former city lines. Many neighborhoods were once independent cities (The Heights for example that is why the area is still dry - it is in the original city charter)

As Houston engulfed the towns streets were connected, even if the cities weren't annexed (Belliare, Piney Point, Hedwick, Bunker Hill, Spring Valley). Also when the highway traffic got busy enough to need overpasses some streets were moved over to make the pattern of on ramps, over passes, off ramps work better. Voss was moved over that is why you have that section called old Voss. Memorial cut Piney Point in two and now you have that little section called S. Piney Point that Vargos is on (actually most people just call it Fondren because it dead ends into Fondren right about in front of Vargos) Wirt is in Spring Valley (Do not speed there) Chimney Rock is in Houston. 90A is Called Old Main because it was originally Houston's Main Street.

Southside is my favorite floating city. It's like 8 blocks long, and I think they're only purpose is to give traffic tickets on Bellaire.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Ambrosia Hino on June 29, 2010, 09:27:26 AM
if you are the car causing a long line of traffic, and you are going significantly below the speed limit (10mph or more below), and we're driving through very hilly, no-pass areas, please, pull off the side of the road as soon as its safe to do so, and let everyone else by.

please, do not slam on the brakes to stop at a yellow light. by this, I don't mean "oh the light is yellow, I need to slow down so I can stop when its red" but "stop-on-a-dime but the light is still yellow and if anyone behind you didn't have new brakes, there was just a wreck 3 cars back"

do not pull out of a gas station parking lot into the rear passenger tire of another car, then scream that its THEIR fault that your headlight is now broken. Teen drivers actually are not automatically in the wrong ;D (I was the 16 year old, and it was my rear passenger tire...her insurance paid)

Cops...do not give me a ticket for running a red light when I did indeed stop, for a full minute, before making my right turn. Telling me I ran a light, to which I responded "No, if I'd run it, I would've wrecked with *described other vehicle" then stating "Oh, well you weregoing to"...since when did you receive mind-reading powers? It doesn't matter if I was "going to" stop or not, I did stop and that is the point. You can NOT ticket for assumed intent.

I can't believe no one's mentioned this simple rule:

Do NOT shave your hoo-ha while driving.

http://keysnews.com/node/21349 (http://keysnews.com/node/21349)
this reminds me...an adult novelty store my friend used to work at sold a particular item that made her want to gather license plate numbers and driver's license numbers...something normally battery-operated for a lonely woman's recreation - plugged into the cigarette lighter instead of using batteries...

Please, if you MUST use this item, either be the passenger (with a non-distracted driver) or pull over and do what you need to do before resuming your drive...I really, really don't want you to try driving while doing this
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Bexx27 on June 29, 2010, 10:25:36 AM
I was once rear-ended while stopped at a red light by someone who was changing her shoes while driving.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: rhirhi on June 29, 2010, 12:54:41 PM
I was once rear-ended while stopped at a red light by someone who was changing her shoes while driving.

I hate to admit it, and after the fact I was thinking 'How was I not just killed?', but I've changed clothes while driving- from school clothes (private school) to my track uniform. Just to make a HS track meet. Changed tops *completely*, slid off the school skirt (at least I didn't have to change my shorts- they were underneath) and changed socks (I hate wearing shoes while driving). On the interstate. Going at least 70 mph. My only defense is that I was 17 and had strange priorities (I loved track).

But at least I did wait until I was AT the track to take my muscle relaxers. I at least knew better than to take them while driving (I had been injured that day, my Cousin is a doc and got me at least ready for that day)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: KaosP on June 29, 2010, 08:02:25 PM
Turn into your own lane.  Don't turn from the inside lane to the outside lane, especially when someone else is trying to turn from the outside lane into the outside lane.


The other day, I watched a police officer sit at a light and pull anyone over who turned left from the left lane into anything other than the left lane in which they were supposed to be turning. (did that make sense?) So I think this might be a legality thing, not an etiquette thing.

(illegal or not, it's pretty high on my "ARRGH!" list for driving)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: KaosP on June 29, 2010, 08:11:37 PM
If your lane is ending and merging into another lane, it is your responsibility to signal and merge as efficiently and seamlessly as possible into the other lane.  The drivers that are already in the established lane are not really obligated to slam on their brakes to "let you in" especially when you are not signalling your intent.
Actually, when one lane is ending you are supposed to merge every other car. No one lane has the right over the other.

This isn't how I was taught. I was taught that the person in the merging lane was supposed to match their speed and find a spot in which to merge, as Betelnut said, "as efficiently and seamlessly as possible". And to be honest, I *hate* when someone assumes I'm going to let them in just because didn't do this, and ran out of lane.

Anyway...if you're turning left at a light, ENGAGE THE INTERSECTION! Take it (without turning your wheels) and pull up so that you're parallel to the street on which you are turning. It will make your left turn much quicker, hence getting through before it turns red, and may allow a car or two behind you to go through. (another tidbit from Young Driver's of Canada)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: 567Kate on August 23, 2010, 11:14:45 PM
It's not polite to wave another car ahead of you at an intersection (like a four way stop) when it's your turn to go. It just makes it confusing. Take your appropriate turn.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Shoo on August 24, 2010, 09:41:15 AM
It's not polite to wave another car ahead of you at an intersection (like a four way stop) when it's your turn to go. It just makes it confusing. Take your appropriate turn.

This drives me crazy!  People think they're being nice by doing this, but all they're really doing is creating a dangerous and confusing situation.  Traffic rules exist for a reason!!
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Mopsy428 on August 24, 2010, 09:44:59 AM
It's not polite to wave another car ahead of you at an intersection (like a four way stop) when it's your turn to go. It just makes it confusing. Take your appropriate turn.
I admit that I'll do this if it's only me and another car, and the other car just barely stops. For me, it's like, "What are you doing?! Just go so you don't suddenly take off while I'm crossing the intersection." People like that make me nervous.  >:(
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: 567Kate on August 24, 2010, 09:50:57 AM
It's not polite to wave another car ahead of you at an intersection (like a four way stop) when it's your turn to go. It just makes it confusing. Take your appropriate turn.
I admit that I'll do this if it's only me and another car, and the other car just barely stops. For me, it's like, "What are you doing?! Just go so you don't suddenly take off while I'm crossing the intersection." People like that make me nervous.  >:(

Yeah, I let pushy people just go as well, rather than risk an accident taking my turn. I was referring to the action Shoo describes: waving someone ahead when it's really your turn because you think it's nice, but it's confusing for any other drivers or pedestrians who are trying to follow the traffic pattern.

Edited to fix a typo
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Lysistrata on August 25, 2010, 06:30:32 AM
It's not polite to wave another car ahead of you at an intersection (like a four way stop) when it's your turn to go. It just makes it confusing. Take your appropriate turn.
I admit that I'll do this if it's only me and another car, and the other car just barely stops. For me, it's like, "What are you doing?! Just go so you don't suddenly take off while I'm crossing the intersection." People like that make me nervous.  >:(

Yeah, I let pushy people just go as well, rather than risk an accident taking my turn. I was referring to the action Shoo describes: waving someone ahead when it's really your turn because you think it's nice, but it's confusing for any other drivers or pedestrians who are trying to follow the traffic pattern.

Edited to fix a typo

I hate this as well. Anymore, if I'm approaching a 4-way stop and see a car coming from my left or right, I slow way down (pretty much barely rolling along) about 50-100 feet before the stop sign facing me so that the other car(s) will get to the intersection first and we can avoid the hassle of waving. There's rarely anyone behind me when I do this...if there happens to be someone behind me, I do a normal stop and just have to hope that everyone knows the traffic rules, but I much prefer the slowdown method.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: HoneyBee42 on February 20, 2011, 12:22:25 AM
It's not polite to wave another car ahead of you at an intersection (like a four way stop) when it's your turn to go. It just makes it confusing. Take your appropriate turn.

This drives me crazy!  People think they're being nice by doing this, but all they're really doing is creating a dangerous and confusing situation.  Traffic rules exist for a reason!!
Yes--this has me snarling on my way to work many a time.  The street I live on meets a major N-S street with a 2-way stop (my street and the continuation of my street on the other side of the N-S street, N-S street traffic does not stop).  So, to go to work, I pull up to this intersection east-bound, indicating that I am going to be turning north-bound.  Then, someone at the stop sign west-bound (so facing me) who is either intending to go straight (or even more maddeningly, intending to turn north-bound so that they have the easy right, while I have a left turn that has to cross the south-bound traffic) will start waving or blinking their headlights at me to try to say I should go when it is *their* right of way because left-turn yields to all other traffic and *I* will decide when it's safe for me to cross south-bound traffic, thank you very much and part of that means that all others with right of way over me need to be out of the way, and that does mean you, "Ms. Go-ahead-take-my-turn".  I wish there were some way to politely wave them off.  I typically make a big show of shifting into park.  Makes me want to scream every time -- no, it's not "nice"; no, it's not "polite" ... just follow the rules of the road and we'll all get where we're going.

And please, please ... if you park your car in the street and there's alternate day parking ... move your car at the appointed time.  Especially when there's snow (and the plows will be coming through .. or they'll skip our block because the plow can't fit through the 1-car width space available when there's parked cars on both sides), but at any time .. constricting the traffic to a single lane for both directions of travel just makes everyone else miserable because you were too lazy to go out and move the car when you were supposed to.  
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Nurvingiel on February 20, 2011, 12:42:30 AM
For your car: please do not purchase one of those obnoxious car alarms that just make noise. Get an engine immoblizer or something instead.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Anyanka on February 27, 2011, 06:37:29 PM
If I can`t give you a lift, I can`t give you a lift. Phoning me constantly will not make me any more available.

Phoning me at 2am to drive 100+ miles into a town I  know my way around means I will likely refuse.Phoning your DH to demand my DH gets me to comply will result in both of us laughing at you.

Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Giggity on March 01, 2011, 11:45:00 AM
For your car: please do not purchase one of those obnoxious car alarms that just make noise. Get an engine immoblizer or something instead.

My office's parking garage has a few hair-trigger car alarms. People, it is not 1984! NO ONE PAYS ATTENTION. Turn the things OFF already.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Xandraea on January 25, 2012, 11:01:55 AM
For your car: please do not purchase one of those obnoxious car alarms that just make noise. Get an engine immoblizer or something instead.

My office's parking garage has a few hair-trigger car alarms. People, it is not 1984! NO ONE PAYS ATTENTION. Turn the things OFF already.


I don't know about other places, but too many people seem to use their car alarm to find their car in a crowded parking lot, or worse, in a 5 story parking ramp.  (unless you're pretty close to your vehicle, the sound echoes throughout the ramp and it's very difficult to pinpoint the direction it's coming from).  I admit I have pushed the button on my remote after a bit of hunting, but only to make it beep as if I'm locking it, not to leave horn blaring while I continue the search.  The entire point of loud vehicle alarms has been destroyed by people who use them incorrectly. I pray I'm never in a situation where the panic button is because of PANIC and people ignore it because they assume someone has "misplaced" their car and is hunting for it.

A funny, related story: My father, 20 yrs or so ago, had a vehicle with an alarm which had two modes: One, it would alarm if the window were actually broken or the lock jimmied.  Two, it would alarm if the car were touched/moved.  He was at a party when friends of his went out and sat on the car and shook it around just to set off the alarm as a joke. (First time it was funny, 2nd and 3rd times not so much.  After that they got the hint.)  Another time, we took a family trip to bike a 30-mile trail.  He'd parked the car along the street in the small town and we'd gone a few blocks up to the start of the trail, when a large truck drove by, shaking the car enough that the alarm started blaring, lights flashing.  I've only seen my dad move that fast one other time.  He ran back down the blocks to his car, disabled that alarm mode and left it on the break-in mode.  Good thing this happened while we were still in town, and not 15 miles away on our bicycles!
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Pippen on May 11, 2012, 10:34:41 PM
The driver of the car is responsible for your safety. Not your entertainment. Some people find constant chatter distracting.

Pointing out interesting landmarks or sights and telling them to look and comment on them may not be their highest priority. Poking them or grabbing them to force them to look may mean you end up getting dropped on the side of the road so you can have a extended opportunity to view it.

A rental car is hired under one persons name and that person is responsible for it. If you expect to drive it then hire it under your own name.

If you want to borrow someones car while they are away and they decline your request, please do not just take their keys and use it anyway.

Just because a friends vehicle has a towbar does not mean they are available to hire a trailer and help you shift, nor does it mean they are obligated to lend it to you.

If someone lends you their car please don't drive it like you stole it just because 'you wanted to see  what it could do.'

If you insist on your vehicles being used in a friends wedding despite them telling you that won't be required and they already have arrangements in place with a professional company, please ensure they are in good mechanical condition and that you do not arrive and hour late to pick up the bride because you had a flat tire and no spare.

Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: whatsanenigma on May 12, 2012, 04:51:33 PM
From a pedestrian's point of view:

Drivers, please realize that we pedestrians watch your turn signals also.  Even if a road is otherwise deserted, please use your turn signal if you are going to turn onto the road I am trying to cross.  If I don't see your turn signal, I am going to assume you are going straight, and go ahead and cross, which will lead to you almost running me over when you turn instead.  And when this happens, please do not honk and yell out the window at me, thank you.

(There was an intersection notorious for that problem, on the campus where I went to college.)

Also, I know that some traffic light setups are just stupid and annoying.  I know that technically, you can drive across my right-of-way as a pedestrian, without doing anything illegal according to your light.  But please be patient with us, who have pushed the button and waited  for the walk signal,  and let us walk, given that this is the only legally safe time for us to do so.  I don't like those intersection setups any more than you do, but please don't take it out on me by honking and/or yelling, because it isn't my fault any more than it is yours.

(This problem happens with a set of intersections in my town but because it's a state highway, nobody seems to be able to do anything about it.)
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: 25wishes on May 13, 2012, 10:40:17 AM
I would like to add, if you live in a populated area and keep late hours, please set your remote locking thing to NOT blow the horn to confirm that your car is locked. It may be under the window of someone who is sleeping. You can set it to blow the horn, flash the lights, or neither. Check your owner's manual. I have mine set to Neither, I can hear the car locks clunk and that is good enough for me.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: cabbagegirl28 on May 13, 2012, 02:03:26 PM
I would like to add, if you live in a populated area and keep late hours, please set your remote locking thing to NOT blow the horn to confirm that your car is locked. It may be under the window of someone who is sleeping. You can set it to blow the horn, flash the lights, or neither. Check your owner's manual. I have mine set to Neither, I can hear the car locks clunk and that is good enough for me.

See, and for me, my hearing isn't the most amazing ever. I need to hear the honk to know that my car is locked. However, it's also a very quick and relatively quiet honk (more of a beep than anything), and I press it once. If my car's horn were loud, I would make an effort to change the options on my car lock.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: 25wishes on May 15, 2012, 01:42:21 PM
I guarantee you, I have woken up from a quick "beep" from such a car. I am a light sleeper. Maybe you could set it for flashing lights?
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: gadget--gal on May 16, 2012, 04:34:05 AM

Rule of thumb: if you need to put your windshield wipers on, your lights should be on also.  It's actually the law in some judisdictions. 


(emphasis mine)

I'm moving away from etiquette a little but, in your area, do you have rain on bright sunny days, or does it always turn dark?
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Ryuugan80 on May 16, 2012, 10:10:31 AM
Drivers, if you know your passenger is wary about cars as it is, don't swerve your vehicle around or make screeching sounds 'jokingly.' Actually, just don't do it ever.

I'm already cringing at the very thought.

Also, if you have room to go around someone, don't tailgate them. It's just weird. If you're using them to keep you speed in check (especially around those police trap areas) that all well and good, but keep a better distance.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: RiverSong on May 17, 2012, 12:40:40 PM
The heat/AC should be treated like the radio: it is the driver's to set at their discretion. Not to say that you can't ask to turn it up/down/on/off/open the windows, but it should be a discussion, not a demand.

If you are prone to car sickness, is it appropriate to let the driver know the reason behind the request to open the window ( being that if it is cooler outside the air will help to ward of the final step of said sickness)?
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Black Delphinium on May 17, 2012, 12:58:26 PM
The heat/AC should be treated like the radio: it is the driver's to set at their discretion. Not to say that you can't ask to turn it up/down/on/off/open the windows, but it should be a discussion, not a demand.

If you are prone to car sickness, is it appropriate to let the driver know the reason behind the request to open the window ( being that if it is cooler outside the air will help to ward of the final step of said sickness)?
Of course. Health concerns are always acceptable reasons. Same as asking for the front seat if you get motion sick.
Title: Re: Driving and Car Etiquette
Post by: Anyanka on June 28, 2012, 09:41:51 PM
You are not a good learner driver and I do not wish to supervise you. especially in my car for which you have no insurance.

So why aren't your parents teaching you again?