Etiquette Hell

General Etiquette => Etiquette of the Rich and Famous => Topic started by: Oscar1 on August 11, 2010, 03:18:05 AM

Title: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Oscar1 on August 11, 2010, 03:18:05 AM
For anyone who's not heard the story of this air steward's dramatic resignation, just Google his name.

He's being hailed as a hero in some quarters and I certainly have some sympathy with him but, in etiquette terms, his behaviour was inexcusable. A classic case of responding to rudeness with rudeness.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Ceallach on August 11, 2010, 04:29:36 AM
Straightforward case of retaliatory rudeness, IMHO.  Part of the reason retaliatory rudeness is so bad is that it inevitably inflicts discomfort upon innocent bystanders, and in this situation that is more so than ever.  I can't imagine what all of those other poor passengers thought when the flight attendant began swearing over the PA system.  Regardless of how rude a particular passenger had been or even if he'd had dozens of them be rude to him, his behaviour was completely inappropriate. 

Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Akarui Kibuno on August 11, 2010, 06:39:45 AM
Had he just used the thingies to get off the planes, I would have thought simply clueless.

The swearing, however, puts this into Super Speshul Snowflake Territory. Not saying his job isn't hard, but there are millions of people who might do a harder job than he does and that doesn't give them a free pass to swear at all the people who annoys them  ::)
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: kingsrings on August 11, 2010, 10:15:56 AM
I'm ashamed to admit that I found humor in this situation. And I still kind of do.  :-[

But taking away that and really looking at it, of course what he did was not okay. There were better ways to handle the problem other than having a breakdown like he did. He also could of endangered people with setting off the emergency chute like he did. Airline officials said if workers had been in the area where it deployed, they would of been killed.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Akarui Kibuno on August 11, 2010, 10:19:32 AM
I'm ashamed to admit that I found humor in this situation. And I still kind of do.  :-[

But taking away that and really looking at it, of course what he did was not okay. There were better ways to handle the problem other than having a breakdown like he did. He also could of endangered people with setting off the emergency chute like he did. Airline officials said if workers had been in the area where it deployed, they would of been killed.

Worst thing is, I did find the humor in it too, and then I did just like you and came back to reality pretty quick :)
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: kingsrings on August 11, 2010, 10:23:00 AM
I think most of us can emphasize with this guy due to our own experiences with customers and the type of job. I’ve heard that being an airline steward/ess is one of the toughest CS jobs out there. And a lot of us have had thoughts of what we would love to do in a difficult situation. That is where we find humor and can emphasize with him. But thinking it and actually doing it are two completely different things!! 
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Bibliophile on August 11, 2010, 10:24:08 AM
To me it wasn't really a case of rudeness as a response to rudeness - it was more of rudeness in response to rude AND abusive behavior.  The guy has scabs on his forehead.  Yeah, what he did was totally uncalled for, but someone needs to arrest the passenger too for not following instructions & injuring the flight attendant.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: audrey1962 on August 11, 2010, 10:30:45 AM
Not only did he retaliate with rudeness, but he also broke the law.

I feel for the guy, and I could see a fictional character acting this way in a movie, especially in a comedy, but it's simply not appropriate in the "real world."
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Hillia on August 11, 2010, 10:44:41 AM
To me it wasn't really a case of rudeness as a response to rudeness - it was more of rudeness in response to rude AND abusive behavior.  The guy has scabs on his forehead.  Yeah, what he did was totally uncalled for, but someone needs to arrest the passenger too for not following instructions & injuring the flight attendant.

This.  Slate was completely out of line - as pointed out, he could have seriously injured someone on the ground - but that passenger needs to be held accountable for the assault.  He/she (I don't think it's ever been clarified) apparently smacked Slater in the face with the carryon that was being removed from the overhead bin, in violation of directions from the cabin crew.  It's a completely separate incident and does not excuse the response, but I am disappointed that there's been no mention of holding that person accountable.  I imagine they're pretty pleased with themselves with how things turned out - hey, I got to violate regulations, throw a tantrum, assault someone, and waltz off with no consequences! 
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: kingsrings on August 11, 2010, 10:45:42 AM
It will be interesting when more details on the female passenger who instigated the incident is identified and gives her side of the story (or is confronted). There are allegations that she hit him on the head intentionally with the overhead bin, of course, it's not clear what really happened in that case. If she did, it seems that she should also have legal action taken against her for assault. But given what happened, that might not be possible. If he had only kept his cool and followed the procedures for dealing with unruly passengers.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on August 11, 2010, 11:24:44 AM
Since I work in customer service, I understand the urge to retaliate, and the feeling that I am just going to lose it.

BUT, I keep coming back to the fact that Mr. Slater's behavior was inexcusable.  One version of the incident that I read, another passenger was quoted as saying that they had no idea that there was anything going on, until he heard the profanity laced announcement that Slater made.

About 2 months ago, I had to deal with an extremely difficult customer, for the second time.  The first time, he had apologized for his behavior.  The second time, he claimed that his military recruiter had told him that we would waive licensing fees for anyone in the military, and when I explained that I can waive late fees only, he became almost impossible.  He even went so far as to scream at me, "You want me to go to Iraq and be killed!  That would make you happy!  Admit it!  Admit it!"

As much as I wanted to slap his face, as much as I was tempted to yell back, "Yes!  Yes!", I didn't.  I told him that his statement was childish, collected his fees, called him back as he started to storm out to remind him that he had demanded a receipt from me, and gave him his receipt.

I'm glad I didn't, because the other customers applauded me, literally cheering and clapping.  I was also complimented on my professionalism and maturity.  I'm glad I didn't sink to my customer's level, or Mr. Slater's either.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Sharnita on August 11, 2010, 12:08:59 PM
I don't know what to think.  His response certainly wasn't good but I do think the fact that he was injured and apparently verbally abused do play a role too.

OTOH, I have been cussed out, threatened by students and have even caught a stray punch meant for a classmate and I manage to keep it together.  I know CPS workers who have never gone off on child abusers like that.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: MyFamily on August 11, 2010, 01:24:50 PM
I don't think Mr. Slater's actions were correct.  But I do understand why he did it - the stress of his job combined with the stress of taking care of a dying mother was too much.  I think he needs some psychiatric help on learning on how to deal with the stress in his life.  Unfortunately, when his stress became too much for him he made some really bad choices - one choice was rude and the other choice was illegal. 

As far as why people are supporting him - because he did what they wish they could do but would never do.  Even Pierrotlunaire0's example of the difficult customer highlights this - the desire to yell back and be mean was there, but the knowledge that it was the wrong thing to do was enough to stop Pierrotlunaire from being rude.  In Mr. Slater's case, the knowledge that this was rude and wrong wasn't enough to stop him.  But all these people (his fans on facebook, for example) are jealous that he just did it, because they wish that they could.  Doesn't necessarily mean they are going to do it, doesn't necessarily mean that they think he was right to do it, but they are jealous that he had that momentary satisfaction of telling off that really awful customer.  And it is from there that the support is coming from, imo.

I'm going to say that I feel sorry for him.  He let himself go for one moment of feeling good, and now he is facing up to 7 years in prison; his mother is dying and he is dealing with that and now his own legal issues.  He made a really bad choice, but from what I can tell he isn't a bad person.  So, I really hope that this works out well for him and that the courts don't decide to come down too hard on him.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Sharnita on August 11, 2010, 01:28:08 PM
I do think that the passenger who caused him injury should be facing his/her own legal issues.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: kingsrings on August 11, 2010, 02:18:17 PM
ITA w/myfamily. That's a perfect summary.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: MyFamily on August 11, 2010, 02:36:33 PM
I do think that the passenger who caused him injury should be facing his/her own legal issues.

I have to agree with that - she was completely out of line.

ITA w/myfamily. That's a perfect summary.

Thank you (not for agreeing with me exactly, but saying that my summary was perfect - it has been a hard day and that just made me feel good).
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: aventurine on August 11, 2010, 03:31:47 PM

Thank you (not for agreeing with me exactly, but saying that my summary was perfect - it has been a hard day and that just made me feel good).

Well, MyFamily, if it helps, ITA as well.  I hope the passenger has some music of her own to face soon. 

I admit to feeling a strong sense of solidarity with the guy.  I think a great many people, whether they approve of his actions or not, do as well.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: kingsrings on August 11, 2010, 03:44:45 PM
I bet this passenger would like to go hide under a rock at this point!!
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Hushabye on August 11, 2010, 04:16:10 PM
From what has been released so far, it's really not possible to tell whether he was hit in the head deliberately -- I know that there are news articles that say she slammed the overhead bin on his head, but there are also articles that say that he got hit with luggage.  If she did hit him deliberately, she should be facing charges as well.  But either way, he should have maintained some sort of professionalism and arranged to have air marshalls waiting instead of engaging in some juvenile stunt that might have felt good at the time but could have killed somebody.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: pierrotlunaire0 on August 11, 2010, 04:44:02 PM
From what has been released so far, it's really not possible to tell whether he was hit in the head deliberately -- I know that there are news articles that say she slammed the overhead bin on his head, but there are also articles that say that he got hit with luggage.  If she did hit him deliberately, she should be facing charges as well.  But either way, he should have maintained some sort of professionalism and arranged to have air marshalls waiting instead of engaging in some juvenile stunt that might have felt good at the time but could have killed somebody.

That is what bothers me so much about Slater's actions.  Yes, there are times when I went to strike back, and we always are griping to each other that the Powers That Be do not have our back.  But if I had to, there are things I could do that would cause a world of trouble for the customer.  For example, I could file a form which flags a person as potentially incompetent to drive.  Or, I could file that a customer is committing fraud.  These measures may be totally appropriate when used correctly.

Mr. Slater did not avail himself of the appropriate way to handle the issue.  I really do feel for him, but I cannot approve.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: hannahmollysmom on August 11, 2010, 06:31:16 PM
I'm sure the airline will be charging him for releasing the chute.

They have to be replaced after they are opened, meaning the passengers had to be rebooked or delayed until the chute could be replaced. If they don't have any in stock, then they have to be flown in which could take hours.

I learned this when one was accidently deployed at the airport I work at.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: PeasNCues on August 11, 2010, 06:35:02 PM
From what has been released so far, it's really not possible to tell whether he was hit in the head deliberately -- I know that there are news articles that say she slammed the overhead bin on his head, but there are also articles that say that he got hit with luggage.  If she did hit him deliberately, she should be facing charges as well.  But either way, he should have maintained some sort of professionalism and arranged to have air marshalls waiting instead of engaging in some juvenile stunt that might have felt good at the time but could have killed somebody.

That is what bothers me so much about Slater's actions.  Yes, there are times when I went to strike back, and we always are griping to each other that the Powers That Be do not have our back.  But if I had to, there are things I could do that would cause a world of trouble for the customer.  For example, I could file a form which flags a person as potentially incompetent to drive.  Or, I could file that a customer is committing fraud.  These measures may be totally appropriate when used correctly.

Mr. Slater did not avail himself of the appropriate way to handle the issue.  I really do feel for him, but I cannot approve.
This really reflects my feelings on the matter. He had other recourses and instead had a hissy fit and disturbed, inconvinienced and probably frightened/insulted quite people on the plane who never did anything to harm him.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: afbluebelle on August 11, 2010, 07:06:48 PM
I can't really fault the guy... Only because I've ALWAYS wanted to ride the emergency slide in a non-emergency situation.

He has officially lived my dream. For that, I muse applaud him.  The dang safety cards make those slides look so fun ;D
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: miranova on August 11, 2010, 09:04:04 PM
We have all had moments where we wanted to scream at people and slide down a chute and leave.  But we don't.  That's what seperates mature adults from those who need serious help.  If it is true that the chute could have killed someone on the ground, then he must have known this with his training.  In that case, it is completely, 100% inexcusable.  I can not for a second sympathize with an action that he KNEW could kill someone because he was ticked off or even injured.  No excuse.  Sliding down a chute did not help his injury.  He did it because he was mad, plain and simple.  If he had hurt or killed an innocent bystander, he'd be facing much more consequences than he is now.  He should consider himself lucky that he didn't hurt anyone.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: guihong on August 11, 2010, 09:21:42 PM
I can't really fault the guy... Only because I've ALWAYS wanted to ride the emergency slide in a non-emergency situation.

He has officially lived my dream. For that, I muse applaud him.  The dang safety cards make those slides look so fun ;D

Oh good-now I don't feel so badly for always wanting to go down the slide, but without the emergency part!
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: MyFamily on August 11, 2010, 09:42:54 PM
I just read that JetBlue has given all the passengers aboard the flight $100 vouchers and that includes the passenger who allegedly hit him in the head.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/travel/sns-ap-us-flight-attendant-jetblue-statement,0,4720318.story
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: PeasNCues on August 11, 2010, 10:06:08 PM
I honestly don't see why he is an "American Hero."

All I see is a boor who took his feelings out on a bunch of innocent people.

The woman shouldn't have hit him, she should not have cursed at him, etc. I am not excusing that.

But, he did that and more. She is not the villian and he the hero.

She is a woman who did something wrong, he is a man who did something worse when there were many, many, many other recourses for him, including having the woman arrested.

Honestly, it kind of disappoints and embarasses me that he is being touted as a "hero." There are plenty of heroes in America. He is not one of them. He is a man who gave into primitive feeling and committed uncouth and selfish actions by lashing out at those around him. Sure we fantasize about telling our bosses off; we fantasize about quiting in a dramatic, theatrical fashion. But it is the person who does so with grace and decorum that is the hero. It is the person who does so without inflicting their aggressions on others that is the hero.

But, I'm in a bad mood, so that could be a reason this leaves a bad taste in my mouth.  :)
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: kherbert05 on August 11, 2010, 10:41:27 PM
To me it wasn't really a case of rudeness as a response to rudeness - it was more of rudeness in response to rude AND abusive behavior.  The guy has scabs on his forehead.  Yeah, what he did was totally uncalled for, but someone needs to arrest the passenger too for not following instructions & injuring the flight attendant.

He should have kept his cool and had the cops waiting for the woman at the gate. That would be much more satsifying  than him facing jail time now.

I was on a flight with an obnoxious family once. The adults were drunk and their kid was allowed to run up and down the aisle - he hit me on the head with a metal tonka truck. They let him loose during landing (the crew was already strapped in and we were landing so they couldn't return him like htey had done repeatedly).

The crew came on board and asked everyone to stay in their seats and allow those with small children to exit first. The family smirked off the plane and into the the waiting arms of the cops. That crew looked very satsified.

Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: MayHug on August 11, 2010, 10:41:57 PM
I honestly don't see why he is an "American Hero."

All I see is a boor who took his feelings out on a bunch of innocent people.

The woman shouldn't have hit him, she should not have cursed at him, etc. I am not excusing that.

But, he did that and more. She is not the villian and he the hero.

She is a woman who did something wrong, he is a man who did something worse when there were many, many, many other recourses for him, including having the woman arrested.

Honestly, it kind of disappoints and embarasses me that he is being touted as a "hero." There are plenty of heroes in America. He is not one of them. He is a man who gave into primitive feeling and committed uncouth and selfish actions by lashing out at those around him. Sure we fantasize about telling our bosses off; we fantasize about quiting in a dramatic, theatrical fashion. But it is the person who does so with grace and decorum that is the hero. It is the person who does so without inflicting their aggressions on others that is the hero.

But, I'm in a bad mood, so that could be a reason this leaves a bad taste in my mouth.  :)

I'm not in a bad mood and I feel the same way!
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Betelnut on August 11, 2010, 11:03:10 PM
He absolutely did the wrong thing.  It was foolish and dangerous.  We all know that and I'm sure he does too.

But I kind of love that he took the time to snag a beer on the way out.  That was hilarious!
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Hanna on August 11, 2010, 11:14:21 PM
I'm not going to judge someone for their reaction to being assualted at work.
No clue how most people would respond in those circumstances.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: anonymoose on August 11, 2010, 11:18:27 PM
I don't think this is a case of retaliatory rudeness, I think this is a case of a man under enormous pressure having a breakdown.
I feel really bad for him.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: ShadesOfGrey on August 11, 2010, 11:25:12 PM
I'm not going to judge someone for their reaction to being assualted at work.
No clue how most people would respond in those circumstances.


I think mature adults call the police. They dont turn around and endanger other people's lives, subject them to profanity, nor run away from the situation. 

So yep, I judge him. Harshly.  I understand it.  But that doesnt make it right.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: PeasNCues on August 12, 2010, 06:29:00 AM
I'm not going to judge someone for their reaction to being assaulted at work.
No clue how most people would respond in those circumstances.
If it were a brief loss of temper - such as he snapped at her angrily, I'd agree with you.

But this lasted quite sometime and targeted people who did not assault him. I do not see this as a visceral reaction to being assaulted, it's a temper tantrum.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Bibliophile on August 12, 2010, 07:53:50 AM
They were saying on the radio that the passenger also made a fuss while getting on the flight & arguing with another passenger about overhead bin space.

A bit off topic, but did anyone see Jimmy Fallon's "Ballad of Steven Slater" (aka Take 2 Beers and Jump)?  I can't get that song out of my head...
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Lady Snowdon on August 12, 2010, 09:08:58 AM
I honestly don't see why he is an "American Hero."

All I see is a boor who took his feelings out on a bunch of innocent people.

The woman shouldn't have hit him, she should not have cursed at him, etc. I am not excusing that.

But, he did that and more. She is not the villian and he the hero.

She is a woman who did something wrong, he is a man who did something worse when there were many, many, many other recourses for him, including having the woman arrested.

Honestly, it kind of disappoints and embarasses me that he is being touted as a "hero." There are plenty of heroes in America. He is not one of them. He is a man who gave into primitive feeling and committed uncouth and selfish actions by lashing out at those around him. Sure we fantasize about telling our bosses off; we fantasize about quiting in a dramatic, theatrical fashion. But it is the person who does so with grace and decorum that is the hero. It is the person who does so without inflicting their aggressions on others that is the hero.

But, I'm in a bad mood, so that could be a reason this leaves a bad taste in my mouth.  :)

POD to this.  His childish and illegal actions caused serious issues and delays for both the airline (chutes cost about $30,000 and planes can be out of commission for *days* while it's replaced and packed) and the passengers (as they all had to be rebooked).  I don't care that his mom has cancer, that the passenger verbally abused him, any of that.  He is still responsible for his own actions, and those actions were criminal. 
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: stargazer on August 12, 2010, 09:09:26 AM

All I see is a boor who took his feelings out on a bunch of innocent people.


Are you kidding?  I would have PAID to get on that flight! (Okay, well you pay for your ticket, but I would have paid more.)  When are you ever going to get that type of show again?    ;)

In case anyone couldn't tell, I completely agree with MyFamily as well.  I cannot BELIEVE they gave that woman who started this $100 voucher as well!  Whether the overhead bin hit him intentionally or not, it WAS intentional because she was not supposed to be out of her seat at all.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: kingsrings on August 12, 2010, 10:03:28 AM
Show, huh? Well, I was on a flight once where a woman smoked in the bathroom (this was right after 9/11, really smart move on her part). Ironically, right before this happened, I was bored out of my mind and complaining to my seatmate how bored I was. This woman cured that pretty quick  ::)

I do believe Mr. Slater snapped and had a nervous breakdown from all the stress he was under. I have empathy and sympathy for him in that regard, although he handled it the wrong way.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: drebay on August 12, 2010, 10:06:45 AM
I haven't been able to find if had a slight concussion or not.  That can make you do odd things.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: KaosP on August 12, 2010, 10:49:18 AM
I honestly don't see why he is an "American Hero."

All I see is a boor who took his feelings out on a bunch of innocent people.

The woman shouldn't have hit him, she should not have cursed at him, etc. I am not excusing that.

But, he did that and more. She is not the villian and he the hero.

She is a woman who did something wrong, he is a man who did something worse when there were many, many, many other recourses for him, including having the woman arrested.

Honestly, it kind of disappoints and embarasses me that he is being touted as a "hero." There are plenty of heroes in America. He is not one of them. He is a man who gave into primitive feeling and committed uncouth and selfish actions by lashing out at those around him. Sure we fantasize about telling our bosses off; we fantasize about quiting in a dramatic, theatrical fashion. But it is the person who does so with grace and decorum that is the hero. It is the person who does so without inflicting their aggressions on others that is the hero.

But, I'm in a bad mood, so that could be a reason this leaves a bad taste in my mouth.  :)

POD to this. It makes my skin crawl that there's a Facebook page honouring his rude behaviour.

Yes, I feel sorry for him (in light of his mother's sickness, etc.) but perhaps if he's under that much stress he shouldn't be working?!? Because yes, it's a difficult CSR job, but he's also in charge of people's lives!!

I also hope the rude lady isn't getting self-satisfaction over this, I hope she understands how inappropriate her behaviour was.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: PeasNCues on August 12, 2010, 11:43:48 AM

All I see is a boor who took his feelings out on a bunch of innocent people.


Are you kidding?  I would have PAID to get on that flight! (Okay, well you pay for your ticket, but I would have paid more.)  When are you ever going to get that type of show again?    ;)

And if I were on that flight, I would have been horrified and frightened at his behavior. Moreso, I would be extremely upset that someone so unstable was someone we were supposed to be able to rely on in an emergency.

I really do not think there is an excuse for his behavior.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: sbtier on August 12, 2010, 01:17:03 PM
Since he had 28 years at the job, presumably as a good employee since he was on 2 special committees, I'd forgive up to the point he deployed the slide.  As he is trained in safety, He KNOWS BETTER to deploy the slide, even if he was having a mini-breakdown.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: kingsrings on August 12, 2010, 01:49:58 PM
Now the passengers are speaking up. According to them, he was rude right from the start of the flight. Snapping at them, refusing requests, and constantly slamming overhead bins and the galley fridge door.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Hillia on August 12, 2010, 02:00:34 PM
Now the passengers are speaking up. According to them, he was rude right from the start of the flight. Snapping at them, refusing requests, and constantly slamming overhead bins and the galley fridge door.

Which is possible, but sounds very odd, given that he's been described by other FAs as great to work with, very professional, etc.  Some articles have described him as being 'high on Blue juice' - company slang for someone who is really enthusiastic and dedicated to teh company.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: jimithing on August 12, 2010, 02:02:43 PM
Now the passengers are speaking up. According to them, he was rude right from the start of the flight. Snapping at them, refusing requests, and constantly slamming overhead bins and the galley fridge door.

I saw a passenger on one of the CNN shows, and she said that her interactions with him were very pleasant and friendly.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Shoo on August 12, 2010, 02:04:00 PM
Now the passengers are speaking up. According to them, he was rude right from the start of the flight. Snapping at them, refusing requests, and constantly slamming overhead bins and the galley fridge door.

I just read that 70% of the passengers have been interviewed by law enforcement and ALL of them have said they did not see him argue with a passenger about luggage, insinuating that he is lying.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: evely28 on August 12, 2010, 02:05:22 PM
Now the passengers are speaking up. According to them, he was rude right from the start of the flight. Snapping at them, refusing requests, and constantly slamming overhead bins and the galley fridge door.

Yeah, one of the passengers that complained about the FA, seemed to ignore the fact that the FA had more pressing problems to take care of-like his bleeding head. She complained that he didn't seem to want to bring her a napkin or paper towel to clean up a wet seat, when he had an obvious injury. I am in CS. I am good at CS, but if I had an obvious injury and I'm bleeding and a customer disregarded that and expected me to still do my job, instead of expressing any kind of concern, I would totally be gobsmacked.

It's bad enough when insult is added to injury, it's beyond imaginable to have many insults added to an injury.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: kingsrings on August 12, 2010, 02:27:48 PM
This is the article I was referencing: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100812/ap_on_re_us/us_flight_attendant_arrest;_ylt=Ao4WHOrL7RMHNBjqJLcFbQ.s0NUE;_ylu=X3oDMTJ2MHY4anU1BGFzc2V0A2FwLzIwMTAwODEyL3VzX2ZsaWdodF9hdHRlbmRhbnRfYXJyZXN0BGNwb3MDOARwb3MDNQRzZWMDeW5faGVhZGxpbmVfbGlzdARzbGsDcGFwYXNzZW5nZXJz
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Namárië on August 12, 2010, 02:32:28 PM
If he had a giant gash on his head, perhaps he had a concussion.

Though really... why would they go in the air with a possibly concussed FA? That is really disturbing to me.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: stargazer on August 12, 2010, 03:56:22 PM
If he had a giant gash on his head, perhaps he had a concussion.

Though really... why would they go in the air with a possibly concussed FA? That is really disturbing to me.

The gash on his head happened when the bin or luggage hit him on the head from what we know right now - at the end of the flight.

What I want to know is why nothing has been said (publically) about the woman who ignored FAA rules in the first place.  I cannot BELIEVE they gave her $100 voucher - she should have been arrested.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: DangerMouth on August 12, 2010, 04:13:03 PM
Since he had 28 years at the job, presumably as a good employee since he was on 2 special committees, I'd forgive up to the point he deployed the slide.  As he is trained in safety, He KNOWS BETTER to deploy the slide, even if he was having a mini-breakdown.

He's 38, I doubt he's been on the job for 28 years. He's been at Jet Blue since 2008, I don't know where he worked before that.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: aventurine on August 12, 2010, 04:22:16 PM
Since he had 28 years at the job -snip-

He's 38, I doubt he's been on the job for 28 years. He's been at Jet Blue since 2008, I don't know where he worked before that.

See, I thought he looked awfully young to have been employed anywhere for 28 years, but that's what the story I read said.  Did he say that, or was it a typo?  Does anyone know?
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Bibliophile on August 12, 2010, 04:29:09 PM
He's been a steward for 20 years...  This article said "the court heard that, before leaving the plane, he also told passengers: “Those of you who have shown dignity and respect these last 20 years, thanks for a great ride.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/7937994/JetBlue-flight-steward-defended-by-mother.html (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/7937994/JetBlue-flight-steward-defended-by-mother.html)
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Hanna on August 12, 2010, 04:40:40 PM
Now the passengers are speaking up. According to them, he was rude right from the start of the flight. Snapping at them, refusing requests, and constantly slamming overhead bins and the galley fridge door.

I just read that 70% of the passengers have been interviewed by law enforcement and ALL of them have said they did not see him argue with a passenger about luggage, insinuating that he is lying.
I have to confess, this kind of thing could happen right in front of my nose on a plane and I probably wouldn't even notice it.
I can't hear a darn thing over the noise of the plane, nor can I see over the seats. 
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: immadz on August 12, 2010, 05:19:25 PM
Now the passengers are speaking up. According to them, he was rude right from the start of the flight. Snapping at them, refusing requests, and constantly slamming overhead bins and the galley fridge door.

I just read that 70% of the passengers have been interviewed by law enforcement and ALL of them have said they did not see him argue with a passenger about luggage, insinuating that he is lying.
I have to confess, this kind of thing could happen right in front of my nose on a plane and I probably wouldn't even notice it.
I can't hear a darn thing over the noise of the plane, nor can I see over the seats. 


I agree. A plane is fairly big. I wouldn't necessarily see or even hear a big commotion if it wasn't super loud. I wouldn't see anything if it was happening in the seats behind me.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: KenveeB on August 12, 2010, 05:33:21 PM
I can cut someone a lot of slack when they're actually assaulted on the job.  But not complete slack.  He did something (deploying the slide) that he knew from his training and experience could have hurt and even killed anyone who was around.  He chose to do it anyway, when it absolutely wasn't necessary for the problems they were having.  I have no sympathy.  He could've handled things much, much better, and the way he chose to do it was not only over the top but very dangerous.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Hanna on August 12, 2010, 06:24:39 PM
Can it really kill people?
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: baglady on August 12, 2010, 07:53:43 PM
I can imagine someone mishearing "20 years" as "28 years," especially if the phrase was spoken in a heated manner.

His comments were definitely retaliatory rudeness, and his subsequent behavior was reckless, could have hurt someone and will cost his employer a lot of money, but I can see why he has become a folk hero. We've all been in those situations where we felt abused and wanted to lash out but couldn't ... and he did.

But his 15 minutes are up, and I hope it's not *too* much to hope that this story goes away quietly and he doesn't make a bundle off this, a la Joey Buttafuoco.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Lisbeth on August 12, 2010, 07:59:53 PM
When I first read the story, I thought, "How rude, immature, unprofessional, and dangerous a response by a flight attendant."  I read it expecting to see that the guy was arrested.  I wasn't disappointed.

Now I'll be the first to agree that flight attendants often have lousy jobs, and having to deal with customers with bad attitudes just makes it lousier-especially when they can't eject them from the plane.  And the passenger in question was rude and her misconduct could have caused danger to everyone on the flight, no doubt about that.  But he chose an extreme and completely inappropriate way to deal-and deserves the consequences.  That he's getting 15 minutes (and more) of fame and support out of this really annoys me.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: jimithing on August 12, 2010, 10:25:49 PM
If he had a giant gash on his head, perhaps he had a concussion.


You know, I wonder if there's something to this. I was listening to NPR tonight, and the new details that emerged said that he received the cut on his head at the very beginning of the flight, and that the passengers said that he was disheveled, seemed a bit out of it, etc.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: C0mputerGeek on August 13, 2010, 01:37:48 AM
An Anonymous Flight Attendant's Take On Jet Blue Folk Hero Steven Slater (http://slog.thestranger.com/slog/archives/2010/08/10/a-flight-attendants-take-on-jet-blue-folk-hero-steven-slater). Note the comment about the danger with deploying that slide. He could have killed someone. Also, note the comment about the female passenger who clocked the Steven Slater with her bag. She violated federal law. Why is she being given a $100 voucher? Why don't we know who she is?

Yes, Steven Slater was rude. I don't think he is a folk hero, but I can sympathize with someone getting fed up by mistreatment. Some companies really do take, "the customer is always right," too far.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: MyFamily on August 13, 2010, 06:49:45 AM
I cannot remember where I read this, but he did check to make sure that there was no one there before he deployed the slide.  I'm not saying he was ok to do it, but it wasn't done without any regard to the safety of others.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: PeasNCues on August 13, 2010, 06:54:34 AM
As far as I know, airlines take federal air regulations very, very seriously. If he was fed up with mistreatment, he definitely had options, especially if the physical assault is true. I am very surprised she hasn't been charged with anything. If she got $100 voucher, that's extremely wrong.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Alex the Seal on August 13, 2010, 08:39:01 AM
Some companies really do take, "the customer is always right," too far.

Exactly. He wasn't "right" either, but I do hope this kind of incident will make companies wake up and re-examine the level of unnecessary stress to which they allow their employees to be subjected.

I do believe Mr. Slater snapped and had a nervous breakdown from all the stress he was under. I have empathy and sympathy for him in that regard, although he handled it the wrong way.

Yes, although I'm not sure that he had terribly much control over how he handled it, either. I give him a complete pass but not his actions, if that makes sense.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Shoo on August 13, 2010, 09:40:27 AM
That the passenger hasn't been identified or charged with anything sort of tells me that we don't know the whole story.  Obviously there is more to it, otherwise she would have been charged with assault or something even more serious.  Also, the airline gave her a $100 voucher.  That says something too.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Kiara on August 13, 2010, 10:32:01 AM
The airline might have just gone down the entire flight list and sent everyone a voucher.  I agree we don't have the whole story, but her getting a voucher doesn't mean she's blameless.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: miranova on August 13, 2010, 10:38:26 AM
The airline might have just gone down the entire flight list and sent everyone a voucher.  I agree we don't have the whole story, but her getting a voucher doesn't mean she's blameless.

I agree.  It takes time to investigate, interview people, sort out the stories, etc.  I think they just gave everyone a voucher while they are investigating.  Truthfully, I don't care that this woman got a $100 voucher.  If she did break laws, and there is enough evidence to prove it, she will be charged and punished.  The $100 voucher will be worthless to her if they decide not to let her fly on their airline again.  It's not cash.  I do hope the truth comes out and everyone involved is charged for the crimes they committed.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: ShadesOfGrey on August 13, 2010, 02:53:37 PM
I cannot remember where I read this, but he did check to make sure that there was no one there before he deployed the slide.  I'm not saying he was ok to do it, but it wasn't done without any regard to the safety of others.

Honestly, all this tells me is that he has presence of mind enough to check, which means he had presence enough of mind to show some self-restraint.  He chose not to. 

Now, I'm not saying he wasnt assaulted or that woman shouldnt be charged as well, but morally, ethically, and etiquettely, this guy was 100% wrong. 
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Isisnin on August 13, 2010, 03:43:40 PM
A couple passengers have said that they saw the wound on his head when they boarded the plane.  One male passenger said that Slater was standing at the door to greet the passenger as they entered.  The male passenger commented on the wound and Slater said something like: it's been a bad day.  Maybe the cut happened on a prior flight????

What I understand is why none of the other attendants step in during all this (apparently).  One of the others should have told him to clean up and put a bandaid on before greeting the passengers.  Can't help but wonder if one of them did and Slater snapped at them.  I can't think of a good reason for a flight attendant to do their job with an unbandaged cut on  his face.

Bottom line, if he couldn't handle dealing with passengers he should have talked to the other attendants and asked them to run interference (since he couldn't go home sick). 

I wonder if he was the head attendants on this flight.  That would explain the other attendants apparently not interceding during all this.  If he wasn't the head attendant, then whoever was should have interceded.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Flora Louise on August 26, 2010, 09:57:56 AM
I suspect the whole thing was an audition for a reality show.
Title: Re: Steven Slater - Retaliatory rudeness?
Post by: Shoo on August 26, 2010, 10:00:48 AM
I got the feeling, from the very beginning, that his story was greatly embellished, if not outright made up.   The eye witnesses did not agree with much of what he claimed to have happened.  I think he lied.