Etiquette Hell

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Title: Local Foods
Post by: Sedorna on July 21, 2011, 09:17:30 PM
Hi, guys. I thought it might be fun to post some local foods and food customs. Both to show off what we've got, and so that any visitors might know what to enjoy--or what to avoid. Plus, it might be fun to see any similarities between different places. I'm from Baltimore, Maryland (well, technically Baltimore County, not City.)

One popular custom is eating sauerkraut at Thanksgiving. It's quite big here. I work in a grocery store and I think about 95% of all sauerkraut is sold during the month of November.

Two refreshing snacks are lemon sticks and snowballs. Now, New Orleans also has snowballs, and I'd love to go there some day to see how they differ from Baltimore snowballs. I like my snowballs powdery and sweet, with marshmallow creme on top. Lemon sticks are so simple, yet so good. Basically, they're a lemon (or lemon half, if large enough) with a soft peppermint stick in them. You suck up the juice through the peppermint, and it sweetens it a bit and adds some minty goodness. Yum.

Three (honestly, I'm not counting) local factory made foods are Berger Cookies, Goetze Caramels, and Mary Sue Easter Eggs. Berger Cookies are shortbread cookies with a thick slab of fudge on top. Goetze caramels (which I'm pretty sure are sold nationwide; heck, I was shock when I learned that they're made in Baltimore) are soft caramels with a sweet white center. Yum. And, while Mary Sue does make other candies, I think of the pecan nougat Easter eggs when I think of the candies. Oh, and the theme song, which is sung to the tune of "I'm called Little Buttercup" from H.M.S. Pinafore.

So, what local treats do all of you have?

Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Aggiesque on July 21, 2011, 10:19:55 PM
bluebell ice cream. I count it as a local treat because it's made here! YUM
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: oz diva on July 22, 2011, 04:47:17 AM
If an Aussie offers you Vegemite, only spread it lightly, it is not like peanut butter, a little goes a very long way.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Sharnita on July 22, 2011, 09:15:56 AM
in Michigan's Upper Peninsula there is an item called a pasty as described here
http://www.upper-peninsula-now.com/pasties.html
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Cyradis on July 22, 2011, 10:32:29 AM
I'm from Trinidad and Tobago and we have an unofficial national breakfast food: doubles. Doubles (which is singular) is made of bara (flour, baking powder, salt and tumeric) filled with curried channa (chick peas/garbanzo beans) It's usually topped with chutney and lots of pepper sauce. It's probably our most popular street food.

Here is a link to a recipe and photo: http://www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/trinidad-doubles-recipe/ (http://www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/trinidad-doubles-recipe/)

Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Thipu1 on July 22, 2011, 10:43:54 AM
Ah, local food.  Let me at 'em.

New York City has a number of delicious treats that people think they know but don't quite.

THE BAGEL
People think they know these but I recall reading about the hazards of eating any bagel 'forged' outside New York City.  The verb was correct in both senses of the term because a proper bagel must be boiled before it is baked.  Just baking the thing produces a doughnut without the sweetness.

PASTRAMI
Good pastrami is getting difficult to find.  You just can't slice the cured meat and put it into a sandwich.  To make pastrami good it needs to be steamed before it's sliced.  If that isn't done, you may as well be eating a beef jerky sandwich.

THE KNISH
The square pillows are an abomination unto the deity of your choice!  The real thing is round and baked.  Classic knish fillings are potato with onion or kasha.  Yonah Schimmel's is said to be the temple of knish-hood in NYC.  I found their product bland.  I much preferred the late, lamented Mrs. Stahl's bakery in Brighton Beach.  They had a Spanish rice knish to die for.  They also offered desert knishes stuffed with apples, cherries or peaches.

CHEESECAKE
There are many places in the world that can lay claim to an excellent cheesecake.  NYC is right up there with the best.  The best of the best comes from Junior's in Brooklyn. 

EGG CREAM
Unfortunately, this is an endangered species.  In these calorie-conscious days, the very name is likely to send people running out the door.  It's really delicious on a hot day although it takes a bit of preparation.

Put a tall glass, a container of milk and a bottle of seltzer (not club soda) into the freezer and chill until the liquids are almost ready to solidify.  When ready to drink, place a good squirt of milk and a good squirt of Foxe's U-Bet syrup into the class.  Top off with ice cold seltzer and enjoy.

The traditional flavor for an egg creme is chocolate but sophisticates may choose coffee.  U-Bet makes both flavors. 

CHERRY-LIME RICKEY
This is an even more endangered species of drink because it isn't quite as easy to make at home.  Traditionally, you could only get it at luncheonettes and there aren't many of those around any more.  It consists of cherry syrup, lime juice and seltzer.           
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: glinda on July 22, 2011, 11:18:30 AM
The Persian - which is made out of dough similar to that a cinnamon bun is made of and topped with pink icing.  Wikipedia has an article on them:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian_%28pastry%29

They are exceptionally good sliced in half lengthwise, buttered, lightly fried and flipped so the icing is all melty in the centre.

Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Red1979 on July 22, 2011, 11:30:30 AM
in Michigan's Upper Peninsula there is an item called a pasty as described here
http://www.upper-peninsula-now.com/pasties.html

There is a place in PA that sells pastys.  I've also seen them from time to time on different menus at "pub" style type eateries.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Bethczar on July 22, 2011, 05:08:02 PM
I know the rest of America has stolen them, put there is no place like Wisconsin for deep-fried cheese curds. We were doing them before it was trendy.

My other favorite treat is kringle, a type of coffeecake/pastry. It's a ring of thin, light, buttery dough (almost croissant-like) around nut, fruit, or cheese filling. (Maybe someone else can describe it better?) Check out www.kringle.com.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Wonderflonium on July 22, 2011, 08:11:13 PM
OP: First off, howdy neighbor! Second, you forgot the crabs with loads of Old Bay! Please tell me you aren't one of those freak Marylanders who don't eat crabs. (I say that with love; my best friend is one of those "freaks."  ;D)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: gollymolly2 on July 22, 2011, 08:34:27 PM
I'm from Trinidad and Tobago and we have an unofficial national breakfast food: doubles. Doubles (which is singular) is made of bara (flour, baking powder, salt and tumeric) filled with curried channa (chick peas/garbanzo beans) It's usually topped with chutney and lots of pepper sauce. It's probably our most popular street food.

Here is a link to a recipe and photo: http://www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/trinidad-doubles-recipe/ (http://www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/trinidad-doubles-recipe/)

That sounds DELICIOUS! I'm going to attempt the recipe soon.  Thanks for posting!
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Zilla on July 22, 2011, 08:42:00 PM
Here it is Eastern or Western Carolina BBQ (http://www.ncbbq.com/Modules/Articles/article.aspx?id=20).  I won't post which I prefer but the battle over it is fierce.


Don't mess with the scrapple (http://neesesausage.com/products/default.htm) or grits (http://www.carolinagrits.com/) either.






Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Shea on July 23, 2011, 06:19:23 PM
I'm from Southern Oregon, and we don't have any really distinctive local dishes. However, if you visit the area, you will not leave without eating something with pears in it. Pretty much guaranteed.

I currently live in Quebec, and although I cannot lay any claim to being "from" here, I feel I must mention the most famous local dish: poutine, which is french fries covered in gravy and topped with cheese curds. People tend to have strong feelings about where to get the best poutine in town. Personally I feel that the best time to eat poutine is in the dead of winter, after having been outside skating, skiing or snowshoeing, when you are beginning to worry about frostbite and are so hungry you may collapse. However, I've also been reliably informed that poutine tastes best when eaten while drunk at 3 AM. You may wish to conduct your own studies on this matter. >:D

There are lots of different variations on the traditional poutine, some of which are good, some of which sound...scary. Today I saw a sign in a restaurant window advertising poutine curry. Now, I'm all for the melting pot, but it seems to me that some cuisines were never meant to be fused :-X.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Sedorna on July 23, 2011, 08:38:16 PM
OP: First off, howdy neighbor! Second, you forgot the crabs with loads of Old Bay! Please tell me you aren't one of those freak Marylanders who don't eat crabs. (I say that with love; my best friend is one of those "freaks."  ;D)

Oh, no. I *love* crabs. But steamed crabs can be so expensive -- plus I really don't like claw meat -- that I haven't had them in a couple years. But I do have crabcakes, made with jumbo lump backfin crabmeat, on a regular basis. Well, whenever I can splurge and afford the good stuff.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Wonderflonium on July 23, 2011, 08:40:18 PM
OP: First off, howdy neighbor! Second, you forgot the crabs with loads of Old Bay! Please tell me you aren't one of those freak Marylanders who don't eat crabs. (I say that with love; my best friend is one of those "freaks."  ;D)

Oh, no. I *love* crabs. But steamed crabs can be so expensive -- plus I really don't like claw meat -- that I haven't had them in a couple years. But I do have crabcakes, made with jumbo lump backfin crabmeat, on a regular basis. Well, whenever I can splurge and afford the good stuff.

Don't like claw meat?!?!!? The horror!!  ;) ;D
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Dazi on July 23, 2011, 08:52:15 PM
For some reason beignets and king cake just don't taste as good anywhere besides Louisiana.  It must be the water or something.

Hmmm....beignets....
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: #borecore on July 23, 2011, 09:43:04 PM
Well, of course there's Tex-Mex. My city's most local takes on it seem to be breakfast tacos (not burritos, and yes, there's a difference) and queso, and the Mexican martini.
The rest of the things I'm thinking of are Texan, but not hyperlocal.

I've never heard of another town with doughnuts like these (http://www.yelp.com/biz/gourdoughs-austin), though.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: kglory on July 24, 2011, 04:40:45 AM
Berger cookies - YUM!  I'm another Marylander and I love them.  I lived in NYC for several years and now describe Berger cookies as "Black & white cookies, but all black, and about a 5x frosting-per-cookie ratio"  ;D

Another one you didn't mention, maybe because it seems so obvious, is crab chips.  They really don't have those in other parts of the country, which is a shame! http://www.grubgrade.com/2010/01/12/snack-review-utz-crab-chips/

Dolle's taffy in the summer, as beach food. Yum.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Nibsey on July 24, 2011, 07:54:13 AM
Cheese, seafood (especially carlingford oysters) and tayto cheese and onion crisps.  :) Well at least those were what I missed most from Ireland when I was away.

But don't eat Irish food, especially seafood from one of those tweed Irish pubs that cater to American tourists. Rural pubs are fine but in the towns and cities you need to go to a good restaurant to get a proper meal.

Or better yet, be invited to someone's house for a meal. My Mom makes a mean colcannon but if you ask for it in a diddly de pub you're lucky if you get champ.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: EngineerChick on July 24, 2011, 02:29:58 PM
For St. Louis, my favorites have to be fried ravioli, gooey butter cake, and concretes.

My favorite from when I lived in New Mexico has to be green chili stew.

From my grandmothers (in North Carolina), fried cornbread, chicken & pastry, and country ham biscuits.

Fried green tomatoes are more of a regional thing, but I found a BBQ restaurant in Florida that makes them (and they are so tasty).
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Information_queen on July 24, 2011, 06:47:35 PM
For some reason beignets and king cake just don't taste as good anywhere besides Louisiana.  It must be the water or something.

Hmmm....beignets....

Mmmmmmmmm I haven't had a beignet in years. I foresee a visit to Mom's as soon as I can.

Here it is Eastern or Western Carolina BBQ (http://www.ncbbq.com/Modules/Articles/article.aspx?id=20).  I won't post which I prefer but the battle over it is fierce.


Don't mess with the scrapple (http://neesesausage.com/products/default.htm) or grits (http://www.carolinagrits.com/) either.

I love Eastern NC bbq. We have had several heated arguments over it because my husband is from Memphis. He got stationed on Camp Lejeune. His main argument is a claim that Eastern NC bbq 'isn't bbq.'  Probably a good thing we live in Memphis now and not Jacksonville....







Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: oz diva on July 26, 2011, 06:25:40 AM
Well there's Vegemite. I think the mistake people make when they first try it, is to assume that you eat it like peanut butter. It is very strong, a little goes a long way. But buttered toast with Vegemite and hot tea is the breakfast of champions.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: JonGirl on July 28, 2011, 05:57:32 AM
Well there's Vegemite. I think the mistake people make when they first try it, is to assume that you eat it like peanut butter. It is very strong, a little goes a long way. But buttered toast with Vegemite and hot tea a long black coffee is the breakfast of champions.

fixed that for you!  :)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Mazdoy on July 28, 2011, 06:08:31 AM
I'm from Trinidad and Tobago and we have an unofficial national breakfast food: doubles. Doubles (which is singular) is made of bara (flour, baking powder, salt and tumeric) filled with curried channa (chick peas/garbanzo beans) It's usually topped with chutney and lots of pepper sauce. It's probably our most popular street food.

Here is a link to a recipe and photo: http://www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/trinidad-doubles-recipe/ (http://www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/trinidad-doubles-recipe/)



That looks amazing.  I'm definitely going to give it a try.  I can almost imagine the taste of it already.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: mandycorn on July 28, 2011, 05:44:06 PM
I'm from Utah, USA and we have a state specialty: Fry sauce. It's always mayonnaise and ketchup mixed together, although depending on where you go, sometimes there's a little pickle relish too. You dip your french fried potatoes, onion rings, tater tots, etc into it before enjoying them.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Nibsey on July 28, 2011, 05:48:17 PM
I'm from Utah, USA and we have a state specialty: Fry sauce. It's always mayonnaise and ketchup mixed together, although depending on where you go, sometimes there's a little pickle relish too. You dip your french fried potatoes, onion rings, tater tots, etc into it before enjoying them.

I live on this sauce but I never realised it had an actual name until I came to this site.  :-[
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: mandycorn on July 29, 2011, 05:55:40 PM
I'm not sure that it was actually invented in Utah, but I know we have a restaurant (Arctic Circle) that claims to be the originator. I'm sure it's been created and reinvented multiple places throughout time.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Nibsey on July 29, 2011, 06:09:43 PM
I'm not sure that it was actually invented in Utah, but I know we have a restaurant (Arctic Circle) that claims to be the originator. I'm sure it's been created and reinvented multiple places throughout time.

Well if you name it, I think it's fair to claim to be the originator.  ;)  I came up with it myself as a child when my mom was letting us experiment making dips. But it's nice to be able to now answer people (more specifically my SO) when they go, 'What the heck is that on your plate?'  :) lol
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Shea on July 29, 2011, 09:23:47 PM
I'm from Utah, USA and we have a state specialty: Fry sauce. It's always mayonnaise and ketchup mixed together, although depending on where you go, sometimes there's a little pickle relish too. You dip your french fried potatoes, onion rings, tater tots, etc into it before enjoying them.

I thought that was Thousand Island dressing in its most basic form. Huh.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: lady_disdain on August 01, 2011, 10:57:38 AM
I'm from Utah, USA and we have a state specialty: Fry sauce. It's always mayonnaise and ketchup mixed together, although depending on where you go, sometimes there's a little pickle relish too. You dip your french fried potatoes, onion rings, tater tots, etc into it before enjoying them.

We call that rosè sauce. It was very common in the 70s, but has fallen out of favour somewhat. I love food fads.

I live on this sauce but I never realised it had an actual name until I came to this site.  :-[
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: lady_disdain on August 01, 2011, 11:06:09 AM
There are so many! And many that are just every day food that we don't even realize foreigners would consider it an unusual local food.

I just roasted a large pan of arracacha roots. It is so delicious! It is bright yellow, but it has an almost creamy texture and a nutty, slightly sweet flavour. You can boil them, puree them, fry them, roast them, make pasta, etc.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/90/Arracacia_xanthorrhiza_%28boiled_and_peeled%29.JPG/710px-Arracacia_xanthorrhiza_%28boiled_and_peeled%29.JPG)

Now, on a much less healthy direction, brigadeiros. They are small sweets, very traditional in children's parties, made with condensed milk, cocoa and butter. Creamy, chocolatey and delicious. There is no way that I wait for a party to have them, so I make them at home sometimes. If they had a good deal fewer calories, I would make them a lot more often.

There are also a lot of variants: coconut and clove, coconut and prune, walnuts or a plain variety coated with sugar.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/15/Brigadeiro2.jpg)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: mandycorn on August 01, 2011, 03:26:17 PM
I'm from Utah, USA and we have a state specialty: Fry sauce. It's always mayonnaise and ketchup mixed together, although depending on where you go, sometimes there's a little pickle relish too. You dip your french fried potatoes, onion rings, tater tots, etc into it before enjoying them.

I thought that was Thousand Island dressing in its most basic form. Huh.

People around here don't seem to eat much Thousand Island, maybe because it reminds them too much of fry sauce ;)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: SamiHami on August 01, 2011, 03:39:25 PM
Charleston SC
Shrimp & Grits
She crab Soup
Crab Cakes (Sorry, Maryland-I know I'm biased but the ones here are the best!)
Boiled Peanuts
Beaufort Stew (aka Frogmore Stew)
Pig Roasts
Any fresh, locally caught seafood (especially shrimp or crawfish) cooked in someones' backyard with a whole bunch of friends!

We really like our food in the south!
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: SamiHami on August 01, 2011, 03:41:27 PM
OP: First off, howdy neighbor! Second, you forgot the crabs with loads of Old Bay! Please tell me you aren't one of those freak Marylanders who don't eat crabs. (I say that with love; my best friend is one of those "freaks."  ;D)

Oh, no. I *love* crabs. But steamed crabs can be so expensive -- plus I really don't like claw meat -- that I haven't had them in a couple years. But I do have crabcakes, made with jumbo lump backfin crabmeat, on a regular basis. Well, whenever I can splurge and afford the good stuff.

Don't like claw meat?!?!!? The horror!!  ;) ;D
seriously! That's the best part!
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Wonderflonium on August 01, 2011, 07:36:41 PM
Crab Cakes (Sorry, Maryland-I know I'm biased but the ones here are the best!)

Wrong! You're WRONG!!!!  ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: cattlekid on August 01, 2011, 07:49:05 PM
I grew up in York County, PA where the world's best potato chips are made.   

http://www.martinschips.biz/potatochips.aspx (http://www.martinschips.biz/potatochips.aspx)

If you plan on ordering some, I'll give you my address so you can send me a box as a tip.   ;D

Definitely go with the kettle cooked, they're way better than the ruffled.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Shea on August 01, 2011, 09:05:18 PM
Crab Cakes (Sorry, Maryland-I know I'm biased but the ones here are the best!)

Wrong! You're WRONG!!!!  ;D ;D ;D ;D

Weirdly enough, the best crab cakes I ever had were in Middlebury, Vermont. I have no idea what was up with that, but they were the food of the gods, I tell you!
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on August 01, 2011, 10:49:20 PM
Hmm.  I don't think Philadelphia has any local foods.

Okay, now that I've surgically removed my tongue from my cheek...   ;)

The Cheesesteak.  Description found here:  http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=90832.msg2403785#msg2403785
The soft pretzel.  Jury's out on whether Philly did it first, but they do it best (and most... a common job for preteens used to be hawking pretzels.  You'd load a box/basket/milk crate up with pretzels, 11 for $1.  Then you'd sell them for $0.25.  On a typical weekend, or any day in the summer, you could hear the kids calling out "Fresh pretzels... all ready... fresh pretzels.  On a decent day, you could make $5 or $10.  My personal best was $25 at a streetside flea market.  I just circled the block and the money poured in.)
The hoagie.  It's got its roots in Philly as much as anywhere.  You might also know it as a po' boy, a sub, or a hero, but a hoagie is a long Italian roll, upon which is lettuce, tomato, onions, oil, meats, and cheese.
The Tastykake.  This is a company, but around Philly, you'd be hard pressed to find much int he way of Hostess goods, Tastykake rules supreme.  Pies, cupcakes, angel food cakes... all soft and delicious.  A Philly lunch might consist of a hoagie, a Tastykake, and a Frank's soda to drink.  Yes, it's fattening, but we don't eat like that every day.   :)

(Edited to format for easier reading)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Anyanka on August 02, 2011, 10:07:50 PM
Quebec's staple dish  poutine (http://poutine) fries with cheese curd and gravy.

My friends who have roots here tell me that eggs poached in maple syrup is the regional dish. I have never tried it.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: PrincessInPink on August 03, 2011, 12:19:26 AM
Charleston SC
Shrimp & Grits
She crab Soup
Crab Cakes (Sorry, Maryland-I know I'm biased but the ones here are the best!)
Boiled Peanuts
Beaufort Stew (aka Frogmore Stew)
Pig Roasts
Any fresh, locally caught seafood (especially shrimp or crawfish) cooked in someones' backyard with a whole bunch of friends!

We really like our food in the south!

I think I need to go there. I've never been to the South, but I'm tempted to go just for the food.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Cyradis on August 03, 2011, 12:57:53 PM
I'm from Trinidad and Tobago and we have an unofficial national breakfast food: doubles. Doubles (which is singular) is made of bara (flour, baking powder, salt and tumeric) filled with curried channa (chick peas/garbanzo beans) It's usually topped with chutney and lots of pepper sauce. It's probably our most popular street food.

Here is a link to a recipe and photo: http://www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/trinidad-doubles-recipe/ (http://www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/trinidad-doubles-recipe/)



That looks amazing.  I'm definitely going to give it a try.  I can almost imagine the taste of it already.

It really is amazing! My advice is to eat it within minutes of making, it's best then.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: SamiHami on August 03, 2011, 01:08:43 PM
Charleston SC
Shrimp & Grits
She crab Soup
Crab Cakes (Sorry, Maryland-I know I'm biased but the ones here are the best!)
Boiled Peanuts
Beaufort Stew (aka Frogmore Stew)
Pig Roasts
Any fresh, locally caught seafood (especially shrimp or crawfish) cooked in someones' backyard with a whole bunch of friends!

We really like our food in the south!

I think I need to go there. I've never been to the South, but I'm tempted to go just for the food.

If you do, let me know! I'll make sure you get the good stuff!
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Giggity on August 03, 2011, 01:09:00 PM
Hmm.  I don't think Philadelphia has any local foods.

Is Philly where the Juicy Lucy is from?

For y'all who do not watch Man vs. Food, the Juicy Lucy is a burger with the cheese inside the patty. It's molten and looks ZOMG great.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on August 03, 2011, 01:28:22 PM
Hmm.  I don't think Philadelphia has any local foods.

Is Philly where the Juicy Lucy is from?

For y'all who do not watch Man vs. Food, the Juicy Lucy is a burger with the cheese inside the patty. It's molten and looks ZOMG great.

No, and I wish I could remember from the article I read...
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: PrincessInPink on August 03, 2011, 02:53:36 PM
Hmm.  I don't think Philadelphia has any local foods.

Is Philly where the Juicy Lucy is from?

For y'all who do not watch Man vs. Food, the Juicy Lucy is a burger with the cheese inside the patty. It's molten and looks ZOMG great.

Minneapolis.

I've seen that episode a couple of times. It looked divine. Man vs. Food is a great show.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Bibliophile on August 03, 2011, 02:56:27 PM
Charleston SC
Shrimp & Grits
She crab Soup
Crab Cakes (Sorry, Maryland-I know I'm biased but the ones here are the best!)
Boiled Peanuts
Beaufort Stew (aka Frogmore Stew)
Pig Roasts
Any fresh, locally caught seafood (especially shrimp or crawfish) cooked in someones' backyard with a whole bunch of friends!

We really like our food in the south!

I think I need to go there. I've never been to the South, but I'm tempted to go just for the food.

I've been in Atlanta almost 10 years & I've yet to have either boiled peanuts or shrimp & grits (or any grits for that matter).  But I'm from Kansas City & Atlanta doesn't have REAL BBQ...  I don't know what they do to the poor sauce...
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: lady_disdain on August 03, 2011, 07:24:50 PM
Hmm.  I don't think Philadelphia has any local foods.

Is Philly where the Juicy Lucy is from?

For y'all who do not watch Man vs. Food, the Juicy Lucy is a burger with the cheese inside the patty. It's molten and looks ZOMG great.

Minneapolis.

I've seen that episode a couple of times. It looked divine. Man vs. Food is a great show.

There is a local restaurant that makes burgers with plenty of pepper in the patty and filled with gorgonzola (blue cheese). To die for.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Giggity on August 03, 2011, 07:28:38 PM
Minneapolis. That's a little far even for me, for a burger.

BUT IT HAS CHEESE INSIDE IT.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: blue2000 on August 03, 2011, 10:53:07 PM
I'm from Southern Oregon, and we don't have any really distinctive local dishes. However, if you visit the area, you will not leave without eating something with pears in it. Pretty much guaranteed.

I currently live in Quebec, and although I cannot lay any claim to being "from" here, I feel I must mention the most famous local dish: poutine, which is french fries covered in gravy and topped with cheese curds. People tend to have strong feelings about where to get the best poutine in town. Personally I feel that the best time to eat poutine is in the dead of winter, after having been outside skating, skiing or snowshoeing, when you are beginning to worry about frostbite and are so hungry you may collapse. However, I've also been reliably informed that poutine tastes best when eaten while drunk at 3 AM. You may wish to conduct your own studies on this matter. >:D

There are lots of different variations on the traditional poutine, some of which are good, some of which sound...scary. Today I saw a sign in a restaurant window advertising poutine curry. Now, I'm all for the melting pot, but it seems to me that some cuisines were never meant to be fused :-X.

I've never had curry poutine, but I've had curry gravy on potatoes before - it is sooo yummy!

Not sure about foods local to this specific area, but if we are talking southern Ontario in general - farmer's sausage. Totally different from the stuff you get in the store. :-*
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Syfygeek on August 04, 2011, 09:58:42 AM
For some reason beignets and king cake just don't taste as good anywhere besides Louisiana.  It must be the water or something.

Hmmm....beignets....

Mmmmmmmmm I haven't had a beignet in years. I foresee a visit to Mom's as soon as I can.

Here it is Eastern or Western Carolina BBQ (http://www.ncbbq.com/Modules/Articles/article.aspx?id=20).  I won't post which I prefer but the battle over it is fierce.


Don't mess with the scrapple (http://neesesausage.com/products/default.htm) or grits (http://www.carolinagrits.com/) either.

I love Eastern NC bbq. We have had several heated arguments over it because my husband is from Memphis. He got stationed on Camp Lejeune. His main argument is a claim that Eastern NC bbq 'isn't bbq.'  Probably a good thing we live in Memphis now and not Jacksonville....

I'm with your DH, I grew up 8 miles from the main gate of Lejeune, and I cannot stand Eastern BBQ (please don't tell my family), I am all about the Lexington NC Style. My favorite BBQ place locally has both Eastern and Lexington style, so my family can get both.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Wonderflonium on August 04, 2011, 11:19:14 AM
I grew up in York County, PA where the world's best potato chips are made.   

http://www.martinschips.biz/potatochips.aspx (http://www.martinschips.biz/potatochips.aspx)

If you plan on ordering some, I'll give you my address so you can send me a box as a tip.   ;D

Definitely go with the kettle cooked, they're way better than the ruffled.

Martin's Kettle-Cooked Chips are the be-all, end-all of potato chips. (Don't tell my cousin, who works for Herr's, that I said that!)

And to whoever mentioned Tastycakes: Peanut butter kandy cakes are the best things that have ever been invented.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Nibsey on August 04, 2011, 11:37:38 AM
I grew up in York County, PA where the world's best potato chips are made.   

http://www.martinschips.biz/potatochips.aspx (http://www.martinschips.biz/potatochips.aspx)

If you plan on ordering some, I'll give you my address so you can send me a box as a tip.   ;D

Definitely go with the kettle cooked, they're way better than the ruffled.

Martin's Kettle-Cooked Chips are the be-all, end-all of potato chips. (Don't tell my cousin, who works for Herr's, that I said that!)

And to whoever mentioned Tastycakes: Peanut butter kandy cakes are the best things that have ever been invented.

Oh that reminds me for 'local' food in Ireland, the original cheese and onion and salt and vinegar flavoured crisps, Tayto. (Even though I prefer Smiths myself even though you can't get them over here.  :( )
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Mazdoy on August 04, 2011, 03:19:50 PM


Oh that reminds me for 'local' food in Ireland, the original cheese and onion and salt and vinegar flavoured crisps, Tayto. (Even though I prefer Smiths myself even though you can't get them over here.  :( )

I'm sorry but Tayto aren't nearly as nice as King.  Especially on a sandwich.  I remember reading years ago that the Irish are the biggest crisp consumers in the world and I well believe it.  I think we have the best variety here too.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Nibsey on August 04, 2011, 04:46:29 PM


Oh that reminds me for 'local' food in Ireland, the original cheese and onion and salt and vinegar flavoured crisps, Tayto. (Even though I prefer Smiths myself even though you can't get them over here.  :( )

I'm sorry but Tayto aren't nearly as nice as King.  Especially on a sandwich.  I remember reading years ago that the Irish are the biggest crisp consumers in the world and I well believe it.  I think we have the best variety here too.

I use to be a kings fan myself but a few years ago I treated myself to a crisp sandwich and it wasn't great. They were all greasy and burnt looking. I mentioned Tayto because they were the inventers of cheese & onion and salt & vinegar crisps. Before that all crisps were just salted.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: 567Kate on August 04, 2011, 05:56:55 PM
The best of San Diego drunk food:

Carne Asada Fries: Like nachos, but with French fries instead of tortilla chips

California Burrito: Steak burrito containing french fries. It's like carne asada fries wrapped up in a tortilla

Hey, they're both on wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carne_asada_fries

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_burrito#San_Diego
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: MamaMootz on August 04, 2011, 06:50:53 PM
Nobody's mentioned it yet, so here I go:

New Jersey: TAYLOR HAM.

Now, you must have the taylor ham with egg and cheese on nothing less than a Kaiser roll. Some people call it Taylor Pork Roll, but those are the folks from South Jersey and Pork Roll tastes slightly different.

I miss it because it is something that is only served in NJ and I cannot buy it (that and TastyKakes) unless I visit a website in South Jersey called njporkroll.com.

A picture of the most succulent breakfast sandwich:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=213200058716959&set=pu.109560659080900&type=1 (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=213200058716959&set=pu.109560659080900&type=1)

And please note the sandwich pictured is on a hoagie roll, and not the proper flaky, crispy, Kaiser roll that has the soft doughy inside that the salty hammy goodness of the Taylor Ham requires.

I miss NJ.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Ligeia on August 04, 2011, 08:30:36 PM
Nobody's mentioned it yet, so here I go:

New Jersey: TAYLOR HAM.

Now, you must have the taylor ham with egg and cheese on nothing less than a Kaiser roll. Some people call it Taylor Pork Roll, but those are the folks from South Jersey and Pork Roll tastes slightly different.

I miss it because it is something that is only served in NJ and I cannot buy it (that and TastyKakes) unless I visit a website in South Jersey called njporkroll.com

A picture of the most succulent breakfast sandwich:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=213200058716959&set=pu.109560659080900&type=1 (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=213200058716959&set=pu.109560659080900&type=1)

And please note the sandwich pictured is on a hoagie roll, and not the proper flaky, crispy, Kaiser roll that has the soft doughy inside that the salty hammy goodness of the Taylor Ham requires.

I miss NJ.

My NJ-native husband introduced me to Taylor Ham years ago! You can finally buy it here (in the South) at Publix.  My husband is very good at making Taylor Ham sammiches, although the diner he frequented in NJ used . . . English muffins.

I've been in Atlanta almost 10 years & I've yet to have either boiled peanuts or shrimp & grits (or any grits for that matter).  But I'm from Kansas City & Atlanta doesn't have REAL BBQ...  I don't know what they do to the poor sauce...

Re: Boiled peanuts.  I'm in another Southern city (and have always lived here), and I had actually never heard of boiled peanuts until I started noticing roadside stands a few years ago. (Maybe they were always there--I might not be too observant).  People told us they were great.  So my husband and I bought some  once, and--we Did.Not.Like.Them.  They reminded me of mushy slugs.  So while I don't doubt people love 'em--I've heard tons of testimonials to that fact--you're not necessarily missing anything, Bibliophile. :)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: MamaMootz on August 04, 2011, 11:32:37 PM
Nobody's mentioned it yet, so here I go:

New Jersey: TAYLOR HAM.

Now, you must have the taylor ham with egg and cheese on nothing less than a Kaiser roll. Some people call it Taylor Pork Roll, but those are the folks from South Jersey and Pork Roll tastes slightly different.

I miss it because it is something that is only served in NJ and I cannot buy it (that and TastyKakes) unless I visit a website in South Jersey called njporkroll.com

A picture of the most succulent breakfast sandwich:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=213200058716959&set=pu.109560659080900&type=1 (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=213200058716959&set=pu.109560659080900&type=1)

And please note the sandwich pictured is on a hoagie roll, and not the proper flaky, crispy, Kaiser roll that has the soft doughy inside that the salty hammy goodness of the Taylor Ham requires.

I miss NJ.

My NJ-native husband introduced me to Taylor Ham years ago! You can finally buy it here (in the South) at Publix.  My husband is very good at making Taylor Ham sammiches, although the diner he frequented in NJ used . . . English muffins.



English muffins.... thud..... that was the sound of me fainting in disbelief that an NJ diner would despoil the Taylor Ham that way. Madness!

Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: AmethystAnne on August 07, 2011, 01:40:34 PM
Local home cooking in southcentral Kentucky is yummy and calorie-laden.
==>For breakfast, Chocolate gravy over a split homemade biscuit OR sausage, biscuit, and gravy with a couple slices of fresh tomatoes.
==>For lunch, fried bologna sandwich ( I add a slice of cheese) 
==>For supper, fresh homemade cornbread, freshly cooked pinto beans (after it's been soaked in water to re-hydrate), with finely chopped fresh onion and some pickle relish.

I miss being able to eaily buy Lebanon Bologna, Taylor ham, and scrapple like I was able to do when we lived in New Jersey. I especially miss the Lebanon Bologna. I ask for it in the deli at the different stores I've tried out here in s.c.KY, and all I get is a blank stare and then a polite "No, we don't carry it."
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on August 07, 2011, 03:17:23 PM
Local home cooking in southcentral Kentucky is yummy and calorie-laden.
==>For breakfast, Chocolate gravy over a split homemade biscuit OR sausage, biscuit, and gravy with a couple slices of fresh tomatoes.
==>For lunch, fried bologna sandwich ( I add a slice of cheese) 
==>For supper, fresh homemade cornbread, freshly cooked pinto beans (after it's been soaked in water to re-hydrate), with finely chopped fresh onion and some pickle relish.

I miss being able to eaily buy Lebanon Bologna, Taylor ham, and scrapple like I was able to do when we lived in New Jersey. I especially miss the Lebanon Bologna. I ask for it in the deli at the different stores I've tried out here in s.c.KY, and all I get is a blank stare and then a polite "No, we don't carry it."

For the record, scrapple is an invention of the Pennsylvania Dutch.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: I'mnotinsane on August 07, 2011, 05:58:51 PM
Sedorna I'm from NJ and I lurrrrrve Berger Cookies.  About twice a year I'm tempted to drive down just for the cookies.  I've tried black and whites and they just aren't the same. 

From my state we have Salt water Taffy and the best tomatoes in the nation. 

Northern NJ is highly influenced by NYC and southern NJ is similarly influenced by Philly so you can generally find good cheesestakes, pizza, bread/rolls/bagels, and tastykakes here. However, we rule in where to eat.  More 24 hour diners than any other state.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: POF on August 07, 2011, 06:11:50 PM
Hi, guys. I thought it might be fun to post some local foods and food customs. Both to show off what we've got, and so that any visitors might know what to enjoy--or what to avoid. Plus, it might be fun to see any similarities between different places. I'm from Baltimore, Maryland (well, technically Baltimore County, not City.)

One popular custom is eating sauerkraut at Thanksgiving. It's quite big here. I work in a grocery store and I think about 95% of all sauerkraut is sold during the month of November. Two refreshing snacks are lemon sticks and snowballs. Now, New Orleans also has snowballs, and I'd love to go there some day to see how they differ from Baltimore snowballs. I like my snowballs powdery and sweet, with marshmallow creme on top. Lemon sticks are so simple, yet so good. Basically, they're a lemon (or lemon half, if large enough) with a soft peppermint stick in them. You suck up the juice through the peppermint, and it sweetens it a bit and adds some minty goodness. Yum.

Three (honestly, I'm not counting) local factory made foods are Berger Cookies, Goetze Caramels, and Mary Sue Easter Eggs. Berger Cookies are shortbread cookies with a thick slab of fudge on top. Goetze caramels (which I'm pretty sure are sold nationwide; heck, I was shock when I learned that they're made in Baltimore) are soft caramels with a sweet white center. Yum. And, while Mary Sue does make other candies, I think of the pecan nougat Easter eggs when I think of the candies. Oh, and the theme song, which is sung to the tune of "I'm called Little Buttercup" from H.M.S. Pinafore.

So, what local treats do all of you have?


YES ! I  turkey with  sauerkraut !!!! Now that I live in New England people think I am crazy
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Sharnita on August 07, 2011, 08:35:58 PM
I just remembered an incident with one of my students.  We were in the middle of discussing the Revolutionary War.  He raised his hand and I called on him.  He asked "Why are they Virginia hams?  What's so special about the pigs in Virginia?"
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: I'mnotinsane on August 07, 2011, 09:03:51 PM
I just remembered an incident with one of my students.  We were in the middle of discussing the Revolutionary War.  He raised his hand and I called on him.  He asked "Why are they Virginia hams?  What's so special about the pigs in Virginia?"

This is what I love about teaching.  How did you answer his question?
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Julia Mercer on August 09, 2011, 08:06:59 PM
Since my dad's family is from Scotland, I can highly recommend Orkney fudge, that stuff is YUMMMMMM, melt in your mouth! Haven't had it in years, but loved it the last few times I had it!

Jules
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Giggity on August 09, 2011, 08:35:06 PM
Local home cooking in southcentral Kentucky is yummy and calorie-laden.
==>For breakfast, Chocolate gravy over a split homemade biscuit OR sausage, biscuit, and gravy with a couple slices of fresh tomatoes.

What on EARTH is chocolate gravy? I MUST KNOW IMMEDIATELY.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Jaelle on August 09, 2011, 08:59:51 PM
Wings!  ;D  I mean, seriously, Buffalo wings are NAMED for us! And I think it's probably a local thing that there are so many take-offs on the wing thing here ... chips, subs, pizza, shrimp, pasta ... a local copy even makes a "Buffalo-wing"-themed ice cream! (No chicken in it ... but there is cayenne pepper. ;))

I think orange chocolate is a Western New York thing, too. I'm not taking about one of those oranges that break into pieces when you smack it ... although it's similar ... I'm talking about orange-flavored chocolate that's made into pretty much everything, from Easter bunnies to sponge candy.

Actually, I think sponge candy might be a WNY thing as well ...
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Sharnita on August 10, 2011, 02:40:44 PM
I just remembered an incident with one of my students.  We were in the middle of discussing the Revolutionary War.  He raised his hand and I called on him.  He asked "Why are they Virginia hams?  What's so special about the pigs in Virginia?"

This is what I love about teaching.  How did you answer his question?

I said that it was an excellant question but I didn't know the answert and that if he could research it and tell me I'd give him extra credit.  Knowing him he did research it but forgot to tell me.  The next day he was asking me about the Treaty of Versailles when we were, of course, still covering the Revolutionary War.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on August 10, 2011, 02:48:55 PM
I just remembered an incident with one of my students.  We were in the middle of discussing the Revolutionary War.  He raised his hand and I called on him.  He asked "Why are they Virginia hams?  What's so special about the pigs in Virginia?"

This is what I love about teaching.  How did you answer his question?

I said that it was an excellant question but I didn't know the answert and that if he could research it and tell me I'd give him extra credit.  Knowing him he did research it but forgot to tell me.  The next day he was asking me about the Treaty of Versailles when we were, of course, still covering the Revolutionary War.

So I'm a dork and I looked it up.  It turns out a Virginia Ham is no different than a Tennessee Ham, or a Georgia Ham, with one notable aspect:  they have a good PR department.  Seriously, the only reason VA hams are famous is because their country hams became famous before the hams of any other state.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: FauxFoodist on August 10, 2011, 08:20:00 PM
The best of San Diego drunk food:

Carne Asada Fries: Like nachos, but with French fries instead of tortilla chips

California Burrito: Steak burrito containing french fries. It's like carne asada fries wrapped up in a tortilla

Hey, they're both on wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carne_asada_fries

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_burrito#San_Diego

Am not so fond of the California burrito, but, on my first trip back to SD since I moved away, I did get some Arizona burritos to take home with me (one with carne asada and one with chicken).  Arizona burritos are just like California burritos except, instead of french fries, they have homefried potatoes.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: kethria on August 17, 2011, 10:42:48 AM
There are so many! And many that are just every day food that we don't even realize foreigners would consider it an unusual local food.

I just roasted a large pan of arracacha roots. It is so delicious! It is bright yellow, but it has an almost creamy texture and a nutty, slightly sweet flavour. You can boil them, puree them, fry them, roast them, make pasta, etc.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/90/Arracacia_xanthorrhiza_%28boiled_and_peeled%29.JPG/710px-Arracacia_xanthorrhiza_%28boiled_and_peeled%29.JPG)


*faints* I can't remember the last time I had an arracacha!! Wait yes I can, 3 years ago when I took DH to Colombia to visit family. I wish we could get them here.

Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: lady_disdain on August 20, 2011, 09:47:58 PM
If they didn't spoil so easily, I would send you some :D
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: MamaMootz on August 21, 2011, 01:33:29 PM
Can I ask a question of all you current NJ-ites (and former ones)?

I told my co-worker to check out a genuine NJ diner when she went to visit. She asked a person she was visiting with for a recommendation.... and this person told her "Well there's such and so diner but it's owned by Greeks and I don't know how good it is."

I was born & raised in northern NJ and lived there for most of my adult life. To the best of my knowledge, all the diners there worth talking about were Greek-owned. I can't think of one that wasn't, actually.

Did something change in the last 6 years since we've moved out of the state?
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: heartmug on August 25, 2011, 06:33:19 PM
Turkey burgers with sprouts and avocado.  Also, See's candy (from CA).
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: ladiedeathe on August 25, 2011, 07:23:57 PM
No. Ky/Greater Cincinnati Area
Gliers Goetta (no other brand will do!)- best served with real maple syrup to dip it in.
Cincinnati Greek chili- Skyline, Gold Star, Empress. Served at a chili parlor. No resemblance to Tex-Mex chili
Aglemesis or Graeters Ice Cream
Montgomery Inn BBQ Sauce
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: MERUNCC13 on August 26, 2011, 07:43:56 PM
Reporting from the other side of NC (the Great State of Mecklenburg!)

Fried Chicken from Price's Chicken Coop - a Charlotte institution and a must for anyone visiting the city, also Bubba's BBQ, which serves great Eastern NC Style BBQ (can you tell which way I lean in the NC BBQ wars?)

Soul Food which is southern food with heart and soul cooked in.

Any snack foods made by Lance Crackers.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Cyradis on August 28, 2011, 10:54:35 PM
Corn Soup!

It's a staple of public fetes, cricket matches, Carnival, Parrang parties and weekends at the beach. It's filling and good!

Recipe: http://www.simplytrinicooking.com/2008/09/corn-soup-trini-style.html (http://www.simplytrinicooking.com/2008/09/corn-soup-trini-style.html)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Sharnita on August 30, 2011, 07:10:39 PM
I have to say, I had peanut soup somewhere or another out east and was very excited to try the local specialty.  It wsa one of the worst soups I've ever eaten.  It seems like something that is an aquired taste.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: jayhawk on September 02, 2011, 10:03:44 AM
I've been in Atlanta almost 10 years & I've yet to have either boiled peanuts or shrimp & grits (or any grits for that matter).  But I'm from Kansas City & Atlanta doesn't have REAL BBQ...  I don't know what they do to the poor sauce...

Preach it, sistah!! 
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Poirot on September 02, 2011, 10:12:10 AM
Hmm.  I don't think Philadelphia has any local foods.

Okay, now that I've surgically removed my tongue from my cheek...   ;)

The Cheesesteak.  Description found here:  http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=90832.msg2403785#msg2403785
The soft pretzel.  Jury's out on whether Philly did it first, but they do it best (and most... a common job for preteens used to be hawking pretzels.  You'd load a box/basket/milk crate up with pretzels, 11 for $1.  Then you'd sell them for $0.25.  On a typical weekend, or any day in the summer, you could hear the kids calling out "Fresh pretzels... all ready... fresh pretzels.  On a decent day, you could make $5 or $10.  My personal best was $25 at a streetside flea market.  I just circled the block and the money poured in.)
The hoagie.  It's got its roots in Philly as much as anywhere.  You might also know it as a po' boy, a sub, or a hero, but a hoagie is a long Italian roll, upon which is lettuce, tomato, onions, oil, meats, and cheese.
The Tastykake.  This is a company, but around Philly, you'd be hard pressed to find much int he way of Hostess goods, Tastykake rules supreme.  Pies, cupcakes, angel food cakes... all soft and delicious.  A Philly lunch might consist of a hoagie, a Tastykake, and a Frank's soda to drink.  Yes, it's fattening, but we don't eat like that every day.   :)

(Edited to format for easier reading)

All of the above, plus you forgot cream cheese (Philadelphia, the best in the world!), Tony Luke's Roast Pork and broccoli rabe and Crab Fries from Chickies' & Pete's! :)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: HermioneGranger on September 09, 2011, 12:52:51 PM
Another Marylander here.  Pit Beef.  Or Pit Ham.  Or Pit Turkey.  They're all good.  There's a place in my neck of the woods that's so awesome it's been on the Food Network several times.  Every time, though, they very carefully film so as not to show the strip club that's located directly behind it and shares the parking lot.   >:D
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Betelnut on September 09, 2011, 01:07:49 PM
A true Southern Maryland local food:  Stuffed Ham.  I had never heard of it until I moved here.  Usually it is homemade but a few locally-owned stores sell them during Christmas, Thanksgiving and Easter.  I've only had it a few times and it is interesting.  Very much a family/traditional food with variations based on family recipes.

From Wikipedia:

Stuffed ham is a variety of ham in which cabbage, kale, onions, spices and seasonings are chopped and mixed, then stuffed into deep slits slashed in a whole, corned ham.

http://somd.com/news/headlines/2007/6754.shtml (http://somd.com/news/headlines/2007/6754.shtml)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Nibsey on September 09, 2011, 03:45:06 PM
A true Southern Maryland local food:  Stuffed Ham.  I had never heard of it until I moved here.  Usually it is homemade but a few locally-owned stores sell them during Christmas, Thanksgiving and Easter.  I've only had it a few times and it is interesting.  Very much a family/traditional food with variations based on family recipes.

From Wikipedia:

Stuffed ham is a variety of ham in which cabbage, kale, onions, spices and seasonings are chopped and mixed, then stuffed into deep slits slashed in a whole, corned ham.

http://somd.com/news/headlines/2007/6754.shtml (http://somd.com/news/headlines/2007/6754.shtml)

This sounds awesome!!!
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Carnation on September 09, 2011, 06:16:20 PM
Devil Dogs/Ring Dings/Yankee Doodles, all variations of the same product, but soooo  good.   My mother lives within walking distance of the bakery.  (And yet I haven't tried to break in.)

Anyone dare to drink Moxie?

Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: cattlekid on September 11, 2011, 07:00:03 AM
I know the place of which you speak.  My sister lives in Baltimore and my husband went to visit her and BIL - he specifically asked to go to this establishment b/c he had seen it on the Food Network.

When he got home, I asked him how the food was at the establishment.  Before he even said one thing about the food, he said "We didn't know it was in the parking lot of a strip joint."

Travel Channel did this to us as well with a place in Washington DC.  When it was shown on TV, we knew the establishment itself was small, but there appeared to be outside seating.  No problem!  We get to the place (cab dropped us off in a slightly sketchy neighborhood), got in line and got our food. Then we realized - the outdoor seating we saw on TV was just there for the TV show (or had been removed for some other reason).  So while we were standing on the curb contemplating sitting on the curb and eating, two older ladies from the neighborhood asked us where we wanted to go.  We told them that we needed to go to the train station to catch our train back out to Maryland.  I knew there was plenty of seating at the train station so they said they would drive us the six blocks.  We were skeptical but they looked harmless so in the car we got.  They dropped us at the train station after a few minutes of pleasant conversation and we stuffed ourselves with some of the best fish sandwiches we have ever had.

Another Marylander here.  Pit Beef.  Or Pit Ham.  Or Pit Turkey.  They're all good.  There's a place in my neck of the woods that's so awesome it's been on the Food Network several times.  Every time, though, they very carefully film so as not to show the strip club that's located directly behind it and shares the parking lot.   >:D
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: HermioneGranger on September 11, 2011, 01:42:42 PM
I know the place of which you speak.  My sister lives in Baltimore and my husband went to visit her and BIL - he specifically asked to go to this establishment b/c he had seen it on the Food Network.

When he got home, I asked him how the food was at the establishment.  Before he even said one thing about the food, he said "We didn't know it was in the parking lot of a strip joint."

Travel Channel did this to us as well with a place in Washington DC.  When it was shown on TV, we knew the establishment itself was small, but there appeared to be outside seating.  No problem!  We get to the place (cab dropped us off in a slightly sketchy neighborhood), got in line and got our food. Then we realized - the outdoor seating we saw on TV was just there for the TV show (or had been removed for some other reason).  So while we were standing on the curb contemplating sitting on the curb and eating, two older ladies from the neighborhood asked us where we wanted to go.  We told them that we needed to go to the train station to catch our train back out to Maryland.  I knew there was plenty of seating at the train station so they said they would drive us the six blocks.  We were skeptical but they looked harmless so in the car we got.  They dropped us at the train station after a few minutes of pleasant conversation and we stuffed ourselves with some of the best fish sandwiches we have ever had.

Another Marylander here.  Pit Beef.  Or Pit Ham.  Or Pit Turkey.  They're all good.  There's a place in my neck of the woods that's so awesome it's been on the Food Network several times.  Every time, though, they very carefully film so as not to show the strip club that's located directly behind it and shares the parking lot.   >:D

The food's still awesome.  If you're ever there, try the mac and cheese, or the loaded potato salad.   :D
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Maujer on September 16, 2011, 09:52:45 AM
Devil Dogs/Ring Dings/Yankee Doodles, all variations of the same product, but soooo  good.   My mother lives within walking distance of the bakery.  (And yet I haven't tried to break in.)

Anyone dare to drink Moxie?

I was born in Maine so yes.  ;D I'm not a big fan, but I really want to go to the Moxie festival someday. Moxie ice cream sounds much tastier to me than actual Moxie.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: mechtilde on September 16, 2011, 10:46:56 AM
From where I grew up- Haslet- a type of cold sliced meatloaf. Lovely, nice and spicy- just like the sausages. Lincolnshire plum loaf (yum) and Haddock and Chips with fish from Grimsby and potatoes from Lincolnshire. Smoked haddock. Wonderful chutneys.

When I came up to the North East I noticed a disting leek theme- pork and leek sausages,  leek pudding. The nearest thing to haslet was savoury duck- much smaller and sold whole. About the size of a tennis ball. Large bread stottie cakes. The wonderful local cheeses.

The one thing I've never had is a singing hinny. Must make some.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: General Jinjur on September 19, 2011, 07:32:02 PM
Italian beef sandwiches. I tried to like them, I did, but even the most highly recommended ones were gristly beef on a soggy bun (the juice is poured over it). Shudder.

The Mother-in-Law. A tamale in a hot dog bun, topped with chili, cheese, and onions. Never tried this and probably never will.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: CosmicChicken42 on September 19, 2011, 08:27:42 PM
I'm from Harrisburg, PA.  Some of the best things are:
Shoo-Fly Pie.  Seriously it is a combination of complete and utter molasses bliss than you will fall in love with and want to marry.

Middlewarths BBQ Chips  & UTZ chips

Also, and I didn't realize that this did not happen outside of the East Coast, but Made To Order food at gas stations.  We have a wonderful gas station called Sheetz(which is almost as good as WaWa) that serves MTO food.  You can order specialty drinks, pizza, burgers, sandwiches, paninis, salads, soups, wraps, ANYTHING made to order at your local gas station and it'll be ready in less than 5 minutes.  So I will add Sheetz to the wonderful list of local food even though it serves everything you ever wanted. 



Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Kaora on September 20, 2011, 01:46:27 AM
In the deserts of Southern CA here.  We don't have any specially local food (excluding a burger named after the town that a restaurant that went out of business a couple years ago made.  Most ironically, said burger made everyone sick...)

What we do have is a mishmash of cuisine.  I am talking about foods which are highly German, or highly Midwestern, sometimes with Tex-Mex (like Mexican but not really) thrown in there for flair.  I have had, personally, churros, Tex-Mex Tacos, Nachos, Hamburgers, Mashed Potatoes with Gravy and Fried Chicken, Stoll, Spetzhul, Fruitcake, Brotwurst (mmm :D ), Cheddarwurst, puddings (of the American and British varieties-- from chocolate to Bread and Yellow puddings), Orange Ruffy (a white fish) in cream sauce (a very white sauce, bland looking dinner ;) ), Ludafisk (offered, not tried  ;) ), Calimari Rings (like onion rings, with squid.  They're served in a semi-nice restaurant here ;D), donuts, potato pancakes WITH applesauce (best thing EVER), potato salad, macaroni salad, and enough Jell-O Salad from a single family reunion to make a 1:2 scale Gelatine Statue of Liberty, with enough Coolwhip (whipped cream) to frost that torch.  No, I wish I *was* kidding.

Then again, my family is mostly Midwestern, German, and Norse themselves, and a large chunk of the town's early population is from Oklahoma, with a later few waves from the Los Angeles area.  The first two probably have lent a heavy German influence into my appetite.  :)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: mechtilde on September 20, 2011, 02:04:52 AM
Apropos cheese- cheese savoury- a sandwich filling made of grated cheese, onion and carrot, with mayonnaise. I've never seen it outside the North East.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: oz diva on September 20, 2011, 03:38:25 AM
We had fish and chips the other night and it occurred to me that you probably only get fried dim sims in Australia. They're a little fried dumpling filled with cabbage and other 'stuff' you really probably don't need, or in fact want to know, what else. They're quite delicious. I'm sure they have a Chinese background, but we've made them our own. You can get them steamed too, but they look a bit flaccid for my liking, though I like steamed dumplings in other settings.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Betelnut on September 20, 2011, 10:17:05 AM
Italian beef sandwiches. I tried to like them, I did, but even the most highly recommended ones were gristly beef on a soggy bun (the juice is poured over it). Shudder.

The Mother-in-Law. A tamale in a hot dog bun, topped with chili, cheese, and onions. Never tried this and probably never will.

Hopefully the corn husk is taken off the tamale first?  Or perhaps the name of the item comes from the fact that you are expected to choke down the corn husk...LOL!
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: General Jinjur on September 20, 2011, 02:00:18 PM
I think the name comes from the attendant indigestion.

They're actually not the fat tamales I think most of us are familiar with, but long, skinny machine-extruded tubes. Not sure if they're ever packed in corn husks, but I think not. They're produced locally.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: dogcazza on September 21, 2011, 12:48:40 AM
I'm in Australia, and while it's not really an everyday food, we eat Kangaroo. It's readily available at every day supermarkets, and I must say it is quite delicious when marinated and fried, very gamey but lean, and super healthy.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: siamesecat2965 on November 02, 2011, 02:03:21 PM
Can I ask a question of all you current NJ-ites (and former ones)?

I told my co-worker to check out a genuine NJ diner when she went to visit. She asked a person she was visiting with for a recommendation.... and this person told her "Well there's such and so diner but it's owned by Greeks and I don't know how good it is."

I was born & raised in northern NJ and lived there for most of my adult life. To the best of my knowledge, all the diners there worth talking about were Greek-owned. I can't think of one that wasn't, actually.

Did something change in the last 6 years since we've moved out of the state?

Nope, not that I'm aware of.  There are 4 diners within 4 miles of where I live, and to the best of my knowledge ALL are Greek-owned.  I've only eaten at 2, and while I prefer certain things at each one, they are both good.  I don't know what your friend's host was talking about :)

And I will come out and admit, as a Jersey I don't like taylor ham.  There. I said it.  But I also don't like regular ham, so I think I get a pass on that.

We also have great pizza; thin crust, etc.  I won't eat pizza anywhere else but here....
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: SamiHami on November 02, 2011, 02:30:50 PM
Charleston SC
Shrimp & Grits
She crab Soup
Crab Cakes (Sorry, Maryland-I know I'm biased but the ones here are the best!)
Boiled Peanuts
Beaufort Stew (aka Frogmore Stew)
Pig Roasts
Any fresh, locally caught seafood (especially shrimp or crawfish) cooked in someones' backyard with a whole bunch of friends!

We really like our food in the south!

I think I need to go there. I've never been to the South, but I'm tempted to go just for the food.

I've been in Atlanta almost 10 years & I've yet to have either boiled peanuts or shrimp & grits (or any grits for that matter).  But I'm from Kansas City & Atlanta doesn't have REAL BBQ...  I don't know what they do to the poor sauce...

Can't speak for Atlanta, but here in Chucktown we have fantastic BBQ. Just last week the Food Network visited the Bessinger's BBQ around the corner from my house. The Bessinger name is huge in SC--everyone knows about "Piggy Park" in Columbia, owned by another Bessinger. There are numerous other small BBQ joints around here as well, most of them are quite good.

Out of curiosity, where you are from is your sauce tomato, vinegar or mustard based? You can get all 3 here, but the mustard is the best...mmmmm.....
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: siamesecat2965 on November 03, 2011, 08:47:22 AM
I'm from Harrisburg, PA.  Some of the best things are:
Shoo-Fly Pie.  Seriously it is a combination of complete and utter molasses bliss than you will fall in love with and want to marry.

Middlewarths BBQ Chips  & UTZ chips

Also, and I didn't realize that this did not happen outside of the East Coast, but Made To Order food at gas stations.  We have a wonderful gas station called Sheetz(which is almost as good as WaWa) that serves MTO food.  You can order specialty drinks, pizza, burgers, sandwiches, paninis, salads, soups, wraps, ANYTHING made to order at your local gas station and it'll be ready in less than 5 minutes.  So I will add Sheetz to the wonderful list of local food even though it serves everything you ever wanted.

I LOVE Utz chips. Back in the 80's, they were named best in the country by Food and Wine magazine (and still have this on their bags!)  They weren't as readily available everywhere as they are now, so I can remember my parents and I driving out to Krumsville, to Dietrich's meat market with TWO cooler chests,and stopping at a local Weis market for some Utz.

And while not local for me, although I was born in York, lebanon bologna.  I love it.  Even after watching Dirty Jobs and seeing how its made.  I've loved it since I was a kid.  It's also something you weren't really able to get here in NJ when I was  kid, so when we did get it, it was a treat.

I also like Sheetz; I drive through PA and MD to get to my mom's in VA and my Sheetz of choice is the one on US15 in Dillsburg.  Its the perfect stop, both timewise, and location.  I prefer on and off stops, not ones where you get off and have to drive several miles to whatever it is you want.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Smitty on November 10, 2011, 03:38:02 PM
Several people have already mentioned poutine (which is amazing). I would add butter tarts and tourtiere to the list of Canadian delicacies. Also, vinegar is offered as a standard condiment with french fries - it's so frustrating to order fries when I'm in the USA and not have vinegar to go with them!

Most Canadians will know what I mean if I say "I ordered the Festive Special last night - I'm still mad that they changed the chocolates!" There is a restaurant chain called Swiss Chalet here that specializes in rotisserie chicken. In Nov/Dec they have the "Festive Special", which is a meal that includes dressing and cranberry sauce, and comes with chocolates. The chocolate used to be a miniature Toblerone bar, but now it's a box of assorted Lindts. This was national news.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: blue2000 on November 10, 2011, 03:49:03 PM
Several people have already mentioned poutine (which is amazing). I would add butter tarts and tourtiere to the list of Canadian delicacies. Also, vinegar is offered as a standard condiment with french fries - it's so frustrating to order fries when I'm in the USA and not have vinegar to go with them!

Most Canadians will know what I mean if I say "I ordered the Festive Special last night - I'm still mad that they changed the chocolates!" There is a restaurant chain called Swiss Chalet here that specializes in rotisserie chicken. In Nov/Dec they have the "Festive Special", which is a meal that includes dressing and cranberry sauce, and comes with chocolates. The chocolate used to be a miniature Toblerone bar, but now it's a box of assorted Lindts. This was national news.

LOL! I nearly snorted my dinner at that. We went to Swiss Chalet for Thanksgiving dinner and Mother wanted the holiday special. They didn't have stuffing with the meal. You would have thought they forgot the plate, she was so horrified!

She's going to be ticked when she finds out about the chocolate. :P
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Smitty on November 10, 2011, 06:20:04 PM
Several people have already mentioned poutine (which is amazing). I would add butter tarts and tourtiere to the list of Canadian delicacies. Also, vinegar is offered as a standard condiment with french fries - it's so frustrating to order fries when I'm in the USA and not have vinegar to go with them!

Most Canadians will know what I mean if I say "I ordered the Festive Special last night - I'm still mad that they changed the chocolates!" There is a restaurant chain called Swiss Chalet here that specializes in rotisserie chicken. In Nov/Dec they have the "Festive Special", which is a meal that includes dressing and cranberry sauce, and comes with chocolates. The chocolate used to be a miniature Toblerone bar, but now it's a box of assorted Lindts. This was national news.

LOL! I nearly snorted my dinner at that. We went to Swiss Chalet for Thanksgiving dinner and Mother wanted the holiday special. They didn't have stuffing with the meal. You would have thought they forgot the plate, she was so horrified!

She's going to be ticked when she finds out about the chocolate. :P

Don't mess with our Festive Special. Seriously, we will cut you.  :P
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Julia Mercer on November 13, 2011, 12:40:35 PM
And from Waterford Michigan you can find the divine Downey's Potato Chips, my friend and her now late aunt turned me on to these gems, they are only available in Oakland County Michigan, and I ask her to bring a bag or two with her whenever I meet up with her, lol, of course I bring her some Canadian chocolate as a trade! http://www.facebook.com/pages/Downeys-Potato-Chips/167500419933695

Jules
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Lynda_34 on November 15, 2011, 10:02:28 AM
There are so many! And many that are just every day food that we don't even realize foreigners would consider it an unusual local food.

I just roasted a large pan of arracacha roots. It is so delicious! It is bright yellow, but it has an almost creamy texture and a nutty, slightly sweet flavour. You can boil them, puree them, fry them, roast them, make pasta, etc.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/90/Arracacia_xanthorrhiza_%28boiled_and_peeled%29.JPG/710px-Arracacia_xanthorrhiza_%28boiled_and_peeled%29.JPG)

Now, on a much less healthy direction, brigadeiros. They are small sweets, very traditional in children's parties, made with condensed milk, cocoa and butter. Creamy, chocolatey and delicious. There is no way that I wait for a party to have them, so I make them at home sometimes. If they had a good deal fewer calories, I would make them a lot more often.

There are also a lot of variants: coconut and clove, coconut and prune, walnuts or a plain variety coated with sugar.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/15/Brigadeiro2.jpg)

I'm going to read the whole thread, I promise but where are you and how can I get this stuff. I am in New England
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Lynda_34 on November 15, 2011, 10:04:44 AM
I grew up in York County, PA where the world's best potato chips are made.   

http://www.martinschips.biz/potatochips.aspx (http://www.martinschips.biz/potatochips.aspx)

If you plan on ordering some, I'll give you my address so you can send me a box as a tip.   ;D

Definitely go with the kettle cooked, they're way better than the ruffled.
Yes I'm reading the whole thread, but Stateline in southern Mass are the best.
They aren't easy to find anymore but I can mail you a bag if you'd like.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Mal on November 15, 2011, 10:26:36 AM
The part of Germany I'm from is directly adjacent to Austria, so a lot of the local cuisine intermingles. But here goes:

- Brezel (/Breze), which are usually soft, a lot like bagels, and can be cut open to put on spreads (mostly butter and cream cheese)

- Knödel (/Klöße), dumplings made from day-old rolls, milk and eggs that are a traditional side-dish for gravy-heavy meals.

- Spätzle, a noodle-like side dish where the dough is scraped into the boiling water

- Schnitzel (of course ;)), either breaded (Austrian origin) with fries or plain wit a lot of gravy, often mushrooms, and sides of rice, mashed potatoes, Knödel, noodles or Spätzle

- Krapfen (Berliner), like beignets, but filled with jam or jelly

- Stollen, a traditional christmas loaf with raisins and candied lemon and orange peel

- a wide variety of christmas cookies which reminds me I need to start baking and making chocolates soon :)

There must be tons more, Germans love to eat, but I can't come up with anything more right now... because I'm hungry now...
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: siamesecat2965 on November 15, 2011, 02:10:15 PM
The part of Germany I'm from is directly adjacent to Austria, so a lot of the local cuisine intermingles. But here goes:

Spätzle, a noodle-like side dish where the dough is scraped into the boiling water

 
- a wide variety of christmas cookies which reminds me I need to start baking and making chocolates soon :)
There must be tons more, Germans love to eat, but I can't come up with anything more right now... because I'm hungry now...

Spätzle - YES, best with my favorite, rouladen. I make it every now and then (the rouladen, not the spatzle)  But there isa german pork store near me and i buy the most authentic spatzle I can find.  My mom and I are toying with the idea of a saurbrauten for Christmas dinner since we don't want our traditional pork roast.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: General Jinjur on November 16, 2011, 11:11:55 AM
I've been craving the chocolates I grew up with - See's Candies. Sadly, they are only a West Coast thing. Happily, a friend on the West Coast is mailing me a box of their chocolate lollipops! Which are amazing. They're kind of like the bits of fudge that get stuck to the pan. Yum.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: siamesecat2965 on November 16, 2011, 11:59:43 AM
I've been craving the chocolates I grew up with - See's Candies. Sadly, they are only a West Coast thing. Happily, a friend on the West Coast is mailing me a box of their chocolate lollipops! Which are amazing. They're kind of like the bits of fudge that get stuck to the pan. Yum.

I just discovered them a few years back (east coaster here) and last year, they had a kiosk in one of the malls.  Which is why my co-workers all got a small box of See's for Christmas!
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: CLE_Girl on November 16, 2011, 12:39:08 PM
Okay - I haven't read the whole post but I'm going to chime in with Chicago and Cleveland

Chicago - deep dish pizza.  Uno's is the orginal, Lou Malnati's is my favorite chain.  I've had deep dish outside Chicago, it is not the same, I think it's the Lake Michigan water  ;)
             - Gyro's.  Maybe not a Chicago thing, but I've never found them as good as in Greek Town in Chicago.
                           The G is silent!
Cleveland - We have become a city of foodies.  Cleveland is now the place for chef's to test resturant concepts before disapearing to NYC or LA.  Guy Fieri showcased 8 resturants here, Michael Symon has Lola, Lolita and his burger chain B spot, Anthony Bordain even did a "No reservations" about Cleveland.  There are fabulous resterants everywhere!  But I think Cleveland is know for it's Polish population and therefor has AMAZING perogi! 
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: General Jinjur on November 16, 2011, 01:04:34 PM
I've been craving the chocolates I grew up with - See's Candies. Sadly, they are only a West Coast thing. Happily, a friend on the West Coast is mailing me a box of their chocolate lollipops! Which are amazing. They're kind of like the bits of fudge that get stuck to the pan. Yum.

I just discovered them a few years back (east coaster here) and last year, they had a kiosk in one of the malls.  Which is why my co-workers all got a small box of See's for Christmas!

I've heard there are keee-ahsks here in some malls around holidays, but I never go to malls, so it doesn't enter my mind. Besides, do I really need the prospect of chocolate buttercreams, Bordeaux, Divinity, and - the best! - toffee? Sadly, I do not.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: I'mnotinsane on November 23, 2011, 07:40:50 PM
I'm from Harrisburg, PA.  Some of the best things are:
Shoo-Fly Pie.  Seriously it is a combination of complete and utter molasses bliss than you will fall in love with and want to marry.

Middlewarths BBQ Chips  & UTZ chips

Also, and I didn't realize that this did not happen outside of the East Coast, but Made To Order food at gas stations.  We have a wonderful gas station called Sheetz(which is almost as good as WaWa) that serves MTO food.  You can order specialty drinks, pizza, burgers, sandwiches, paninis, salads, soups, wraps, ANYTHING made to order at your local gas station and it'll be ready in less than 5 minutes.  So I will add Sheetz to the wonderful list of local food even though it serves everything you ever wanted.

I was at a Sheetz a few months ago and was amazed at how many types of food (MTO and grocery) that they had, but no maps! 
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Mal on November 24, 2011, 02:53:14 AM
- Gyro's.  Maybe not a Chicago thing, but I've never found them as good as in Greek Town in Chicago.
                           The G is silent!

If it's supposed to be Greek, it's not silent, just pronounced differently (and has no apostrophe ;)). My uncle is Greek and he pronounces it "Ghee-ross".

If this is something Chicago-specific and different than traditionally seasoned meat from a rotating skewer, I never said anything  ;D
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Sharnita on November 25, 2011, 04:07:29 AM
The part of Germany I'm from is directly adjacent to Austria, so a lot of the local cuisine intermingles. But here goes:


- Spätzle, a noodle-like side dish where the dough is scraped into the boiling water

- Schnitzel (of course ;)), either breaded (Austrian origin) with fries or plain wit a lot of gravy, often mushrooms, and sides of rice, mashed potatoes, Knödel, noodles or Spätzle


- Stollen, a traditional christmas loaf with raisins and candied lemon and orange peel

- a wide variety of christmas cookies which reminds me I need to start baking and making chocolates soon :)

There must be tons more, Germans love to eat, but I can't come up with anything more right now... because I'm hungry now...

My sister made Spatzle and green beans last night as one of our Thanksgiving sides.  It was the first time she made it, though we;ve had them plenty of times before.

Love Shnitzel but not so hot on Stollen.

You mentione Christmas Cookies - do you do something called "Springerlie"? (Not sure about the spelling)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Mal on November 25, 2011, 04:17:37 AM
You mentione Christmas Cookies - do you do something called "Springerlie"? (Not sure about the spelling)

I haven't actually made any myself because you need special molds for them, which I don't own, but they are traditional cookies where I live :)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: EngineerChick on November 25, 2011, 09:07:59 AM
You mentione Christmas Cookies - do you do something called "Springerlie"? (Not sure about the spelling)

I haven't actually made any myself because you need special molds for them, which I don't own, but they are traditional cookies where I live :)

My family does, but we usually just roll out the dough and cut into rough squares.  (US/North Carolina--but it probably came from my grandfather, who grew up near a Pennsylvania Dutch area)
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: oz diva on November 25, 2011, 11:27:02 PM
This isn't strictly local as I know it's made in other countries, but perhaps not so much the US. I just put a fruit cake in the oven for Christmas and beyond. It's got loads of sultanas, currants, raisins, glace cherries, peel & apricots, mixed with a little cake mixture and brandy and topped with almonds. It's the most amazing cake, and if necessary will last years.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Stranger on November 26, 2011, 01:47:57 AM
South Africans love "pap" (maize porridge), as a breakfast food and as a side dish to meat casseroles.

http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=pap+en+sous&hl=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=-ZbQTozaDYi0iQfH5em9CA&sqi=2&ved=0CDUQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=549 (http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=pap+en+sous&hl=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=-ZbQTozaDYi0iQfH5em9CA&sqi=2&ved=0CDUQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=549)

"Pap" is the maize, and "sous" is the vegetable gravy, made with mostly onions and tomatos.

We also love koesisters http://www.mydiversekitchen.com/2010/05/koeksisters-south-african-deep-fried.html (http://www.mydiversekitchen.com/2010/05/koeksisters-south-african-deep-fried.html) and

milktart http://allrecipes.com/recipe/south-african-melktert-milk-tart/ (http://allrecipes.com/recipe/south-african-melktert-milk-tart/) and

biltong http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=biltong&hl=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=uZjQTtePIYaSiQeYoNnRDg&sqi=2&ved=0CGQQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=549 (http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=biltong&hl=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=uZjQTtePIYaSiQeYoNnRDg&sqi=2&ved=0CGQQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=549)

There is nothing better than a samoosa http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=biltong&hl=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=uZjQTtePIYaSiQeYoNnRDg&sqi=2&ved=0CGQQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=549#hl=en&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=samoosa+pictures&pbx=1&oq=samoosa&aq=2&aqi=g1g-s1g1g-s7&aql=&gs_sm=e&gs_upl=58330l61257l0l64646l13l8l0l0l0l2l1329l4525l2-2.1.1.0.1.2l8l0&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=e3e551bf642aa3c4&biw=1024&bih=549 (http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=biltong&hl=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=uZjQTtePIYaSiQeYoNnRDg&sqi=2&ved=0CGQQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=549#hl=en&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=samoosa+pictures&pbx=1&oq=samoosa&aq=2&aqi=g1g-s1g1g-s7&aql=&gs_sm=e&gs_upl=58330l61257l0l64646l13l8l0l0l0l2l1329l4525l2-2.1.1.0.1.2l8l0&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=e3e551bf642aa3c4&biw=1024&bih=549) dipped in the hottest chilli sauce you can find.

Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on November 26, 2011, 03:02:52 AM
This isn't strictly local as I know it's made in other countries, but perhaps not so much the US. I just put a fruit cake in the oven for Christmas and beyond. It's got loads of sultanas, currants, raisins, glace cherries, peel & apricots, mixed with a little cake mixture and brandy and topped with almonds. It's the most amazing cake, and if necessary will last years.

Fruitcake is somewhat... infamous in the US.  There are stories (tales, one might say) of families trading the same fruitcake around for years like a White Elephant gift.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: blue2000 on November 26, 2011, 04:02:51 AM
This isn't strictly local as I know it's made in other countries, but perhaps not so much the US. I just put a fruit cake in the oven for Christmas and beyond. It's got loads of sultanas, currants, raisins, glace cherries, peel & apricots, mixed with a little cake mixture and brandy and topped with almonds. It's the most amazing cake, and if necessary will last years.

Fruitcake is somewhat... infamous in the US.  There are stories (tales, one might say) of families trading the same fruitcake around for years like a White Elephant gift.

I've eaten some of those fruitcakes. They are like bricks with little smudges of fruit flavouring. How they can ruin a perfectly good cake so badly is beyond me. But somehow people manage.

The good stuff is moist and lovely and I could eat half the cake at one sitting.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: oz diva on November 26, 2011, 05:49:49 AM
This isn't strictly local as I know it's made in other countries, but perhaps not so much the US. I just put a fruit cake in the oven for Christmas and beyond. It's got loads of sultanas, currants, raisins, glace cherries, peel & apricots, mixed with a little cake mixture and brandy and topped with almonds. It's the most amazing cake, and if necessary will last years.

Fruitcake is somewhat... infamous in the US.  There are stories (tales, one might say) of families trading the same fruitcake around for years like a White Elephant gift.

Actually, if I got one, no matter how old it was, I would probably try it. Traditionally couples keep the top tier of their wedding cake to serve at the christening of their first child. My brother was married 13 years before they had their son, and the cake tasted great!

If you think you don't like fruit cake, you just haven't tasted mine. I will honestly say, without fear, that it is delicious.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Diane AKA Traska on November 26, 2011, 08:38:13 AM
This isn't strictly local as I know it's made in other countries, but perhaps not so much the US. I just put a fruit cake in the oven for Christmas and beyond. It's got loads of sultanas, currants, raisins, glace cherries, peel & apricots, mixed with a little cake mixture and brandy and topped with almonds. It's the most amazing cake, and if necessary will last years.

Fruitcake is somewhat... infamous in the US.  There are stories (tales, one might say) of families trading the same fruitcake around for years like a White Elephant gift.

Actually, if I got one, no matter how old it was, I would probably try it. Traditionally couples keep the top tier of their wedding cake to serve at the christening of their first child. My brother was married 13 years before they had their son, and the cake tasted great!

If you think you don't like fruit cake, you just haven't tasted mine. I will honestly say, without fear, that it is delicious.

Oh, I don't doubt that American fruitcake is one of those things that was *so* close to the way it should be yet leagues away.

But really, there are tales of people using them as paperweights, doorstops, ballast...
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Thipu1 on November 26, 2011, 10:01:08 AM
I seem to remember a fruitcake toss in which people see who can get the longest distance from the brown bricks. 

However, a good fruitcake is a thing of beauty.  One of the mail order cheese merchants used to offer a Hawiian fruitcake made with macadamia nuts and pineapple.  It was scrumptious. 

There's also a bakery in Texas that turns out a fruitcake to die for. 

Darn!  Now I want fruitcake.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Bethczar on November 26, 2011, 03:19:26 PM
My mother has passed the torch to me this year... I'm baking the fruitcake. I just hope I can do her fantastically delicious recipe justice!
On the other hand, I have also tasted fruitcake that would definately scare a person from ever trying it again.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: oz diva on November 26, 2011, 11:26:25 PM
Talking of local foods, did you know that macadamia nuts are indigenous to Australia. They are practically unopenable and it was an American who came up with a method of opening them without destroying the kernel in the process.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: jenny_islander on November 27, 2011, 02:24:11 AM
Smokefish, or Alaska style smoked salmon.  This is salmon that has been filleted and hung over a carefully tended wood fire until it becomes so hard it goes "clunk" when you drop it.  If kept dry, it will remain edible for more than a year without refrigeration.  It is delicious, but has a penetrating smoky odor and is very chewy.  Can be eaten on its own or used as a substitute for very firm dry sausages, bacon bits, or country ham.

Backstrap.  This is the two back muscles of a not very large deer--deer here are not much bigger than dogs.  Delectable braised with wine, new potatoes, and onions.  In a larger animal this would yield filet mignon.  I should also mention the "deer-ky," which is an especially small adult deer (just the two flank halves and the haunches) trimmed, trussed, and oven-roasted like a very large turkey.

Halibut cheeks.  Simply put, the two "cheek" areas of a large halibut, cut away and sold separately.  Tender, delicately flavored morsels, easily substituted for scallops.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Maujer on November 27, 2011, 07:53:46 AM
Halibut cheeks.  Simply put, the two "cheek" areas of a large halibut, cut away and sold separately.  Tender, delicately flavored morsels, easily substituted for scallops.

I have the hardest time convincing my husband that fish cheeks are often the best part of the fish. He thinks I'm a total weirdo.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: siamesecat2965 on November 27, 2011, 06:10:25 PM
Halibut cheeks.  Simply put, the two "cheek" areas of a large halibut, cut away and sold separately.  Tender, delicately flavored morsels, easily substituted for scallops.

I have the hardest time convincing my husband that fish cheeks are often the best part of the fish. He thinks I'm a total weirdo.

I saw something on a cooking show where they used fish cheeks and I think I could eat them, as long as  they came nicely served...I don't know if I could if I had to detach them and prepare them myself.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: oz diva on November 27, 2011, 07:36:01 PM
I have the most delicious (but involved) recipe for beef cheeks and I've had them at a restaurant. It's the most amazingly wonderful dish. The meat is so deliciously moist and tender.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: General Jinjur on November 27, 2011, 09:12:18 PM
There's also a bakery in Texas that turns out a fruitcake to die for. 

Collins Street Bakery. We had some at Thanksgiving this year. My MIL always buys it and no one will touch it, because it's fruitcake...I don't sing its praises too loudly, the last thing I want is to set the locusts upon it. I think part of what makes it so great is that it lacks the typical demon fruit that infests most of these kinds of cakes: raisins. Foul, horrible, disgusting, vile raisins. I feel a little angry just thinking about them.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: oz diva on November 27, 2011, 10:08:03 PM
What's wrong with the maligned raisins? They don't taste so amazingly different to sultanas, surely? I was so happy this year I found the candied apricot my recipe requires, for the first time.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: iridaceae on November 28, 2011, 05:02:15 AM
My sister made Spatzle and green beans last night as one of our Thanksgiving sides.  It was the first time she made it, though we;ve had them plenty of times before.

Love Shnitzel but not so hot on Stollen.


Oh, I love spatzle the next day when you fry up the leftovers and they get so wonderfully crunchy and browned.

And stollen is good- as long as it's heavy on the marzipan.  I love me some marzipan.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: bigozzy on November 28, 2011, 09:15:01 AM
Talking of local foods, did you know that macadamia nuts are indigenous to Australia. They are practically unopenable and it was an American who came up with a method of opening them without destroying the kernel in the process.

When I grew up in QLD we had a macadamia nut tree in our back yard and we kids loved being given or gathering great bags of them. The fun but difficult part was cracking them.
First you had to get the outer fibrous shell off before you even got to the bullet/bomb proof shell.
Bricks and hammers need just the right force applied or the whole thing would mush or go shooting off at speed. Not to mention the banged finger hazard! I was somewhat of an expert at using a hammer to quicly crack and open up a whole nut.

One Christmas we ound that you could crack them eaily by lodging a nut in the door jamb and forcing a door open on them. My father was a bit annoyed at the dents in the frame thoough!

Then came Bazza's Mac nut cracker which made it easy and I still refuse to lower myself to its use, silly I know but i have standards. ;D
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: General Jinjur on November 28, 2011, 12:20:05 PM
What's wrong with the maligned raisins? They don't taste so amazingly different to sultanas, surely? I was so happy this year I found the candied apricot my recipe requires, for the first time.

They are horrible, rancid, wretched, and disturbing. Also, when bitten into they pop in a distressing way - like bugs. Soft, sour bugs  :-X I loathe them immeasurably, and I like almost everything.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: blue2000 on November 28, 2011, 04:26:51 PM
What's wrong with the maligned raisins? They don't taste so amazingly different to sultanas, surely? I was so happy this year I found the candied apricot my recipe requires, for the first time.

They are horrible, rancid, wretched, and disturbing. Also, when bitten into they pop in a distressing way - like bugs. Soft, sour bugs  :-X I loathe them immeasurably, and I like almost everything.

I love cooked raisins, but I have to say, this description made me howl. I'll have to think of this next time I am eating fruitcake. "Mmmm, nice and maggoty! Extra protein!" ;D
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Faerydust on January 04, 2012, 11:44:55 PM
Here in Hawaii, white rice is the standard starch. We have what we call a "plate lunch" which is a pretty standard local lunch meal consisting of a meat, one scoop of white rice and one scoop of mac salad. Common meats are hamburger steak smothered in gravy, loco moco (hamburger steak with eggs on top), teriyaki, kalua pork, or chicken katsu.

We have a large Asian poplulation, so many of our local dishes also incorporate Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino food. For example, spam musubi, which is sticky rice shaped into a rectangle with a piece of spam on top and wrapped in seaweed. Sort of like sushi.

Saimin is our local version of ramen. It usually contains kamaboko which is a type of fish cake, spam or pork, and green onion.

True Hawaiian food would be kalua pig (pork roasted in an underground oven), lau lau, and poi.

Shave ice is a really popular snack and mochi is a wonderful Japanese snack that locals love.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: lesserspotted on January 07, 2012, 05:56:02 PM
I'm not sure how many people still eat this, and I've certainly never been brave enough to try them, but a traditional food from East London is jellied eels. Pie and mash is much better.

Of course, there is always the British national dish of chicken tikka masala.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Julian on January 17, 2012, 01:35:26 PM
Tasmania  has some great local produce, and some wonderful local dishes.

Curried scallop pies are to die for!  As are housecakes - a wonderfully light, cake-textured pastry shell filled with custard and topped with local raspberries or blueberries.  Yum!

We're in the height of stone fruit season here, there's a cherry orchard just down the road that sells fruit at the door.  Cherries the size of plums, sweet and delicious!  Blackberries will be ripe soon - many rural roads have blackberry brambles down the fenceline, it's common to see cars parked and people picking the berries.  And I've never had an apricot before like the ones here - we're just starting to get into apricot picking time.

I found I have a plum tree in my garden (Hah!  paddock...) but apart from a few I picked early, the possums seem to have beaten me to it.   :'(
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: bigozzy on January 18, 2012, 06:15:01 AM
Tasmania  has some great local produce, and some wonderful local dishes.

Curried scallop pies are to die for!  As are housecakes - a wonderfully light, cake-textured pastry shell filled with custard and topped with local raspberries or blueberries.  Yum!

We're in the height of stone fruit season here, there's a cherry orchard just down the road that sells fruit at the door.  Cherries the size of plums, sweet and delicious!  Blackberries will be ripe soon - many rural roads have blackberry brambles down the fenceline, it's common to see cars parked and people picking the berries.  And I've never had an apricot before like the ones here - we're just starting to get into apricot picking time.

I found I have a plum tree in my garden (Hah!  paddock...) but apart from a few I picked early, the possums seem to have beaten me to it.   :'(


Yum. Here in Scotland the two small plum trees, apple tree and pear tree in our back garden exploded with fruit this year. The branched on the plum trees were actually starting to break due to the weight of ripening plums.

I still have a freezer full of compots/pie fillings and aother treats.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Julian on January 18, 2012, 05:03:41 PM
Lucky you, no sneaky possums to nick them!   :D  I've only ever seen one on my property, a ringtail, but he must have friends - there was a lot of plums!  I'll be buying a bird net for next year. 

I'm also keeping a watch on a few wild apple trees on the side of the road. 

Unfortunately I got in too late last winter to buy fruit trees, next winter I will make sure I get some early. 
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: SamiHami on January 18, 2012, 05:43:24 PM
This isn't strictly local as I know it's made in other countries, but perhaps not so much the US. I just put a fruit cake in the oven for Christmas and beyond. It's got loads of sultanas, currants, raisins, glace cherries, peel & apricots, mixed with a little cake mixture and brandy and topped with almonds. It's the most amazing cake, and if necessary will last years.

Fruitcake is somewhat... infamous in the US.  There are stories (tales, one might say) of families trading the same fruitcake around for years like a White Elephant gift.

Actually, if I got one, no matter how old it was, I would probably try it. Traditionally couples keep the top tier of their wedding cake to serve at the christening of their first child. My brother was married 13 years before they had their son, and the cake tasted great!

If you think you don't like fruit cake, you just haven't tasted mine. I will honestly say, without fear, that it is delicious.

I believe that it is traditional for couples to eat the top tier of their cake on their first wedding anniversary, not upon the birth of their first child. I've been married 23 years now and no kids, so I would never have been able to eat mine! Not that I was able to anyway...Hurricane Hugo took care of that 5 months after my wedding.

Perhaps it's a cultural difference between Australia & the US?
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Vall on January 18, 2012, 05:51:17 PM
I'm really enjoying this thread.  I just wanted to say thanks for the recommendation on fruitcake.  My DH loves fruitcake and I'm thinking of ordering one for him.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: Nibsey on January 18, 2012, 06:21:33 PM
This isn't strictly local as I know it's made in other countries, but perhaps not so much the US. I just put a fruit cake in the oven for Christmas and beyond. It's got loads of sultanas, currants, raisins, glace cherries, peel & apricots, mixed with a little cake mixture and brandy and topped with almonds. It's the most amazing cake, and if necessary will last years.

Fruitcake is somewhat... infamous in the US.  There are stories (tales, one might say) of families trading the same fruitcake around for years like a White Elephant gift.

Actually, if I got one, no matter how old it was, I would probably try it. Traditionally couples keep the top tier of their wedding cake to serve at the christening of their first child. My brother was married 13 years before they had their son, and the cake tasted great!

If you think you don't like fruit cake, you just haven't tasted mine. I will honestly say, without fear, that it is delicious.

I believe that it is traditional for couples to eat the top tier of their cake on their first wedding anniversary, not upon the birth of their first child. I've been married 23 years now and no kids, so I would never have been able to eat mine! Not that I was able to anyway...Hurricane Hugo took care of that 5 months after my wedding.

Perhaps it's a cultural difference between Australia & the US?

In Ireland it's traditional to serve the 1st tier for your first child christening, so it's not just in Aus.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: wx4caster on January 19, 2012, 10:06:38 AM
3 specialties of Nova Scotia are:

1) Donair - originally a gyro but evolved to better suit local tastes - very greasy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donair)

2) Blueberry Grunt - a cooked/steamed (not baked) cobbler with a much cooler name

3) Rappie Pie - a casserole of grated and squeezed potatoes, deboned chicken plus the broth from stewing the chicken
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: oz diva on January 19, 2012, 05:53:34 PM
A branch of my plum tree did break. I netted the two other prolific branches against the possums, ats and birds. I'll make plum jam today with some of the plums I rescued. I sell it at the school fair.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: dietcokeofevil on February 25, 2012, 03:42:20 PM
There are so many! And many that are just every day food that we don't even realize foreigners would consider it an unusual local food.

I just roasted a large pan of arracacha roots. It is so delicious! It is bright yellow, but it has an almost creamy texture and a nutty, slightly sweet flavour. You can boil them, puree them, fry them, roast them, make pasta, etc.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/90/Arracacia_xanthorrhiza_%28boiled_and_peeled%29.JPG/710px-Arracacia_xanthorrhiza_%28boiled_and_peeled%29.JPG)

Now, on a much less healthy direction, brigadeiros. They are small sweets, very traditional in children's parties, made with condensed milk, cocoa and butter. Creamy, chocolatey and delicious. There is no way that I wait for a party to have them, so I make them at home sometimes. If they had a good deal fewer calories, I would make them a lot more often.

There are also a lot of variants: coconut and clove, coconut and prune, walnuts or a plain variety coated with sugar.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/15/Brigadeiro2.jpg)

I just made 300 brigadeiros last night!   My girl scout troop is representing Brazil for our World Thinking Day event tomorrow.  They turned out pretty good.
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: SamiHami on February 25, 2012, 06:14:22 PM
How could I possibly have forgotten to mention that Charleston, SC has America's only commercial tea farm? It's just a very short drive from my house-maybe 30-40 minutes away. Charleston Tea Plantation is open for tours and is a great place to go for an unusual, interesting and tasty morning!

We also have Bee City, a working bee farm that produces the best honey in the world (not that I'm biased or anything).
Title: Re: Local Foods
Post by: baglady on February 25, 2012, 06:40:02 PM
I love fruit. I love cake. I do not love fruitcake. I love the sweetness and (if it's frosted) creaminess of cake. I love the sweet juiciness of fruit. The fruit in fruitcake is not juicy, so for me it just spoils the creamy sweetness of cake. I've always liked the joke about how there were four Wise Men -- the fourth was turned back because he brought the fruitcake.

In upstate New York where I live, all the diners are Greek-owned, but some of them do Greek food better than others. In New Hampshire, where I grew up, not only were the diners Greek-owned, so were many of the pizzerias. I still remember the one in Hanover where, if starving students came in late at night, they would be told, in heavily accented English: "No pizz' afta one-teddy! Col' grindah, maybe!"

("Grinder" being north-of-Boston speak for what is known elsewhere as a sub, hero or hoagie.)