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Life...in general / Re: Friend's wife is a bit strange
« Last post by Yvaine on Today at 06:53:30 PM »
For me, I think it's a pretty good rule of thumb to not disclose personal information about other people, especially if they are sitting right there and could volunteer this information themselves if they wanted to. For some reason, this woman didn't want to talk about her "home" country, or make it known she was from there.

But when you are introducing people, isn't it the norm to point out things they have in common in order to facilitate conversation? I don't think I breached any confidences by mentioning where she was from, since she has never been shy about discussing it previously.

IMO, a good host provides an entry topic of conversation for people, which is what you did. 

Is this location somewhere where there is political unrest or controversy as of late?  You could try asking her at a quieter time if you were mistaken or if this is a topic of conversation you should avoid in the future.

Oh, good question, and are there two names for the place--such that maybe you inadvertently called it the name her faction doesn't use?
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I may or may not be considered a "Millennial."  I am more or less on the edge of the age range.  However, I would run away from any job that called my mother in an attempt to recruit me (exception being someone my mother already knew personally).  That's just creepy and intrusive to me.
This. A thousand times this. That's so wrong that it sounds like a hoax or an Onion article.

Not a millennial, but still. Aside from creepy, I can not even count the number of ways that a potential employer calling (someone they think is) a parent is very very wrong. If an potential employer did that to me, I could guarantee an extremely negative reaction on my part.

They are essentially cyber-stalking their potential new hires. They are making all kinds of assumptions they should not (eg/ I knew someone who was estranged from her father.... because he was arrested when he tried to murder her.) I can't imagine that this does not violate privacy laws of numerous jurisdictions.

How would they know they have the right person? Are they just going to call everyone with the same last name in my home town to ask "Are you DanaJ's mommy?" (Note: My mom re-married and does not share my name.) How incredibly offensive that a potential employer feels that it is appropriate to act as if they were my 4th grade teacher.

Imagine if your bank called your parents: "Hi, DanaJ's mom. Dana is a really responsible spender with a good credit rating. She's thinking about taking out a mortgage and she'd really get a great rate from us. Would you mind putting in a good word for us?"

Edit: Just to make sure it wasn't a hoax, I Googled it and Forbes has the same story. Now I can understand some of he "Bring Your Parents to Work Day" initiatives. Those make more sense as a tool to increase brand awareness and as an excuse to have a reception that builds/improves a sense of workplace community. However, directly contacting an employee's parents without their knowledge is a very different thing. "Increasing engagement"? Mm. I kind of think it would be more along the lines of "fostering resentment".

Someone in the AAM thread suggested they're probably using emergency contact info, which is totally overstepping.
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It may not be an American thing (it isn't -- but neither is sending your kids to strangers' birthdays), but when I lived in Austin (for 10 years up to last year) I know RSVPs were basically ignored.

It might've been my social circle (which did not involve many kids!), but I was repeatedly totally unaware of whether we'd end up having 5 or 30 people at a Friday night party at our (small) house; people just didn't go in for formality, much! We had 10 longtime friends text me during my wedding day that they weren't going to be able to make it to the casual reception they'd been invited to 5 weeks prior!

I think it's really smart to tell her that people aren't deliberately snubbing her; they probably just see a birthday invitation from a stranger or near-stranger as a very informal thing and not something that requires a response. We aren't used to these things when it comes to kids, really.

If she doesn't have any way of contacting these people before to check, then I guess she'll just have to try her luck. If she does have contact info, I think she should try them once more before the event to confirm.

Is her kid old enough to be in school? Perhaps she'd have better luck with schoolmates.

What method of RSVP did she ask for (phone, email, letter)?
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Do I have any chance of succes if I plant sunflowers in a balcony planter?
I think the deepest planter I saw was 8 inches deep, and some varieties grow "small" (I saw one who had 18" advertised on the seed packet) so maybe, hopefully, I can grow some this summer...
(the spot I'm thinking about gets plenty of sunshine and is protected from too much wind).
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I could totally see a 16yo not realizing this even if her own parents weren't wealthy, or if they did have a mortgage.
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Recipe Requests / Re: Cinnamon rolls and bacon
« Last post by TootsNYC on Today at 06:26:03 PM »
Google!!

Pillbury has you cook the bacon before rolling it into the cinnamon rolls ("cook bacon until crisp," actually)

These guys have you cook it until it's not quite raw, and then finish it in the cinnamon rolls (from the tube, not from scratch).
http://www.tablespoon.com/recipes/bacon-cinnamon-rolls/c268a5e7-46af-4de1-9edf-d8e7996a4a60


As do these guys
http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-Bacon-Cinnamon-Rolls/

And these guys
http://guyism.com/lifestyle/food/how-to-make-bacon-cinnamon-rolls.html

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Recipe Requests / Re: Cinnamon rolls and bacon
« Last post by MorgnsGrl on Today at 06:23:56 PM »
:o :o :o

Now this sounds pretty gross to me but DD#1 made a request for Easter breakfast.

She wants to make cinnamon rolls but before rolling, she wants to place a slice of bacon so that the bacon is rolled up inside.

I say that there is no way that the bacon would cook all the way through when rolled up inside before the roll is done baking . . . or am I wrong?

Has anybody heard of anything like this?

Maybe cook the bacon first and crumble it inside before rolling?

I am NOT a fan of undercooked bacon, so I think cooking it first and either crumbling it inside before rolling, or sprinkling it on top would be better options.
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I remember that story from 20/20 or some such show. Town people still very "closed mouthed" about the whole thing.
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Life...in general / Re: Friend's wife is a bit strange
« Last post by Amara on Today at 06:16:34 PM »
I can imagine the awkwardness, OP. It's one of those situations where you just don't know what to say because your brain to trying to process several contradictory factors. I do think your brother was rude to say what he said to you. He could have said something about being confused but to directly accuse you of lying was way beyond polite.

I think Mrs. Donny realized the awkwardness of the situation at the time, did what she could (nothing), and later decided that because it was likely a bit embarrassing to all put it behind her. She apparently doesn't think it warrants further discussion or apologies and would like to move forward. I think she's doing quite well, and I would encourage you to do the same and enjoy her friendship.
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I may or may not be considered a "Millennial."  I am more or less on the edge of the age range.  However, I would run away from any job that called my mother in an attempt to recruit me (exception being someone my mother already knew personally).  That's just creepy and intrusive to me.
This. A thousand times this. That's so wrong that it sounds like a hoax or an Onion article.

Not a millennial, but still. Aside from creepy, I can not even count the number of ways that a potential employer calling (someone they think is) a parent is very very wrong. If an potential employer did that to me, I could guarantee an extremely negative reaction on my part.

They are essentially cyber-stalking their potential new hires. They are making all kinds of assumptions they should not (eg/ I knew someone who was estranged from her father.... because he was arrested when he tried to murder her.) I can't imagine that this does not violate privacy laws of numerous jurisdictions.

How would they know they have the right person? Are they just going to call everyone with the same last name in my home town to ask "Are you DanaJ's mommy?" (Note: My mom re-married and does not share my name.) How incredibly offensive that a potential employer feels that it is appropriate to act as if they were my 4th grade teacher.

Imagine if your bank called your parents: "Hi, DanaJ's mom. Dana is a really responsible spender with a good credit rating. She's thinking about taking out a mortgage and she'd really get a great rate from us. Would you mind putting in a good word for us?"

Edit: Just to make sure it wasn't a hoax, I Googled it and Forbes has the same story. Now I can understand some of he "Bring Your Parents to Work Day" initiatives. Those make more sense as a tool to increase brand awareness and as an excuse to have a reception that builds/improves a sense of workplace community. However, directly contacting an employee's parents without their knowledge is a very different thing. "Increasing engagement"? Mm. I kind of think it would be more along the lines of "fostering resentment".
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