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Life...in general / Re: Kiss off?
« Last post by starry diadem on Today at 02:03:36 AM »

I have no problem with people swearing. I have no problem with people not swearing. I don't swear myself. However, I dislike "cutesy" swearing. You know you mean p* when you say kiss off, I know you mean p* when you say kiss off, so why do it? Unless there was a child around, it seems pretty useless to me. We all know the feeling behind it.
When I was growing up, I often heard 'kiss off'. I didn't run into 'piss off' until I was old enough to be reading books set in England, and I still think of it as being more of an English thing to say. (ymmv) So it's not a matter of trying to be 'cutesy', it's a matter of having heard and used one idiom for a long time time before learning of the other. And no, I don't secretly mean 'piss', I mean 'kiss'. As in giving a big, sarcastic smackaroo in a person's direction as they depart.  ::)
I'm there, too--kiss off is what I'd heard pretty much all up to this thread.  "Piss off" is not a "go away", it's a "made/got angry".  So telling people to go get angry (from the op, substituting the meaning for the phrase) just makes no sense at all.  The kiss off phrase gets stronger with "kiss off and die".  So, two totally different phrases.
Depending on context and where you're from, it can also mean "get lost". I think that's how the OP was using it.


Brit here.

If I  have made someone angry, I have p*ssed them off. If I am angry myself at something or someone, then either I am p*ssed off, or will say that "X p*sses me off."

If I want someone to go away and I'm angry/vehement about it, I will tell them to "P*ss off!" Note that between friends this can be jocular, depending on the circumstances, but never so with strangers. It can also be a defensive reaction to a verbal challenge.

If I am p*ssed, I am drunk, not angry.

I don't normally use 'kiss off', nor do I know anyone who does much, but from the contexts I've seen it used (usually US usage) I'd expect it to mean something closer to brushing someone off, rather than telling them to go away. The construction might be something like "X kissed me off." to mean X dismissed all my concerns and comments and was obvious about not wanting to listen to me.

We have a wonderful language, don't we, with all these multifarous meanings?

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Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: Swearing three year old
« Last post by perpetua on Today at 01:46:51 AM »
Is the OP overreacting?  I don't know.  Different people find different things to be offensive while other people might just laugh.  I think OP's feelings are valid, even if I happen to find the video to be hilarious.

Where I fall is I don't think anyone's overreacting to find it offensive - you can find whatever you like offensive - but I think calling out people who *do* find it funny is a big overreaction. I do think "I find this offensive therefore you shouldn't find it funny" is judgemental.
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Just to clarify, you said the non seafood options cost a lot more than the seafood? That's pretty unusual in my experience regardless of the restaurant's specialty. Unless they only offer filet Mignon option.
I've been to one or two seafood places like what Yarnspinner described. In both I just ended up with salads. One time it was a side salad. Everyone in my family but me loves seafood. It's not so bad at home- you can nosh quietly later but on vacation it's a pain.
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Entertaining and Hospitality / Re: Who gets to decide?
« Last post by gollymolly2 on Today at 12:59:51 AM »
1. I think it would be totally fine to tell them "I breast feed and pump in the living room so I'd prefer if you keep the door closed." And if they leave the door open, close it.

2. Agree that there's not much you can do about this.

3. This would bug me too, but I don't have any ideas. The basket suggestion might work well. Maybe put the basket in their room before they arrive next time and tell them there's a basket in there for them to keep their medicine in.

How long are the visits?
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Life...in general / Re: Kiss off?
« Last post by Owly on Today at 12:52:07 AM »

I have no problem with people swearing. I have no problem with people not swearing. I don't swear myself. However, I dislike "cutesy" swearing. You know you mean p* when you say kiss off, I know you mean p* when you say kiss off, so why do it? Unless there was a child around, it seems pretty useless to me. We all know the feeling behind it.
When I was growing up, I often heard 'kiss off'. I didn't run into 'piss off' until I was old enough to be reading books set in England, and I still think of it as being more of an English thing to say. (ymmv) So it's not a matter of trying to be 'cutesy', it's a matter of having heard and used one idiom for a long time time before learning of the other. And no, I don't secretly mean 'piss', I mean 'kiss'. As in giving a big, sarcastic smackaroo in a person's direction as they depart.  ::)
I'm there, too--kiss off is what I'd heard pretty much all up to this thread.  "Piss off" is not a "go away", it's a "made/got angry".  So telling people to go get angry (from the op, substituting the meaning for the phrase) just makes no sense at all.  The kiss off phrase gets stronger with "kiss off and die".  So, two totally different phrases.
Depending on context and where you're from, it can also mean "get lost". I think that's how the OP was using it.
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Entertaining and Hospitality / Re: Who gets to decide?
« Last post by julianna on Today at 12:50:59 AM »
1.  I'm a little confused as to why it bothers you to have their door open.  Is it that you worry about disturbing them, or worry about them disturbing you, or something else entirely?  Could you clarify please?

2.  I don't think you have much say in this, though I understand why it would bother you. 

3.  You can absolutely put the snacks away, but I agree that if you do, they'll likely forget to eat them.  I'd suggest getting a basket that sits out for the duration of their stay and contains all of their snacks.  I realize it's not as good as a clean counter, but at least it will be neatly contained.

However, I think you need to make a house rule about the medicine.  It won't be long until your child is mobile and it's very dangerous to have medicine where a child can reach it (even if it's in "childproof" bottles).  It would be prudent to get the in-laws in the habit now of keeping the medicine where the child can't get it.  (On the same note, if your MIL keeps any medication, even over-the-counter stuff, in her purse, then the purse should be somewhere the child can't get at it.)

How long are their visits?  In general, I think short visits require a bit more tongue-biting on your part, and for longer visits they can be expected to adapt a bit more to the house norms.  Also, I'm not sure if there are clutter issues beyond the kitchen, but if so, it might help if you can brainstorm some ways to contain their clutter that will work with their existing habits (if you have some other specific examples, people here might be able to help with ideas).

Good luck!


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Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: Captain Know-It-All stories
« Last post by MommyPenguin on Today at 12:39:02 AM »
And most of these people also seem to believe that gender roles have remained immutable throughout time and culture. I notice that a lot when people nowadays talk about real men not expressing emotion or caring about their appearance. The exact opposite was expected of men in the 17th and 18th centuries. Same with the whole 'pink is for girls blue is for boys' thing...the opposite was true in the Victorian times. But some people really seem to think there are two giant categories labeled Girl and Boy and everything is divided into one or the other. Which also leads to truly bizarre situations like some *food* being coded as 'girly' or 'boyish'...

Yup.  My Papa(my aunt's father, who decided my mother, and therefore I, were his too.) showed me how to do a knit cast on that four women in the family had failed to help me with (they tried! It was a confusing book). Then he started talking about learning to knit... In the trenches of ww2.

He was a masterful knitter and made primarily dishcloths in his later years because they were easier on his eyes, but in his youth made a beautiful lace bedspread(that my aunt had BETTER leave me when she passes, it was willed to me, but the shawl he willed to her was stolen by another aunt). No can say papa wasn't 100% man! even when he was making pink dish soap aprons. (I have an apron at least. It's so frilly and foofy!)

Yeah, my understanding is that knitting was actually fairly common for soldiers, because they could make themselves socks, scarves, and other warm weather gear while on the field, when they otherwise couldn't get new ones.

There's a wonderful fantasy book that is a retelling of "The Twelve Dancing Princesses," in fact, that has as the hero a male soldier who knits, and who solves the riddle of the dancing princesses largely due to his knitting abilities.  It's called "Princess of the Midnight Ball," and I highly recommend it.
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Entertaining and Hospitality / Re: Who gets to decide?
« Last post by CakeEater on Today at 12:34:42 AM »
I think it's fine to shut the ILs door if you are pumping, or have the TV on, but I don't think you can dictate that they must keep their door closed all the time, especially if nothing else is happening in the lounge when you all go to bed.

Are they paying for the food? If so, then no, you can't tell them to eat their own leftovers. You cankeep asking if they're going to eat it after 3 or so days, and toss it. You can have a 'three days and it's gone', policy, but not a 'you must use the items you've paid for yourself' policy.

Can they have a basket for their snacks/medicine? Would that help in keeping it all together, but still tidy? Medicine is tricky because you might need it out as a reminder to take it.
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I used to be happy to eat leftovers for breakfast, but as I've gotten older and more staid (I'm 35 now ;) ) I like very standard breakfast foods. Except I don't like eggs or cereal. So toast, mostly. Or porridge, or fruit and yoghurt. That's about as crazy as I like to go first thing in the morning. If I'm at a breakfast buffet, I'll eat bacon and sausage, and pancakes etc, but I wouldn't bother making any of that for myself first thing.

Actually, I ate bircher muesli and greek yoghurt with stewed prunes at a hotel buffet the other morning, and it was excellent. I'd go for that if someone could prepare it for me. I'm not sufficiently awake at breakfast time to put that much effort in.
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Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: Thrift Score!
« Last post by allthelittledaisies on Today at 12:10:18 AM »
Gads!  :-\

Elfmama, BarensMom, thanks for the heads-up! Neither of those things are very heart-warming or endearing. In conclusion, would not buy new.
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