News: IT'S THE 2ND ANNUAL GUATEMALA LIBRARY PROJECT BOOK DRIVE!    LOOKING FOR DONATIONS OF SCIENCE BOOKS THIS YEAR.    Check it out in the "Extending the Hand of Kindness" folder or here: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=139832.msg3372084#msg3372084   

  • September 20, 2017, 06:54:15 PM

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21
Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Last post by Redneck Gravy on Today at 03:35:29 PM »
BeagleDaddy has a client who tries to get everything for free.

She regularly downloads viruses by accident or decides her computer isn't working fast enough and has her son's friend's brother look at it since he's "good with computers" and then calls BeagleDaddy when it is so messed up no one else can help.

His rates are $50.00 for the first hour regardless of how long he's at your place and $20 per hour after that.  She has repeatedly asked if he's at her house and fixes the computer in 15 minutes shouldn't she only pay $12.50?  Sorry, nope.

Last time he told her that she needed a part (I forget what).  She insisted on buying the part herself off the internet.  Okay, fine.  He gave her the specs for the part and told her it should cost about $40 and to call him when the part arrived and he would install it.  She calls.  He goes over to find out she ordered the wrong part because "this one was cheaper".  It was only $18.  Yeah, and it wouldn't work in her computer.  She got upset that he wouldn't "just try" to install it.

This is when he usually tells her to try one of the repair places associated with chain stores.  That brings her back to reality since she knows what they charge and BeagleDaddy charges less and works faster.

I know this person by many other names...  occasionally one of my clients has to fire one of their customers over this type of annoying behavior.  Maybe it is time for BeagleDaddy to say "that will not be possible" at her next phone call for service.  It's just not worth the "cost benefit versus cheap aggravating factor" for some customers, just not. 

I have been 2nd car shopping on Craigslist for a couple of weeks, I am looking for a beater, not expecting to get a Mercedes for a Ford price.  I have contacted three possible sellers for what seemed like reasonable prices - all darn three have turned out to be scammers.  You know the kind, want to ship you a car through Ebay motors and you have xx number of days to inspect the car and get your money back if there are any problems.  Yeah, right.

Two were the "I am shipping out overseas in the military and don't want to pay storage" but I got a new one (new to me), "my son recently died and I just can't stand to pay his storage costs any longer and I don't want that reminder sitting in my driveway".  All three claim to have the car stored in Omaha, NE - like that's not a bizarre coincidence.  I am getting a little frustrated.

I am getting better at spotting them though - if the price is too low or if the pictures are too professional looking and/or if the photos look completely out of place (lots of trees in our desert or better yet on the beach...).
22
...if you pull your winter coat out for the season and discover dessicated dog treats in the pockets.
23

I get lots of juice cleanse advice from friends.


Is it the <Scottish accent> Garth Brooks' Weekly World News Juice Diet</Scottish accent>?   ;D
24
Life...in general / Re: Negative Nancy at the nail shop.
« Last post by GardenGal on Today at 03:24:12 PM »
I'm currently getting a, much needed, pedicure. This lady is working my feet like nobody else can and it's amazing. The only downside is that the client sitting next to me is having a phone conversation(argument) and the tone of her voice suggests that she's trying to be quiet, but it's not working. She keeps repeating that she's really irritated with whoever she's talking to. She's really killing my vibe.

She's rude, right? I think she is, but I'm curious what everyone else thinks.

Can I say anything?

I'd like to hear any thoughts! I'll just be sitting here, fighting off her negative energy!

If this happened to me, I'd tell her "Excuse me, I know you're trying to keep your voice low, but you need to know that I'm hearing the entire conversation and I feel like I'm invading your privacy. Could you take the phone outside or call back?"  I don't know if this would get her to stop talking or take her phone outside, but it would make me feel better to let her know she was broadcasting her drama.
25
Not a shock!

I see (and saw) nothing wrong with being honest about your experiences with this group if anyone that asks why you distanced yourself.

We might owe people extra opportunities to make things right, but we do not owe that same consideration to organizations.

I think that's part of what irked me about the situation. There are other similar businesses out there that are centered on one particular personality, but SB used Group Leader's availability as a marketing strategy. GL personally (or someone with access to GL's Facebook/Instagram) comments on a lot of stuff and gives advice, and generally attempts to be seen as approachable. GL personally called me to tell me I won, and part of the prize was spending time with GL and SB employees. There are a lot of businesses out there, but none of their leaders have ever promised me something and then personally flaked on me.

I'd write GL a letter and list exactly what happened and on what dates, and express my disappointment with the organization.  I would feel used, and I'd tell them so.
26
Life...in general / Re: Awkward Gift Offer
« Last post by GardenGal on Today at 03:12:46 PM »
I think the OP said she didn't want a professional photographer.  There were several talented friends and family members who would be there and they would probably take lots of the kinds of relaxed, fun pictures she wanted.

I know, but it would be the path of least resistance for her problem here.

I don't see how hiring a photographer you don't want, at an added cost you hadn't planned on, is the path of least resistance when all she has to say is "No thank you, you're kind to offer, but I've got this covered," and let her friends take casual photos.
27
Complete Silence / Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Last post by NFPwife on Today at 03:11:31 PM »

Cashiering isn't as cut and dried, easy peasy as it looks. They have to scan the items, bag them properly, make sure you're not leaving anything in the cart, remember the produce codes (so you don't have to wait for them to look it up), etc. They also have to be cheerful and engage in conversation. Talking about something that's right in front of you is much easier than trying to think of other things to talk about. Yes, they are required to be friendly and talk to each customer. They also have a script of things they must remember to ask about, and some stores require them to upsell a minimum of one item per customer. They can base that upsell on what you're buying to making it easier. The scrip of questions can change with the season, depending on the store, too. They're just trying to do their job and be friendly and cheerful while making it look like they want to be there. It's not as easy as it looks.



As a cashier, thank you for this. The small talk is because people complain we aren't friendly if we don't talk. I can see why it can be a hassle to a customer, but we aren't trying to be your friend, we are trying to be friendly. We are trying to not get into trouble because we aren't smiling or talking. Yes, some cashiers go over board, but in all honesty, I, myself, would rather have an overly chatty, friendly cashier, to one who grunts hello, or doesn't say anything.

I can usually pick up a customers attitude, (not sure if that's the word I want) by how they react to my chatter. I have customers who like to come through my lane because of how I chatter, my sarcasm and my quick witted come backs. The other cashiers also have regular customers. We aren't trying to make friends with our customers, although, sometimes it does happen, just make your shopping experience better. We are supposed to say, "Hello", "Did you find everything you wanted?", make some small talk here, at the end of the transaction, "Do you want to apply for the Walmart Credit Card?" if the customer has a lot of groceries, "Would you like a carry out today?" and then, finally, "Thank you for shopping with us today, and have a great day!"

I'm guessing you can't relay to your superiors that some customers so have an issue with it? I mean, I'm less introverted than I used to be, but even then I'm really only conversing because it's rude not to. In all honesty, I'd rather put the stuff on the belt, pay, and get going. We *do* recognize that it's not your (general you) idea, though. :)

Honestly, the conversations and the smiles from the customers were the only things that got me through my days. I have a collagen disorder, but didn't have the diagnosis back when I was a cashier. By the time my breaks would hit, I'd be desperate to sit down and get off my feet. The end of my shift couldn't come fast enough. The customers who would chat and be nice to me were the only distraction I had for the pain I was in. If I had had to stand there for eight hours with no one talking to me, just scanning, bagging, exchanging money and moving to the next customer it would have been hell. Cashiering is not a fun job. We're expected to go fast enough that 85% (or more) of our time is spent actually scanning and cashing out. Even if we're sick, tired, emotional problems at home, have a problem customer, need a price scan, none of it mattered. If we dropped below that efficiency percentage, we were put on notice/probation. If it wasn't brought back up, we could be fired. Customers will complain that we talk too much, or that we don't talk enough (I even got both from the same person once.) They'll complain that we bagged too fast, too slow, the wrong way, crumpled their clothes, etc. We can't ever do anything right in the eyes of the customers. You're only in that cashier's lane for a few minutes. I understand being introverted and not wanting to talk, but reading through the complaints here is just disheartening to those who've been behind the register. What would you be saying if a cashier didn't say anything to you, scanned your items (even scanned quickly, perfectly, made no mistakes, etc) and cashed you out and sent you on your way. You say you'd like it, but stop and think about it a minute. You'd probably be brought up short, like, well, THAT cashier was very unfriendly to me. We can't tell by looking at somebody what the perfect amount of chatting will be for that specific customer. You do have to interact with people when you're out in public, and sorry to say, but talking with a cashier is not going to go away.

I don't mind small talk... but when I'm buying multiples of something and the cashier says something along the lines of "you must really like [item]"... it makes me feel conspicuous. My instinct (that I've never acted on) is to put some of it back because clearly, I've bought so much that I am now a curiosity. Talk about the SHIELD or Weird Al shirt I'm wearing, the weather, the traffic getting to the store... but please don't comment on my purchases! (I mean, I personally would rather not small talk, but I'm better with it than I used to be.)

I'm with Diane, I don't mind small talk either, I mind small talk about my groceries. At the risk of being immodest, I'm great at small talk and will engage the cashier, if... s/he hasn't actively disengaged me with chatter about the groceries. Like Diane, I don't like becoming a curiosity -- or more of one because this has likely happened a couple times through the store.

I was a cashier, also, and I don't ever remember relying on grocery chitchat to engage customers.
28
Family and Children / Re: Baby shower rsvp conundrum
« Last post by GardenGal on Today at 03:07:10 PM »
Quote
I am expecting some pushback from the stepmom on my "no" rsvp, which I'd love to minimize if possible.

Anyone who pushes back when someone RSVPs no is being rude.  If asked why you can't attend, for this or any other occasion, just say "I have other plans," and don't explain any further. Sitting on the couch watching movie re-runs is a perfectly good other plan, as is anything else you choose to do.
29
Overbooked flights. Which means you're forced to either upgrade your seat for $$ or you're stuck on standby hoping a seat will open up. >:(
30
Complete Silence / Re: You're going to get fat if you eat that!
« Last post by Diane AKA Traska on Today at 02:45:10 PM »

Cashiering isn't as cut and dried, easy peasy as it looks. They have to scan the items, bag them properly, make sure you're not leaving anything in the cart, remember the produce codes (so you don't have to wait for them to look it up), etc. They also have to be cheerful and engage in conversation. Talking about something that's right in front of you is much easier than trying to think of other things to talk about. Yes, they are required to be friendly and talk to each customer. They also have a script of things they must remember to ask about, and some stores require them to upsell a minimum of one item per customer. They can base that upsell on what you're buying to making it easier. The scrip of questions can change with the season, depending on the store, too. They're just trying to do their job and be friendly and cheerful while making it look like they want to be there. It's not as easy as it looks.



As a cashier, thank you for this. The small talk is because people complain we aren't friendly if we don't talk. I can see why it can be a hassle to a customer, but we aren't trying to be your friend, we are trying to be friendly. We are trying to not get into trouble because we aren't smiling or talking. Yes, some cashiers go over board, but in all honesty, I, myself, would rather have an overly chatty, friendly cashier, to one who grunts hello, or doesn't say anything.

I can usually pick up a customers attitude, (not sure if that's the word I want) by how they react to my chatter. I have customers who like to come through my lane because of how I chatter, my sarcasm and my quick witted come backs. The other cashiers also have regular customers. We aren't trying to make friends with our customers, although, sometimes it does happen, just make your shopping experience better. We are supposed to say, "Hello", "Did you find everything you wanted?", make some small talk here, at the end of the transaction, "Do you want to apply for the Walmart Credit Card?" if the customer has a lot of groceries, "Would you like a carry out today?" and then, finally, "Thank you for shopping with us today, and have a great day!"

I'm guessing you can't relay to your superiors that some customers so have an issue with it? I mean, I'm less introverted than I used to be, but even then I'm really only conversing because it's rude not to. In all honesty, I'd rather put the stuff on the belt, pay, and get going. We *do* recognize that it's not your (general you) idea, though. :)

Honestly, the conversations and the smiles from the customers were the only things that got me through my days. I have a collagen disorder, but didn't have the diagnosis back when I was a cashier. By the time my breaks would hit, I'd be desperate to sit down and get off my feet. The end of my shift couldn't come fast enough. The customers who would chat and be nice to me were the only distraction I had for the pain I was in. If I had had to stand there for eight hours with no one talking to me, just scanning, bagging, exchanging money and moving to the next customer it would have been hell. Cashiering is not a fun job. We're expected to go fast enough that 85% (or more) of our time is spent actually scanning and cashing out. Even if we're sick, tired, emotional problems at home, have a problem customer, need a price scan, none of it mattered. If we dropped below that efficiency percentage, we were put on notice/probation. If it wasn't brought back up, we could be fired. Customers will complain that we talk too much, or that we don't talk enough (I even got both from the same person once.) They'll complain that we bagged too fast, too slow, the wrong way, crumpled their clothes, etc. We can't ever do anything right in the eyes of the customers. You're only in that cashier's lane for a few minutes. I understand being introverted and not wanting to talk, but reading through the complaints here is just disheartening to those who've been behind the register. What would you be saying if a cashier didn't say anything to you, scanned your items (even scanned quickly, perfectly, made no mistakes, etc) and cashed you out and sent you on your way. You say you'd like it, but stop and think about it a minute. You'd probably be brought up short, like, well, THAT cashier was very unfriendly to me. We can't tell by looking at somebody what the perfect amount of chatting will be for that specific customer. You do have to interact with people when you're out in public, and sorry to say, but talking with a cashier is not going to go away.

I don't mind small talk... but when I'm buying multiples of something and the cashier says something along the lines of "you must really like [item]"... it makes me feel conspicuous. My instinct (that I've never acted on) is to put some of it back because clearly, I've bought so much that I am now a curiosity. Talk about the SHIELD or Weird Al shirt I'm wearing, the weather, the traffic getting to the store... but please don't comment on my purchases! (I mean, I personally would rather not small talk, but I'm better with it than I used to be.)
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