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31
I view that kind of hosting as the hosts trying to make the dinner better for the kids and their parents rather than it being a substandard meal. I know there are young kids who prefer steak and salad to hotdogs, but I'd guess that there are more that would prefer the hotdog. An 18 month old is a different creature to an older child, though. You definitely need to be able to supervise eating, no matter what the food at that age.

I used to take our own DVD player with something that my kids would definitely watch. But if you have a no TV ever rule, you might need to decline invites like those. You can't ask the hosts to turn it off, i don't think.

On the other hand, you can't invite kids, but insist they stay in another room with no parental input for most of the night. Mine wouldn't cope with that at all. Certainly an 18 month old can't be expected to entertain themselves in another room for the duration of an adult dinner. Maybe some can, but I don't think it can be expected as a rule.
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Humor Me! / Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Last post by mmswm on Today at 03:15:15 AM »
I'm just going to drop this here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yjjv2GN8ve8
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I don't have a problem.  While I'm happy to socialise with children, I actually have a bit of an issue with people who refuse to participate in any socialising which doesn't includetheir kids.  It's a completely different environment.

By doing it this way, most of the families couldavoid having to arrange a babysitter.  And as you stated, they already accomodated your child, whoc is too young to be in another room without supervision.

As for the different dining, had the kids been served the same (steak, on china) then they wouldn't ahve been able to eat seperately, which would have avoided the "adults" part of the evening.  Its not about children being "lesser", its just about practicality.
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I never heard of making a chain of paying for the person behind you in line.  I've always thought of pay it forward as more of a way of life.  When I'm financially down I depend on the kindness of strangers,  and when I'm financially up,  I help others.  Ex.  I was out of work for a long time,  and when I finally got a job I only had like two pairs of pants and 3 shirts appropriate for the job.  One day I went to work and my co-worker gave me a bag of cloths that one of our customers had dropped off for me.  No one will tell me which customer (but based on the sizes I can guess).  Anyway,  now that I have a few dollars a week left over to save for cloths,  I bought a belt for a homeless man who picks up trash in exchange for food at work,  and I payed for one ladies pizza when she didn't have enough food stamps for her dinner,  and a few other things like that. 
Pay it forward to me is just a way of life -- I've been doing it since long before the movie gave it a name.
If you are talking about my post, I think she may have been just doing a kind act for someone, possibly because someone had done something for her.  I think that's what pay it forward means.
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Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Last post by JadeAngel on Today at 03:00:23 AM »
Nominating all the people who walk across the street against the light and hold up four rows of traffic because they can't wait thirty seconds for the light to change and the walk light to come on.

I see this all the time on my lunch break.  I love it when the pedestrians get upset with the drivers for having the unmitigated gall to want to drive through the intersection for which they, the drivers, currently have the right of way.   ::)

I did see the one who came unstuck - they crossed against the lights in such a way (they were crossing a four lane road left to right) that the right lanes had moved off by the time they reached them and after they passed the lanes on the left moved off too so they ended up stuck in the middle of the road with the traffic flowing around them unable to go forwards or backwards until the lights changed. Incredibly dangerous of course if someone had been slightly out of their lane or if the pedestrian had decided to just make a run for it the results could have been fatal, but fortunately they survived (and hopefully learned a lesson).

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from Katycoo, "I would be incrediable angry if someone took it upon themselves to "help" in this way if I was grieving the death of my partner."

Exactly.  This is none of your business.
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I remember growing up with this (I think the adults followed dinner with trivial persuits and wine, we ended up watching a film in our pyjamas and walking (or being carried) home afterwards (lived in same street)

We all enjoyed it

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Techno-quette / Re: Wrong Not To Acknowledge?
« Last post by MariaE on Today at 02:38:40 AM »
Not at all a faux pas. Like you said, nice to acknowledge, not wrong not to.

Besides, even if you didn't hide such announcements, you still might not have seen it! FB is notorious for making up its own mind as to what it wants to show and what it doesn't. Your uncle is being ridiculous.
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I worked for a company where the VP looked over every expense with a fine tooth comb.  I ate at Emeril's in New Orleans and submitted only one meal for that day's per diem.  The VP instructed me that I had to use my daily meal allowance for more than one meal a day.  I couldn't spend it all on only one meal.  I left that job a few months later, that was just one example of his micro management techniques.
40
Life...in general / Re: Don't park in the loading zone!
« Last post by RooRoo on Today at 02:11:31 AM »
I'm curious about those handicapped spaces. Do they have enough space between them for someone to unload their wheelchair, for instance? If not, I can cut the guy some slack. Not much, just a little.

Also, does that far-away lot have a shuttle? Having been in a wheelchair twice in the last 3 years, I can guarantee you that I'm not wheeling in from any far-away lot! (Both times were temporary, so a motorized one was not in the cards for me. Which is fine - at least I got some exercise.)

But I agree with those who say to call campus security. If any of the above is true, they may have given him permission to park there, and you'll find out - but if not, he is being a Special Snowflake, and deserves a bit of Karma.
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