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  • January 31, 2015, 02:20:03 PM

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31
Speaking of passwords...

I am currently looking for work.
99.99% of the applications are done online.

This means I have to log in and create a profile on multiple websites.
Every single site seems to have different requirements for user names and passwords.

So I have an ever growing list of user name and password combinations.
At present, I am adding a couple daily and it's driving me up the wall!
32
Is there any particular reason you've chosen the New York City area or Washington D.C. as probably living/working destinations?  Those are two of the absolutely most expensive areas in the country!

Good for you for letting your son decide for himself how to handle his situation.  I know it's so hard.  But hopefully you'll both grow from the experience.
33
The kitchen one really struck a chord with me. I admit that I have kitchen issues and I like everything to be “just so”. Some of the things I’ve read on E-Hell would result in steak knives at dawn if they happened in my kitchen. >:D For this reason, I tend not to allow people in there.

It really, really annoys me when other half does certain things in the kitchen that I have repeatedly asked him not to do, such as shove everything that needs washing up in the sink.
Better the sink than the oven...
34
Humor Me! / Re: Uh.. ya, don't do that....
« Last post by Elfmama on Today at 11:37:19 AM »
I make my own facial cleanser (oil method - I was put onto it by somebody here!) and add a drop of whatever essential oil I fancy this morning to make it smell nice. Useful tip for anybody doing this: deal with contact lenses first. Contact lenses + clove scented fingers = crying for half an hour. I've worn lenses for 35 years; you'd think I would have known better.
That's another advantage to glasses - it doesn't matter what residue you might have on your fingers.  :D
35
Apologies for the delayed response, this week has been very busy!

The Burns Night was so much fun. We had 56 guests, which led to a change of menu as I didn't have any way of keeping the fish soup warm enough to get it served to everyone. I carried the haggis in behind the piper without dropping it (which I was genuinely worried about, especially as so many people were filming me on their phones). My friend who addressed the haggis was really good. I invited lots of non-Brits who loved seeing the guys in dress kilts and hearing the bagpipes.

The menu was smoked salmon dip with oatcakes, mini scotch eggs, haggis, vegetarian haggis, neeps and tatties, cheeses with oatcakes and caremelised red onion chutney, flapjacks, brownies and shortbread, washed down with enough Irn Bru to put you in a sugar coma. My Scottish friends were appalled at the idea of vegetarian haggis which made me giggle and there was none of the traditional haggis left at all. Even the children who came along ate it with every sign of enjoyment.The only hiccup was it took the neeps much longer to cook than I thought so they were a bit late to the table.

Thank you so much for all the help and advice I received. I think I might have started an new regular event in my social calendar  :D
36
I have a little 4 cup kettle that I had in University that I now take with me when I'm travelling, at least by car.  I graduated in 1990...
37
All In A Day's Work / Re: Brushing/flossing teeth at work
« Last post by Tea Drinker on Today at 11:21:19 AM »
Brushing teeth at the work bathroom sink (or similarly in a sink in an airport restroom or such) seems entirely reasonable. I'd be sympathetic if someone didn't want to see other people flossing, because flossing often leads to a little bit of bleeding, and I know the sight of blood bothers some people. (I had a friend in college who was uncomfortable looking at the bandage on my arm after I donated blood.) The sight of toothpaste shouldn't.
38
All In A Day's Work / Re: Brushing/flossing teeth at work
« Last post by camlan on Today at 10:54:26 AM »


I never thought about them brushing in a stall and spitting into the toilet. I've never noticed anyone doing that here. For the people who think that's gross, do you mean that, as the brusher, you don't want to look at the toilet enough to spit into it? Because toilets obviously get a lot of gross stuff put in them and then flushed away, so I don't see how it could be gross as in, "that's not a proper use for a toilet."

I'd never, ever thought of brushing in a stall until reading this thread. My thoughts are these:

1. Way more water to flush than to rinse out the sink.
2. Way more chance to get toothpaste spatter all over the place, as you'd have to bend down pretty far to spit directly into the toilet.
3. And therefore, more cleanup needed.
4. No clean water to rinse your mouth with.
5. And it just seems really, really odd to bypass the sink--which is more or less the accepted place to brush  teeth, and brush them by the toilet, which is very much *not* a normal place to brush your teeth.

While I admit that it is not the norm to walk into the restroom at work and seeing someone brushing their teeth at the sink, I don't find this activity to be surprise-worthy. I would very definitely be startled if I realized someone was brushing their teeth in the toilet stall, when there was a perfectly good, working sink a few feet away.

From reading this thread, I can see that some people would be bothered, in various ways, by a co-worker brushing their teeth in the shared bathroom at work. My feeling is that this falls under the "excuse me for living" type of thing. The co-workers are doing a normal activity in a place where this activity is commonly performed. If it bothers a co-worker, the co-worker can leave the restroom until the tooth-brusher is finished.

Should the tooth-brushing or flossing be moved to a more public area of the office, then I would think co-workers could comment on the location of the activity.
39
Are there smaller electric kettles?  Something that only holds a cup or two?  The ones I've seen are fairly large.  I'd love a small one, but I really don't need one that can heat up a liter at a time.

You don't have to fill it... 

It can be useful to have the spare capacity available for the occasions when you do need it.

That is the advantage of the electric kettle, I'll admit - because of the way it's designed, it doesn't take any longer to boil the whole thing than it does to boil just barely a cup.  So you can just fill it to whatever level you want and if you decide you want a second cup, or some oatmeal, or whatever, the water will already be hot.
40
Are there smaller electric kettles?  Something that only holds a cup or two?  The ones I've seen are fairly large.  I'd love a small one, but I really don't need one that can heat up a liter at a time.

You don't have to fill it... 

It can be useful to have the spare capacity available for the occasions when you do need it.
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