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41
Humor Me! / Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Last post by VorFemme on Today at 11:05:12 AM »
I have a sinus infection, I had to get up last night after I blew my nose in bed and there were lumps in the stuff.  (Well, I had to turn on the light to see what they were and then wash my hands...)

Small harder yellow lumps with red dots in a swirl of clear mucous...I was glad that it was gross enough to prove that I really am sick (even if just to me, since no one else saw it) and that it was no longer in my sinuses...

Now to get concentrate on getting well...
42
Life...in general / Re: teens and Halloween
« Last post by TootsNYC on Today at 11:00:27 AM »
I would like my teenager to not ToT, but he's not completely under my control. I'm at work.
I'll admit I also abdicated on this point; I pick my battles.

He gets dressed up (bcs he can buy candy any day; it's the total experience).

And he's polite. I've reminded him to be extra solicitous of any littler kids (pointed out, it'll make the grownups like him more).

This is slightly off topic, but I've always wondered how kids in New York City go trick or treating?  If you live in an apartment building do you just go door to door inside the building?

Some buildings organize that; they give people pumpkins to put on their doors. If your building doesn't organize something like that, then you don't go door-to-door in the building. I've actually never lived in a building that organized it, and so those kids didn't ToT, that I know of.

But in some of the neighborhoods I've lived in, businesses give out small candies, so that's what most kids do. I live in an apt. complex that has a central garden, so each building hands out candy in the garden, but not on Halloween; on some other day that there's a party.

I always took my kids to my ILs' neighborhood, which has houses w/ yards. And my son is going w/ his friend, who lives in a neighborhood w/ houses and tiny yards.
43
Life...in general / Re: teens and Halloween
« Last post by AngelicGamer on Today at 10:59:42 AM »

My family had an interesting discussion about this. My parents and grandparents did Halloween well into their teens. It was a night teens were allowed to be out real late and have a blast only 1/2 aware the community was watching them.  It was my generation that stopped after 5th grade - but we didn't do trick or treating as much as school carnivals because of the murder of Timothy O'Bryan by his father in an insurance scheme. 



I'm confused - Surely you should have stopped accepting candy from your family rather than strangers if Timothy's murder was a concern.


I remember that incident, and unfortuantely, the media tended to treat (see what I did here?) it as if we were in imminent danger from strangers.  That innocent looking apple from the neighbor down the street was loaded with razor blades, and the gum drops were not covered with sugar.  It was broken glass.

Wasn't that even on Snopes?  There has only been one instance of Halloween treat tampering, and it was immediate family, not some group of murderous neighbors.

Oh yeah, people were super paranoid about it. It definitely resulted in a shift away from anything homemade toward individually packaged candy--I mean, that was there already, but it grew. And you got a lot fewer apples and bags of popcorn. And my parents had us break each piece open, at least the one year they were most intensely worried about it, so they could look before we ate.

I was a kid and have fuzzy memories about this but it's carried on to being an adult.  If I take a piece of candy from a candy dish and it's open in any sort of way, it gets thrown out instead of eaten.  I just can't bring myself to eat it.

For everyone who gave me advice: Thank you!  I feel a lot better about it.  Depending on how many we get tonight, which I'm thinking it's not being much considering it snowed this morning and they're saying more tonight, I'll think about how many little ones come about.  I remember last year it was only like 3 or 4 itty bitty ones. 
44
Entertaining and Hospitality / Re: vegetarian, fish-free, gluten-free
« Last post by TootsNYC on Today at 10:54:28 AM »
I don't remember my pumpkin ending up too runny. But it's been awhile.

I've been thinking--if I do this one, what should I use as a sauce/binder? I can't do regular cream-of-mushroom soup, and I won't have time to track down a GF one (I found one on amazon.com that looks really good--it looks as if it's got a nice, intense slavor).

I can put mushrooms in there, which gives the "toothy" feel; I have some dried shiitake, and I can buy portobello and oyster.
   I guess I could use the liquid from soaking the oysters, and some vegetable broth, and cook it w/ some cornstarch or potato starch.
45
Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: Books - "I couldn't put it down!"
« Last post by siamesecat2965 on Today at 10:54:08 AM »
The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino. That book drove me crazy! If you plan to read it, don't read in-depth reviews first - they could spoil a lot of the fun (although, maybe fun isn't the right word). Best mystery I've read in years.

I found The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo un-put-downable. I love it still, and I've read it several times. I don't have as much enthusiasm for The Girl Who Played with Fire and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest.
 

I haven't read the Devotion of Suspect X but its on my list.

Girl with the Dragon Tattoo I couldn't put down either. I found it at my mom's on year at Christmas, before it was huge, and while I had seen it I really didn't know much about it. Wow. I lay on the couch and read until I was done.

I then started on a whole Nordic drama kick. I'd find a new author, read one book in the series, and buy as many as were available in English (some had yet to be translated)

Add me to the HP bandwagon. I remember when the next to last book came out, i w as in the middle of some huge grad school project, but I bought it anyway. and I'd work on my project, read a couple chapters, and so on. I finally just gave in and sat down and read the whole thing.

ANother one I couldn't put down, and let me tell you, NOT light reading, is The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer. VERY interesting. But I had to read it again, and probably will yet again, since there is so much stuff in there.
46
Life...in general / Re: teens and Halloween
« Last post by Yvaine on Today at 10:53:37 AM »

My family had an interesting discussion about this. My parents and grandparents did Halloween well into their teens. It was a night teens were allowed to be out real late and have a blast only 1/2 aware the community was watching them.  It was my generation that stopped after 5th grade - but we didn't do trick or treating as much as school carnivals because of the murder of Timothy O'Bryan by his father in an insurance scheme. 



I'm confused - Surely you should have stopped accepting candy from your family rather than strangers if Timothy's murder was a concern.


I remember that incident, and unfortuantely, the media tended to treat (see what I did here?) it as if we were in imminent danger from strangers.  That innocent looking apple from the neighbor down the street was loaded with razor blades, and the gum drops were not covered with sugar.  It was broken glass.

Wasn't that even on Snopes?  There has only been one instance of Halloween treat tampering, and it was immediate family, not some group of murderous neighbors.

Oh yeah, people were super paranoid about it. It definitely resulted in a shift away from anything homemade toward individually packaged candy--I mean, that was there already, but it grew. And you got a lot fewer apples and bags of popcorn. And my parents had us break each piece open, at least the one year they were most intensely worried about it, so they could look before we ate.
47
Techno-quette / Re: Correcting facts on a Facebook post
« Last post by kherbert05 on Today at 10:50:59 AM »
With hoaxes I do this all the time. I see a lot less of them now than in the past. One of the worse offenders even asked me for the site I've used to debunk hoaxes (I start with snopes), and has started debunking instead of spreading these hoaxes.
48
Hugs. I think this thread is a great example of how things can be after a divorce.
49
While I 100% agree that the OP should host the Thanksgiving that she wants to, an invitation is not a summons. A huge portion of the posters here said that Turkey was a must have for thanksgiving and if there wasn't Turkey, they would not attend. So now the sister and parents are doing exactly that and they're vilified.

I actually agree that if this is really about Turkey, I think that's kind of dumb. But if the OP wants to host holidays, she needs to consider accommodating the guests tastes
I think that's also the case with her mum and sister. OP has stated, several times that she doesn't like turkey or ham, that her sister will serve it anyway.

On the holiday she was given to host (given as in not allowed the holiday she wanted), she suggested - didn't say she was doing it just suggested - doing something different. And the family's reaction was not to discuss it or ask her to stick to the normal menu or even make sure that beef was in her actual plans, they just yanked the holiday from her and relegated her to dessert.

Maybe she should have sucked it up and done a turkey, but then maybe they should have asked her to do that before discarding her plans so casually. Their behaviour is really out of order.

Edited to add: the thing that gets me about this is that to someone in this position it's an inequality of behaviour.
OP doesn't like turkey, but rather than cause a fuss over the holiday meal, she has elected to spend the time with her family to avoid hurting their feelings.
Now the shoe is on the other foot, and rather than the meal they would prefer, her family might have ended up with a meal they liked, but didn't think was best for the holiday. So they hurt her feelings instead.
OP could be forgiven for feeling that they have chosen a turkey over her.

I mostly agree with you but I think the last sentence goes a bit too far.  They didn't tell her not to come.  They are trying to choose turkey AND her, but I agree wholeheartedly that the way they are going about it is wrong.  Again, they should have discussed it with her like adults.

But OP's parents aren't posting here, so since we can't give them advice, I'd focus on what the OP can do at this point.  At this point, since we are advocating honesty, OP can model that and call her parents and say she is hurt that they expect her to give up hosting Thanksgiving.  Someone has to start being open and honest here, and it may as well be the OP since she is the one posting for advice.  Their behavior is hurtful, and I do think it's appropriate to call them out on it.
50
Life...in general / Re: Facebook Response ?
« Last post by Yvaine on Today at 10:44:30 AM »
I don't think that you should take this personally. There are people like myself who just don't care much for Facebook. I have an account that I use minimally. I check out notifications, but as far as "likes" and so on, I just don't bother. This is nothing against Facebook or against people who use it. It is just a personal preference on my part.
Since your friend is responding to you in other ways, I would assume that she simply prefers to communicate with you in those other ways.

And some people don't really know how to use it! There's a funny picture that sometimes makes the rounds of a guy who tries to google a grocery store by typing in his Facebook status box.  ;DAnd I've met people who will comment to your post by posting a whole new post on your wall instead.
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