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71
Entertaining and Hospitality / Re: Help! Gender Reveal Party!
« Last post by takeheart on Today at 06:24:09 PM »
Do the parents already know, or will this be a reveal for them too?

I will be the only person who knows.
72

It's the juice of a lemon, it's exactly the same, except it isn't fresh.
And you have to learn somehow, you start out small, and with things you know you like. You don't have to use expensive spices, use salt and pepper. If you want to change something, you'll find a way, but it's always much easier to just say, "It's impossible, I can't".

It's not exactly the same, if the goal is to eat only healthy fresh foods, which is what Jamie Oliver promotes (if that's the particular advice you're choosing to follow). It's got preservatives in it, for one thing - that's not something I think of as particularly healthy. It's still a processed food.

Nobody's saying it's impossible. What I'm saying, if you care to read my post, is that someone with no knowledge of cooking would probably not even know you *can* substitute things. It would likely not even *occur* to them to do so.

I repeat: If I'm following a recipe *it is because I do not know how to make this particular thing*. Therefore, I'm not going to want to leave anything out or change anything, because I don't know what it'll do to the flavour, and if it's inedible because I haven't got, say, a parsnip, and I've chosen to leave it out or substitute it for the carrot I've got in the fridge (or whatever) I've wasted the cost of all the other ingredients. And that's before you even get to the people who might be thinking "But... I haven't got a parsnip, so I can't make this..." because they don't know any better because they never learned about food.

And that last one would be me because the last time I tried to substitute it came out horrible so I am not willing to try again until I am more confident in my cooking. I at least have the luxury of tossing and ordering take out - if it was what I was cooking or nothing I would be even less willing to take chances.
73

It's the juice of a lemon, it's exactly the same, except it isn't fresh.
And you have to learn somehow, you start out small, and with things you know you like. You don't have to use expensive spices, use salt and pepper. If you want to change something, you'll find a way, but it's always much easier to just say, "It's impossible, I can't".

It's not exactly the same, if the goal is to eat only healthy fresh foods, which is what Jamie Oliver promotes (if that's the particular advice you're choosing to follow). It's got preservatives in it, for one thing - that's not something I think of as particularly healthy. It's still a processed food.

Nobody's saying it's impossible. What I'm saying, if you care to read my post, is that someone with no knowledge of cooking would probably not even know you *can* substitute things. It would likely not even *occur* to them to do so.

I repeat: If I'm following a recipe *it is because I do not know how to make this particular thing*. Therefore, I'm not going to want to leave anything out or change anything, because I don't know what it'll do to the flavour, and if it's inedible because I haven't got, say, a parsnip, and I've chosen to leave it out or substitute it for the carrot I've got in the fridge (or whatever) I've wasted the cost of all the other ingredients. And that's before you even get to the people who might be thinking "But... I haven't got a parsnip, so I can't make this..." because they don't know any better because they never learned about food.


74
Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: How on earth did this happen?
« Last post by deadbody on Today at 06:20:18 PM »
When me and deadwife got married (almost 17 years ago, holy cow is that a long time ago) during the ceremony our pastor dropped her ring.  It was in his bible, he tilted it up and bit, and the ring vanished.  Stopped the ceremony looking for it, nothing. 

We finished the ceremony, and he promised that if it wasn't found he would buy a replacement (not expensive ring, he was an friend and we were broke teens).  He came out at the end of the receiving line, and handed her the ring.  It had fallen, and bounced into the cuff of his pants.  He found it while changing to come to our reception.
75
At my mother's funeral, the funeral director had to grab several men we hadn't designated as pallbearers, because the men we'd chosen, while a generation younger than my mother, were still not spring chickens, and the architecture of the church meant that the casket had to be carried, not rolled. I'm  not sure who all helped, I had just looked out the window and saw them all transferring the casket, and having a darned difficult time of it.

I agree with the PP that if there were any considering about who was being asked, that someone may have decided to leave you to support your mother, rather than asking both you and your brother to participate. I wouldn't expect an older grieving woman to walk by herself, not if a child were available to walk with her.
76
The difference between your situation and the one in the letter is that they were excluding the sister from everything because they thought she beneath them, and you left your sister out from one specific type of event because she doesn't enjoy them.

It's a little disappointing that you guys won't get to hang out this time, but perhaps you can make it up to her by calling her more often, or making a point to do something special and fun with her another time.
77
Oh yes and... the point about getting good information from the library/the internet/medical professionals etc.?

That only works if you already know that you don't know something. In order to know that you can learn to cook cheaply without using processed food, you have to know ahead of time that it's possible. If you 'know' that the cheapest way to feed your family is frozen pizza and oven chips, because your own parents fed you that way, because the people around you eat that way, you'll watch Jamie Oliver and the other TV chefs from a position of 'that's cheap food for people who can afford more than I can'. That goes back to the marginal cost thing: you may watch him starting promisingly with a pack of lentils but as soon as he names the third spice you don't have, you're going to assume that you can't do this. One TV chef saying you can won't outweigh the whole of your family and social circle demonstrating every day that you can't. Why would you go to the library to research cheap food when all the evidence you see every day is that the cheap food is processed?

Exactly.

I didn't grow up eating pizza and oven chips and even I raise eyebrows at some of Jamie's suggestions/proclamations. Now, since I *know* the logic behind it because I'm fairly bright, it all makes sense in my head, but then I look at how much it'd cost me to buy all the things I don't have to make this thing that's only going to cost 1.50 per head (or whatever), that I might never use again or that would go off before I could use them. Olive oil, for example. He uses that a lot. Lemon. He does love a lemon squeeze, doesn't he? But a lemon runs to 35p in Sainsbury's - just to squeeze over something, that's quite expensive, when you think about it. Yeah, you can buy a bag of 5 lemons in Lidl for a quid, but who's going to get through 5 lemons before they go off? (and an off lemon is a horrible thing, as I discovered to my fridge's peril). *And* then you've spent an extra pound.

You can click through from the recipe pages themselves now to build a shopping list using some whizzy new technology and the cost of some of this stuff makes me gasp.
You can buy bottled lemon juice, it keeps for quite a while. You can also substitute things, you don't have to follow it exactly. And if he uses quite a bit of olive oil, then it would be worth the occasional extra expense. You can't buy everything all at once, but you can acquire them little by little. And I've lived in poverty, without a car, ect.

But again, someone with no knowledge of food isn't going to know that. Especially in terms of substitutions - that requires a knowledge of cooking and what flavours work with what and what you can add or leave out if necessary. If I'm following a recipe, it's because I don't know how to make something. Someone who's spent all their life living on frozen pizza with no idea of how to cook anything probably isn't going to feel confident doing that and may not even know that you *can*. So, again, there's probably a bit of a feeling of "It's not for me" going on.

Good point about the bottled lemon juice, although in terms of being healthy it's probably not as good as using fresh lemons.


I don't think it's fair to criticize reasonable suggestions for healthy cooking (just like it's not ok to criticize people in difficult situations for not taking those suggestions, in my opinion). Sure, not everyone is going to be able to afford a bottle of olive oil or a lemon. But most people can (even among the people Oliver is trying to reach). He doesn't have to make every recipe one that 100% of the population can afford.
78
Oh yes and... the point about getting good information from the library/the internet/medical professionals etc.?

That only works if you already know that you don't know something. In order to know that you can learn to cook cheaply without using processed food, you have to know ahead of time that it's possible. If you 'know' that the cheapest way to feed your family is frozen pizza and oven chips, because your own parents fed you that way, because the people around you eat that way, you'll watch Jamie Oliver and the other TV chefs from a position of 'that's cheap food for people who can afford more than I can'. That goes back to the marginal cost thing: you may watch him starting promisingly with a pack of lentils but as soon as he names the third spice you don't have, you're going to assume that you can't do this. One TV chef saying you can won't outweigh the whole of your family and social circle demonstrating every day that you can't. Why would you go to the library to research cheap food when all the evidence you see every day is that the cheap food is processed?

Exactly.

I didn't grow up eating pizza and oven chips and even I raise eyebrows at some of Jamie's suggestions/proclamations. Now, since I *know* the logic behind it because I'm fairly bright, it all makes sense in my head, but then I look at how much it'd cost me to buy all the things I don't have to make this thing that's only going to cost 1.50 per head (or whatever), that I might never use again or that would go off before I could use them. Olive oil, for example. He uses that a lot. Lemon. He does love a lemon squeeze, doesn't he? But a lemon runs to 35p in Sainsbury's - just to squeeze over something, that's quite expensive, when you think about it. Yeah, you can buy a bag of 5 lemons in Lidl for a quid, but who's going to get through 5 lemons before they go off? (and an off lemon is a horrible thing, as I discovered to my fridge's peril). *And* then you've spent an extra pound.

You can click through from the recipe pages themselves now to build a shopping list using some whizzy new technology and the cost of some of this stuff makes me gasp.
You can buy bottled lemon juice, it keeps for quite a while. You can also substitute things, you don't have to follow it exactly. And if he uses quite a bit of olive oil, then it would be worth the occasional extra expense. You can't buy everything all at once, but you can acquire them little by little. And I've lived in poverty, without a car, ect.

But again, someone with no knowledge of food isn't going to know that. Especially in terms of substitutions - that requires a knowledge of cooking and what flavours work with what and what you can add or leave out if necessary. If I'm following a recipe, it's because I don't know how to make something. Someone who's spent all their life living on frozen pizza with no idea of how to cook anything probably isn't going to feel confident doing that and may not even know that you *can*. So, again, there's probably a bit of a feeling of "It's not for me" going on.

Good point about the bottled lemon juice, although in terms of being healthy it's probably not as good as using fresh lemons.

It's the juice of a lemon, it's exactly the same, except it isn't fresh.
And you have to learn somehow, you start out small, and with things you know you like. You don't have to use expensive spices, use salt and pepper. If you want to change something, you'll find a way, but it's always much easier to just say, "It's impossible, I can't".

I don't cook - I  never learned how. Now I am in the position where I really should learn - and it isn't easy. It is so easy for you to say "just find a way" but it is overwhelming and scary. I have no idea what those spices do - last time I "just tried something" the meal was almost inedible because I added too  many spices but I ate it anyway because I didn't want to waste the food. That doesn't exactly make me want to run out and try to experiment again. So right now I follow recipes strictly. I just don't know enough to deviate from them. And i have the luxury of if it really is that bad I can throw it away and order a meal online. People who are poverty line can't - they ruin the meal and they are going to go hungry that night. So it is very easy for you, who knows what you are doing, to say "they can learn", but when you are faced with having to learn and failing is such a drastic outcome it isn't that cut and dried.
79
Most high school marching band programs are competition bands.  This differs significantly from college programs that perform but are not judged on those performances.

The only thing that I can see that the director did wrong was not having a written policy where needing a note is spelled out.

That way, parents who do not wish to follow that policy can abstain from having their child participate in marching band.

As I said, my experience is across a lot of stuff. Trust me, there's as much pressure on a national TV appearance as there is in a HS competition. The director is out of line. Being competitive does not justify the director's position. Sorry.

I can't agree with you. I don't see anything wrong with a director requiring a doctor's note for an absence.  Parents are not doctors.  Requiring a note puts everyone on a level playing field.


I work in healthcare and see the issues with the uninsured / under insured.  This outs a great hardship on those children whose parents cannot afford a Dr. visit and / or can not take time out of work.  I think it makes the playing field less even.

80
Oh yes and... the point about getting good information from the library/the internet/medical professionals etc.?

That only works if you already know that you don't know something. In order to know that you can learn to cook cheaply without using processed food, you have to know ahead of time that it's possible. If you 'know' that the cheapest way to feed your family is frozen pizza and oven chips, because your own parents fed you that way, because the people around you eat that way, you'll watch Jamie Oliver and the other TV chefs from a position of 'that's cheap food for people who can afford more than I can'. That goes back to the marginal cost thing: you may watch him starting promisingly with a pack of lentils but as soon as he names the third spice you don't have, you're going to assume that you can't do this. One TV chef saying you can won't outweigh the whole of your family and social circle demonstrating every day that you can't. Why would you go to the library to research cheap food when all the evidence you see every day is that the cheap food is processed?

Exactly.

I didn't grow up eating pizza and oven chips and even I raise eyebrows at some of Jamie's suggestions/proclamations. Now, since I *know* the logic behind it because I'm fairly bright, it all makes sense in my head, but then I look at how much it'd cost me to buy all the things I don't have to make this thing that's only going to cost 1.50 per head (or whatever), that I might never use again or that would go off before I could use them. Olive oil, for example. He uses that a lot. Lemon. He does love a lemon squeeze, doesn't he? But a lemon runs to 35p in Sainsbury's - just to squeeze over something, that's quite expensive, when you think about it. Yeah, you can buy a bag of 5 lemons in Lidl for a quid, but who's going to get through 5 lemons before they go off? (and an off lemon is a horrible thing, as I discovered to my fridge's peril). *And* then you've spent an extra pound.

You can click through from the recipe pages themselves now to build a shopping list using some whizzy new technology and the cost of some of this stuff makes me gasp.
You can buy bottled lemon juice, it keeps for quite a while. You can also substitute things, you don't have to follow it exactly. And if he uses quite a bit of olive oil, then it would be worth the occasional extra expense. You can't buy everything all at once, but you can acquire them little by little. And I've lived in poverty, without a car, ect.

But again, someone with no knowledge of food isn't going to know that. Especially in terms of substitutions - that requires a knowledge of cooking and what flavours work with what and what you can add or leave out if necessary. If I'm following a recipe, it's because I don't know how to make something. Someone who's spent all their life living on frozen pizza with no idea of how to cook anything probably isn't going to feel confident doing that and may not even know that you *can*. So, again, there's probably a bit of a feeling of "It's not for me" going on.

Good point about the bottled lemon juice, although in terms of being healthy it's probably not as good as using fresh lemons.

It's the juice of a lemon, it's exactly the same, except it isn't fresh.
And you have to learn somehow, you start out small, and with things you know you like. You don't have to use expensive spices, use salt and pepper. If you want to change something, you'll find a way, but it's always much easier to just say, "It's impossible, I can't".
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