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  • January 16, 2018, 03:30:04 AM

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91
Techno-quette / Re: "Welcome to our restaurant. I Googled your name"
« Last post by Hmmmmm on Yesterday at 10:17:53 AM »
I surprisingly not bothered by this. I've chosen to have a business relationship with a restaurant by calling to make a reservation. If they choose to spend time and resources researching me to try and provide me an optimum experience? Go right ahead.

I'm so much more irritated by targeted ads being presented for things at companies I've never attempted to interact with. It's so much more creepy to me to have clicked on a link on an email from Sur la Table for a pasta maker and now have ads for pasta makers from there and every other store following me around the internet.

High end restaurants have been keeping notes on clients for years, both in little books and later in computer programs. It helps with planning to know that Mr. Collins likes to sit in "Angelas" area, that Ms Jones loves the arancini so lets make sure we have it on the menu that evening, and that The Smiths do not drink so don't offer them a wine or cocktail list. When patrons walk in, the host can say "Welcome back, Hmmmmm, we haven't seen you in a while" or "We are honored to have you return so soon" or "this is your first time dining with us correct? We are glad you chose us." The Sommelier can say "I remember you enjoyed the Cab from tiny winery last time. We just received in a bottle of their merlot, would you like to try it?" From his notes, the waiter will know that Ms. Watson is gluten intolerant so will have some wheat free options brought to the table when have a bread basket sent out or that Mr. Sherlock loves ordering off the menu so can make some helpful suggestions.

I really don't know what the restaurant can ascertain from a google search about me that would really help with improving my dining experience. But their doing a google search of me no more creepy than the prospective employee that has an interview with me, the sales guy who wants to pitch a new contract to me, or the guy that I contacted about his used car and he wants to make sure I'm a real person.
92
Entertaining and Hospitality / Re: No Facebook in my house!
« Last post by mime on Yesterday at 09:55:36 AM »
I don’t understand why the letter writer is inviting people to her home that she has such a low opinion of. If I know someone who is incapable of setting down their phone to have an adult conversation, I wouldn’t invite then on vacation. So why is the letter writer? She’s either inviting people who she knows can’t put down their phone so she can get all pissy about it. Or she’s inviting people who don’t have that issue and she’s blocking it anyway to get a power trip.

I'm just not reading that the LW has a low opinion of her friends. I'm getting that she has a low opinion of social media.

I can relate. There are some industries that I refuse to support-- one even with pretty widespread acceptance. I have friends and family who I hold in very high regard who don't feel the way I do, and do support that industry. I don't think less of them for having a different opinion. I don't think they're incapable of giving up the product of that industry for the time that they're a guest in my home. If I thought that, then I wouldn't extend the invitation (and I probably would have a lower opinion of them).

The fact that the LW was surprised by the reaction of some of their guests makes me think that they also didn't consider their guests to be some sort of social media addicts.

93
Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: Pet peeves at work
« Last post by Kiwipinball on Yesterday at 09:07:45 AM »
If I tell you that I can't run a report for you because I don't have access the the data, and when you complain to my boss she tells you the same thing, tattling to *your* boss will not magically give me the ability to run the report.  I promise you, I'm not refusing to do it out of spite.  Furthermore, threatening to escalate to Senior Management not only doesn't get you the report, but had a decidedly negative effect on my attitude.

Such a bizarre thing to threaten to escalate to senior management. I could see asking them if they could give you access (or who has access and could run the report - no idea how complicated any of this is), but did they think you and your boss were both lying about it?
94
Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: Pet peeves at work
« Last post by rose red on Yesterday at 08:51:31 AM »
It makes me cringe hearing a coworker say "bye-bye" on the phone instead of "good-bye."

Back in the day, I was taught to never(!) say "bye-bye" and especially to a customer/client. Am I being old-fashioned and out of touch?

I think it would be perfectly appropriate if a parent was phoning up to say their child wouldn't be attending crèche today because of minor illness, and the child wanted to speak on the phone to the carer in the crèche.  Maybe also for kindergartners...

Other than that, I'm guessing it would sound to my ears the same as when a 'professional' person uses baby talk in the workplace: I hope that that person can't see what my face is doing (because it's all kind of scrunching up; I'd rather hear nails on a blackboard).

I can't remember where you work, rose red, but I'm pretty sure it wasn't dealing with toddlers?

I work in a regular office type place. I also used to work in a call center. At the call center, I was actually fine with customers saying "bye-bye" or "bye" because they are not at work and need to sound professional. But a coworker is at work which is what makes me cringe. I'm not saying we should sound like robots and not be personable with a customer but you can still sound warm and friendly with "good-bye."
95
All In A Day's Work / Re: Constant lack of acknowledgement
« Last post by TurtleDove on Yesterday at 08:40:40 AM »
... The company sent out a division-wide newsletter today listing people who were approved for spot bonuses in December and guess what. My name was on the list...

I must be missing something, because to me, recognition in a division-wide newsletter is affirmative and "bigger" acknowledgment than an email to your team. I asked earlier and did not see a response, but was there an email sent around to the team with other people who got the bonus but eliminating the OP? If yes, I might be a little surprised/concerned/hurt. But if not? The OP *was* acknowledged - division wide!!!!!!
96
Life...in general / Re: Babysitting rules. UPDATE
« Last post by lowspark on Yesterday at 08:25:16 AM »
Wait, wow. She was having you take her child to school, a different school than your child goes to? No way I would have agreed to this even once!

You need to stop thinking of this neighbor as someone to feel sorry for and begin thinking of her as a user. That might help you to turn her continuous requests down.
97
All In A Day's Work / Re: Constant lack of acknowledgement
« Last post by DaDancingPsych on Yesterday at 08:10:54 AM »
Does this need to be a big sit down discussion? I would probably go to my boss and thank him for the bonus. I would mention that I had not realized that it was happening until I saw the newsletter (if appropriate throw out there that I never saw the email), but make the point of the discussion to thank him. If this was a timing accident, it brings it to his attention to fix it. If this is a case of him thinking you do not need the praise, then hopefully he will say that. And you can mention that you actually do appreciate it. It is somewhat passive aggressive and it may yield no results, but either way, I always try to thank my bosses when they provide a bonus, so I would not be ignoring it either way.
98
Life...in general / Re: Apartment noise.
« Last post by SiotehCat on Yesterday at 08:05:17 AM »
If he has a gym membership, and the gym has a punching bag, then why not use that one?

No offense, but I find it interesting that you even asked for our opinions. The majority said it probably is a bad idea, and yet you seem to be going ahead anyway and will let him use it.

I asked for opinions because I was interested in different opinions. Not letting my son punch it at all isn't an option for me. I'm willing to take steps to make everyone in the building a little more comfortable. That includes my son also though. So I will do what I can for the sound and I will make sure he's using it during normal hours.

The lady at the rental office that I had been working with knew about the dummies before I signed the lease. Aside from our beds, they are the only heavy things we own. We had to haul those big things up a giant hill and three flights of stairs.

Per the bold:  And?  Did the lady at the rental office have any idea just what those dummies would entail?  How much noise they would make and how often your son would be using them?

I agree with the other posters, if your son has a gym membership, why isn't he doing his punching/kicking thing there? 

Also, very much agree with Mary Lennox!

I mentioned the lady at the rental office to give more information. I don't think your "And?" comment was necessary.

i don't know how much she knew or knows about punching dummies. I just know I was open about them.

Thank you for your advice, though!
99
Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: Pet peeves at work
« Last post by Chez Miriam on Yesterday at 07:31:48 AM »
It makes me cringe hearing a coworker say "bye-bye" on the phone instead of "good-bye."

Back in the day, I was taught to never(!) say "bye-bye" and especially to a customer/client. Am I being old-fashioned and out of touch?

I think it would be perfectly appropriate if a parent was phoning up to say their child wouldn't be attending crèche today because of minor illness, and the child wanted to speak on the phone to the carer in the crèche.  Maybe also for kindergartners...

Other than that, I'm guessing it would sound to my ears the same as when a 'professional' person uses baby talk in the workplace: I hope that that person can't see what my face is doing (because it's all kind of scrunching up; I'd rather hear nails on a blackboard).

I can't remember where you work, rose red, but I'm pretty sure it wasn't dealing with toddlers?
100
Time For a Coffee Break! / Re: S/O Dear Dog...Dear Cat
« Last post by Nikko-chan on Yesterday at 07:01:57 AM »
Dear Robert,

After last weekend with Matilda at the vets, you are not allowed to be ill, OK? That said, kitten sneezes are very cute, and the extra laptop is nice.

Regards,
Mum
P.S. At least you get to meet the vet before she gices you the snip.

Dear Mum,

What is this 'snip' you speak of? I asked Matilda and she started laughing at me.

Sincerely,

Robert
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