Author Topic: K-12?  (Read 4201 times)

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Kess

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K-12?
« on: August 31, 2011, 07:25:20 AM »
I've just been reading the summary of a study relating to school, and one of the graphs has "K-12" in the title.  I guess this is something to do with years in school, but what ages exactly does it correspond to?  I assume "K" is Kindergarten, which is what, 3 years old?  Our (England) Year 12 is age 17, but that seems an arbitrary point to study up to when I think in the US you finish school at 18, so are your years numbered differently or am I just confused?

Just Lori

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2011, 07:28:44 AM »
Kindergarten is typically for age 5.  We then switch to grades, starting at 1 and working up to 12.  Our 12th graders are in the 17- to 18-year-old range.  I hope this makes sense!

hot_shaker

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2011, 07:34:21 AM »
K does mean kindergarten.  Most kids start when they are 5 (or on the verge of turning 5, depending on where you live).  Anything before that is Pre-K or pre-school.  Students finish up 13 years later so at ~age 18. 

So you don't have to sit and count out the grades and ages for the average student:
- start Kindergarten at age 5 (in my area elementary school was K-6)
- start of junior high/middle school (grades 7 and 8 )  at age 12
- start of high school (grades 9-12) at age 14
- start grade 12 at age 17 but usually turn 18 before graduating

Keep in mind that while the ages/grades are fairly consistent across the country, the actual grades that are together vary by region (for example, some middle schools are 7 & 8, some are 6-8, some are 6-9).

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Kess

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2011, 07:44:53 AM »
Thank you both!

Ah, so Kindergarten there is like our Reception class, the very first class in proper school kids go into?  Whenever I've seen it over here (England) it's been in private schools (our state schools don't have Kindergarten) and it's been from about age 3 (after nursery) until 4, when they start Reception.  We'd generally be 5 when we went into Year 1 (although compulsory school age isn't until the September after a child's fifth birthday I believe, so they don't need to start Reception until then but most start at 4), so that explains why our schools go up to age 18 and Year 13 and yours are Year 12 and age 18!  I was wondering where the missing year went...

MommyPenguin

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2011, 08:25:57 AM »
The first school that kids go to over here is generally preschool/nursery school/prekindergarten (called different things in different places).  Generally, kids go to preschool for two years, when they are 3-turning-4 and when they are 4-turning-5.  Preschool is not compulsory, and for most of the country it is a private school thing that can be anywhere from $1000 (if you live in an inexpensive part of the country) to $5000 or probably even more a year.  Most kids that are going into the school system go to preschool.  Some kids may be eligible for public preschool or some sort of free preschool, depending on what the local area offers.

Whether kindergarten is compulsory depends on where you live.  Some states have a compulsory school age of 5, some of 6.  In my area, the compulsory school age is 6... however, you have to go to kindergarten before you can start 1st grade, unless you go through some rigamarole to show that you are prepared for school (a test, etc.).

Oh, and school age cut-offs can be anywhere from September to December (maybe even earlier than September in some areas).  So sometimes you don't have to have turned 5 before kindergarten, which would mean that you are still 17 at graduating and might even start college before turning 18.

Ruelz

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2011, 11:15:26 AM »
Kindergarten is also not compulsory.  Nor is pre-Kindergarten (which some provinces have initiated).

The concept of Kindergarten was to start young children in school, getting them used to the institute, easily, by attending half-days.

However, due to baby-sitting needs/demands there is now full-time Kindergarten being offered in some areas.
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Sunbeem

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2011, 12:47:39 AM »
Related to the grade levels, I should note that their requirement and/or common-ness has changed over the years.  My Dad, born in 1957, started school with 1st Grade, at age 6 (there was no "Kindergarten" back then in his area).  I was born in 1988 and started with Kindergarten at age 5, and most people my age started at age 5 and did not go to preschool.  Nowadays, it is certainly not unusual to start at age 5, but it is becoming quite common for kids to go to preschool at age 4 or sometimes even 3.   (Note: I'm from the Minnesota/Iowa/Illinois/Wisconsin region; things may be different other areas in the USA)

Bluenomi

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2011, 12:55:53 AM »
Kindergarten is also not compulsory.  Nor is pre-Kindergarten (which some provinces have initiated).

That depends on the area, it is in some paces. I know where I am kindergarten is the first year of school and is full time but pre school (which is sperate from school and for 3-4 year olds) isn't compulsory and is usually part time.

lady_disdain

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2011, 09:13:51 AM »
Kindergarten is also not compulsory.  Nor is pre-Kindergarten (which some provinces have initiated).

The concept of Kindergarten was to start young children in school, getting them used to the institute, easily, by attending half-days.

However, due to baby-sitting needs/demands there is now full-time Kindergarten being offered in some areas.

So reading is taught in the 1st grade?

camlan

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2011, 09:25:06 AM »
Kindergarten is also not compulsory.  Nor is pre-Kindergarten (which some provinces have initiated).

The concept of Kindergarten was to start young children in school, getting them used to the institute, easily, by attending half-days.

However, due to baby-sitting needs/demands there is now full-time Kindergarten being offered in some areas.

So reading is taught in the 1st grade?

It depends on the school system. Reading used to be a 1st grade thing, with kindergarten focusing on learning the alphabet and being able to print your own name. The primary focus of kindergarten was intended to be getting kids used to school, to sitting at a desk and following the teacher's instructions and learning a few basic skills. Back in 1965, when I was in kindergarten, I can remember the teacher showing us how to throw and catch those large red rubber playground balls, how to tie a shoe, that sort of thing.

But my nephew just started 1st grade this fall. He went to all-day kindergarten last year and could read simple words and sentences before the school year finished. He was also doing math that I wouldn't have seen until 1st grade. He had a planner (provided by the school) for his homework assignments--I never had homework in kindergarten.

Part of the change might be that so many kids have been in daycare or preschool before entering kindergarten now. Back when I was a kid, most of us stayed home with our moms until kindergarten--those basic skills we were learning are now probably being taught in preschool. But even so, I left kindergarten being able to sound out words, and really started reading the summer between kindergarten and 1st grade, so somewhere I got the skills I needed.
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MommyPenguin

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2011, 09:52:34 AM »
I remember reading an article not too long ago, something about kindergarten being the new 1st grade (and 1st grade being the new 2nd grade, etc.).  Basically, it was saying that, because students are doing so poorly in school, they've started pushing teachers to start teaching material earlier and earlier, thinking that that will improve things.

My nephew is starting 1st grade.  I don't know about this year, but for kindergarten, he was expected to *start* kindergarten knowing 10 sight words and being able to read regular CVC (consonant-vowel-consonant that sound like they look, like pat, sam, sit, man, etc.) words.  He knew 25 sight words and suchforth and so-on, so they ended up putting him in an advanced kindergarten class.  Yes, they have advanced kindergarten now.  :)

What I remember about kindergarten is doing things like puzzles and games and having "corners" for activities like blocks and dress-up.  I'm sure we did stuff with letters and reading, but I have no idea what.  I don't remember learning to read at all, I just remember being able to read.  My dad says I taught myself when I was very young.  I think that unlikely, my guess is that I learned to read in school and it just wasn't visible to Dad, so he doesn't remember.  But I don't know for sure, and I have no idea when in school it was taught.

The curriculum I'm using is organized like this for reading levels:

Level K: learning the letters, their sounds, and how to write them.  Beginning to read short books of CVC words and easy sight words starting on week 10, gradually getting into simple consonant cluster words like "quest" near the end.

Level 1: very early reader books, like the Cat in the Hat and A Fly Went By

Level 2: slightly more advanced early readers like Frog and Toad Are Friends

Level 3: books like "The Littles," with more advanced story lines but not too difficult to read

Level 4-5: Encyclopedia Brown, Beverly Cleary books, etc.

There is some development within each level, obviously.  But that gives you a bit of an idea.  And most homeschool curriculums I've looked at seem to be roughly on that level.  Of course, you do the level when your child is ready for it, so my 4.5-year-old is halfway through Level K, knowing her letters and their sounds, now working on reading easy books.

Sunbeem

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2011, 10:14:49 AM »

[/quote]

So reading is taught in the 1st grade?
[/quote]

I was taught in Kindergarten (age 5), homeschooled.  In college I knew a guy who taught himself to read at age 3 (no, he wasn't bragging about it- his mom told me).

Ruelz

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2011, 10:56:57 AM »
Here they still teach the KG kids their letters...and to print their names, but reading formally starts in the first grade.

If you didn't go to KG, you really wouldn't be that far behind - if at all.  Older kids generally pick up on concepts faster, so they'd catch up very quickly.

Quite a few 3-year olds pick up the concept of reading and writing quickly.  My daughter was one.  My oldest son was typical - took him a bit longer, but no problem.  My youngest has a slight speech-language pathology, so it was more of an effort for him, but he still managed to be caught up with everyone by Grade 2.

He'll never be a reader though...he reads too slowly for it to be fun...
"The only difference between a rut and a grave is their dimensions." Ellen Glasgow

Slartibartfast

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #13 on: September 12, 2011, 03:28:45 AM »
It depends a lot on the school, honestly.  In poorer areas, children tend to come into kindergarten not having had any preschool and not having had much time at home with their parents.  As a result, those kindergarten classes often focus more on "basics" such as identifying letters and numbers and colors and how to behave in a school environment.  In more affluent areas, most of the children have attended some sort of communal learning program before (preschool, daycare, mother's morning out, etc.) and usually had more parental support at home.  Those schools can breeze right past letters and numbers and work on things like reading, simple conceptual math, computer literacy, etc.

A lot of it has to do with budget and resources, too.  You can't teach reading if your district can't afford books  :-\

General Jinjur

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Re: K-12?
« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2011, 02:41:29 PM »
K does mean kindergarten.  Most kids start when they are 5 (or on the verge of turning 5, depending on where you live).  Anything before that is Pre-K or pre-school.  Students finish up 13 years later so at ~age 18. 

So you don't have to sit and count out the grades and ages for the average student:
- start Kindergarten at age 5 (in my area elementary school was K-6)
- start of junior high/middle school (grades 7 and 8 )  at age 12
- start of high school (grades 9-12) at age 14
- start grade 12 at age 17 but usually turn 18 before graduating

Keep in mind that while the ages/grades are fairly consistent across the country, the actual grades that are together vary by region (for example, some middle schools are 7 & 8, some are 6-8, some are 6-9).

A quick addendum to your post, for clarity's sake: "junior high" refers to grades 7 and 8 (and maybe 9? Some schools split them like that) while "middle school" is 6, 7, and 8.