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  • July 27, 2016, 02:33:03 PM

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Author Topic: Home Buying Etiquette  (Read 30888 times)

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Mel the Redcap

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #90 on: September 23, 2015, 11:55:42 PM »
Best to board your cat elsewhere or take her to your friend's place during showings, yes. You have no idea who'll be coming through your house, they may be careless or even actively dislike cats, or just too slow to stop your cat from running out the door... safest to have her somewhere else entirely.
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Klein Bottle

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #91 on: September 24, 2015, 04:49:59 PM »
Best to board your cat elsewhere or take her to your friend's place during showings, yes. You have no idea who'll be coming through your house, they may be careless or even actively dislike cats, or just too slow to stop your cat from running out the door... safest to have her somewhere else entirely.

Thank you! I am probably going to let my BFF keep them while the house is on the market, unless I already have the tiny house I'm looking for. (I looked at a one bedroom in the city a couple weeks ago. It's darling, and the price is certainly right, but it has issues such as the one bathroom being located in the basement. Thus, it's a cash only deal, as no bank will issue a mortgage with that condition. And, I don't have the time or expertise to fix or remodel things, at least, not beyond the cosmetic. I hope another small cute one is waiting for me next Spring!)
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crazycatlady331

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #92 on: May 07, 2016, 07:04:54 PM »
Old thread but this takes me back to my childhood (when I was dragged to open houses almost every weekend between about 7-10).   I hated it then (my parents had no intention of moving or buying another house, they just went to open houses for fun) and honestly I don't see myself ever buying a home.  I had enough with the home stuff in childhood to be happy in an apartment for the rest of my life.

Until you are a serious buyer of a particular home (follow-up visit, etc) consider making alternative arrangements for your children as it is not the most age-appropriate activity (babysitter, playdates, grandma time, etc).  This is a benefit for you, the children, and the seller (they won't run wild). 

Kate

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #93 on: July 09, 2016, 07:31:10 PM »
My elderly friend with early stage dementia had sold her home,and asked me to come over to be with her when the home inspection was being done as she did not want to be alone in the house with a strange man.. I figured this would take maybe an hour, but no, the buyers came with him AND the real state agent as well...why she was there I do not know.
He proceeded to show and explain in minute detail everything he was inspecting, to the new owners, and then stood in the house and chatted with the real estate agent for about an hour afterward. I was so annoyed at being tied up for so long and if it had been my house I would have asked them to finish their conversation outside. Very rude IMO.

Alicia

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #94 on: July 09, 2016, 08:05:10 PM »
My elderly friend with early stage dementia had sold her home,and asked me to come over to be with her when the home inspection was being done as she did not want to be alone in the house with a strange man.. I figured this would take maybe an hour, but no, the buyers came with him AND the real state agent as well...why she was there I do not know.
He proceeded to show and explain in minute detail everything he was inspecting, to the new owners, and then stood in the house and chatted with the real estate agent for about an hour afterward. I was so annoyed at being tied up for so long and if it had been my house I would have asked them to finish their conversation outside. Very rude IMO.
Home inspections often take 3 or 4 hours that is typical. It is suggested in general and very very advisable for the buyers to attend and usually their real estate agent will attend as the real estate agent is often required to be there. The current selling home owner usually does not attend. The new home owner needs to learn where everything is located as well an overview of the state of the home. The error was your friends in making you expect 1 hour and for that matter not leaving the house..
« Last Edit: July 09, 2016, 08:09:24 PM by Alicia »

Kate

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #95 on: July 11, 2016, 08:04:20 AM »
My elderly friend with early stage dementia had sold her home,and asked me to come over to be with her when the home inspection was being done as she did not want to be alone in the house with a strange man.. I figured this would take maybe an hour, but no, the buyers came with him AND the real state agent as well...why she was there I do not know.
He proceeded to show and explain in minute detail everything he was inspecting, to the new owners, and then stood in the house and chatted with the real estate agent for about an hour afterward. I was so annoyed at being tied up for so long and if it had been my house I would have asked them to finish their conversation outside. Very rude IMO.
Home inspections often take 3 or 4 hours that is typical. It is suggested in general and very very advisable for the buyers to attend and usually their real estate agent will attend as the real estate agent is often required to be there. The current selling home owner usually does not attend. The new home owner needs to learn where everything is located as well an overview of the state of the home. The error was your friends in making you expect 1 hour and for that matter not leaving the house..
I have not heard of the buyers being present for the home inspection, I don't think that is normally done around here. My friend did not want to leave the house as she had nowhere to take her dog and she would not leave it alone. I could not have the dog at my place because my dog is not socialized with other dogs. One day they had an open house and she drove around all day with the dog in her car .
People with dementia do not handle normal life things as other people, and often are not open to helpful suggestions. Her son should have moved her before putting the house up for sale.
All the upheaval was very hard on her

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #96 on: July 11, 2016, 10:01:36 AM »
In my area, the buyers are present for the home inspection, as is their agent.  The sellers usually absent themselves and their agent is usually not present.  I've been present for two of three inspections; I was too far away to make the third.  The homeowner was home for one of them but not for the other two.  I left during the home inspection on my place that just sold at the beginning of the year, though we just arrived home as they arrived, grabbed the dogs and left.

If you have bought a home and are using one of your prearranged visits to the home before closing?  Don't bring your entire family and all your friends with you.  After having 15 people in my house that I wasn't expecting, I will be very specific the next time I sell a home:  visits are limited to the buyers, their real estate agent and two additional people.

And if you are scheduling one of the said visits, don't schedule it for Mother's Day at dinner time.

(The inspection was inconvenient; we were out of town and had to cut our visit with my Dad short to get back in time to take the dogs out.  The first visit with the 15 people was on Valentines day.  And the second visit, they asked for Mother's Day.  Finally put my foot down on that one.  And asked how many people would be there.  Though for the second visit, I wouldn't have minded if they brought everyone and their brother because I'd mostly moved out by that point.)

Kate, when my Dad was ready to sell his place, we did exactly that.  We got him moved to his apartment and he still had enough furniture to stage the house for sale.  So much easier!  And he's is probably also in the early stages of dementia and never does well with change even without that so it was good we did it that way.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

shortstuff

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #97 on: July 11, 2016, 03:10:20 PM »
Our area is similar to what Outdoor Girl wrote, but if the sellers are still in the house they are sometimes present.  And in those cases, their agent is present too, which I like, because it provides a bit of buffer. 

Before our house process got nasty, the seller was present at the septic inspection with my husband, and explained a bit about the surrounding area, the trees on the property and which one the bees like to nest in, history of some repairs, etc.  It was nice to have extra information.

In our area, which is rural, there are many tests that are done, so I wouldn't expect the sellers to vacate their house every time.  We have septic inspection, home inspection, sometimes a follow up to inspect any repairs, a radon gas test (dropping off then picking up the tester), and a well water test, although the sellers typically handle that one, so buyers only get results mailed.  There's also an appraisal, and sometimes even a land survey - no buyers present for those, though. 

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #98 on: July 11, 2016, 03:24:36 PM »
^ As a buyer, I would never trust the seller's water test.  I work in the industry and we've heard so many stories about agents taking samples at their homes in town on municipal water, submitting that sample as the seller's home.  And you can shock a well with bleach then take a sample, which virtually guarantees a good water sample.  I would take my own sample on one of the visits, without informing the sellers, so they can't do anything to artificially improve the well water quality ahead of time.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

Sophia

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Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #99 on: July 11, 2016, 06:13:32 PM »
Now some of the remarks have me worried; we're going to be listing our house for sale very soon but instead of using a listing agent we're giving FSBO a try. Seeing as it's our house and we're the "seller's agent", we will be showing it ourselves and running open houses.

So, to those who have experienced this before (from either side, buyer or seller), what should we try to avoid? I'm already schooling my DH on not waxing poetic about the house and I'm in the midst of de-cluttering and scrubbing everything twice. I know there's one room I'm going to be apologizing for non-stop; my craft room. Sorry, but I still have a small business to run out of there, so it's not going to be perfect.

I don't know about in your area, but where I live real estate is HOT.  Since selling isn't actually required right now, I think you are smart to skip the real estate agent.