Author Topic: Voting  (Read 2289 times)

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katycoo

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Re: Voting
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2011, 06:41:05 AM »
Because of another thread I've been thinking about how people without ID's vote, as you have to prove your identity when you vote. It's not particularly difficult to get an id here as you don't need a birth certificate (for anything), if you don't have an id the police will just interrogate you to make certain you are who you say you are (because they have records of all your past addresses, among other things) and though it's not cheap it's not that expensive either (though I only have a passport because of the expense, no other form of id) and I think that if you're that poor you're likely to be a client of social services already and they'll pay for it. And probably the majority of people have a drivers license, which isn't renewed here until you're something like 60. It's not really an official id (because you may be 18 in the picture and are now 58) but most places accept it, including polling stations.   

You don't need to show ID to vote in Australia.  You get a fine if you're marked off twice at 2 different locations.  You'd risk someone knowing who you were (or who you were claiming to be) if you gave another name, not to mention you'd have to be sure they weren't voting at that venue.  And I think you can avoid the fine by swearing a stat dec saying it wasn't you who voted twice.

AFAIK its not a problem because 1 or 2 extra votes is not likely to make any difference and because the voting is manual paper voting, pulling of a successful vote rigginh would be a ridiculously enormous task.

oz diva

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Re: Voting
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2011, 07:22:08 AM »
I'm not sure that I'd want somebody voting to avoid a fine.  If it helps establish the importance of voting that is good but having disinterested or even resentful participants doesn't seem helpful.
I'd rather have a low turn-out of informed voters than a high turn-out of ill informed voters.

I can see your point, but I think our system makes more people think about it and the ramifications of voting than would otherwise be the case, especially in very close elections such as the last one.

I get annoyed with political activists who say there's no one worth voting for, but they don't join the discussion, they just hurl insults on the sidelines. People around the world die for their right to vote and these idiots just throw that privilege away.

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katycoo

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Re: Voting
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2011, 07:27:56 AM »
I don't think many people in Australia realise that the elctoral roll is available to the public - full names and addresses (you do have to attend the office in person but there's no security).  I don't think that would go over very well in the USA being so privacy paranoid.

Actually you can apply  for a ' silent enrollment ' if you fear your life may be in danger. Or you can do it the bad way by moving house and not telling Australia post your new address.

 I like our way of voting here in Australia - except when everyone votes Opposite Party >:D

It can be quite difficult for a private citizen to get information off the enrollment list anyway it's one of the few restricted gov. lists. There are only limited places you can get information and they are vigilant. They take a copy of your driver's license and any current details and are constantly monitored the short time you are allowed there and you cannot go and browse though names (at least when I went with a friend). You give names and they give you a list of names/info you asked for if they have not been taken off. Pretty sure last time a friend of mine went she was quickly run through a police database and she was looking up a friend she had lost contact with a decade earlier.

I am a private citizen.

I have searched the electoral roll in Sydney CBD on several occasions for work.  On each occasion I obtained a visitors pass in the building lobby by telling them I was going to the Electoral Commission.  They hand one over.  I have never been asked for my name, let along had my ID checked.  I have never been asked my purpose. 

When you go up to the correct floor, I have never seen any AEC staff. There is a reception desk I have never seen anyone at.   There is also a computer bank with about 7 terminals.  I have completely free reign to search my heart out, for an unlimited time.

Perhaps the office you attended was handled differently but it certainly isn't univeral.

Thipu1

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Re: Voting
« Reply #18 on: September 26, 2011, 10:10:08 AM »
Some places in the US don't require you to show your ID to vote. So, yes, I could go down to the voting booth at 7 AM, vote as "Mopsy Rabbit", then go back at noon, and vote as "Flopsy Rabbit", and then go back at 5 PM and vote as "Cottontail Rabbit".

That sort of fiddle wouldn't work here. 

When you go to vote, you report to the desk for your election district.  There, the registers are kept.  You give your name and the poll worker finds it in the register.  This will contain your signature from the last time you voted.  You sign again, the signatures are compared and you're given your numbered card for the voting booth.

Believe me, in NYC a rat would immediately be detected if a Flopsy Rabbit and a Mopsy Rabbit were registered at the same address with the same signature.

Mopsy428

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Re: Voting
« Reply #19 on: September 26, 2011, 06:10:34 PM »
Some places in the US don't require you to show your ID to vote. So, yes, I could go down to the voting booth at 7 AM, vote as "Mopsy Rabbit", then go back at noon, and vote as "Flopsy Rabbit", and then go back at 5 PM and vote as "Cottontail Rabbit".

That sort of fiddle wouldn't work here. 

When you go to vote, you report to the desk for your election district.  There, the registers are kept.  You give your name and the poll worker finds it in the register.  This will contain your signature from the last time you voted.  You sign again, the signatures are compared and you're given your numbered card for the voting booth.

Believe me, in NYC a rat would immediately be detected if a Flopsy Rabbit and a Mopsy Rabbit were registered at the same address with the same signature.
We don't have that here. You go in. You state your name. The worker crosses off your name, gives you your ballot, and you vote.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2011, 06:23:54 PM by Mopsy428 »

Judah

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Re: Voting
« Reply #20 on: September 26, 2011, 06:15:22 PM »
Some places in the US don't require you to show your ID to vote. So, yes, I could go down to the voting booth at 7 AM, vote as "Mopsy Rabbit", then go back at noon, and vote as "Flopsy Rabbit", and then go back at 5 PM and vote as "Cottontail Rabbit".

That sort of fiddle wouldn't work here. 

When you go to vote, you report to the desk for your election district.  There, the registers are kept.  You give your name and the poll worker finds it in the register.  This will contain your signature from the last time you voted.  You sign again, the signatures are compared and you're given your numbered card for the voting booth.

Believe me, in NYC a rat would immediately be detected if a Flopsy Rabbit and a Mopsy Rabbit were registered at the same address with the same signature.
We don't have that here. You go in. You state your name. The worker crosses it off your name, gives you your ballot, and you vote.

In California, you go in, give your name, they ask you to give your address, you sign the roster next to your name, and they hand you a ballot.  Back when I first started voting, 1984, they would ask to see ID, but it's been probably 15-20 years since I've been asked to show ID.
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