Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 96525 times)

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P-p-p-penguin

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #105 on: September 27, 2011, 05:40:01 AM »
nappies - is it diapers for Americans and nappies also for the UK ehellions? 
Yep, we call them nappies too.

Snooks

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #106 on: September 27, 2011, 05:55:44 AM »
Our biscuits are...well, US cookies...not always with choc chips, there are Custard Creams, Ginger Nuts, digestives, shortbread, fruit shorties, Party Rings etc. My favourite in America were the "Chips Ahoy!" cookies. I could devour a packet of them!!

Seconded on Chips Ahoy!

I only know what a Ute is from watching Neighbours, I don't think we really have an equivalent in the UK because they're just not that common over here.

Larrabee

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #107 on: September 27, 2011, 06:36:17 AM »

and a truck to us is a big many wheeled vehicle that takes heavy loads, I always have to remember this when a US ehellion casually says "I took the truck to the mall" and I sit there thinking "Crikey, thats a bit of overkill, must have lots of shopping to do"


That's a lorry here in the UK.

iridaceae

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #108 on: September 27, 2011, 06:50:35 AM »
I love the biscuits vs cookies debate lol. When we went to the US, we saw on a menu something that was basically a casserole (stew) with biscuits?!?! I asked why anyone would have biscuits with casserole?! We found out that these biscuits were more like scones.  Cookies are the sweet biscuits...how totally confusing lol!!

Well, you have to remember that American English had a lot of contributions from other languages, and cookie in America is popularly supposed to be from the Dutch koekje.

Wonderflonium

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #109 on: September 27, 2011, 09:06:18 AM »
What do you call cling wrap?  We call it Gladwrap, even though it may not be the brand in the drawer it's always gladwrap.

I call it plastic wrap.

I'm Australian, and I was in a thread the other day and said "You should ring her" and the American poster noticed straight away the difference in language - what do Americans say when they want to call someone?

We just say call.
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Betelnut

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #110 on: September 27, 2011, 09:11:06 AM »
USians would say diapers, not nappies (although I would know what you meant).
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katycoo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #111 on: September 27, 2011, 09:12:25 AM »
What do you call cling wrap?  We call it Gladwrap, even though it may not be the brand in the drawer it's always gladwrap.

I'll give you that one.  It's always Gladwrap.

I'm Australian, and I was in a thread the other day and said "You should ring her" and the American poster noticed straight away the difference in language - what do Americans say when they want to call someone?
<snip>
ute - for a 2 door car with an open tray at the back

I'm a hybrid.  I'd say "You should call her", but I'd also say "I'll give her a ring".

And you can get 4 door utes, but they're useless.

bigozzy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #112 on: September 27, 2011, 10:26:53 AM »
In Australia while waiting to be served in a pubcafe,shop the server might ask "Are you right"? or shortened to "Ya right"? depending on place.


Bethczar

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #113 on: September 27, 2011, 11:41:48 AM »
What do you call cling wrap?  We call it Gladwrap, even though it may not be the brand in the drawer it's always gladwrap.

I call it plastic wrap.
Me too. Never heard Gladwrap used as a common term for it.

I know this was mentioned earlier in the thread, but "hoover" for vacuum seems so funny to me. I first time I read it, it took me a while to figure it out because I was thinking of the president (the book was set during the Depression).

Thipu1

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #114 on: September 27, 2011, 11:42:57 AM »
This thread is so much fun!

Ring her.
In the US, we'd understand that but would be more likely to say, 'call' or 'phone'.

4 wheel drive vehicles.
These are cars that people who live in ski areas are likely to own.  The combination of steep grades and lots of snow means that any sane resident of Vermont will own a 4 wheel drive car.

UTEs.
Here, we call these vehicles ATVs for all terrain vehicles. 

Truck.
This is a toughy because, in the US, a truck can be anything from the small hand-operated contraption used for delivering crates of oranges to a grocery store to eighteen wheelers.  (are those giant vehicles still called panopticons? )
When posters from the US say that they took the truck to the store, they usually mean a pick-up truck.  This usually seats two or four people and has an open flat-bed in the back.  A truck of this type usually fits into a standard parking space.

Biscuit.
Although most people we know understand that a biscuit in most of the Anglophone world is what the US knows as a cookie, there's still a lot of fun to be had with that.

Biscuits here are traditionally yeasty, fluffy, buttery creations that are served with dinner.  What
appalled another poster was probably chicken and biscuits.  If you think of a pot pie with American biscuits on top instead of a pastry crust, you've got the idea.  However, a bit of ginger biscuit added to a chicken stew might not be a bad idea.

Biscuits and gravy is an American farm breakfast dish that makes people who think a biscuit should include chocolate chips turn green.  This is a dish that consists of left over biscuits from last night's dinner served up in a cream gravy containing bits of sausage.  Made properly, it's absolutely
delicious.  If it isn't done properly you may as well be eating plaster. 




exitzero

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #115 on: September 27, 2011, 12:02:06 PM »
I had a friend from Scotland who caused a few looks like this:  :o when she said that her next door neighbor had knocked her up at 6 AM that morning.

Apparently, for her it meant that the knocked on her door at 6 AM. The rest of us thought he had made her pregnant!

camlan

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #116 on: September 27, 2011, 12:19:39 PM »

 Rubbers are a synonym for galoshes - rubber boots that keep the rain out.


This might be regional, or just the era I grew up in, but we made a distinction between boots and rubbers. Boots covered your foot and your ankle and a portion of your lower leg. Rubbers covered just your shoe, leaving your ankles and legs exposed. These are called galoshes, but when I was a kid (back in the 60s) we would have called them rubbers: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002LKSZD6/ref=asc_df_B002LKSZD61717798/?tag=becomcom00687-20&creative=394997&creativeASIN=B002LKSZD6&linkCode=asn

Galoshes were a specific type of boot, one that open down the front and closed with metal clasps, like this: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_R-Xb8KhK1eE/S5UeSC-M6JI/AAAAAAAAAQ4/pN3Jl1uMIXI/s1600-h/galoshes.jpg
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Betelnut

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #117 on: September 27, 2011, 12:24:49 PM »
Okay, more questions about the word "stone" meaning 14 pounds in the UK. 

Do scales have "stones" on them?  Because I was watching a weight loss program on BBC America and the host said, after a weigh-in, "Oh, you weigh 16 stone!"  Then, later, "Wow, you lost 2 stone in 6 weeks!  Great!"  Did she have to mentally figure that all out or did the scale actually have stones on it (along with pounds, I'd imagine)?

Do you use that term for other weight, like, a stone of cat litter, etc.?
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P-p-p-penguin

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #118 on: September 27, 2011, 12:37:14 PM »
Okay, more questions about the word "stone" meaning 14 pounds in the UK. 

Do scales have "stones" on them?  Because I was watching a weight loss program on BBC America and the host said, after a weigh-in, "Oh, you weigh 16 stone!"  Then, later, "Wow, you lost 2 stone in 6 weeks!  Great!"  Did she have to mentally figure that all out or did the scale actually have stones on it (along with pounds, I'd imagine)?

Do you use that term for other weight, like, a stone of cat litter, etc.?

Yeah, our scales do show stones.  On non-digital ones they'll show the pounds and then have a numbered marker for each stone.  Digital ones would show the weight as xxst xxlb.  Because of this, when people refer to their weight in pounds I have to manually work out how many stone that is, otherwise it's meaningless to me.

I've only ever seen stones used for human (or pet) weight.  Other things, like cat litter, would be measured in grams.

Betelnut

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #119 on: September 27, 2011, 01:20:12 PM »
Okay, more questions about the word "stone" meaning 14 pounds in the UK. 

Do scales have "stones" on them?  Because I was watching a weight loss program on BBC America and the host said, after a weigh-in, "Oh, you weigh 16 stone!"  Then, later, "Wow, you lost 2 stone in 6 weeks!  Great!"  Did she have to mentally figure that all out or did the scale actually have stones on it (along with pounds, I'd imagine)?

Do you use that term for other weight, like, a stone of cat litter, etc.?

Yeah, our scales do show stones.  On non-digital ones they'll show the pounds and then have a numbered marker for each stone.  Digital ones would show the weight as xxst xxlb.  Because of this, when people refer to their weight in pounds I have to manually work out how many stone that is, otherwise it's meaningless to me.

I've only ever seen stones used for human (or pet) weight.  Other things, like cat litter, would be measured in grams.

Huh, that's interesting.  I figured the stones had to be on the scale because host would know the number of stones immediately.  As a USian, I would have to do the opposite of you, if someone said 15.4 stone, I'd have to figure out how many pounds that is for me to get the weight.
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