Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 95432 times)

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Mopsy428

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #120 on: September 27, 2011, 03:47:50 PM »
Around here, most people call "plastic wrap" "Saran wrap". (Yes, I know that Saran is the trade name.)

Slartibartfast

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #121 on: September 27, 2011, 04:11:27 PM »
I heard an amusing anecdote about an American friend in NZ who asked her hostess if she should put the napkins out on the table - apparently "napkin" is a feminine hygiene product in NZ.  So what do y'all call the paper or cloth things you use to wipe your fingers and your mouth after a meal?  We'd call those napkins (or paper towels, if you're cheap like me and don't want to bother with actual paper napkins!), and the feminine hygiene products are pads.

Larrabee

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #122 on: September 27, 2011, 04:17:59 PM »
Around here, most people call "plastic wrap" "Saran wrap". (Yes, I know that Saran is the trade name.)

In the UK its clingfilm to pretty much everybody, I've certainly never heard a Brit call it anything else.

One that an American friend noticed was the different words for refuse/waste.  When I told her that "rubbish goes in the bin over there", she looked at me blankly so I pointed at "Oh the trash can!"  'Rubbish' became one of her favourite 'British' words but sadly she never really managed to pronounce it properly...

Elfmama

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #123 on: September 27, 2011, 04:29:49 PM »
And to add to the jelly/jam conundrum, we have four or five fruit spreads in the US, all with different names and ingredient lists specified by the government.  (Before the Pure Food and Drug Act in the early 1900's, manufacturers could put all sorts of stuff in their jars and call it 'jam', 
Quote
Chemical additives were used to "heighten color, modify flavor, soften texture, deter spoilage, and even transform … apple scraps, glucose, coal-tar dye, and timothy seed" into a "strawberry jam"
Current regulations specify the fruit/sugar/pectin ratios, so something like strawberry jam doesn't vary much from one brand to another.

Jelly is made from filtered fruit juice, sugar or HFCS, and a pectin to make it 'set'.  It's translucent.  Grape is the most popular, but you can also get apple, strawberry, apricot, etc.

Jam is made from crushed fruit (sometimes sieved to remove seeds), sugar or HFCS, and pectin.  Strawberry is the most popular, but I prefer seedless blackberry and raspberry.

Preserves are about half and half crushed fruit and whole fruit, sugar, and pectin.  Especially yummy when you're a little kid and you sneak a whole strawberry out of the jar with a spoon. 

Marmalade I think you Brits know about.   ;)

There are also fruit spreads that are touted as 'sugar free', but their first ingredient is  juice concentrates (pear, grape), which of course is a high-fructose sweetening.  It also has a fruit like strawberries or grapes,  maltodextrin (dietary fiber), pectin, and citric acid.  The manufacturers can't call them jams because of those government regulations  so 'fruit spread' is their preferred term. 
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katycoo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #124 on: September 27, 2011, 04:38:20 PM »
This thread is so much fun!


UTEs.
Here, we call these vehicles ATVs for all terrain vehicles. 

Truck.
This is a toughy because, in the US, a truck can be anything from the small hand-operated contraption used for delivering crates of oranges to a grocery store to eighteen wheelers.  (are those giant vehicles still called panopticons? )
When posters from the US say that they took the truck to the store, they usually mean a pick-up truck.  This usually seats two or four people and has an open flat-bed in the back.  A truck of this type usually fits into a standard parking space.

I don't know what an ATV is, but your description of a pick up truck is what we mean by Ute.

I heard an amusing anecdote about an American friend in NZ who asked her hostess if she should put the napkins out on the table - apparently "napkin" is a feminine hygiene product in NZ.  So what do y'all call the paper or cloth things you use to wipe your fingers and your mouth after a meal?  We'd call those napkins (or paper towels, if you're cheap like me and don't want to bother with actual paper napkins!), and the feminine hygiene products are pads.

This suprises me.  While I'm not NZ (so it could be a regional thing) we call them pads too.  Contextually I would expect Australians and Kiwi's to understand napkins, althoguht serviette is more common here (regardless of linen or paper IME)

RainhaDoTexugo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #125 on: September 27, 2011, 04:57:02 PM »
This thread is so much fun!


UTEs.
Here, we call these vehicles ATVs for all terrain vehicles. 

Truck.
This is a toughy because, in the US, a truck can be anything from the small hand-operated contraption used for delivering crates of oranges to a grocery store to eighteen wheelers.  (are those giant vehicles still called panopticons? )
When posters from the US say that they took the truck to the store, they usually mean a pick-up truck.  This usually seats two or four people and has an open flat-bed in the back.  A truck of this type usually fits into a standard parking space.

I don't know what an ATV is, but your description of a pick up truck is what we mean by Ute.


As I understand it, a Ute is pretty much a pickup truck.  I think there may be some small differences, though.  An ATV is an all terrain vehicle, used for riding around in mud, as far as I know ;)  Clicky for ATV

Four wheel drive here is interchangeable with all wheel drive, and doesn't really denote a specific type of vehicle.  If it has four wheel drive, it counts.  This covers everything from big Jeeps to my little Suzuki SX4 (which is technically a crossover, but is really basically a hatchback).  It's definitely a nice feature in Chicago winters.

Elfmama is right on the various types of fruit spreads.  I would generally call a sandwich made with any of them a peanut butter and jelly, though. 


 Rubbers are a synonym for galoshes - rubber boots that keep the rain out.


This might be regional, or just the era I grew up in, but we made a distinction between boots and rubbers. Boots covered your foot and your ankle and a portion of your lower leg. Rubbers covered just your shoe, leaving your ankles and legs exposed. These are called galoshes, but when I was a kid (back in the 60s) we would have called them rubbers: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002LKSZD6/ref=asc_df_B002LKSZD61717798/?tag=becomcom00687-20&creative=394997&creativeASIN=B002LKSZD6&linkCode=asn

Galoshes were a specific type of boot, one that open down the front and closed with metal clasps, like this: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_R-Xb8KhK1eE/S5UeSC-M6JI/AAAAAAAAAQ4/pN3Jl1uMIXI/s1600-h/galoshes.jpg

You're probably right, honestly.  I don't think I've ever actually had a pair. 

DavidH

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #126 on: September 27, 2011, 05:23:16 PM »
I can think of a few:

Pudding, in the US it's like custard and usually chocolate or vanilla, from what I can tell the term covers all sorts of desserts in the UK

Standing in a line in the US versus a queue

A fanny pack is a kind of purse like thing you strap around your waist in the US, a British colleague of mine was quite taken aback the first time I used the term

A three letter word starting with f and ending in g seems to be used in the UK to mean a cigarette, but something very different in the US

A friend of mine who works at a car dealership was quite surprised to have woman come in and say her hooter was broken....it took a while to understand she meant horn



camlan

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #127 on: September 27, 2011, 05:26:47 PM »

Standing in a line in the US versus a queue


In some places in the US, you don't stand in line; you stand on line.

Which really confused me the first time I heard it, because I thought it meant that there was an actual line painted on the ground that you had to stand on.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


RainhaDoTexugo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #128 on: September 27, 2011, 05:28:37 PM »

A friend of mine who works at a car dealership was quite surprised to have woman come in and say her hooter was broken....it took a while to understand she meant horn


Ahahahaha!  Where was that?  I don't think that's something I'd go to the mechanic for!

mechtilde

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #129 on: September 27, 2011, 05:34:25 PM »
Pudding, in the US it's like custard and usually chocolate or vanilla, from what I can tell the term covers all sorts of desserts in the UK

It originally meant sonmething boiled in a cloth (or similar). So we do still have savoury puddings- like black pudding (a sort of blood sausage) and steak and kidney pudding (a steamed pudding with suet on the outside and steak and kidney with lovely gravy in the middle.)

We also have sweet steamed puddings, but the term has expended to be synonymous with dessert.
NE England

Mopsy428

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #130 on: September 27, 2011, 05:38:57 PM »
Around here, most people call "plastic wrap" "Saran wrap". (Yes, I know that Saran is the trade name.)

In the UK its clingfilm to pretty much everybody, I've certainly never heard a Brit call it anything else.

One that an American friend noticed was the different words for refuse/waste.  When I told her that "rubbish goes in the bin over there", she looked at me blankly so I pointed at "Oh the trash can!"  'Rubbish' became one of her favourite 'British' words but sadly she never really managed to pronounce it properly...
Where I live, we use the word "rubbish". Maybe it's regional in the US? I've had other American friends not from my area look at my oddly when I've said "rubbish".

Snooks

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #131 on: September 27, 2011, 05:46:16 PM »
A fanny pack is a kind of purse like thing you strap around your waist in the US, a British colleague of mine was quite taken aback the first time I used the term

In the UK that's a bum bag.

DavidH

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #132 on: September 27, 2011, 06:05:54 PM »
RainhaDoTexugo, it was in North Carolina. From what I understand, a number of the mechanics would have volunteered to have a look, at no charge...

He explained to her that in this country hooter meant something else entirely.

camlan

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #133 on: September 27, 2011, 06:15:23 PM »
Around here, most people call "plastic wrap" "Saran wrap". (Yes, I know that Saran is the trade name.)

In the UK its clingfilm to pretty much everybody, I've certainly never heard a Brit call it anything else.

One that an American friend noticed was the different words for refuse/waste.  When I told her that "rubbish goes in the bin over there", she looked at me blankly so I pointed at "Oh the trash can!"  'Rubbish' became one of her favourite 'British' words but sadly she never really managed to pronounce it properly...
Where I live, we use the word "rubbish". Maybe it's regional in the US? I've had other American friends not from my area look at my oddly when I've said "rubbish".

In the Boston area, trash used to be separated into garbage, which was food waste, and rubbish, which was everything else. The trash men picked up the rubbish weekly, and local pig farmers came by a couple of times a week to collect the garbage. Homes would have special garbage cans sunk into the ground, with a cast iron lid operated by a foot pedal to collect the garbage in.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


lollylegs

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #134 on: September 27, 2011, 06:17:10 PM »
Okay, I've got one.

In Australia, we call them hundreds and thousands.

In US, I believe you call them sprinkles.

What do they call them in the UK?

Edited cause I pressed enter too early.