Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 119765 times)

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oz diva

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #150 on: September 27, 2011, 09:33:38 PM »
Yes, has to be white bread, and I prefer the round ones too, the flat ones are sprinkles not 100s and 1000s and the wrong colour.


Victoria

Onyx_TKD

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #151 on: September 27, 2011, 09:36:22 PM »
On the pad versus napkin though, a pad can be referred to as a sanitary napkin but usually in signs and ads - I've never heard an actual person say it.

I have, but it was my newly-divorced dad awkwardly inquiring whether he needed to pick up any for his teenaged daughter while at the store, so I don't think he'd had much reason to figure out the difference between the ad terminology vs. commonly-used terminology (and I, the early-teenage daughter, had no desire to prolong the conversation by "correcting" it).  :P ;D

RainhaDoTexugo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #152 on: September 27, 2011, 09:36:39 PM »
Is anybody else getting really hungry?

marcel

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #153 on: September 27, 2011, 09:39:33 PM »
In another thread I already gave an extensive (though not complete) list of all the different types of sprinkles we have in The Netherlands. Sprinkles are an everyday bread? (is there an English word for something you put on your bread, but is not a spread?*)
They are found in almost every household, and they can be eaten on any type of bread.

This vacation I spend a weekend with an Irish group. They were talking about 100's & 1000's, I had never heard of them before, but figured out the meaning by context.
Wherever you go..... There you are.

RainhaDoTexugo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #154 on: September 27, 2011, 09:47:22 PM »
In another thread I already gave an extensive (though not complete) list of all the different types of sprinkles we have in The Netherlands. Sprinkles are an everyday bread? (is there an English word for something you put on your bread, but is not a spread?*)
They are found in almost every household, and they can be eaten on any type of bread.

This vacation I spend a weekend with an Irish group. They were talking about 100's & 1000's, I had never heard of them before, but figured out the meaning by context.

I guess I'd use topping, but in my experience, Americans only really put spreads on bread.  Well, and sandwich fillings, of course.

We have a few types of sprinkles, but if you just say sprinkles, this is what I imagine.  They also come in chocolate, which doesn't really taste chocolatey.

We also have these sprinkles, and these flat sprinkles, which are delicious on the sides of birthday cakes.  They're usually round, but sometimes come in fun shapes.


kareng57

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #155 on: September 27, 2011, 09:49:06 PM »
What do you call cling wrap?  We call it Gladwrap, even though it may not be the brand in the drawer it's always gladwrap.

I call it plastic wrap.

I'm Australian, and I was in a thread the other day and said "You should ring her" and the American poster noticed straight away the difference in language - what do Americans say when they want to call someone?

We just say call.


My family (in Canada) usually says Saran Wrap, even if that's not the brand that we're using.  Kind of along the same lines as saying "could you pass me a Kleenex", meaning any kind of nose-tissue.

Re telephoning someone - we usually just say "I'll phone her", though "I'll call her" is used pretty frequently, too.

lollylegs

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #156 on: September 27, 2011, 10:51:07 PM »
What do you mea, "under 7" birthday parties? I've had fairy bread at every birthday party I've ever thrown and I'm 25!

Although there is some disagreement about how it is best prepared - soft, fresh white bread and a thin layer of margarine then, personally, I prefer the round sprinkles to the flat ones.

Some mums, especially friends of mine with young kids, seem to think that wholemeal (whole wheat) or multigrain bread is appropriate for fairy bread, which it isn't.

Best option ever (guilty pleasure only-eat-it-when-I'm-celebrating) option?

Nutella with sprinkles!

No no no, it has to be butter! And definitely white bread.

JonGirl

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #157 on: September 28, 2011, 04:33:14 AM »
Yes, has to be white bread, and I prefer the round ones too, the flat ones are sprinkles not 100s and 1000s and the wrong colour.



Noooooo! they have to be flat!!!  :D
Stewart/Colbert '16

oz diva

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #158 on: September 28, 2011, 05:26:49 AM »
Them's fighting words, girl!

Victoria

katycoo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #159 on: September 28, 2011, 05:41:33 AM »
Yes, has to be white bread, and I prefer the round ones too, the flat ones are sprinkles not 100s and 1000s and the wrong colour.



Noooooo! they have to be flat!!!  :D

Nope.  If you use flat sprinkles, it aint fairy bread.  It's wannabe bread.  or something.  Im not sure what you call it but I am sure you're WRONG!

bigozzy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #160 on: September 28, 2011, 08:40:49 AM »
Yes, has to be white bread, and I prefer the round ones too, the flat ones are sprinkles not 100s and 1000s and the wrong colour.




Flashback 40 years to birthday parties! Just need some Aeroplane jelly (lime) and icecream and maybe a spider to drink.

Leafy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #161 on: September 28, 2011, 08:51:01 AM »
Yes, has to be white bread, and I prefer the round ones too, the flat ones are sprinkles not 100s and 1000s and the wrong colour.



Noooooo! they have to be flat!!!  :D

Nope.  If you use flat sprinkles, it aint fairy bread.  It's wannabe bread.  or something.  Im not sure what you call it but I am sure you're WRONG!

Oh, flat sprinkles are definitely wrong! That's just faux bread not fairy bread.

bigozzy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #162 on: September 28, 2011, 09:12:16 AM »
If I were to ask you good folk for a dink, or to dink me somewhere what would you assume I am asking?

What if we had a bingle while dinking?

Wonderflonium

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #163 on: September 28, 2011, 09:21:25 AM »
I would have no idea what you were saying. I'm assuming a dink is a ride? What the blue blazes is a bingle?
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bigozzy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #164 on: September 28, 2011, 09:25:47 AM »
I would have no idea what you were saying. I'm assuming a dink is a ride? What the blue blazes is a bingle?

In Oz when was a child, you would give someone a ride on your bike- dink. A double dink would be someone on the handlebars and someone balancing behind! In this case bingles, or minor accidents, were possible.

How did we survive childhood?